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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 2, 2019 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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and mega munchetty. our headlines today: more travel chaos, as heavy snow leads to a second night of delays. motorists were left stranded as major routes in the south east of england became impassable. very picturesque, i'm sure, but being here in the traffic, stationary, for nearly five hours now is not a huge amount of fun. there are still warnings in force this morning, mainly for eyes but there will be a few further snow showers, but for many of us today is an improving picture, much drier and brighter, and i will have more detail in 15 minutes. the moment millions of tonnes of mud engulfed buildings, after a dam burst in brazil leaving hundreds dead or missing. a call for a ban on smartphones in the classroom from england's school standards minister. an incredible start to this year's six nations. french fumbles in the rain help wales produce one of the biggest comebacks of all time, to win 2a—i9 in paris.
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it's saturday the 2nd of february. our top story: snow and ice has caused a second night of disruption across parts of the uk. in the south of england, dozens of motorists were left stranded for hours, as the wintry weather brought traffic to a standstill. highways england says its gritters covered 80,000 miles of roads overnight. kathryn stanczyszyn has the details. a nightmare journey home. as the extreme weather continued last night in southern england, some parts of hampshire saw 7.5 inches of snow. it led to chaos on the m3 when motorists were trapped for hours. emergency services struggled to reach them. swirling blizzards made driving dangerous on many other routes as well, including the a339, where ian crowder got stuck travelling home after celebrating his last day in work before retirement.
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it's very picturesque, i'm sure, but being here in the traffic, stationary, for nearly five hours now is not a huge amount of fun. sometimes even the people sent to help struggled. here in basingstoke, willing volunteers pushed this ambulance uphill when the specialist vehicle sent to rescue it also got stuck. at raf 0diham, a serious covering, but fortunately also the equipment to deal with it. 0vernight, the worst of the snowfall centred on the south—east. in kent, police were exceptionally busy dealing with accidents. highways england says gritters covered 80,000 miles of major routes throughout the night, but travel on many smaller roads will still be tricky. for some, that won't matter... whoo! ..as the weekend means they might actually be time to enjoy it. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. let's find out how it's looking.
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0ur reporter caroline davies is by the m3 motorway in the west of london. what's the picture? if you can see behind me the m3 is flowing pretty smoothly and there is still a light dusting of snow at the side, between junctions six and junction 7, those ca i’s junctions six and junction 7, those cars we re junctions six and junction 7, those cars were stuck overnight but highways england says they were moved with help from hampshire police so that road is now clear. city airport had to temporarily close its runway yesterday because of the snow and bristol airport had major disruptions but both airports expect everything to flow smoothly today although there seem to be some delays at bristol airport because of de—icing planes. south—western
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railways say they expect some do lanes on some of their trains till about midday and the advice with all this is to check before you travel because there is still eyed yellow weather warning, many critters have been out on major roads but a lot of smaller roads will not have been covered so if you are driving or walking on those, do be careful. footage has been uncovered showing the moment a dam burst in brazil, releasing millions of tonnes of mining waste. 115 people are now known to have died in the disaster. hundreds more are still missing. 0ur science editor, david shukman, reports from the site of the dam, in the south east of brazil. first, a long cloud of dust, then a nightmare vision of an unrelenting torrent of sludge. the waste from decades of mining racing towards hundreds of unsuspecting people down below. the catastrophe unfolded a week ago but only now has this video come to light, adding to the sense of loss and of outrage. and difficult for you?
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this red cross volunteer, hernando silveira, leads me to the edge of the disaster zone. seis corpos. six bodies? he alone has found six bodies. any hope of reaching survivors in this endless sea of mud was quickly dashed. emergency workers are now scouting for any signs of bodies from the air. by the time the wall of mud reached this point, it had already overwhelmed the cafeteria where the miners were having lunch and destroyed the offices of the mine itself before arriving here, tearing through a hotel and holiday chalets before surging on over that ridge in the distance and down into the valley beyond, where it caused yet more destruction. and the question that everyone here is just stunned by is how in a big, growing, modern economy, this could ever be allowed to happen. investigators are now on the scene. the dam holding back the waste was owned by one of the world's largest mining companies.
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it was inspected only last year. a special mass, seven days since the disaster. there's grief and anger, and the demand for answers will only grow. david shukman, bbc news, in brazil. the minister for school standards in england has told the bbc he believes pupils should be banned from taking smartphones into school. the government is about to publish new guidance on internet safety, social media and online gaming. the minister, nick gibb, said that while there was nothing intrinsically damaging about spending time online it reduces time for conversation, exercise, homework or play. the germanjustice minister has told breakfast there will be no renegotiation over the plan to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland after brexit. mps agreed this week that theresa may should hold further discussions with the eu over the so—called backstop. katerina barley told us a delay to the date of brexit is not out of the question, but the british government needs to be clear about what it wants. we can talk about a delay
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but we need an idea at the least of what we are going to negotiate within this delay and i don't see a plan. i really do not see where and how other solutions can be brought up that haven't been discussed in the last two and a half years. two men have been shot and injured in separate attacks in londonderry. police have said they were paramilitary style shootings. both men have been taken to hospital and are said to be in a stable condition. it comes two weeks after a car bomb exploded in the city centre. celebrity—endorsed ads that promote weight loss products should be banned on social media, according to england's top doctor. some celebrities with lots of young followers are promoting products like diet pills and detox teas. nhs medical director, professor stephen powis, says these products can have a damaging effect on young people. celebrities and social media companies that promote these products have a real responsibility
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to think about the adverse harm they can have on young people's mental health. the nhs is doing more than ever, and investing more than ever in its mental health services to support children and young people but we can't fix these problems alone. we need others in society to take responsibility, to step up and make sure we are reducing the many pressures on our young people. a link to brexit again. lots of household items, from electrical appliances and toys, to drinking glasses, have the letters "ce" printed on them. that is the eu safety symbol, but after brexit, it will have to change, and it could be costly for businesses. the bbc has learnt that the government is about to announce plans for a replacement. our business correspondent rob young has been taking a look. kettles, heaters, toys, light bulbs.
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dozens of items in your average home are stamped with the letters "c and e". the mark says a particular product meet legal requirements and has been tested to high standards. consumers have been told to buy goods with this symbol. it's been with us for more than two decades. the ce mark belongs to the european union so if britain leaves the eu without a deal, items on sale like these will have to be stamped with something else to show consumers the products meet the rules. this is the new logo the government has drawn up. it stands for "uk conformity assessed". this is what it might look like on the back of a smartphone and on the label of a toy, so if there's no deal, this is the mark we will have to look out for on products in the shop. a uk mark would provide confidence to consumers and to the authorities that these products placed on the market in the uk were meeting uk regulatory requirements, so it provides flexibility for government, should there be divergence in regulations, to insist that manufacturers were committing to that uk regulatory
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practice in future. if the new logo is to be used, companies would have to change their packaging, advertising and an element of the product themselves. businesses warned it would mean higher costs, at least in the short term. that's another reason many companies want the government to do some kind of brexit deal with the eu. rob young, bbc news. those are the main stories. the amount of time a child spends on the internet on their smartphones is probably something that has been a concern for every parent at some point. now, england's schools minister, nick gibb, is pushing for children to be banned from taking their phones to school, to help them concentrate on learning. so is he right, or is that too extreme? we're joined now by patsy kane, executive head teacher at the education and leadership trust. good morning. let's make this clear,
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does he want a ban on children having their phones from the moment they enter school so they never have it in their bags, orjust turn it off in school? it sounds like he wa nts a com plete off in school? it sounds like he wants a complete ban which i think a lot of students and parents would be nervous about in terms of safety on the way home, especially in dark months. that aside, is it a good idea? it's worth considering but he's missing a point about how fantastic phones can be for learning when they are about recording someone when they are about recording someone practising modern languages. we have huge emphasis on growing vocabulary so you can get your phone out ina vocabulary so you can get your phone out in a lesson and search words you might not know, there is a fantastic rate of apps now for revision and stu d e nts rate of apps now for revision and students are motivated to use them
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on the bus going home or at lunchtime but we still see students reading regularly, we have done a lot to promote reading and sport and keeping kids safe, and we need to teach them how to get a good's nights sleep and i agree that is a bit of a national issue for children and adults. in the three schools you look after, they can bring phones in and use them in the classroom. people who are against this might think you are seeing the bit you wa nt to think you are seeing the bit you want to see, they are in the classroom and looking up what the teacher has said, but are you ignoring the bit when they are searching something on social media, what someone else has tweeted or done at the weekend, are you choosing not to see that because you think you cannot pull it back in, it has shifted ahead of you so you have
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to adapt? no, we were proactive, we could see the value of that technology and a school budgets get cut we cannot provide as many new ipads and computers but students are bringing in this technology with the teacher's permission, they will have it removed if they are using it inappropriately. so give me an idea ofa inappropriately. so give me an idea of a circumstance, if what you are saying is true and it is a useful tool, give us an example of where a teach it takes a phone or whatever the device is? they will have a warning, the teacher will keep it safe and they will get it back at the end of the day. this is what it ends up being, you were in class and the teacher comes over and says what doing and aitken says he was researching the biology experiment,
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so researching the biology experiment, so how do they know? it gets tricky. not necessarily because that's the same issue for parents at home and evenif same issue for parents at home and even if you ban it, you could still have inappropriate interaction or bullying at the weekend that comes into school anyway so it needs to be in the context of being kind and there are a lot of apps to help young people deal with stress. if young people deal with stress. if you have an anti—bullying culture that needs to apply to behaviour outside of school, banning phones will not prevent nasty stuff happening at evenings and weekends u nless happening at evenings and weekends unless it's part of a bigger educational drive. there is always the argument about screen time, the time that people spent looking at phones can be damaging, and also the development implications, there needs to be a balance, and when you say we don't have the budgets to
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keep providing tablets and computers, it will almost be detrimental regardless, you just have to accept bad things will happen? we need a lot of education because we want them to interact well and wheat structure that into the curriculum, most schools in the country have huge drive is encouraging kids to read. but is it interaction if they are just on their screens, are you interacting? that's not what i see in schools, i might seek to students sharing an earphone while listening to music so they are sharing that and joining in a conversation oi’ they are sharing that and joining in a conversation or playing a game at lunchtime and still joining a conversation or playing a game at lunchtime and stilljoining in a chat, like adults tend to do, so it's part of a bigger picture but it is structured, the access in
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schools, it is notjust whenever is 0k. the minister for schools standards, if he brings in a ban, what do your schools do? it depends because a lot of the laws apply to maintain schools but we are academies that are independent, so some laws like the curriculum, academies can choose whether to do that so there are range of opinions on this, a lot of headteachers think they need to be banned and a lot of teachers think they can enrich learning. interesting to hear your thoughts, thank you. let's talk to helen about the weather, that's a big wet windscreen behind you. a little bit of sleep in norwich but on that coast where showers are
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coming in, temperatures are above freezing so we tend to get a mix of rain and sleet, it's just to show you we have those showers with us through the day so this is not far away, in cambridgeshire, so we have quite a covering of snow in many parts of the uk this morning so there are still warnings in force, mainly for eyes because we are not seeing much new small —— new snow falling today. this is the shower picture on the radar, these are the snow showers through this central lowla nds snow showers through this central lowlands and eastern england and they will continue to pester eastern england and scotland and on the west of the uk, parts of pembrokeshire and cornwall may see further showers, one or two for the north and west of northern ireland, eastern scotland will keep those
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showers but they should ease in the central lowlands, moving into northumberland and yorkshire, east and western areas more likely to see wintry showers but for many of us are beautiful start to the day, cold and not especially warm but we have lighter winds and sunshine and fewer showers, so a that day. but through this evening and overnight, temperatures will drop like a stone, towns and cities at —34 “4, even in southern parts of the uk, potentially —64 birmingham so it could be —10 across the snow fields in the south, then it's all change, a lot of muggy weather by the end of the day and you have this cloud with the day and you have this cloud with the atlantic milder air on top of cold air to make some great, misty
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and murky, quite a lot of snow over the hills but it turns back to rain, it looks like southern england should be a largely dry picture after dark and it dries up later in the north but tomorrow night does not look good at all so if you are stargazing, tonight is the night. a lot of snow across the hills and there could be some to lower levels but generally milder atlantic are moving in at the weekend but especially tomorrow when we get the return of that air, low cloud, heavy rain, pretty windy tomorrow night and then that sets us up for a milder week ahead, temperatures moving towards double figures but with rain and strong winds, not especially warm but less cold than it has been.
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that's a nice positive ending. less cold, we will take that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's time now for a look at the newspapers. broadcaster ian collins is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we will talk about universities, and a place where you should be able to talk about things. it should be the centrepoint of free speech, challenging speech, disagreeable debates, that would be the perception. the telegraph is delving into this. you would assume universities artwork uncomfortable things happen that a lot of students say they don't agree with this line of opinion so we are empty platforming you come it arrived in a strange place when the likes of germaine greerwere
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strange place when the likes of germaine greer were deemed too extreme despite being very switched oi'i extreme despite being very switched on academics, peter tatchell, a man who devoted his life to human rights but have been told they cannot appear because of what they are saying. people are coming to give full speeches in advance so they are checked to make sure... comedian was booked for a student gig but was told to submit his material first so they could vet the jokes. it seems unreasonable especially when freedom of speech is something this country is proud of but if it will incite violence and real disk constants, real tension, is that not a good thing? if it is going to incite
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violence, someone was booked to appearand violence, someone was booked to appear and talk about how fabulous something was in south africa under his regime, tony robinson have appeared at oxford union, i would rather hear all these people than stop them and now universities have been told to swap safe places for free speech —— tommy robinson. as a result of that, you should be able to challenge people and surely that is better. you will take us in a com pletely is better. you will take us in a completely different area, any story about sleep is one that fascinates us. about sleep is one that fascinates us. this is about snoring, i will not ask the obvious question, most people don't admit to snoring. not ask the obvious question, most people don't admit to snoringlj don't know why, it's natural. the
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theory is that snoring has an impact on your memory. it could kill off your memories, scientists have found that those with sleep apnoea struggle to remember details like colleagues' names or house numbers. 0ften colleagues' names or house numbers. often when you snort or have sleep apnoea which is very different, it means you haven't had a good nights sleep, so that will affect your memory. you would think it would be obvious. i don't want to pour cold water on the story. you snort when you lie on your back, you try to get comfortable, i'm not responsible for what i do when i'm asleep, i roll over, that'sjust what i do when i'm asleep, i roll over, that's just sleep. what i do when i'm asleep, i roll over, that'sjust sleep. how are you when you go to the dentist? root
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canal surgery in the last week, it was two of two courses i had that word difficult. courses i had that word difficultlj imagine courses i had that word difficult.” imagine you are grateful you were treated. but i had to pay for it because apparently 2 million people we re because apparently 2 million people were turned away in pain and could not be seen because of an issue with nhs dentists, you pay for it, fine if you're having a quick check but root canal surgery, my dentist was oi'i root canal surgery, my dentist was ona root canal surgery, my dentist was on a hammock in barbados after my surgery. in support of dentists, i remember when going to the dentist really was hell and it's not like that any more, i had root canal work done and it was fine in terms of, it's a bit awkward but...” done and it was fine in terms of, it's a bit awkward but... i watched oceans 11 while i had root canal
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treatment on a big screen. that's why your dentist is in barbados, you we re why your dentist is in barbados, you were paying for that, but people are being turned away in pain. i'm tempted to say this was quietly taken tempted to say this was quietly ta ken out of tempted to say this was quietly taken out of the nhs, there are still nhs dentists but not enough and there is nothing worse than toothache, but it's banging your head against a wall kind of pain. and streak which i'm not too surprised by... workers start worrying about the week ahead on a sunday afternoon, two thirds supper from an anxiety dubbed sunday night fear, it's now taking in an eight sunday. does that surprise you? know, i get it. stop it, just enjoy
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the moment. thanks, ian. it's estimated more than £13 billion worth of food is wasted in the uk every year. but in norway, they're coming up with new solutions to stop good grub ending up in the bin. in one hotel, they're targeting the breakfast buffet by reducing the size of plates, and they've shrunk the croissants. our environment analyst, roger harrabin, has been to see how much of a difference it's really making. in a restaurant there's always food thrown away. this hotel in tromso is trying to halve its food waste, but how? let's start with these smoothie shots. these are made from yesterday's leftover fruit. then crafty tricks to nudge people into taking less, like skinny tweezers to stop you piling up the salmon, or little spoons to serve the herring. and look at this — a micro muesli. how cute is that? another idea — instead of guests taking a big melon
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slice and leaving some, the staff dice it so you take precisely what you want. and in case you missed the message... many people load onto their plates so they don't have to go multiple times. we were able to make people think about how they put food on their plate and how much they bring to the table to make sure they eat it all. another trick is to keep food looking fresh. as a serving dish empties, guests assume the remains are stale, so why not switch the food into a smaller dish? then again, so it still looks fresh and all gets eaten. ideas like this have cut food waste almost 10% in a yearfor this chain. the target is 20% by 2020 and then 50% by 2030, the same as the un target. the chef weighs the daily waste. so far the policy has saved
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the hotel chain 26 tonnes tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions. and there's a bonus. we're also making money out of it, which is a real positive side—effect by reducing food waste. so how do guests respond to this culinary nanny state? if i have tools given to me that i take less, then it helps me, i don't put on as much weight when i travel. i think it's a good thing, i feel it helps the environment but it also helps myself to not gain, what do i call it, weight that i don't need. there is no ban on loading up your plate here. take as much as you want. but you'd better not leave it. roger harrabin, bbc news, norway. who else would you talk to about this other than matt? shrinking croissants?
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matt is taking over saturday kitchen, how would you feel if somebody shrunk your croissant? when i park my plate up, i finished the lot but it is very topical, we have a food film all about that later so stay tuned to watch that. our special guest today is explorer ed staff, i bet you cannot wait for some decent food? talking of all things exploring and adventuring, what is your food heaven? coconut. i am obsessive in that i cannot get enough of them, you would have thought i couldn't stand them but i'io. thought i couldn't stand them but no. i bet your family love that.
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what about food held? suet pudding, from boarding school, i cannot imagine why anyone wouldn't eat that. it's nearly chinese new year so we have two great chefs here to celebrate. you will get scallops and clams and a delicious sauce. proper celebratory dish. and the great ken hom, what are you cooking for us? fish which is great to make and needles which expand your longevity. we all need that, and you have drinks for us? i have wine from new zealand and china and from argentina and some boos from the freezer. and possibly some shots, and you guys at
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home are in charge of what ed eats at the end of the show, we will see you at 10pm. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before 10am, helen will have the weather for you. but first at 9:31am, a summary of this morning's main news. snow and ice has caused a second night of disruption across parts of the uk. in the south of england, dozens of motorists were left stranded for hours, as the wintry weather brought traffic to a standstill. highways england says its gritters covered 80,000 miles of roads overnight. some weather warnings are set to remain in place for much of the morning. footage showing the moment a dam burst in southern brazil has been uncovered. these images, obtained by a local tv channel, show the moment a muddy sludge engulfed the area around the iron ore mine. an investigation into how this happened is under way.
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115 people are now known to have died in the disaster. hundreds more are still missing. the minister for school standards in england has told the bbc he believes pupils should be banned from taking smartphones into school. the government is about to publish new guidance on internet safety, social media and online gaming. the minister, nick gibb, said that while there was nothing intrinsically damaging said that while there was nothing reduces time for conversation, exercise, homework or play. the united states will today pull out of a nuclear disarmament treaty with russia. the deal was signed during the cold war and outlaws the use of intermediate range nuclear missiles stationed on land. moscow has angrily denied american claims that it had violated the terms. the germanjustice minister has told breakfast there will no renegotiation over the plan to avoid a hard border on the island of ireland after brexit. mps agreed this week that theresa may should hold further discussions with the eu over the so—called backstop. katerina barley told us a delay to the date of brexit is not out of the question,
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but the british government needs to be clear about what it wants. we can talk about a delay but we need an idea at the least but we need an idea at least of what we are going to negotiate within this delay and i don't really see a plan. i really do not see where and how other solutions can be brought up that haven't been discussed yet in the last two and a half years. celebrity—endorsed ads that promote weight loss products should be banned on social media, according to england's top doctor. some celebrities with lots of young followers are promoting products like diet pills and detox teas. nhs medical director professor stephen powis says these products can have a damaging effect on young people. the government is planning to replace the european safety mark on products sold in the uk after we leave the eu. since 1993 the letters c and e on an item has shown that it meets eu standards.
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after brexit the uk will no longer be able to use the symbol. it'll be replaced by a new logo, which businesses say will lead to higher costs. those are the main stories this morning. we have a great sporting story today. if anyone didn't see it, i woke up the second half. we're talking about wales against france yesterday. it all seemed as if it was completely over at the time. 16-0 was completely over at the time. 16—0 down, the french pack, the heaviest in the tournament, were all over wales. can we put the image up. you will sometimes there are pictures in a match that tell a tale? this was the second half when the welsh wing lost the ball in the dangerous area, and george north picked up the ball and difficult
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conditions. he pounced, and that was the defining moment, symbolic of wales historic comeback. the biggest ever overturned in six nations herstory. never give up on a lost cause. wales' comeback victory in france in the opening match of the six nations showed they have "forgotten how to lose", according to head coach warren gatland. 16 points down and out at half time, wales produced one of the all—time great comebacks to stun the french in paris, winning 24—19. more on this byjoining sarah mulkerrins who's in dublin ahead of ireland, england later and sarah, it will be hard to match the drama of that second half in paris. yes, what a way to open the six nations. all the more significant because we're in the rugby cup world yearin because we're in the rugby cup world year in the ——japan. we're hoping
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at the aviva stadium here in dublin later, we will have some drama of our own, but let's bring in chris jones, the bbc‘s rugby union correspondent. everyone was watching this in the pubs around here, and for wales and warren gatland, it was so important to have the comeback. yes, warren gatland has been saying that if wheels were to win in paris they could go on to win the whole six nations, but at half—time, 16—0 down in the pouring rain away from home, and turned it around. the momentum wheels will now get is enormous. it was helped by a french mistakes, two lost tries, and warren gatland knows the value of momentum. before we get to dublin and ireland hosting england, let's top scotland. there are good force. yes, mrs
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championship where the need to take the next step. they have been able to win two or three but not been able to challenge for the title. england at the weekend as their finalfrontier, england at the weekend as their final frontier, they have england at the weekend as their finalfrontier, they have not england at the weekend as their final frontier, they have not won at twickenham since 1983, but italy at home is a good place to start. the professional sides in glasgow and edinburgh have been going well, and it is widely expected for scotland to get up and running. rugby world cup is so significant to the six nations and ireland. eddie jones has been keeping the pressure on them, seeing that we could be lulled into some complacency, but the world cup angle is fascinating. in the past ireland have gone to world cups with confidence and blown it. i spoke to rory best dog and a podcast, he said 0liver focused on previously was the
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world cup, but it looks as if they have learned from their last experiences, and ireland have to be focusing on the here and now, which is the challenge from all the six nations sites. chris, enjoy the afternoon. thanks for joining nations sites. chris, enjoy the afternoon. thanks forjoining us. mike, full coverage across the bbc. we're hoping for a plenty more drama. absolutely, starting at 1:45pm on bbc one, scotland against italy, followed by ireland and england. in the women's competition, england ran in eight tries to demolish ireland in the opening match of their tournament. england are fully professional and the class showed throughout with a 51—7 win in dublin. zoe harrison and emily scott amongst the scorers in the visitors' eight—try victory. and italy ran in four tries, this the pick of them, to earn a bonus point as they beat scotland by 28 points to seven in glasgow. so to another difficult day for england's cricketers,
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in the caribbean as west indies built a lead of 85 runs, heading into the third day of the second test in antigua. remember england had been skittled for 187, and for a time, it looked like their bowlers were some revenge, in the afternoon. but the windies' patient approach, mixed with the occasional flamboyant shot paid off — and three batsmen scored more than a0. stuart broad was the pick of the bowlers with three wickets, but the west indies will resume in control on 271 for six. and don't forget they lead the series 1—0. hull kingston rovers claimed the glory in rugby league's hull derby, but only just. they won their opening superleague match of the season 18—16 with the last play of the game. jimmy keinhorst the hero as he snatched victory from defeat. elsewhere there were wins for castleford and salford. kilmarnock missed the chance to narrow the gap on scottish premiership leaders celtic,
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to three points as they lost 2—1 to hearts. goals from sean clare and steven naismith, in a five minute spell did the damage, and althouthordanjones pulled a goal back, kilmarnock couldn't avoid theirfirst home defeat in three months. qatar have won the asian cup for the first time in their history. they beat previous champions japan 3—1 in the final. not a bad goal to win it. qatar will host the next world cup in 2022. it's the new sport played with a giant ball and three teams on court at once. it's called kinball and if you've ever had fun keeping a balloon off the ground with your family or mates, this could be for you. if we had a balloon, i would show you. next best thing, inflatable shark. sorry! line we searched for a balloon, but where was this?! shark. sorry! line we searched for a balloon, but where was this? !m
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shark. sorry! line we searched for a balloon, but where was this?! it was ona balloon, but where was this?! it was on a shelf! how did it get there? who knows? great britain is looking for players to send to the kinball world cup later this year. what are you doing? there is always one. i went to liverpool'sjohn moore university tojoin some of the hopefuls. it's the sport that is breaking all boundaries, going where no game that has gone before, starting with the size of the ball. the biggest ball in any sport, which floats in the air for long enough for your team to try and stop it hitting the ground. giant keepy—ups. it was invented by a canadian about 15 years ago. he was in a rock concert and he saw
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a giant ball floating around the arena and he saw how much people were enthused and having fun. when it's your team to serve, you shout the colour of the opponents you're nominating to catch it next. next, yellow, yellow, yellow! and in this 3—team game, whoever fails to do so hands the point to the other teams. as soon as i heard pink called, the chase was on, attempt to stop it falling to the floor. oh, but my heavy touch just knocked it out. it also meant the other two teams scored a point. one of kinball‘s main aims is to get everyone of all abilities playing together on the same team. even i can get involved and that's good for me to get involved in exercise and stuff. it was quite easy. just touching the ball. and it's been particularly successful in engaging those people left on the sidelines by other team sports. if you've ever played a game where no—one passes to you, you are completely involved, no matter if you are the best player or the weakest player, doesn't matter. at the moment of impact,
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when you serve, everyone has got to be touching the ball. everyone has got to take turns as the server. if you are not included, you can't score points. another unique part of kinball is that three teams compete for points at the same time, so the scores tend to stay close right to the end. it helps to avoid one team getting a thrashing and so losing interest. it makes it a bit more fair because two teams are always getting a point rather than having a bad day and you are getting absolutely battered. it works all your muscles as well. my legs are killing me, my arms and everything are aching. it's only been two games, so... kinball is now played in a0 countries around the world and at this year's world cup in france, great britain will enter a team to the first time. some of the more experienced british players are hoping to go to the world cup in france later this year, you really see the skills and the speed and the teamwork involved.
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and you might think that playing with a huge ball would give you better ball control. out of bounds. it gives everybody a rest, at least. give it a go, you might be able to go to the world cup. we're going to be looking at the weather and a couple of minutes. yes, we have been saying that in those areas in the south, the m3 is moving this morning, and the same problems as yesterday are not so much of an issue. the word is, there
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is snow in some places, so be careful. it isa it is a good night for stargazing, and we will talk about that in the moment, but you have the all—important moment, but you have the all—importa nt update. i have. it has been a cold night, but will be colder still tonight. the problem is there will be a little bit of melting snow today, but with temperatures just above freezing there could be some snow like you see here, and we have seen some snow falling in norwich. there could be some melting, and the ice risk returns. it is already with us this morning because it has been snowy, and it will take a while to melt. wave it does, it freezes over again. we're not expecting much fresh snowfall. we have a late flurry in central london, and this
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is where we will have a few centimetres today, causing a little disruption, but you will find it moving towards the coastline as time goes on. so it is going to be cold enough for snow showers today, across east anglia and the north—east of england. use for yourself on the radar picture, east of england is most prone to snowfall today, but for many of us it is much drier with plenty of sunshine around. it will not feel warm, though? —— it will not feel warm, though. temperatures about where they should be this time of year, and that will give the snow a chance to melt. temperatures will fall away under the clear skies tonight, and will freeze very rapidly. it looks like it will be the coldest night of the winter so far, with temperatures
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in london and cardiff getting four or5 in london and cardiff getting four or 5 degrees below freezing, which is very unusual. —15 potentially in the countryside in scotland. it is probably the last cold mate for a while, because the atlantic influence comes in tomorrow, bringing some more snow for a time, mostly over the hills and possibly at lower levels, but mostly dry further south and east. as it comes m, further south and east. as it comes in, we will get into damp weather. but today, it is still cold, and will be very cold tonight. have a good day. thank you very much, you too. hope your cold improves. would you know how to identify 0rion's belt in the night sky?
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i would not. iwould not. much i would not. much as i like looking up i would not. much as i like looking up at the sky, i wouldn't know it. it's part of a constellation which can be quite easy to see on a clear night, but it depends where you live. the campaign to protect rural england wants us to count exactly how many stars we can spot with the naked eye, so it can assess the full impact of light pollution. earlier we asked emma marrington, from the group, what exactly she wants us to do. what we're asking is for people to count the stars they can see in the orion constellation, so this is one of the most well—known constellations in the night sky. if you look towards the south, a little—known fact is that satellite dishes generally point south, so if you are in an urban area, have look at the satellite dishes and you will be able to locate it yourself. a lot of people have mobile phones that have compasses on as well. so you look out for the orion constellation, one of the most commonly known. it has four rectangular corner stars, so you look for those corner stars and it has a three—star belt in the middle going across diagonally. so count the number of stars you can see within those stars, and then go to our website,
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submit your star count, and it means we can create a map of britain's views of the night sky. and what is the endgame? what we would like to do, so we want as many people as possible to take part in the star count, it's a really exciting way exciting way of getting out, for a bit of an adventure in darkness. but the endgame would be to create this map of people's views of the night sky, so across the whole country, as many people as possible, and we can use that as evidence as what people can actually see, then we can press councils, we can lobby the government, we can also encourage local people to take action. this week we have been talking about how cold it is, and i would imagine some people will be watching saying, i'm not going out there and standing and watching the stars! how do you pick your moment, so to speak, especially with the weather the way it is? i think, certainly for children and families, anyone can treat it as an adventure, so one of the things we do with my family is we go out on a night—time adventure, to richmond park, moonlit walk,
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take a flask, wrap warm, look at the stars. so it is a really good way of going out and trying to get out at night. are the skies going to be more clear? of course, we have had a look and things are changing, there is a lot of snow, but that should mean clearer skies, a better view of the night sky. the colder it is, the better chance it is being clear and crisp. have you any practical tips on being sure you're not counting the same star...! you know what i mean? there is a lot of! there is a lot of them! any practical tips? you need to let your eyes adjust for maybe 15 minutes, perhaps have a walk somewhere dark, or sit in the garden, let your eyes adjust, and try your best to get the number you see. as an indicator, if you have fewer than ten stars, that indicates you have severe light pollution, so for example where i live in kingston,
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at the last star count i saw seven, so that's not great. including the three stars on the belt. is that the kielder forest that is supposed to have the clearest skies? what might you see there? that should have more than 30, that is truly dark skies. it is citizen science, so there will be some variables variables with individuals, but it is the taking part that counts. there has been a lot about light pollution, actually. people are taking action with that, led lighting and things like that. yes, more directional lighting, led lighting is more common, and councils are switching off and reducing the brightness of streetlights, this is being done in conjunction with the police to make sure there aren't any safety issues. but having lighting that is more
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directional that is only used where and when it is needed, and it is not only councils, individuals can do something. domestic security lighting, being mindful as to when you have baton and how it is directed. to shooting stars count? you can certainly tell me about them on the form, so we have the number of counts, and we asked people to make comments about what they see, so if you see a shooting star, all the better, let us know. so it could bea the better, let us know. so it could be a decent weekend, and the cold it is, the clearer. and you can share your star counting experiences with others on social media using the hashtag starcount. we all know it's pretty freezing out there at the moment — so not many of us would fancy going for an open air dip. but some people do, and now a new film, ‘the ponds', which dives deep into the swimming culture of london's hampstead heath ponds. filmed over 12 months it explores why so many are drawn to the chilly water.
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here's a little snippet. it is quite strong. called, exhilarating, excited. totally present in the moment. you cannot throw yourself into each of any more than that. just looking around and everything and getting in it, experiencing every depth of the season, from beginning to end. it's just stunning. it is so beautiful here today, you just feel really alive, glad to be alive. we're joined now by the film's directors, samuel smith and patrick mclennan. i agree with one thing, it is
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absolutely stunning. but as someone who does not swim well, i cannot imagine swimming in the water. but you were out there yesterday? yes, it was1.6 you were out there yesterday? yes, it was 1.6 degrees, it was lovely! i wasn't in for a long, but i did get in. the thing about it is the feeling you have, itjust transforms your day. lots of people won't be familiar with the ponds you're talking about. there are three at hampstead heath, how come they are there and people are like to swim in them? they have been their hundreds of years and people have swim there for hundreds of years. that is a great history. they are much loved and there is a great tradition. 0ne for men, one for women and one mixed. that wasn't always the way, in the 19th century the men had
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their mixed pond, and the ladies we re allowed their mixed pond, and the ladies were allowed to swim on one day of the week, and it took until the 19205 the week, and it took until the 1920s until the ladies got the wrong pond, and they love it. obviously you have a passion for swimming in very cold water, it is very refreshing and good for the soul. it is almost like the ponds are device for telling some really lovely interesting human stories. is that a fair assumption of what people would get out of this? yes, i would say that. people swim for therapy, i suppose. people are drawn there, and it is almost ritualistic, the everyday swimmers, the people who go there. who inspired you most? there are some amazing stories that came through, which touched you the most?
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i think all characters are amazing, carrie is a breast cancer survivor, and this water is so important to her. we can see a clip of her from the film. there are not many places you can just go on your own and never feel worried. there places you can just go on your own and neverfeel worried. there is a lwa ys and neverfeel worried. there is always someone to talk to, always someone who will give you a hug. before my operation i was really emotional, and the thought of losing my breast was really hard, and i was crying in the shower. i have people ibump into crying in the shower. i have people i bump into in the street, and i don't recognise them with their clothes on, there my friend, i don't know their name but they are my friend. it makes sense, that camaraderie that can be healing. yes, if you go through the gates at the ladies ponder the men's pond, —— the ladies ponder the men's pond, —— the ladies' pond and the men's pond,
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there is a falling away ofjudgment, and it is to do with the sheer bond of getting into this cold water, people are more real. there are so many great friendships, and just as carrie was explaining, strangers hugging her. there are also many private stories, and you did most of the filming, around four fifths, how did you approach them and how are you allowed in many ways to kind of intrude, for want of a better word? yes, the process was quite simple. people were very open to telling their stories, so it wasn't actually so hard to get them to open their hearts and expressed the reasons the subject themselves to cold water swimming. can youjust subject themselves to cold water swimming. can you just turn up and swim? people will be curious. yes,
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the lifeguards do an amazing job at all three of the ponds. it will keep an eye out on the new people, children under the age of 12 have to doa children under the age of 12 have to do a test. in fact, they tell us that most of the risk is to do with adults, being brazen andjumping into the water, and quite often they have people who cannot actually swim jumping in. it is a fascinating snapshot of characters are and time. thank you, it is showing at selected cinemas around the uk. that is it for this morning, we will be back tomorrow. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 10am: freezing temperatures are continuing into the weekend after snow causes more travel chaos overnight. being here in the traffic that's
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stationary for nearly five hours now is not a huge amount of fun. england's minister for schools says pupils should be banned from taking smartphones into school russian president vladimir putin has said that russia is withdrawing from the cold war—era intermediate—range nuclear forces treaty after a similar move by the united states. floods in the north—east australian state of queensland have reached catastrophic levels. a french fumble and a welsh fightback last night — and there's more six nations action to come today.
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