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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 3, 2019 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: theresa may vows to deliver brexit on time and promises to battle for britain as she prepares to re—open negotiations in brussels. promising to go armed with new ideas about the issue of the irish border. a new search to try to find the missing cardiff city footballer emiliano sala and his pilot begins this morning off guernsey. hundreds of students join the search to look for libby squire, who disappeared in hull on thursday night. police say they are extremely concerned for her welfare. in sport, england make the perfect start to their six nations campaign, as they beat the reigning champions in dublin — ireland's first home six nations defeat in six years. scotland also open with a victory over italy. and another very cold morning out there. widespread frost but guess what? from tonight onwards, it is all change. milder weather on the
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way. it's sunday, february 3rd. our top story: theresa may says she is still determined to deliver brexit on time as she prepares to re—open negotiations in brussels. writing in the sunday telegraph, the prime minister says she will "battle for britain" in the upcoming talks and hopes to come back with "new ideas" on the issue of the irish border. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. the first with the prime minister clearly wa nts the first with the prime minister clearly wants to squash the suggestions that have been floating around in the ether that brexit may be delayed, she said explicitly she wa nts to be delayed, she said explicitly she wants to deliver it on time on the 29th of march next month at their is still a row about the so—called backstop, this is the insurance policy to ensure that the border between northern ireland and the republic remains open under any circumstances. after brexit. now the prime minister says she gets that parliament wants it to be either time—limited off the uk to be able
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to leave the backstop at a time of its choosing but into ireland, and the deputy prime minister writing a piece in the sunday times. he says look, the backstop is therefore a good reason, it is a legal guarantee to keep the border opened, and nothing has been suggested that could replace it. so guess what? we are where we were. ireland and the eu is saying look, the deal is on the table. you can take it or leave it. in the uk is saying without luck the backstop and has not prevented —— resented anything publicly yet to convince the eu to change its view. britain's car manufacturing industry is expected to be dealt a blow this week when nissan announces it's cancelling a planned investment at its plant in sunderland. the company confirmed in 2016 that it would build a new version of its x—trail people carrier at the site, after receiving government assurances on the impact of brexit. it's understood executives will make an announcement to pull investment tomorrow. no immediate job losses are expected at the site, which employs almost 7,000 people. an underwater search for the missing
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plane carrying footballer emiliano sala and his pilot is due to begin this morning. cardiff city's new signing disappeared with pilot david ibbotson over the english channel 13 days ago. two search ships — one privately funded and one from the air accidents investigation branch — will search the sea bed off guernsey. john fernandez reports. in the early hours of this morning, the search boat left the harbour in guernsey tojoin the search boat left the harbour in guernsey to join up with a larger vessel commissioned by the air accidents investigation branch. the two search teams, one of them sponsored by a crowdfunding operation on behalf of the sala family will check for multiple miles. the cebit will be scanned using sonar technology and unmanned submersible vehicles. we have these sonars off the seabed and gives us a high—resolution picture and we can
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pick out small objects the size of a tyre from a car to the resolution is really, you know, very tight and we will be running lines in a grid pattern overlapping these lines. we call it mowing the lawn. it is expected the search will take around three days. if nothing is found in that time, the teams have as yet no plans to continue. that was bbc guernsey's john fernandez reporting. more from him during the course of the morning. victims of crime will be given new rights to challenge the release of violent offenders, under a review of the parole system. the change, follows an outcry last year over the planned release of the so—called black cab rapistjohn worboys. it will mean that victims will not have to go to court to contest parole board decisions. instead, they will be able to apply to the department ofjustice with any objections. hundreds of students have joined the search for libby squire, who went missing after a night out in hull on thursday. police say they are extremely concerned for her welfare and herfamily said her disappearance was completely out of character, as simon clemison reports.
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no search is easy. but try subzero temperatures. the conditions here could not have made things more difficult. loving, down to earth, 21—year—old libby squire is studying at the university of hull. she got into a taxi outside the welly club at about 11 o'clock on thursday night. it is thought she got out of what graf or short time later and was last seen on cctv at about 11:45 p.m.. officers have been leading the operation to find her having going from house to house, about 200 stu d e nts from house to house, about 200 students have also been involved. from house to house, about 200 students have also been involvedlj wa nt to students have also been involvedlj want to thank everyone for their m essa 9 es want to thank everyone for their m essa g es of want to thank everyone for their messages of concern, the sharing information about libby and those who live in the area have been checking their gardens, porches and sheds to try to help us look for her. the 70 officers have been out searching, speaking to herfriends visiting the pubs and clubs in the
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area, and making enquiries with those who saw her drink thursday evening. despite these efforts, we have still not located libby. her family say her disappearance is out of character and police are still concerned. but with more freezing temperatures this morning, for now, this search is not getting any easier. simon clemison, bbc news. it's being claimed that workers in their 30s have been hit hardest by the effects of the 2008 financial crisis. the resolution foundation, a think tank which focuses on people on lower incomes, has been examining the impact of the crash on salaries. our business correspondent rob young has more details. the height of the financial crisis may have been more than one decade ago but many people are still feeling its effects in their wallet 01’ feeling its effects in their wallet or purse. according to an analysis of paid—up by the resolution foundation, most age groups continue to see a squeeze on their pay with pay packets buying 3% less than they did one decade ago. one age group
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jumps out, people who were starting out in their careers drink the crisis and are now in their 30s. their pay is said to be 7% below its high point. there is concern that falling real wages for those thirtysomethings may effect them at big moments in their lives with property and family. this age group is now doing things like trying to save enough to buy a house, settling down and having children, and yet they have just gone through a really significant pay squeeze. it is important that we see pay grades returning, productivity growth driving higher pay in helping these people be able to afford to do things like settle down, have a family, and move their own home. unemployment is currently the lowest it has been the 40 years. wages have been rising in recent months. the economist hope that means better paying news to come. rob young, bbc news. tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of venezuela in rival mass rallies. the head of the opposition, juan guaido, is trying to force president maduro from power.
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the president also spoke at a rally in support of his leadership and the current government. european countries say they'll recognise the opposition leader if presidential elections aren't called by midnight tonight. pope francis will become the first pontiff to visit the arabian peninsula when he arrives in the united arab emirates later. he's been invited to the region by abu dhabi's crown prince to take part in an inter—faith conference. the trip will also feature a mass on tuesday, which is expected to draw tens of thousands of people. everyone is happy, everyone is excited, the people are lining up just to get tickets to it is something that we are really, really looking forward to. the fact that the pope was able to come here supported by the rulers of this country is such a positive exciting time for everybody in abu dhabi and beyond right now. american football's showpiece event takes place tonight as the new england patriots and the la rams meet in the super bowl in atlanta.
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millions of people worldwide are expected to watch the game which could see patriots quarterback tom brady make history by becoming the only person to win six super bowl titles. and it is on bbc one. is it? now that i have just said it's... and it is on bbc one. is it? now that i have just said it's. .. it is watched by millions, it is huge advertising revenue from there although the viewership has dropped. is it? something like 7% it was down and we will talk about it later on richard will talk about it later. he will. sports people get very excited about it. let's talk about the papers. theresa may vowing to go back to brussels and reopening negotiations and she says she is going to battle for britain in brussels. also in the telegraph, they are saying she has support of
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they are saying she has support of the labour leader as well as she says the eu must give ground on opening the brexit backstop. this photograph though, this is what we want. what a game that was! did you watch it! i did! we were talking earlier in the day yesterday, saying that ireland looked as though, on paper, it would either better team and most in england were expecting it through but it was a game of nip and tuck. it was a great game for scotland, wales in paris on friday was superb as well. it is interesting that theresa may's article is buried away on page 19 in time to —— inside the sunday telegraph. the times has this story, talking about a brexit plan to evacuate the queen. essentially it is talking about the reintroduction ofa is talking about the reintroduction of a plan they had in the cold war to get the royals out of london and the sunday times is saying if there isa the sunday times is saying if there is a deal, and if there is civil
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unrest, they will get the queen out of london. brexit, brexit, brexit. the sunday express looks at the bbc begging mps to help scrap free television licences. apparently the bbc has been accused of lobbying influential mps for support when it comes to scrapping the free licence for the over 75. it is saying it does not, cannot afford the scrapping of the licence. it wants the bbc to pay for it. i will quickly show you this. sunday mirror, or is in a excerpt, this is a story about borisjohnson throwing away some potentially sensitive political papers into a bin at a petrol station. i will show you this, a wonderful story. a £10 car boot sale ring is actually worth £240,000. it is a thing to dream of, isn't it? -- 740,000. she paid £10
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and thought it was a fake. they got some financial troubles and so she got it valued. it was worth three quarters of a million. fantastic. she sold it and after fees and everything, she has earned almost half a million. that is not bad at all! it is 12 minutes past six we have had a week of really wintry weather, haven't we? we have been talking a lot about it but now, as we heard in the headlines, it will get mild and rain will come. we heard in the headlines, it will get mild and rain will comem we heard in the headlines, it will get mild and rain will come. it will melt and we will get washed away. good morning, sir! it is certainly going to be a big change compared to what we have had. don't get me wrong, it is still very icy this morning. temperatures in england get down to —12 degrees in the north on the border with scotland and you can see the extent of the frost, it is actually down to the south coast but
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in the tropics there in cornwall,, tropics of course, it has been freezing but really cold. see this cloud here? that is essentially streaming our way, it is heading in the direction of scotland and northern ireland first, bringing rain, some snow for a time across the hills but mild air behind me moving in our direction and it is going to wash away all of the cold airso by going to wash away all of the cold air so by buying winter, for now. through the course of this morning, it'll be a period of a little bit of rain through scotland, maybe northern ireland, the lake district as well but for many us across southern and south—eastern areas, i think the weather is looking fine. until tonight. then it really is all changeable, this low pressure these bits of rain and wind and cloud you can see behind me while sweeping and this is a weather front and when you see these at westerleigh winds on it means right —— wind coming from a milder source. five degrees now —5
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was last night, so we are talking about a 10 degrees swing and a big swing of the pendulum as far as the temperatures are concerned. it may be down for a time across the south—west with a weather front dragging its heels little bit, maybe in the north—east to macro but once the wet and windy weather clears and toro daytime actually for many of us isn't bad. eight or nine degrees, it will feel let's say warmer out there compared to what we have had at these low pressures will be lining themselves up in the atlantic, one after the other after the other after the other after the other after the other that it essentially means the weather will be very u nsettled means the weather will be very unsettled over the coming days. this is the outlook for the week ahead, this is actually from tuesday onwards. but the double—figure temperatures across southern parts of the uk. not far off in the north as well. we have had a dose of winter. all changed now. a lot milder with periods of wind and rain
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but that of course does not mean that winter is over. it could well return at some point during the course of debris. back to you two. thank you very much, tomasz that. —— tomasz. we're talking about swimming later and adults learning to swim, i think you're a pretty good swimmer. no, actually not a great summer. i can doa no, actually not a great summer. i can do a few lengths. i think it is breeding technique, i cannot go backwards and forwards like most people, cycling is good but no, and embarrassed, not a good swimmer. do not be embarrassed, john legend, the singer, has revealed that he is taking lessons at the age of 40. our editor started taking lessons at the
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age of 40. i am not a great swimmer. and did not really enjoy swimming lessons as a kid at all. i can remember that the teacher said to go andi remember that the teacher said to go and i went straight down and could see the wall, and that was it. we wa nt to see the wall, and that was it. we want to hear about your experiences. you can email us bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. or send us a tweet, @bbcbreakfast. perhaps he loved swimming, perhaps he had a really good experience, to all those issues as well about pulling out your swimming and walking around with wet hair, it is horrible. it has made us nervous this. it has. tell us your thoughts, we will talk about it at about 8:15am. thousands of police officers and civilian staff in england and wales have not been vetted to national standards, the bbc has found. the new guidelines, designed to weed out rogue recruits, were introduced in 2006, but figures from 31 forces show
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almost 6000 staff have not had the retrospective checks. let's get more on this now from 5 live investigates presenter, adrian goldberg. good morning. this is on your programme on five live this morning, should be worried about this?|j should be worried about this?” think there is cause to worry dear. the whole point of the guidelines introduced in 2006 was to weed out rogue officers, there are really quite detailed background check sign up, social media checks, friends, people you might associate with it anyway. the whole point is to make sure that rogue officers do not get. that they are not being done. they are not and people who have been employed before 2006, should have been subjected to these tough new guidelines since 2006, and really 6000 officers had not been checked
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to were employed before 2006 according to these new guidelines. have you been told why? i know the freedom of information request will not have said how many been done, but have you been given a reason?” was speaking to the national police council about this, they said that this is a national emergency and they want to address it but they said it is impossible based on the number of new recruits coming onstrea m number of new recruits coming onstream that they want to check. the number of incidents, reported police officers or staff seeking to gain sexual advantage to access to vulnerable people has doubled over the last four years, we are talking about something like 170 people over the last four years. we cannot say for certain that is related to this vetting failures that nonetheless, thatis vetting failures that nonetheless, that is an increase does the considerable cause concern. and there was a very high profile case just a couple of months ago. yeah, there was an awful case involving a
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pc, you took advantage and rate to 30 new girl in capturing his vetting process having been finished and then actually starting his job, which was a gap of about five months. he was investigated for another rape allegation, that was dropped, but there were two other serious allegations against him on the national police database that we re the national police database that were not referred to cheshire police, which had there been, that would have raised a really big red flag in his case and they have acknowledged that they do need to do things better as well cheshire police. you can hear more on that story on 5 live investigates this morning at 11am. thank you very much. we'll be back with the headlines at 6.30am. now it's time for the film review with carrie gracie and mark kermode. hello.
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welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what have you got for us this week? well, we're definitely in awards season, so we have a couple of big awards contenders. firstly, green book, which is the story of an unlikely friendship. can you ever forgive me?, memoirs of a literary forger. and burning, a breath—taking film from south korea. where do you want to start then? let's start with green book. so, oscar contender, which is up for a number of awards, including best picture, best actor for viggo mortenson, best supporting actor for mahershala ali, who i think is pretty much tipped to win. peter farrelly with his brother used to make comedies like dumb and dumber, and this is a comedy. it's a drama with some comedic elements in it.
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its based on a real life friendship. tony, who needs work, an old school racist, he goes for a job interview and he finds that the job is to be a chauffeur and minder for an african american pianist. but he needs the work. they are going to go down to the segregated south. and they're chalk and cheese. one of them is educated and a brilliant musician, and the other is vulgar and comes from the streets. and yet inevitably, during theirjourney together, they find that they have things in common, not least when tony is trying to write letters home to his wife and dr don starts telling him how you actually should write a letter. here's a clip. dear dolores, d—e—e—r. this is an animal. "as i'm writing this letter, i'm eating potato chips and i'm starting to get thirsty." you do know this is pathetic, right? tell me what you're trying to say. i don't know.
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you know, i miss her. then say that. but do it in a manner that no one else has ever done it before. something like... put this down. " falling in love with you was the easiest thing i've ever done." "nothing matters to me but you and every day i'm alive i'm aware of this. i loved you the day i met you. i love you today and i will love you the rest of my life." aw. yeah, so look, you can see from that, it's a good—hearted film, there's been quite a lot of controversy. it is nominated at the oscars, so whenever there is an oscar contender, there is controversy. on the one hand, the family have said this isn't true,
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they were not friends, it was an employer and employee relationship. there have been complaints that this is a story about racism but seen through the eyes of a white character and he saves the day. there have also been comparisons with driving miss daisy, which won the oscar for best picture. that was soft soap, but that was saved by the performances. in this case, it is the performances that save it. i understand the criticism that it's a soft film, especially if you compare it to if beale street could talk, which is a brilliant film, this is just trivia. but the performances are really winning, so much so that when you are watching the film you think, i am going to park all the things i think that is wrong with it because i like the characters. i think mahershala ali has a good chance of winning. i think viggo mortensen does a good job with his role. you'd be hard pressed not to be charmed by it because its heart is in the right place. yes, it makes a lot of mistakes,
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it's not ground—breaking, and it is fantastically soft soaped and fanciful, but remember it is awards season... how much of the aspects of the chemistry between the two leads applies to your next pick of the releases? forgive me. that's a very good question. melissa mccarthy and richard e grant have been nominated as well. he'll probably lose out out to mahershali ali, but who knows? this is based on a true story, the story of lee israel, an author who couldn't get published, so she started forging letters from famous literary figures, noel coward and dorothy parker. she found out she got quite good at it. she describes herself in the film by saying "i'm a better dorothy parker than dorothy parker." richard e grant is jack hock, the character she fakes the letters for. a lot of people say the character he plays in this is like withnail and i, but that character was needy. in this, he puts up a lot of front because he's got a lot of anxieties. she is fantastic. a couple of reviews have said it is a revelation. it's not a revelation, she was in dramatic theatre for a number of years. if you look at thing
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like st vincent, she's always had a dramatic underpinning. this was co—writen by nicole holofcener, who was initially going to direct it. this was brought to the screen in a very likeable form. i like the chemistry between them. nora ephron's name comes up a lot in the dialogue in a funny way. and as a huge fan of her, i liked this in much the same way. it is about the characters. it is about somebody who finds her own voice by pretending to be the voices of other people and i think it works really well. i really liked it and i do think richard e grant is fantastic. and i think it's a long overdue nomination for him. the next release, burning, which is not about chemistry and it is entirely different. this is based on a short story by haruki murakami, which i have to say i haven't read.
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a shy young man, his mother has left home and his father is in trouble with the law and he has to turn to the family farm. one day he sees a girl who's outside a stall trying to get punters to come in and he doesn't recognise her. what he doesn't realise is she knew him as a child hard to work out from that what that film is really about. fine. exactly. i've seen the whole film and it's still quite hard. ok, so he's smitten but he's mystified. she tells him about things that happened to them as children, but he doesn't remember any of them. then she asks him to look after her cat, which he can neverfind. then she turns up with a sort of playboy boyfriend, who is this sort of gatsby type figure, and he likes to make barns disappear by burning them down, and the next thing is she disappears. the rest of the film is him trying to figure out whether she has disappeared, is he somehow involved,
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has she actually disappeared? is he involved ? do we get any answers? maybe it's a murder mystery, maybe it's a film about rich and poor and town and country and reality and invention and memory and what you actually remember and what you think you remember. the film closes on you like this and it becomes so mesmerising. i mean i was completely gripped by it and afterwards, i spoke to a couple of people and said, was that a clue? was that her makeup box in the thing? did you see the cat? what i loved about it if it is one of those films that gets right under your skin. it is absolutely breathtaking. is it a murder mystery, is it a love story, is it a paranoid thriller? is it all in his mind? you've gone through the whole of the film and at no point does the film decide to sit down and say well, here's what is going on. that happened and that happened. it's really brilliantly mystifying, in a way which is completely mesmerising. ijust wanted to go straight back
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in and watch it again. i think i will watch it again. even on second viewing, it will keep the secrets. you've got to be up for the uncertainty of it. yes, but how wonderful, how wonderful. i loved it. how wonderful to see a film that it's so hard to describe... i have no idea what you're talking about, even after seeing it. go and see it to have a proper discussion with you about it. destroyer. i like this. we have another oscars in which the whole of the best director list has not one single female director in a year in which there are so many great movies directed by women. this film has been sadly overlooked and it needs to find an audience. it's a really, really good, twisted cop thriller. and, just two sentences on best dvd. disobedience, again it's a story about life, love, religion, betrayal, the universe, and everything. wow, that'll do me. ok, well, that's a good collection for this week. thanks so much, mark.
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thank you. and that is all we have time for. thank you for watching. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: theresa may says she's still determined to deliver brexit on time as she prepares to re—open negotiations in brussels this week. writing in the sunday telegraph, the prime minister says she'll "battle for britain" in the upcoming talks and hopes to come back with "new ideas" on the issue of the irish border. but ireland's foreign minister, simon coveney, has insisted there are no credible alternatives available to the so—called backstop — the insurance policy designed to prevent the return of physical checks at the irish border. an underwater search for the missing plane carrying footballer emiliano sala and his pilot is due to begin this morning. cardiff city's new signing disappeared with pilot david ibbotson over
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the english channel 13 days ago. two search ships — one privately funded and one from the air accidents investigation branch — will use sonar to search an area of seabed to the north of guernsey. victims of crime will be given new rights to challenge the release of violent offenders, under a review of the parole system. the change follows an outcry last year over the planned release of the so—called black cab rapistjohn worboys. it will mean that victims will not have to go to court to contest parole board decisions. instead, they will be able to apply to the department ofjustice with any objections. hundreds of students have joined the search for libby squire, who went missing after a night out in hull on thursday. police have said they are "extremely concerned" for the 21—year—old. herfamily have said her disappearance was "very out of character". thousands of police officers and civilian staff in england and wales have not been vetted to national standards, the bbc has found. the new guidelines, designed to weed out rogue recruits,
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were introduced in 2006, but figures from 36 forces show almost 6,000 staff have not had the retrospective checks. the national police chiefs' council said it was working hard to bring that figure down. earlier five line investigator adrian goldberg explained to us the vetting procedure. people have had been employed before 2006 should have been subject to these tough new guidelines and nearly 6000 officers have not been checked who were employed before 2006, according to these new guidelines. adrian goldberg speaking earlier. tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of venezuela in rival mass rallies. the head of the opposition, juan guaido, is trying to force president maduro from power. the president also spoke at a rally in support of his leadership and the current government. european countries say they'll recognise the opposition leader
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if presidential elections aren't called by midnight tonight. pope francis will become the first pontiff to visit the arabian peninsula, when he arrives in the united arab emirates later. he's been invited to the region by abu dhabi's crown prince to take part in an inter—faith conference. the trip will also feature a mass on tuesday, which is expected to draw tens of thousands of people. everyone is happy, everyone is excited. the people are lining up just to get tickets, so it is something that we are really, really looking forward to. the fact that the pope was able to come here, supported by the rulers of this country, is such a positive, exciting time for everybody in abu dhabi and beyond right now. for the first time, a list of britain's 20 most endangered plants and animals has been put together to help conservationists save them from extinction. the project to find those species most at risk began a year ago and already, scientists have been able to reintroduce some of those which were close to being wiped out. on the subject of wildlife, customs
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officials in india have detained a passenger after they found the month—old leopard cub hidden in his luggage. it is very cute now! cute now but what a stupid thing to do! they heard noises coming from the man's bag and they found the animal. it was weak and in a state of shock. it was weak and in a state of shock. it was weak and in a state of shock. it was taken to a wildlife park to be cared for. they are investigating if the man was part of an international smuggling ring. they are not meant to be stuffed in your luggage. sport now and what should we talk about weston it was so good! —— what should we talk about? so many questions about the build up to the world cup, they beat the irish by
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32-20, a world cup, they beat the irish by 32—20, a superb performance and they can 32—20, a superb performance and they ca n refle ct 32—20, a superb performance and they can reflect on that. it was ireland's first six nations defeat in dublin for six years. earlier, scotland started their campaign with a 33—20 win over italy at murrayfield. our sports editor dan roan rounds up the action. with these two teams dominating recent six nations, this promised to be an epic. grand slam winners and second in the world rankings, ireland were favourites, but it was england who started fastest. the game had barely begun whenjonny may scored his country's first try here for eight years to stun the home crowd. ireland responded, cian healy borrowing over after sustained pressure. —— cian healy burrowing over after sustained pressure. but england were forcing their opponents into uncharacteristic mistakes. jacob stockdale's blunder pounced on by elliot daly. the lead, seven points at half—time. ireland aren't used to being bullied — this is a team who beat the mighty all blacks here in the autumn. but despite losing maro itoje to a serious injury, england's ruthlessness earned a famous win.
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first, may's clever kick through was gathered by henry slade, before the centre scored his second and the decisive try, seizing onjohnny sexton's desperate pass. ireland managed a late consolation, but this was england's day, their first win here for six years and by a margin few had predicted. ireland very rarely lose here and so, this is a hugely significant result for england, and certainly, this team bears little resemblance to the one that finished fifth in last year's championship. in a world cup year, this is hugely encouraging for eddie jones' side. meanwhile, earlier at murrayfield, the fans were in good voice as scotland managed a winning start to their campaign against italy, blair kinghorn scoring the hosts's first championship hat—trick in 30 years — a result scotland will look to build on next week, when they welcome a bruised ireland. dan roan, bbc news, dublin. in the women's six nations,
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france thrashed wales. caroline thomas scored a hat—trick as the defending champions ran in nine tries for a 52—3 victory. wales' only points came courtesy of a first—half penalty. england's cricketers have slumped to another heavy defeat against the west indies in antigua, and with it have lost their 3—match test series with a game still to play. england finished their second innings with a lead ofjust 13 runs after another batting collapse. the windies quickly completed a 10—wicket win, john campbell clearing the boundary to clinch the victory in style. i'm in shock, to be brutally honest. i left the hotel this morning thinking that england will fight back. it was going to be hard for them but they fought manfully yesterday with the ball. it was 120—odd plays and misses and things probably did not quite go their way yesterday, and i thought they had earned the right again to win their luck, but with the batting,
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it wasn't good enough. cardiff city's players and fans paid tribute to emiliano sala yesterday. the game against bournemouth was their first at home since their new argentine signing went missing when his plane disappeared over the channel islands. both team's captains laid flowers on the pitch and fans created a mosaic in honour of the argentine striker who they had signed from french side nantes. bobby reid scored both of cardiff's goals in a 2—0 win and after the first, he held up a t—shirt adorned with sala's image. emiliano was a super guy and i met him fora emiliano was a super guy and i met him for a couple of months and it just got hold of me after the final and walking across to the fans on the far side, they were amazing and you start thinking about things and you start thinking about things and you just can't stop, it is an emotional time, it was great for the clu b to emotional time, it was great for the club to get the win today, i am
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pleased to the chairman, they have work hard and good to—i was proud of the club today. new loan signing gonzalo higuain and eden hazard both scored twice in chelsea's comfortable 5—0 victory over bottom side huddersfield. the win moved maurizio sarri's side back into the top four after their 4—0 defeat at bournemouth last week. southampton were on course forjust their sixth league win of the season. nathan redmond put them ahead against burnley at turf moor. the home side salvaged a point, thanks to ashley barnes' penalty deep into stoppage time. at the other end of the table, tottenham moved above manchester city into second, thanks to son heung min's late strike and a little bit of help from the newcastle keeper martin dubravka. manchester city will reclaim that second spot if they get a point against arsenal later today. elsewhere in the championship, norwich city went top after beating leeds united 3—1 at elland road. two goals from mario vrancic ensured they took all three points to move ahead of leeds on goal difference. in the scottish premiership,
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rangers beat st mirren 4—0, narrowing the gap on leaders celtic to three points. meanwhile, aberdeen moved into third place after coming from behind to win at hibernian. gary mackay—steven fired them 2—1 in front before half—time, and that's the way it stayed. celtic play stjohnstone today. tom daley's made his return to competitive diving after a long break last year. he struggled with injuries and became a father. he and his new diving partner matty lee won gold at the british national cup. they've only been training together for four months. it was the first time daley had competed in front of his 7—month—old son, robbie. down on the end of the board of the first time i was so nervous, it was like i was there for the first time, i was like in my goodness, i am competing again, i am back at it, it is really weird, and my son is watching me, oh my goodness, but it was really nice to go out there and
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compete ahead of the individuals tomorrow, argives were decent and it was a pretty decent score for our first ever performance together so very happy about that. i'm sure how worried i would be about a seven —month—old's opinion. he is exactly about to critique his appearance, is he? always fascinates me how short the amount of time is that they get the partnerships, before they have to perform. absolutely. split-2nd, isn't it? the synergy has to happen... synchronicity. it is all about synchronicity. same as rugby league. let's look at that. warrington wolves kicked off their super league season with a comprehensive 26—6 win over leeds rhinos. josh charnley scored the second of warrington's four tries, giving dave furner a rough start to his life as rhinos head coach. leeds travel to champions wigan on friday, while warrington host hull kingston rovers on saturday. the super bowl gets its own half—time show, but yesterday's match between everton and wolves had its own mid—game spectacle. the game at goodison park was held up for several minutes.
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that is a big cat! the reason for the ‘paws' was this little pitch invader. sorry! they're meant to be good luck, right? try telling everton that. they lost 3—1 to wolves. but even the winning manager was a bit spooked. so scared! so scared!” so scared! so scared! i don't know how long it lasted but... it was one minute or more. the commentator on final score was, he was commentating on the cat. as though it was trying to score a goal, a whisker wide and things like that, it was very good. lovely, lovely, iam things like that, it was very good. lovely, lovely, i am glad things like that, it was very good. lovely, lovely, iam glad it things like that, it was very good. lovely, lovely, i am glad it was all right. it was fine. well, was it? how is your swimming? you have the physique. i am all right. are you
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good at the whole breeding... you can tell i am not a good swimmer. controlling your breath? —— one —— breathing. i can sort of, you know when you struggle with your left hand? i am impressed. john legend is, the singer, you know him, he is 40 and he is taking swimming lessons and he has just 40 and he is taking swimming lessons and he hasjust revealed 40 and he is taking swimming lessons and he has just revealed that. 40 and he is taking swimming lessons and he hasjust revealed that. just started ? and he hasjust revealed that. just started? just started. while talking earlier to tomasz and he was said that he was embarrassed and i think as an adult have an issue but we are talking about it this morning.” as an adult have an issue but we are talking about it this morning. i was in the pool this more —— the pole at the gym and he thought i would be a good swimmer. but i am not. i was like a beached whale. flailing. flailing. many people have been in
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touch. thank you. including quite a few swimming coaches who tell us it is never too late. good! some council—run nurseries are at risk of having to close because of threats to funding, according to a group of mps. maintained nurseries are often in deprived areas and are given top—up money to help meet their needs. but that money's under threat, and campaigners say that could devastate the life chances of thousands of vulnerable children. nina warhurst reports. really isn't having his best day. —— dili. any three —year—old can feel overwhelmed and his social and communication problems mean he needs extra support, which is what he gets at hindley. how do you think the stuffy handle children like billy? fa ntastically. stuffy handle children like billy? fantastically. i have never heard them raise their voices, they are calm and understanding and they get it. it seems really silly because nurseries do that but it does, it is
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just different. maintained nurseries excel, almost two thirds are rated outstanding by ofsted, but increasingly they are struggling financially. by 2013 less than 6% of them were in debt. last year the figure went up to more than 20%. and it is with the extra funding they are currently receiving from government. something that could stop next year. sometimes you can see the trouble family face when they come here and think they here to help a child and they are here to help me. what would happen to be sent without the top—up money? help me. what would happen to be sent without the top-up money? we would not be here, we would close because it would not have enough money. it is that serious? it is that serious. some children simply have a harder start in life with problems at home or issues with their physical or emotional development and those other children who come first in these nurseries, they are guaranteed a place and told
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that everything possible will be done to close the gaps in those vital early years. yeah! the government told us they do recognise the excellence of maintained nurseries but have not decided on long—term funding. this week, mps from both main parties came together to say that is not good enough.” think this would be social vandalism of the worst kind to let these nursery schools go by default when we don't really want to go but we cannot actually find the pot of money to keep them open. and it could be bought in before we find out if that pot is being provided. too long a wait for some nurseries already making cup. —— cuts. billy is behaving now that mum has gone, unaware that decision is happening hundreds of miles away could have a profound impact on his future here. nina warhurst, bbc news. thank you forjoining us, in need to
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know what is going on with the weather. tomasz is your man for that, morning. good morning. forthe next four hours, it really is all change. we've had a dose of winter, very frosty out there. temperatures have been —10 degrees across the uk last night and this morning. here's the frost but the winds are starting to change now. you can see the milder weather getting into ireland and that is because the weather fronts aligning themselves up out there, and heading in our direction. all change, all change, we are going to wave goodbye to this colder weather at least for now. here's what is happening through the morning, a spell of wind and rain with the northern ireland temporarily, it will be to scotland too. there will be some snow across the hills, maybe some snow across the hills, maybe some snow across the pennines is well and then it looks as though there will be a little bit of cloud and spots of rain across more central parts of the uk that either side of that, it is actually looking fairly bright and then late in the day it does
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look as though it will cloud over everywhere and then another weather front everywhere and then another weather fro nt m oves everywhere and then another weather front moves through, so that is when the really big weather changed moves in. in windy to the uk, again another period of snow across the scottish hills but this past night, temperatures well below freezing. we are talking about well above freezing in some areas in the south this coming night. he is monday's weather, the work, unsettled across scotland, sleet and snow across the mountains. wales, london maybe, further north in the norwich, could be damp and krabi for a time. parts of liverpool, much of eastern england, belfast into glasgow bathe in it sunshine on monday with temperatures around nine degrees, so a lot milder. all that cold weather by this stage, towards the east of europe, we getting these low pressure is coming in and in fact, if you look at the temperatures to thursday and saturday, the weekend,
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look at that, into double figures to the south of the country, not far off double figures in the north. but off double figures in the north. but of course, at this time of year, when we get my weather we pay for it, and that is in the form of weather front moving through, bringing us and rain. so it is a bit of give and take. it is always that way with the weather, why can't we just take, take, take? thank you, tomasz. we'll be back with the headlines at 7am. now it's time for the travel show. coming up on this week's travel show: i know they said i'm not going to feel the cold, but i'm really nervous about my body going into some kind of shock once i get in the water. it's an icy plunge for me in the french alps. we have some chairlift speed dating in the us. fancy learning how to cook tentacles and suckers? we have a special family recipe of couscous. and we meet one lady making waves in the canary islands. the ski season is now in full swing
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in the northern hemisphere. and so far, the snowfall has been somewhat unpredictable. i'm in tignes, a ski resort in the french alps. it's part of the espace killy ski area, and home to the grande motte glacier, which rises to a whopping 3,450 metres. despite the resort's high altitude, like many others, it had to delay the start of its season by a couple of weeks due to lack of snow. across the world, global warming is shortening the ski season, and starting to seriously affect the economy for lower resorts. it may be hard to believe given recent heavy snowfall in europe,
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but the bigger picture is looking bleak. the charity protect our winters has been collecting data from climate scientists around the world, all with similar predictions. by 2050, the alps could see a reduction in snow by more than 40%. warren smith is an ambassador for the charity. so, lucy, tell me about your skiing background — what have you done so far? i'm still very much in plough territory. plough. he's also an international ski coach based in the alps. here we go. change direction! i've noticed a massive difference, especially in the last 25 years that we've been doing it, of the glaciers retreating, the glaciers getting smaller. in the winters, our winter season is getting shorter, you know, they used to start in november very comfortably, and now sometimes we're lucky if they start in december. push on the left ski.
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good work. the other thing that's quite scary and is actually really apparent right now is, because of these extreme changes in the temperatures that we're seeing, so, you could have a snowfall injanuary, it could be —15 or —16, and four or five days later, it could be +10. and what this does to the snow pack, it really weakens the way that the snow bonds together, and we have seen a big rise in the amount of avalanches. it makes free riding for me as a free skier a lot more risky, and obviously, for everybody else trying that. here in tignes, the resort has been making plans to ensure its future — and one ambitious project is to open an indoor ski dome by the grande motte glacier. these artist impressions show what it will look like in the winter, and also in the summer, to guarantee year—round skiing no matter the weather. in addition, tignes recently opened the world's first high—altitude cable car roof terrace. it's part of a multimillion—euro
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project called the altitude experience, designed to promote the beauty of the vanoise national park and encourage off—season visitors. hello! hello. hi. well, i'm giving my ski legs a rest to try something a little bit different. nice to meet you. 0k! yes, that is a mask and regulator. i've been persuaded into ice diving. so, once you're inside, we seal everything, and you're completely protected. for this, i'll be wearing a dry suit. we will put some talc inside, so the head can go easily into the protection. ok...oops!
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it's a girl! laughs it's definitely a complicated process getting ready, which is just adding to my nerves. and you're sealed! the good news is i can't feel how cold it is out here, so... the lake i'll be diving into is right in the ski village of tignes le lac, just a stone's throw from the lifts. laughs bye— bye! the more i stare at that icy abyss, the more ijust want to stick my foot in just to get a taste of or a feel for how cold it is. i know they said i'm not going to not feel the cold, but i'm really nervous about my body going into some kind of shock once i get in the water. i'm sure it will be fine, but my mind is currently in overdrive. ijust want to get in now.
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you're in? perfect! dan will be staying above the ice, helping me and another instructor go under. it's not an activity you can do as a group, rather one person at a time with an instructor for safety reasons. 0k. and we rotate into the water...now! my initial worries of freezing to death quickly went away. perfect. bye— bye! but it didn't quite go to plan, and i had to surface. so, my mask started to fill with water... and i started to panic, so i was like, out! after a little reminder about what to do — namely don't panic, i was mentally prepped for another go. i'm ready to go back in. i was only down there for, like, maybe a minute or so, but it's so pretty down there,
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and just being able to touch all the bubbles under the ice is really cool. 0k. this time, my mask stayed put, but we decided not to stray too far from the ice hole, and my confidence returned. it's an otherworldly experience under the ice, cut off from the noise and distractions above. and it's surprisingly relaxing. only towards the end did my toes and fingers start to tingle a little, but otherwise, the drysuit really did keep the cold out. for the really daring, it's possible also to free dive. probably not for me, though — i much prefer having the oxygen tank. finally, we're in fuerteventura in the canary islands,
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where one woman is making waves in the international kite—surfing scene. she shows us why her home is the perfect training ground for the sport. well, that's all for this week. but coming up next week, christa takes a peek at the back of the notre dame cathedral in paris to discover fallen pinnacles and gargoyles, and she meets those trying to save it. within ten years, we could have the cathedral completely down, if we were to do nothing. and in the meantime, don't forget — you can follow us on social media. the links are on our website. but for now, from me, lucy hedges, and the rest of the travel show team, it's goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: theresa may vows to deliver brexit on time as she prepares to re—open negotiations in brussels, promising new ideas
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about the irish border.
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