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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 6, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: president trump themes his state of the union address on "choosing greatness" as he announces a second summit with north korea's leader this month. ifi if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion, be in a major war with north korea. theresa may says she is seeking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop, ahead of talks with stormont leaders. lawyers say five men due to leave today on the first deportation flight to jamaica since the windrush scandal have been given a reprieve. a pound goes almost a fifth further in the north than in london. that is according to research out this morning. i will be finding out why later. as great britain hosts the fed cup for the first time in more than a quarter of a century, i caught up with the team ahead of their match against slovenia.
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good morning. we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine today, albeit hazy. some showers in the west, some rain in the south—east, but by friday it is looking like it is going to be pretty windy. i will have more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 6 february. our top story: donald trump has announced he will hold a second nuclear summit with north korea's leader, kim jong—un, later this month. the comments came during his state of the union address, in which he also appealed for a compromise with the democrats to build his border wall with mexico. our north america correspondent chris buckler reports. the president of the united states. it isa the president of the united states. it is a sign of the political state of this union that this address had to be delayed. democrats initially withdrew donald trump's invitation
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to speak, amid a partial government shutdown. we must reject the politics of revenge, resistance and retribution, and embraced the boundless potential of cooperation, compromise, and the common good. but, after two years during which some critics have called mr trump america's most divisive president, the reaction of many democrats was telling. mr trump invited as some of his guessed the family of a couple allegedly killed by an illegal immigrant, an attempt to get more funding for his promised war with mexico. i will get it built. this was a speech in which america came first, but mr trump made one significant international announcement, giving details of a second summit with the north korean leader. chairman kim and i will meet
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again on february 27th and 28 in vietnam. at mr trump needs to show he can build relationships in washington, as well as internationally. we have correspondents in washington and seoul this morning. we will speak to laura bicker in just a moment. but first, let's get reaction from our washington correspondent chris buckler. good morning to you, chris. so this is so much for an american audience. what did they make of it? how has it been received? good morning, as you can imagine this is a set piece event, and it comes with a great deal of kind of flourish and ceremony. and president trump was speaking about some of the issues that he feels very important for his base. but beyond that, he is being seen to try and reach out. he believes going forward there needs to be greater relationships between democrats and republicans, and that is partly a sign that things have changed inside the house of representatives. democrats now control they are, and there were some incredible scenes, actually,
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whenever they focused on the room. the women who have joined the house of representatives, the democrat women who have come and join that house, they all dressed in white and sat together, and it was something that president trump himself couldn't ignore, at times referring to it. as they cheered some su ccesses to it. as they cheered some successes about the economy. and afterwards, the democrats made clear that they don't want donald trump to feel that they do not want him to be successful, the problem is they still disagree fundamentally on those big issues, like abortion, like immigration, and specifically, of course, that border wall. he is still demanding $5 billion for that. they are still refusing, and nobody is quite sure what will happen next. in ten days, there could be another government shutdown, or alternatively he could declare another emergency at the southern border. let's talk now to our seoul correspondent laura bicker. laura, mr trump made it clear he thinks his election stopped a war between the us and north korea. is that how things are viewed there?
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so let's be clear, i think when it comes to the view when this peninsula came to the brink, it was felt that donald trump played a very big part in that, with his fire and fury rhetoric and those tweets that he aimed at pyongyang. but he is also seen as the president who is prepared to negotiate with kim jong—un, and that is also a change from previous administrations in the united states. and it is seen here as, despite the fact that he may have brought this peninsula to the brink of war, there are people here who feel that he has the potential to also bring it to the brink of peace. because here, there is much anticipation about what a second summit with kim jong—un anticipation about what a second summit with kimjong—un might mean. and to them, it might mean an end to the 68 year korean war and a declaration to end at war. good to talk to you, thank you very much.
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and we will have more reflection on that state of the union address throughout the morning on breakfast. the prime minister is to hold talks with the five main stormont parties on the second day of her visit to northern ireland. she has suggested that she will be looking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop proposals from her brexit withdrawal agreement, which have long divided opinion. our ireland correspondent chris page is at stormont for us this morning. chris, what sort of reception will mrs may get? well, not for the first time on her visit here, she is going to be pulled in two different directions, i think. this is theresa may's third visit to northern ireland in seven months. the reason why she has come here so often is that 2.5 years after the brexit referendum it is still all about the irish border and in particular the backstop, this insurance policy, if you like designed to ensure there will no checks on the frontier with the irish republic, in any circumstances. even if there is a
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big free trade deal between the uk and the eu. yesterday at a speech to business leaders in belfast mrs may indicated she doesn't want to scrap the backstop altogether, as some people would like. she does, though, what changes to it, and in particular she has talked about concerns that the backstop would be indefinite and open ended, nobody would be sure when it would end if it did indeed kick in. as far as the two main parties at stormont are concerned, they have very different perspectives. sinn fein have accused theresa may of a huge act of bad faith in looking for changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, on the other hand, the dup, upon whom theresa may relies on for votes in parliament, they say the current backstop proposal is unacceptable. and by the way, brexit is not the only deadlock situation that theresa may will be talking to the parties about. she will also be speaking about. she will also be speaking about the fact there has been no devolved government here at stormont in two years, since powersharing collapsed, and they will look to
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restore devolution as soon as possible. five men due to be deported to jamaica this morning have been granted last minute reprieves to stay in the uk, an immigration lawyer has said. up to 50 people are believed to be leaving on a plane from an raf base later today — the first such flight since the windrush scandal. the government has defended its position, saying they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, will warn today that digital media companies are endangering democracy. in a speech in london, he will call for changes in the law to force these companies to do more to protect their users, especially children, and prevent the spread of disinformation. a murder investigation is underway after a teenager was stabbed to death in south—west london last night. emergency crews were called shortly after 8:00pm following reports that a 19—year—old was attacked in battersea. paramedics tried to save him, but he was declared dead at the scene. scotland yard say no arrests have been made. council tenants in england, scotland and northern ireland owe local authorities more than £300 million in rent arrears, new figures show.
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that has risen by a quarter in just four years, and debt charities believe changes to the benefits system are to blame. david rhodes reports. look at me. look at me cardigan. lisa, a mum of three, owes york council over £1000 in unpaid rent, she says because universal credit has pushed her into debt. you don't know, like, what's coming next with universal credit. i was out of debt in 2017, and since i got on universal credit last year, i've nearly lost my house twice. and then ijust — yeah, ended up in debt again. universal credit is designed to make claiming benefits simpler,
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and to help people back into work. over 1.5 million people in great britain see up to six benefits merged into one monthly payment. but four years ago, councils in england, scotland, and northern ireland were owed around £250 million by current tenants. last year, that figure had climbed to over £300 million. the welsh government doesn't collect comparable figures to the rest of the uk. the government said there is no one single cause why rent arrears build up, and that many people join universal credit with pre—existing housing debt. adding that 500 social landlords have recently signed up to a scheme that can arrange direct rent payments and help recover arrears. david rhodes, bbc news. when you were growing up, did you have an annoying younger sibling? like a brother? yes, that's why i get on with you. 0k, awkward. then this scene will be familiar. this is yeba, a young
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gorilla determined to get the attention of his older brother kipenzi by throwing wood shavings at him in a bid to get him to play. kipenzi was clearly not in the mood for games, and grabbed his younger brother to settle him down. stop it, stop it, stop it. they live in a zoo in denmark, a p pa re ntly they live in a zoo in denmark, apparently the older brother is quite playful, but quite reserved. an excellent window into the world this morning. calm down, sally. we are not very calm after last night. an amazing night in the fa cup. are not very calm after last night.
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an amazing night in the fa cupm was a classic fa cup night. a goalkeeper with a wife in labour, a plucky underdog, and filthy weather. it all led to newport county shocking middlesbrough to set up a tie against manchester city. that will be again to go to. —— a game to go to. meanwhile, city could go top of the league later. but their boss thinks there are now four teams in the title race, and he even includes their arch—rivals, manchester united. the race where it all went vonn. skiing great lindsey vonn crashes out at her final competition in sweden. and it is a big day for british women's tennis. the fed cup is being held here for the first time in 26 years. we will meet the gb team. look at me naturally posing with the microphone they are. there are some familiar names, watson, konta, but
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stars of the future as well.|j familiar names, watson, konta, but stars of the future as well. i did look and think they looked so young. what time are we showing that? 6:55 a.m., andjust after8:30 what time are we showing that? 6:55 a.m., and just after 8:30 a.m.. what time are we showing that? 6:55 a.m., andjust after 8:30 a.m.. have you spoken to anyone? kenneth branagh? did you call him ken, kenny? no, icalled branagh? did you call him ken, kenny? no, i called him kenneth branagh! we are talking about his new film, in which he plays shakespeare. let's look at the papers, and the front pages of the metro lead with a death at a festival in dorset. the court heard her boyfriend, who denies manslaughter, filmed her as she was dying. the trial is ongoing. the
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daily express leads with reports that the force has literally run out of offices, the times front page reports that driverless cars could be used on uk roads by the end of the year. the express leads on their own report about bedfordshire police. the papers says chief constablejon boutcher told his mp that the force has literally ran out of officers after a series of gang attacks, rapes and a prison riot on one day. the times reports driverless cars could be used on uk roads by the end of the year. the paper also says that government ministers are planning to allow trials to go ahead without a human in control of the vehicles. the daily mail has looked at official statistics which show that adults drinking over the recommended 1a units per week has dropped significantly. and pictured is the today programme presenterjohn humphrys, who says he expects to leave his radio 4 show by the end of the year.
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shall we start with you, steph? yes, there is quite a bit about hmv this morning. it is mixed news. it has been rescued from collapse by a canadian music entrepreneur, but 27 stores, some of them in really prime locations, have closed. it includes the site of its first store on 0xford the site of its first store on oxford street, and that is obviously the picture of it there. under this deal, 100 hmv shops will remain open, protecting thejobs deal, 100 hmv shops will remain open, protecting the jobs of nearly 1500 workers in the stores and head office, but the immediate closure of 27 stores will lead to 455job losses and a further 122 will go from the warehouse in the coming weeks. so some mixed news for them, but i think a lot of people will be pleased to hear that it has been rescued from total collapse. we have been there before with hmv.
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it is one of those ones that keeps coming back and is struggling, because the way we bought music. coming back and is struggling, because the way we bought musiclj thought quite ashamed. there is an independent one in sheffield. i know, that's the problem. we all feel a lot of love that these types of stores. i will tell you what else happened to york '5 ago. as we mentioned in the bulletin, great britain played the tie on home soil. i cannot get my head around how it works. really? it's baffling. and it's yourjob. what makes me feel even better, the captain also doesn't understand. we understand it. it's so compensated. they've
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been calling for a form in the way it is organised. it's much more complex than the davis cup. there has been a lot of attention given to the davis cup. interesting. how do you get a robot to spot dementia? actually, you get it to watch emmerdale. the student has presented, robbie the robot, there he is. quite famous. that is robbie the robot. the reason why he is watching emmerdale, he watched 13 episodes which featured the character ashley thomas who features with the condition. he can now recognise the behaviour. that sort
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of 2a— hour monitoring of people in ca re of 2a— hour monitoring of people in care homes. also, they can identify objects as well. the point is, it is ha rd to objects as well. the point is, it is hard to paper that 4— hours care. a robot can do some of the monitoring. it can be the healthcare of the future. i have got another one. premier league title race. everybody is talking about it. klopp is already showing signs of cracking. it's early days to be saying that, isn't it? i'll just it's early days to be saying that, isn't it? i'lljust catch that name that you dropped. how many times
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have you mentioned that that cup team? i'm not go tell you what he said. the magnetic north pole is heading to siberia, and fast. for many years, its mood five kilometres around. it is now moving up to 50 kilometres per year. it is moving to siberia. what does that mean? for navigation purposes, it is very difficult. used to be in northern canada, but it's on the move, quite significantly. what does jesse lingard think about that? i'll have to ask. a lot of namedropping. carol, please tell us about the weather. i've been speaking to
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nobody particularly but this morning's weather, i can tell you about that. it's a mild start the many areas. fog across south wales in southern england. some hazy sunshine. however, there are sunshine. however, there are sunshine and showers across the north and west. pushing steadily south eastwards. have been moving steadily south eastwards. a lot of cloud associated. this is our waving front. later in the day, rain coming from this. showers packing in. wintry meals. some of those will be heavy with hale, thunder and lightning but in between, a lot of dry weather and hazy sunshine. parts of north—east scotland hanging onto drier conditions with some sunny spells. showers persisting across the north and west. northern ireland, northern england, the odd shower in the west. as we come
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further south, hazy sunshine. the channel islands are seeing rain to much of the day on and off for you. for degrees in stornoway. moving on through the evening and overnight, the rain in the channel islands, it comes back in across south—east england. meanwhile, another system out in the west producing some showers and rain. as it moves from the west towards the east. depositing snow in the east of scotland. it's going to be a cold night in parts, cold enough touch of frost. we could have ice on untreated surfaces. tomorrow morning, we start off with our weather front producing rain lower levels. before it eventually moves away into the north sea. leading a lot of dry weather around. you can
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still see a peppering of showers in the west. we are looking at eight or nine further south. draw your attention to this system here. this is what is coming our way thursday and friday. an area of low pressure thatis and friday. an area of low pressure that is very potent. it's going to be mild, mild on friday itself. we could have gusts of wind up to 70 miles an hour. inland, anywhere from southern scotland south, we could have gusts of wind 50—55 miles an hour. this could lead to some disruption. if you are travelling on friday, do factor that into your travel plans. it does move through and by the time you get to saturday, it's going to be still pretty windy. look at some showers, rain pushing away and hill snow as well that we are looking at this next system
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which is coming in across the south. it's a big milestone in a child's life — learning to use a potty — but new research suggests that toddlers are being toilet—trained at a later age than in previous years. the national day nurseries association and eric, the children's bowel and bladder charity, say busy working parents put off potty training for as long as possible and miss signs that their child is ready to get out of nappies. it means a growing number are starting school still unable to use the toilet, as tim muffett reports. sometimes it's easy, sometimes it's hard. for samantha, potty training has been both. your brilliant, aren't you? you will always use the toilet and potty. and freya, we have had an absolute nightmare. freya is
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three, thin layers for but the samantha, age is not an issue. three, thin layers for but the samantha, age is not an issuelj think it's because i'm a working mum,i think it's because i'm a working mum, i missed that moment when she was worthy of —— ready. i try to make perfectly rather than the pit. increasingly, nurseries are where a lot of potty training is taking place. 0r lot of potty training is taking place. or that two thirds of staff from more than 200 nurseries have said ina from more than 200 nurseries have said in a survey that the age in which children are going nappy free is going up. i think years ago, there was a lot more guidelines given in paris were kind of sticking to those guidelines that it nowadays, parents are actually waiting to their children to show signs of being ready for it. some children, it is quite confusing, if they got pullups, and they used to wearing nappies, it feels the same, really. sometimes in nurseries and other places i seek children who get themselves into such stresses that has negative impacts were the children can become fearful of using the loo. the first one, i was
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reading about all the queue was and what happens, what are the signs of potty training and as i've had more children, i've been very much busier. i'm just so busy to commit toa busier. i'm just so busy to commit to a week. the official nhs guidance on potty training acknowledges that some people —— some children find it easy, some children find it hard, setbacks are common but 0fsted has raised concerns. its is a growing number of children are starting school unable to use the toilet. children were also signs but the important factor is the parent or nursery needs to know when the signs are there. when children are doing one soft to a day and then nappy is driver and now, and a half at the time, those are critical signs of potty training and that is the time to start thinking about it. once it's done, potty training can soon become a distant memory. samantha has a message for all parents were
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not quite there yet. don't give up. there are a couple of times we thought we can't carry on with this. just keep going with it. that's brought back some memories. just keep going with it. that's brought back some memorieslj just keep going with it. that's brought back some memories. i feel for you all still involved. talking about potty training. if you want to talk about that little later. we'll be getting some advice as well the people who are still struggling with that part of their children's life. louise has had a chat with kennett brother —— kenneth branagh. sally has had a chat with the fed cup team. they had the first home tie in six years. let's enjoy that.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. (pres 0628) good morning from bbc london news, good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. almost 150 five thousand of london's hospital admissions may have been linked to alcohol last year, according to new figures. -- 155,000. a report by public health england reveals that ealing and brent were the london boroughs that saw the highest number of alcohol related admissions, with numbers there rising year on year. the report also shows there were 2 thousand 480 alcohol related deaths in 2017. 2,480. richmond council will tonight consider whether to introduce an order banning protestors from outside a family planning clinic that offers abortions. if it goes ahead, it will be the second london council to introduce such a buffer zone after ealing introduced a similar banning order in 2018. the committee will decide whether to recommend the plans to go ahead to a full council vote for a final decision. battersea dogs home is urging people to think carefully before they get
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a dog after a rise in the number of french bulldogs being handed in. vets at the centre say that while the breed is one of the most popular at the moment, their flat—face means they can't breathe properly and owners can be unaware of the health problems they face. it's fairly typical of the dogs we are seeing now, it is having problems with its pleasing —— breeding, you can see why, its nostrils are quite restricted, its soft palate is overlong which is free typical and this has a little pouch tissue at the back of the larynx. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there's no service on southeastern trains between herne hill and victoria because of over running engineering works. 0nto the roads: in aldgate east — commercial street is closed northbound and down to one lane southbound.
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in battersea, westbridge road remains closed by the police following that stabbing incident i mentioned. good morning. we had some rain overnight riches that to that of a damp feel to the morning but the rain has cleared to its largely dry with some bright spells, maybe even a sunny spell or two as well. we could get a spot of light rain or drizzle on the thicker areas of cloud. the cloud penning if you indeed braking so we might see little bit of sunshine at bistro time ahead of cloud the afternoon. temperatures today between ten and a mild 12 celsius. 0vernight, this train tracks back northwards and we will see some more heavy and persistent rain arriving. it will gradually start to break up and fizzle out, still some showers in its wake, still quite cloudy and
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overnight tonight from the wind will also strengthen. the minimum temperatures were four and six celsius. thursday could still get a little bit of light rain and cloud first thing but gradually that will start there, it will break up and we'll get some sunny spells. windy day to thursday but some deep low pressure tracks across the uk on friday bringing some very windy weather and potentially some spells of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: we have been talking about potty training and how stressful it can be for parent and child. we will get some tips from an expert after 7:30am. they are like thoroughbreds to be up and at it. in fact, frankly, you've
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got to be so ready, otherwise you will be taken to the cleaners. that is sir kenneth branagh talking about how nervous he was working with his co—stars, damejudi dench and sir ian mckellen, in his new film looking at the life of william shakespeare. we will have the full interview later. and the hairy bikers are hitting the road for a tour involving cooking and conversation, two of their favourite things. they are here after 9:00am. donald trump has announced he will hold a second nuclear summit with north korea's leader, kim jong—un, later this month. the comments came during his state of the union address, in which he stated the meeting would take place over two days in vietnam. the two leaders first met for historic talks lastjune. mr trump said if he hadn't been elected he believed the countries would be in conflict. much work remains to be done, but my
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relationship with kim jong—un is a good one. if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion, be ina would right now, in my opinion, be in a major would right now, in my opinion, be ina majorwar would right now, in my opinion, be in a major war with north korea. the prime minister is to hold talks with the five main stormont parties on the second day of her visit to northern ireland. she has suggested that she will be looking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop proposal, which is designed to avoid a hard border with the irish republic after brexit. it is hoped mrs may can reach an agreement on the issue that has long divided opinion. five men due to be deported to jamaica this morning have been granted last—minute reprieves to stay in the uk, an immigration lawyer has said. up to 50 people are believed to be leaving on a plane from an raf base later today, the first such flight since the windrush scandal. the government has defended its position, saying they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions. the new york red carpet opening of liam neeson's latest film was cancelled last night amid a race row over comments he made in an interview.
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the hollywood actor sparked outrage after admitting he once wanting to kill a black person after someone close to him was raped by a black man. neeson has denied he is racist, and said he wanted to start a wider conversation about racism. police officers searching for missing student daniel williams say they have found a body in a lake on the campus of reading university. 19—year—old daniel was last seen leaving a student union bar in the early hours of thursday morning. the body hasn't yet been formally identified, but mr williams's family have been informed of the discovery. a murder investigation is underway after a teenager was stabbed to death in south—west london last night. emergency crews were called shortly after 8:00pm following reports that a 19—year—old was attacked in battersea. paramedics tried to save him but he was declared dead at the scene. scotland yard say no arrests have been made. a major investigation is underway into a house fire that killed four children in stafford.
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the four children have been named by staffordshire police as riley holt, keegan unitt, tilly rose unitt and 0lly unitt. they were aged between three and eight. their younger brother, mother and her partner are still in hospital after they jumped to safety from a first—floor window as the fire took hold in the early hours of tuesday. council tenants in england, scotland and northern ireland owe local authorities more than £300 million in rent arrears, new figures show. that has risen by a quarter in just four years, and debt charities believe changes to the benefits system are to blame. the government says no one single factor is causing rent arrears to rise. it has been confirmed the oscars ceremony will take place later this month without a host, for the first time in 30 years. the comedian kevin hart stepped down in december after apologising for homophobic comments he had made a decade earlier. the network that hosts the ceremony said it would instead have various celebrities presenting the trophies.
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hello, various celebrities. maybe they will do one each. if in doubt, get the celebs out. when you were growing up, did you have an annoying younger sibling? i may be that annoying younger sibling, iam i may be that annoying younger sibling, i am third in line to the throne. this is yeba, a young gorilla determined to get the attention of his older brother kipenzi by throwing wood shavings at him, in a bid to get him to play. you can imagine him going, do you like this, do you like this, do you like this, do you like this, do you like this? he is very calm, and i like this? he is very calm, and i like what he eventually does. just
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calm down. do you remember... i am going to make a cultural reference, hopefully... i will get it, because there is a lot of culture. do you remember crocodile dundee, he does the thing with the dog. that is not a knife. years that often, just before we go on air. don't calm down, it is too exciting! iam going don't calm down, it is too exciting! i am going to be the little tiny gorilla throwing stuff at you. and steph is a middlesbrough fan, disappointing, but amazing for newport county. even steph admitted it isa newport county. even steph admitted it is a fantastic story. it had all the hallmarks of a classic cup upset — a raucous crowd, a muddy pitch and filthy weather. so perhaps there was little surprise fourth—tier newport county knocked out middlesbrough.
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boro sit two leagues above county, but were well beaten thanks to a goal from robbie willmott and this one from padraig amond. newport will now play mighty manchester city next. it was a tense evening for newport keeperjoe day. not only did he have to keep middlesbrough out, his wife had gone into labour during the match. so at full—time, no hanging around to celebrate. he was straight off to the hospital. he didn'tjust he didn't just run he didn'tjust run all the way there, he got a lift. by the end of today, manchester city could be back on top of the premier league. they go to everton later, a match rearranged from later in the month, and victory would put them ahead of liverpool on goal difference. but their manager doesn't think the title race ends with the reds. pep guardiola thinks tottenham, chelsea, and even manchester united could win the league.
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with 39 points to play, when you are i9 with 39 points to play, when you are 19 points behind, it's not... it's not much. i never said tottenham was not much. i never said tottenham was not there. indeed, chelsea. i never pulled out all five or six games, and united is making this run of victories every single week. we will be there to fight for the premier league. from the dugout in manchester to the dock in madrid, it has been a tough few months forjose mourinho. he has admitted tax fraud in spain and will have to pay a big fine. he was actually given a jail sentence for hiding earnings from his image rights, but in spain, you can exchange short sentences for fines. the england women's football team will warm up for this summer's world cup by playing four friendly matches around the country. they are calling it the road to france series, and will see the lionesses face canada, spain, denmark and new zealand. junior tickets will only cost £1, if you fancy taking the kids. now some bad news for england rugby union fans.
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forward maro itoje will miss the next two six nations matches with a knee injury. itoje is one of england's key players, but he's out for 2—4 weeks after picking up the injury against ireland. england hope to have him back by the end of the tournament. he's a quality player, and he's a big leader within our group. the qualities that he brings are massive. but also, we've got guys in the squad who have got other qualities that will come in and be just as big an impact. so it is important that we focus on thejob in hand and i'm sure maro will be there in spirit. there are going to be crucial talks about the future of english rugby union in the next two months with the idea of ending relegation from the top division still on the table. the owners of the leading clubs met yesterday and say they want to discuss the long—term future of the game with the governing body, the rfu. one of the greatest skiers of all time, lindsey voon, is competing at her last tournament — the world championships in sweden. but it didn't quite go
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to plan in the super—g. vonn is retiring because of injury, and this crash wouldn't have helped. she did eventually ski down, but it is now touch—and—go whether she will be ready for the downhill on sunday. i feel like i've been hit by an 18—wheeler, but other than that, i'm great. my knees are the same as they were before the race, so that's good, and i'm just going to be really sore. i think my neck‘s going to be sore, and i got the wind knocked out of me, so my — i don't know, my ribs are oddly sore, so... but it'll be fine, sunday will be great. she is putting a very brave face on that. i will be fine, sunday will be great. a bit like andy murray, the
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end of their career perhaps coming towards them in a way they don't want. thank you very much. five men due to be on the first deportation flight to jamaica since the windrush scandal who have been given last—minute reprieves to remain in the uk. the home secretary, sajid javid, has defended the plans to deport up to 50 people who he described as serious criminals. but campaigners say some of the men are being unfairly targeted by hostile immigration policies. let's speak now to solicitor and campaignerjacqueline mckenzie, who joins us from our london studio. good morning to you. thanks very much forjoining us. just to be clear, you are working with people but none of them are on—board this flight, but none of them are on—board this flight, are they? that's correct. so what do you know about these five men who have been given so—called reprieve and will not be on this flight? we don't actually know the fa ct flight? we don't actually know the fact about who has been given this reprieve, we understood that 50 men we re reprieve, we understood that 50 men were due to go, and between 35 and 40 were due to go, and between 35 and a0 have actually gone horror on the
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plane. —— orare a0 have actually gone horror on the plane. —— or are on the plane. so the figures are scant, and that is one of the issues we have with these charter flights. they are so shrouded in secrecy that nobody really knows what is going on. in terms of the people who have been given a reprieve, we know that one of them is mr morgan, described as in afghanistan veteran, he served in the british army. we know either two oi’ the british army. we know either two or three gentlemen appearing as witnesses in an inquest arising from the death of someone in moreton hall, and we know there is a gentleman who was about to be removed until his solicitor contacted me and, after discussing his case, we realised he is possibly a windrush candidate, and he now has an application pending before the windrush task force. i understand some others have actually made asylu m some others have actually made
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asylum applications, some people have put in their own judicial reviews, so there may be others off the plane, but we don't know the fa ct. the plane, but we don't know the fact. sajid javid, especially regarding what you said about windrush, has insisted, iam regarding what you said about windrush, has insisted, i am sure you know this, that none of them we re you know this, that none of them were members of the windrush generation. well, he can't know that, because there certainly is one application pending, and possibly two. also the government making the point that they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions. what is your response to that? as far as i know, some of them do have criminal convictions. again, we do not know the characteristics of all of the 52 people who were initially carded to 90, people who were initially carded to go, and some of the people going being deported, and some of them are what we described as administrative removals, those people who have overstayed their time in the uk or their visas. but we don't actually know the facts and figures about those 52 people, and that is why we are so very concerned those 52 people, and that is why we are so very concerned about this. and so for you to be assured about
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what appears to be going on, and as you say, there is so much you don't know, what would you like to see happen? one of the things i would like to see happen is a proper organisation that represents people who are being deported on charter flights being served with this information. there is in an organisation that gets that. even the high commissions and embassies don't get proper information. there are some charities that work in the detention centres, as far as i know. the ones funded by the home office art... you wouldn't really want to be, you know, sending people to them for advice, because i think they are complicit, and there are some very good ones, but they get very piecemeal information themselves. there is no—one place where anyone can go to and find out who are these 52 people, have they all being, you know, considered properly, do we know, considered properly, do we know the facts and figures about them, and is there any way that these people should be given the
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right to stay in the uk? very good to talk to you this morning, thank you very much for your time. this is today, 23 degrees, it would be lovely. we are starting off on a cold light to some, a milder note further south. across southern wales and england, some mist and england, some missed and the patches, some of which will be slow to clear. this was all about, showers peppering the north and west. rain has been pushing steadily towards the south—east courtesy of this weather front. later, it will pepper. going way back towards the south—east of england. this morning, it continues to push towards the south—east, leaving a residue of cloud. a fair bit of rain across the channel
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islands. even in the afternoon, we hang on to the showers. wintry in the hills. 0r northern ireland, showers but they will be the exception rather than the rule. same for western wales. a lot of dry weather around today and a lot of hazy sunshine. for the channel islands, you've got that rain on and off. temperatures up to 11 in the south, pretty nippy in stornoway. if you watch this band of rain across the channel islands, this is in front. wading back in across the south—east, bringing more rain with it. another system coming in from the west will introduce further rain with hill snow. across the highlands, the southern uplands, into north—west england and north wales. whether temperatures fall is low enough, there will be a touch of frost around and the risk of ice. not so as to push further south. through the course of tomorrow, we still have our weather front of us. still producing this rain and hill
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snow before eventually meandering off into the north sea. 0nce snow before eventually meandering off into the north sea. once again leaving a lot of dry weather. a third of sunshine around and also a peppering of showers in the west. again, some of those have the potential to be heavy. tomorrow is also going to be a windy day than today with highs of four degrees in aberdeen, eight in cardiff. as removed from thursday and friday, the weather turns a bit wilder. this area of low pressure coming our way. look at the squeeze on the isobars telling us it's going to be windy. it's also going be wet. we start off ona it's also going be wet. we start off on a cloudy, which note once again with hill snow. all this rain piling in. it is only half the story because the other half is the wind. strong wind gusting 70 miles per hour with the exposure in the west. inland, anywhere from southern scotla nd inland, anywhere from southern scotland southwards, we are looking at gusts of wind 50, 55 miles per
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hour. that could prove to be disrupted. if you have travel plans on friday, to make sure you check the weather forecast and on saturday, it moves away. there is low pressure sitting out towards scandinavia. then we are looking at the next system coming in across the south—west. so windy, we will be looking out for it. this is the average price of a cup of coffee. in manchester, liverpool, sheffield, york, newcastle or leeds. the average price you would pay. in london, the average price in london is £2 a0. in london. what is going on? it doesn't seem that. and it is
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not the only difference. chips as well. chips are better at the north. cheaper and better. whether you likes your chips up north or down south. the recruitment website totaljobs looked at a range of costs and compared them between london and six northern cities in england — manchester, liverpool, sheffield, york, newcastle, leeds. to give you an example, the daily commute costs on average twice as much in london than in those cities. and when it comes to accommodation — rents for example are more than twice as expensive in the capital. howver, people who live in the capital earn more money on average, eat out more regularly and take more holidays. so who is really better off? we asked people in london and manchester how far it means living within your means.
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travelling, cost of food: the cost of living. i found a reading quite reasonable. food, rent, everything. it all adds up. manchester, leeds, the big northern cities have lots going for them. there is loads to do, itjust going for them. there is loads to do, it just feels going for them. there is loads to do, itjust feels a bit more... just feels more affordable appear. travel is ridiculous. it's every day. geraintjohnes, professor of economics at lancaster university management school. is this about the fact that people in london can earn more? this research involves the design of the
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survey conducted last month and we looked at a whole range of factors are living in london and in these six cities in the north of england. essentially, what you got in london isa essentially, what you got in london is a lot of congestion, a lot of people living there, a lot of people having to commute long distances to get into work. we look at all the various factors that influence the cost of living. in order to try and get a handle on effectively what is the value of the northern pound, how much you have to work on in the north to be as well off as you are in london. we focused particularly on things like the cost of groceries, per example, which is remarkably similar across london in the northern cities. £116 in london per week, £118 in the north. slightly more expensive. the price of beer differs considerably. we looked at the price of accommodation. 2.5 times more in the south and the northern cities. we
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look also at the cost of commuting. also the time cost of commuting. in london, people spend more than 100 hours more per year commuting than people do in these northern cities so people do in these northern cities soa people do in these northern cities so a lot of things there influencing the gap in the cost of living between the north and london. 0verall, between the north and london. overall, the gap comes to around 1796. as in the people in these northern english city ‘s other ones we re northern english city ‘s other ones were better off. if you are earning the same salary, people in the north would be better off, because the cost of living is that much lower but of course, salaries are higher in london and they are in the north. they are more than 17% higher than in the north on average according to a survey. but that 17% means people in london could take a pay cut in order to move to the north. whether
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any surprises in there, do you think? the real surprises in the nature the differentials. the cost of commuting in a time cost of commuting, particularly. so in london, people are spending an average 33a hours over the course of average 33a hours over the course of a year commuting. that's more than 100 hours more than people in the north. it's almost the equivalent of working weeks. you said at the beginning you are trying to look at how much somebody in those northern english cities would have to learn in order to be the same. did you will work out what it was? they would have to learn 17%. will work out what it was? they would have to learn 1796. you didn't get a figure in what that was in terms of value? on average, in our sample, people were earning an annual salary of around 3a,000. somebody earning less than a0,000
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could come to an average paying job in the north and the better off. that's really interesting. there might be people suddenly moving now. i recommend the move, having done it. and a tremendous waste -- a tremendous waistcoat as well. in honour of waistcoat wednesday. sally is here with us. an unusual time. talking about the fed cup. today is a historic day in british tennis. the first time in more than a quarter of a century, britain is finally going to host the fed cup tie on home soil, spearheaded by british number one johanna konta they will play in front of an expected sell out crowd at bath university. they hope it will give them a chance of promotion into the world groups and inspire a new generation of young players. i had a chance to sit down with the team and learn some surprising facts about their team bonding.
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you are about to make history and play the fed cup on british soilfor the first time in more than a quarter of the century. how important is it to be on home soil? well, it's a fantastic opportunity for the team, really, to feel that home support, something we've never experienced before. and in terms of the fed cup,jo, experienced before. and in terms of the fed cup, jo, how important is it that it's seen on an equal footing with davis cup. it's really important, fundamentally i think young kids growing up, whether they are girls all boys, they want to play with equal opportunity so i think it'sjust a play with equal opportunity so i think it's just a great chance for both young girls and boys to see the fed cup in all its glory. and heather, we've been talking a lot recently about a mate of yours, andy murray, whose recently had his surgery. murray, whose recently had his surgery. we talked about serena
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being a role model. but he has been as much of a role model for the women as well, hasn't he? he's such an incredible player and champion. he's been very vocal as well of the court for a swim in and been super supportive. i want to know what you all think? we were just like to point out thatjoe did take naomi 0saka down in our last fed cup tie injapan so she knows how to beat naomi 0saka. injapan so she knows how to beat naomi osaka. waiters set me up next time. she has achieved a lot in the space of three months, as months, two—time grand slam champion, being the world number one. an incredible feat. but since there is a big change coming in women's tennis now? i hope so. we are doing our best. every day we worked just as hard as
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the man and i think it's a great opportunity price to show the public hardly work and getting to that home in front of the home crowd. i hope that inspires a lot of people. how do you wield that team spirit? the girls enjoyed a good singalong. karaoke favourites? sweet caroline. that's one of the best ones. all right, guys. good choice, sally. thank you very much. they look like they genuinely get on. they do. it's the karaoke. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. almost 155,000 of london's hospital admissions may have been linked to alcohol last year, according to new figures. a report by public health england reveals that ealing and brent were the london boroughs
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that saw the highest number of alcohol—related admissions, with numbers there rising year on year. the report also shows there were 2,a80 alcohol related deaths in 2017. richmond council will tonight consider whether to introduce an order banning protestors from outside a family planning clinic that offers abortions. if it goes ahead, it will be the second london council to introduce such a ‘buffer zone' after ealing introduced a similar banning order in 2018. the committee will decide whether to recommend if the the plans should go to a full council vote. battersea dogs home is urging people to think carefully before they get a dog after a rise in the number of french bulldogs being handed in.
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vets at the centre say that while the breed is one of the most popular at the moment, their flat—face means they can't breathe properly and owners can be unaware of the health problems they face. it's fairly typical of the dogs we are seeing at battersea now, it is having problems with its breeding, you can see why, its nostrils are quite restricted, its soft palate is overlong which is very typical and he has this little pouch of tissue at the back of the larynx. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads: in aldgate east — commercial street is closed northbound and down to one lane southbound. that's due to gas works. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning.
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we had some rain overnight which has left a damp feel to the morning but the rain has cleared to its largely dry with some bright spells, maybe even a sunny spell or two as well. we could get a spot of light rain or drizzle on the thicker areas of cloud. north and west, the cloud thinning and breaking so we might see little bit of sunshine at bistro time ahead of cloud the afternoon. temperatures today between 10 and a mild 12 celsius. 0vernight, this train tracks back northwards and we will see some more heavy and persistent rain arriving. it will gradually start to break up and fizzle out, still some showers in its wake, the wind will also strengthen. the minimum temperatures between a and 6 celsius. thursday could still get a little bit of light rain and cloud first thing but gradually that will start to clear, it will break up and we'll get some sunny spells. windy day for thursday but some deep low pressure tracks across the uk on friday bringing some very windy weather and potentially some spells of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: president trump themes his state of the union address on "choosing greatness", as he announces a second summit with north korea's leader this month. if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion, be in a major war with north korea. theresa may says she is seeking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop, ahead of talks with stormont leaders. lawyers say five men due to leave today on the first deportation flight to jamaica since the windrush scandal have been given a reprieve. in the next few minutes, the competition watchdog is expected to announce which hotel booking websites it believes are breaking
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consumer law, after concerns about misleading search rankings and pressure selling. today, great britain hosts the fed cup for the first time in more than a quarter of a century. i caught up with the team ahead of their first match to talk about how much the home crowd helps. good morning. for many of us it will bea dry good morning. for many of us it will be a dry day with some hazy sunshine, but there are some heavy showers in the north and the west and some rain across south—east. i will have more in 15 minutes. it is wednesday 6 february. our top story: donald trump has announced he will hold a second nuclear summit with north korea's leader, kim jong—un, later this month. the comments came during his state of the union address, in which he also appealed for a compromise with the democrats to build his border wall with mexico. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler reports. the president of the united states. it is a sign of the political state of this union that this address had to be delayed.
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democrats initially withdrew donald trump's invitation to speak, amid a partial government shutdown. we must reject the politics of revenge, resistance and retribution, and embrace the boundless potential of cooperation, compromise, and the common good. but, after two years during which some critics have called mr trump america's most divisive president, the reaction of many democrats was telling. mr trump invited as some of his guests the family of a couple allegedly killed by an illegal immigrant, an emotive attempt to get funding for his long—promised wall with mexico. i will get it built. this was a speech in which america came first, but mr trump made one significant international announcement, giving details
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of a second summit with the north korean leader. chairman kim and i will meet again on february 27 and 28 in vietnam. but mr trump needs to show he can build relationships in washington, as well as internationally. we have correspondents in washington and seoul this morning. we will speak to laura bicker in just a moment. but first, let's get reaction from our washington correspondent chris buckler. this is very much, isn't it, for an american audience. and what did he really wa nt american audience. and what did he really want the main message to be? yes, this is a precedent setting out his goals and achievements in front ofa his goals and achievements in front of a prime—time audience in america, which is covered by all of the main television networks here. and he was trying to present himself as a statesman, but in talking about north korea and setting up that
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second summit, but also in trying to push this idea that there needs to bea bi— push this idea that there needs to be a bi— partisan way forward, basically that democrats and republicans need to work together. if you listen to democrats, they will say it is all very well saying that. you need to actually show it. and truthfully, he talked about one of the most divisive issues here, thatis of the most divisive issues here, that is immigration and the desire for $5 billion to build the border wall, democrat say president trump was once again scaremongering about immigrants, talking about people being killed by immigrants, talking about the crime that results from immigration, and they would argue saying that he exaggerates that. as far as donald trump is concerned, though, he also recognises that he has to work with democrats going forward. 0ne has to work with democrats going forward. one of the most memorable moments of this entire speech actually involved some of those sitting inside congress, the new members of the democratic party, who have been elected to the house of representatives, women who sat together and who were basically all wearing white to show that they are
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in favour of women's writes in pushing for gender inequality. there was a significant number there, so significant that president trump himself had to reflect upon that. he has to work with them going forward if he is to achieve anything he wa nts. let's talk now to our seoul correspondent laura bicker. i know you are listening intently to mrtrump i know you are listening intently to mr trump overnight, how have his views being reflected where you are? i think when it comes to his claim that the us would be at war with north korea if it wasn't for him, there were a few eyebrows raised, because if you remember, the recent tensions were heightened on this peninsula was because of president trump's fire and fury rhetoric, and his warnings to pyongyang that he was willing to take any military options available. so that is why tensions were on the brink. however, when it comes to what president trump has done since, he has proved
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quite popular here in south korea, because they see him as an opportunity. they see these talks as an opportunity. the first summit in singapore achieved very little, really. the agreement was very vague, which meant the two sides who have had this stalemate for the last several months, and now there is a unique opportunity to try and change things. and one of the things they are looking forfrom things. and one of the things they are looking for from this side, certainly from here in seoul, is, is the us willing to offer a peace treaty? some kind of declaration to end the near seven—year war that has existed on this peninsula. good to talk to you, thank you very much. five men due to be deported to jamaica this morning have been granted last—minute reprieves to stay in the uk, an immigration lawyer has said. up to 50 people are believed to be leaving on a plane from an raf base later today, the first such flight since the windrush scandal. the government has defended its position, saying they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions, but a lawyer helping some of those involved told us earlier she has concerns over whether proper checks have been carried out.
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there's no—one place where anyone can go to and find out who are these 52 people, have they all been, you know, considered properly, do we know the facts and figures about them, and is there any way that these people should be given the right to stay in the uk? the prime minister is to hold talks with the five main stormont parties on the second day of her visit to northern ireland. she has suggested that she will be looking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop proposals from her brexit withdrawal agreement, which have long divided opinion. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page is at stormont for us this morning. chris, what sort of reception will mrs may get? well, i think, well, ithink, not forthe well, i think, not for the first time ina well, i think, not for the first time in a visit here, the parties will be trying to pull the prime minister in two different directions. this is the third time
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theresa may has come to northern ireland in the last seven months. the reason why she has been here so often, well, 2.5 years after the brexit referendum the process is still all about the border and the backstop, this insurance policy, if you like, designed to ensure there will never be any checks on the frontier with the irish republic under any circumstances, even if there is not a big free trade deal between the uk and the eu. yesterday ata between the uk and the eu. yesterday at a speech in belfast the prime ministers said she didn't want the backstop ministers said she didn't want the ba cksto p to ministers said she didn't want the backstop to be scrapped altogether, as some people had been arguing. she does, though, want legally binding changes to it, and in particular she spoke about mps' concerns that the backstop was indefinite in nature. in other words, it was open—ended. if it does kick in, nobody can be sure when or even if it will ever finish. as regards the two main parties here, they have two very different perspectives on it. sinn fein, the biggest irish nationalist party, say theresa may has acted in bad faith in wanting the backstop to
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be renegotiated. the dup say the backstop in its current form is unacceptable and has to be changed. thank you. the red carpet opening of liam neeson's latest film was cancelled last night amid a race row over comments he made in an interview. the hollywood actor sparked outrage after admitting he once wanted a kill a random black man after a friend was raped. neeson has denied he is racist and said he wanted to start a wider conversation about racism. council tenants in england, scotland and northern ireland owe local authorities more than £300 million in rent arrears, new figures show. that has risen by a quarter in just four years, and debt charities believe changes to the benefits system are to blame. the government says no one single factor is causing rent arrears to rise. it had all the hallmarks of a donald trump speech — a rallying call on immigration, a bold announcement on north korea, and some pointed remarks aimed at the democrats. but how has the president's state of the union speech been received in washington? joining us now to help answer that
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question is political analyst eric ham. lovely to speak to you. thank you very much for staying up and talking to us this morning. do you think... first up, i suppose generally, will it go down as one of his great speeches, do you think? some people are claiming that this morning. speeches, do you think? some people are claiming that this morninglj think it will go down rightfully as one of his longer speeches. this is a president who is very adept at knowing how to read a room, and of course being a master salesman, but u nfortu nately course being a master salesman, but unfortunately he has not learned the art of time, and i think that was one of the major downfalls to this speech, is again he set a record, breaking his record from last year in terms of the actual length and just how long it was. it was a laundry list of a number of different items. in terms of will it be remembered after today? very doubtful, i would say. and he talked
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a lot about the need to sort of reach across and talk amongst each other, and democrats and republicans coming together, which is something that... i would coming together, which is something that... iwould imagine coming together, which is something that... i would imagine you could argue that he hasn't been particular strong at during his presidency. you think that is genuine, or is he being pressured by those elsewhere in his party to make sure he talks about that? no, ithink in his party to make sure he talks about that? no, i think that is what makes this president so helter—skelter, so unpredictable. in fa ct, helter—skelter, so unpredictable. in fact, many people are watching because they are watching to see a car crash. so you have a president who opens the speech addressing this idea of unity and working across the aisle, and then there is a shot across the bow where he basically talks about investigations, they cannot be peace in legislation with warand cannot be peace in legislation with war and investigation. so i think that clearly got the ire of the speaker of the house, and many democrats i think rightfully took it as the president was suggesting that, if they continued or if they mmp that, if they continued or if they ramp up investigations of his
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presidency, of his administration, of his white house, that he will seek to actually not go along and support much of the legislation that will pass from the house of representatives. in terms of some of those big takeaway headlines, he clearly stated i will build the wall, but he also talked about north korea, which you mentioned a lot this morning. much work remains to be done, but my relationship with kimjong—un isa be done, but my relationship with kim jong—un is a good one. if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion, be in a majorwar with north korea. it isa it is a bold claim, isn't it, but he does have... diplomatically he has reached out where other presidents haven't. he has reached out were other presidents have not, but the united states was not on a wall
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trajectory —— war trajectory as it relates to north korea. typically what you see from most presidency is to ignore the north korean regime, but this president actually sparked and ignited a firestorm with back and ignited a firestorm with back and forth rhetoric with the robed leader, which had many thinking the united states was on the precipice of war. so what he did was he pulled the united states back from the brink, the brink which is where he actually took us. so again, you see on one hand this talk and discussion of unity, on the other hand, i think you see the president actually, you know, taking back a lot of goodwill that he himself has made an attempt to actually turn with working across the aisle. one other thing our viewers will spot this morning is quite a few female democrats wore white to honour the legacy of women's suffrage, and he actually mentioned that as well, and many people stood up when he talked about that. he did, and i thought he
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handled that very graciously. i think he was self—effacing, something we don't normally see in this president, i think he saw that asa this president, i think he saw that as a moment to honour himself, and you saw the women in the chamber ta ke you saw the women in the chamber take that moment to bask, and the historic moment that we see a number of women having won a number of seats in congress, and so i thought the president handled that very graciously. i thought he reached out, there was humour, and i thought it was a very touching moment that we saw from president trump. briefly, before we let you go, do you think this was a launchpad for the 2020 campaign?” you think this was a launchpad for the 2020 campaign? i think this was a launchpad to actually ensure that republicans come home and stay home for this president. thank you for your analysis of that state of the union address from president trump, which we will be bringing you throughout the morning. if you would like to know the headlines from it, we will have that for you later on. carol has the weather and she is
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a lwa ys carol has the weather and she is always incredibly accurate. there is wind? if you are travelling, some of us wind? if you are travelling, some of us will have gales. a chilly start in the north, not as cold in the south. southern parts of england, south. southern parts of england, south wales, mist and fog. equally, there is going to be a lot of dry weather around today and some hazy sunshine. this whether frontier has been careering southwards. it's all but cleared the far south—east but it's going to come back later and ta ke it's going to come back later and take another swipe at some rain in the south—east. you can see a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. showers across northern ireland and northern and western scotland. some of those today will be web —— evie. dry conditions in the north—east. it should drive across northern ireland. the same
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for northern england. for most of england and wales, looking at hazy sunshine. you can see the channel islands, the rain for you will be on and off as we go through the day. temperatures up to 11 in the south. nippy in the north. if we pick up this rain, this is our waving weather front across the channel islands. the how it progresses. across the south—east. at the same time, and you will weather front coming in from the west. the pennines, snowdonia for example. the northern half of the uk is going to be colder. also through this rain around. tomorrow, we start off with all this cloud and rain and hill snow. the course of the day, you
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will find it will slowly meander off into the north sea, leaving behind isa dry into the north sea, leaving behind is a dry day with a debit of sunshine. the other thing you'll notice about tomorrow's weather, it will be quite windier than it's been today. as we had on into friday, we do have a deep area of low pressure. you can see there is a lot of rain around it. wherever you are on friday, it's going to be windy. first of all, we've got the rain crossing us with some hill snow. that's likely to be heavy. the strongest gust of wind will be in the west with exposure, where we are looking at up to 70 miles per hour. gusts 60—60 miles per hour. these are disrupted gusts, if your travel
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plans on friday, make sure you check the weather forecast. it moves through during the course of saturday. it will still be quite windy on saturday, just not as windy. a lot of dry weather around. and we are casting our eye on what's coming to the south—west. six degrees in the north and ten in the south. we will see when half—an—hour. that is have a little look at the papers today. some of the front pages. the metro are leading on a court hearing into the death let's look at the papers, and the front pages of the metro of the metro lead with a death at a festival in dorset. the court heard her boyfriend, who denies manslaughter, filmed
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her as she was dying. the trial is ongoing. of force has literally run out of offices of a series of riots on the one day. the front page of the times, this is what it looks like. the times reports driverless cars could be used on uk roads by the end of the year. the paper also says that government ministers are planning to allow trials to go ahead without a human in control of the vehicles. and there's a picture of katherine clarke — one of the barclays bank staff killed in an avalanche in the italian alps on sunday. the daily mail has looked at official statistics which show that adults drinking over the recommended 1a units per week has dropped significantly. and pictured is the today programme presenterjohn humphrys, the paper reports that he is expected to leave the radio a show by the end of the year. i started my career at the bbc getting is breakfast. i'm talking
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out of turn. the front page of the telegraph. this makes your heart race of it, doesn't it? i have a recurring dream being attacked by a massive snake. 0h, recurring dream being attacked by a massive snake. oh, gosh. he heard the wildcat behind him and turned around, it pounced, tried to get on with its claws. he fended it off, jumped on top of the animal and u nfortu nately. jumped on top of the animal and unfortunately. then he managed to get hospital treatment. you could survive apparently. you could fight
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back and throw rocks, according to experts. people have fought back successfully with rocks, sticks and garden tools. it is also considered inadvisable to run and it can stimulate the wildcats in thing. the man who got his arm but not by a crocodile. so did back on. he told a set of the conference. he said it is the most amazing story he ever heard. that's awful. it's funny but really awful. anyway, 22 minutes past seven. you are talking about hotel bookings. there are ten people looking at this room right now. they are in trouble for that today.
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there are six booking websites. high profile firms expedia, booking.com and trivago are amongst firms who have pledged to stop using pressure selling tactics — and from making misleading discount claims. it's things like pressure selling, telling you that there is lots of people looking at this. they might be looking at it but on a different date. also, suggesting discounts might make it look better than they actually are, because again, comparing weekends to weekday prices. you might think you are getting a good deal. it might not be the best one. a lack of transparency in how they rank hotels. what's happening, some of them are paying commissions to be higher up the rankings. 0bviously commissions to be higher up the rankings. obviously as customers, we don't realise that, you can see some
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before others. and strategically placing sold—out hotels around the hotels. to make you think oh, i'd better book it quick. they are selling out in that area at that time. all of these things, that in doing an investigation for a while. you can't carry on like this. these companies are not necessarily doing all of these things. using these different strategies. now they've agreed to be more transparent. to tell you things, like not give false impression of availability on the rooms. also make sure the discount claims are clearer, make sure people understand how they rank the hotels as well. it's going to be really interesting today to see how the websites will look with these rules that they are bringing in. it makes you realise how hard it is to cut through as a consumer, find a decent holiday that you are not being drawn
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in. lots of people out there as well. trying to work out how to get us well. trying to work out how to get us to go to their hotel. even down to the colours they use. if the red colour comes up, to the colours they use. if the red colour comes up, we to the colours they use. if the red colour comes up, we need to deal with this. it's just all of the marketing. some of it, the competition in markets authority, they say it's not on and it needs to stop. he can obviously still go to the hotel direct. very interesting. recommendations of friends is always good. as long as it's not really rich people. i might have made that up. 25 past seven. still to come in the programme. frankly, you've got to be so ready otherwise you will be taken to the cleaners. sir kenneth branagh talking about how nervous he was working
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with his co—stars damejudi dench and sir ian mckellan in his new film looking at the life of william shakespeare. we'll have the full interview later. some real big heavy hitters there. it's a proper lineup. i talk to him about it and you can see that interview a little bit later. feels someone interview a little bit later. feels someone is talented as he is would be daunted about working with someone. be daunted about working with someone. lots of you i'm sure know this. but he did have a son called hamnett, they were twins, and he died when he was young. a lot of it is focusing on that. that comes into the discussion. i look forward to watching that later on. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. the investigation has been launched
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after a teenager was stabbed to death in walls he caught in battersea last night. he was treated by paramedics but died at the scene. two men have been arrested. almost 155,000 thousand of london's hospital admissions may have been linked to alcohol last year, according to new figures. a report by public health england reveals that ealing and brent were the london boroughs that saw the highest number of alcohol related admissions, with numbers there rising year on year. alcohol—related deaths in 2017. battersea dogs home is urging people to think carefully before they get a dog after a rise in the number of french bulldogs being handed in. vets at the centre say that while the breed is one of the most popular at the moment, their flat—face means they can't
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breathe properly and owners can be unaware of the health problems they face. it'ss fairly typical of the dogs we are seeing at battersea now, he's having problems with his breathing, you can see why, its nostrils are quite restricted, his soft palate is overlong which is very typical and he has these little pouches of tissue at the back of the larynx. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0nto the roads: in aldgate east — commercial street is closed northbound and down to one lane southbound. that's due to gas works. in battersea, westbridge road is closed following a police incident. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. we had some rain overnight which has left a damp feel to the morning but the rain has cleared so it's largely dry with some bright spells, maybe even a sunny spell or two as well. largely dry — we could get a spot of light rain or drizzle on the thicker areas of cloud. towards the north and west, the cloud thinning and breaking so we might see little bit of sunshine at least for a time ahead cloud increasing in the afternoon. temperatures today between 10 and a mild 12 celsius. 0vernight, this train tracks back northwards and we will see some more heavy and persistent rain arriving. it will gradually start to break up and fizzle out, still some showers in its wake, still quite cloudy and overnight tonight, the wind will also strengthen. the minimum temperature between a and 6 celsius. for thursday, could still get a little bit of light rain and cloud first thing but gradually that will start to clear, it will break up and we'll get some sunny spells.
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it's a windy day for thursday but a deep area of low pressure tracks across the uk on friday bringing some very windy weather and potentially some spells of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: donald trump has announced he will hold a second nuclear summit with north korea's leader, kim jong—un, later this month. the comments came during his state of the union address, in which he stated the meeting would take place over two days in vietnam. the two leaders first met for historic talks lastjune. mr trump said if he hadn't been elected, he believed the countries would be in conflict. much work remains to be done, but my relationship with kim jong—un is a good one. if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion,
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be in a major war with north korea. five men due to be deported to jamaica this morning have been granted last—minute reprieves to stay in the uk, an immigration lawyer has said. up to 50 people are believed to be leaving on a plane from an raf base later today, the first such flight since the windrush scandal. the government has defended its position, saying they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions. but a lawyer helping some of those involved told breakfast she has concerns over whether proper checks have been carried out. there's no one place where anyone can go to and find out who are these 52 people, have they all been, you know, considered properly, do we know the facts and figures about them, and is there any way that these people should be given the right to stay in the uk? the prime minister is to hold talks with the five main stormont parties on the second day of her visit to northern ireland. she has suggested that she will be looking to change rather than remove
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the irish border backstop proposal, which is designed to avoid a hard border with the irish republic after brexit. it is hoped mrs may can reach an agreement on the issue that has long divided opinion. the new york red carpet opening of liam neeson's latest film was cancelled last night amid a race row over comments he made in an interview. the hollywood actor sparked outrage after admitting he once wanting to kill a black person after someone close to him was raped by a black man. neeson has denied he is racist, and said he wanted to start a wider conversation about racism. we have been showing this picture, because we like them. play with me, play with me, play with me. do you like this, and very calm. ready?
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i've had enough. will you just... a hand in your head, and you are going to calm down. do you know, it works with dogs as well. it could be age, couldn't it? he has seen things, he knows how the world works, just... just calm down. just have a little sit there. while sally does the sport. a great evening of fa cup football last night, unless you are a middlesbrough fan. it had all the hallmarks of a classic cup upset — a raucous crowd, a muddy pitch, and filthy weather. so perhaps there was little surprise fourth—tier newport county knocked out middlesbrough. boro sit two leagues above county, but were well beaten thanks
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to a goal from robbie willmott and this one from padraig amond. newport will now play mighty manchester city next. it was a tense evening for newport keeperjoe day. not only did he have to keep middlesbrough out, his wife had gone into labour during the match. so at full—time, no hanging around to celebrate. he was straight off to the hospital. his boss said that was the fastest he has seen him run all season. brentford, qpr and wolves are also all through to the fifth round. by the end of today, manchester city could be top of the premier league. they go to everton later, a match rearranged from later in the month, and victory would put them ahead of liverpool on goal difference. manager pep guardiola thinks tottenham, chelsea and even manchester united could all still win the league. with 39 points to play, when you are 19 points behind, it's not — it's not much. i never said tottenham was not
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there, indeed chelsea. i never pulled out all five or six games, and united is making this run of victories every single week. we'll be there to fight for the premier league. the sister of missing footballer emiliano sala has posted a heartbreaking photo on social media of his dog, nala, waiting for him to return. the picture shows sala's rescue dog watching out for him, along with the message "nala is waiting for you too". sala was flying from nantes in northern france to cardiff with his pilot when his plane went missing in the english channel. the wreckage was found on sunday. from the dugout in manchester to the dock in madrid, it has been a tough few months forjose mourinho. he has admitted tax fraud in spain and will have to pay a big fine. he was actually given a jail sentence, for hiding earnings from his image rights, but in spain you can exchange short sentences for fines. the england women's football team will warm up for this summer's world cup by playing four friendly
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matches around the country. they are calling it the road to france series, and will see the lionesses face canada, spain, denmark and new zealand. junior tickets will only cost £1, if you fancy taking the kids. one of the greatest skiers of all time, lindsey vonn, is competing at her last tournament, the world championships in sweden. but it didn't quite go to plan in the super—g. vonn is retiring because of injury, and this crash wouldn't have helped. she did eventually ski down, but it is now touch—and—go whether she will be ready for the downhill on sunday. i feel like i've been hit by an 18—wheeler, but other than that, i'm great. my knees are the same as they were before the race, so that's good, and i'm just going to be really sore. i think my neck‘s going to be sore, and i got the wind knocked out of me, so my — i don't know, my ribs are oddly sore, so... but it'll be fine, sunday will be great. that really is a case of mind over
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matter. it'll be fine, she says through gritted teeth. it is so sad, the picture of sala... through gritted teeth. it is so sad, the picture of sala. .. and he was going back to france to put the dog in kennels to bring her over here, and rescued her in the first place, desperately, desperately sad. it is a big milestone in a child's life, learning to use a potty. but new research suggests that toddlers are being toilet—trained at a later age than in previous years. the national day nurseries association and eric, the children's bowel and bladder charity, say busy working parents put off potty training for as long as possible and miss signs that their child is ready to get out of nappies. it means a growing number are starting school still unable
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to use the toilet, as tim muffett reports. sometimes it's easy, sometimes it's hard. for samantha, potty training has been both. well, you're brilliant, aren't you? you always use the toilet and potty. and freya, we have had an absolute nightmare. freya is three, finlay is four, but for samantha, age is not an issue. i think it's because i'm a working mum, ijust missed that moment when she was ready. yeah, i tried to make herfit me, rather than me fit her. increasingly, nurseries are where a lot of potty training is taking place. two—thirds of staff from more than 200 nurseries have said in a survey that the age
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at which children are going nappy—free is going up. i think years ago, there was a lot more guidelines given, and parents were kind of sticking to those guidelines. but nowadays, parents are actually waiting to their children to show signs of being ready for it. i think for some children, it's quite confusing, if they've got pull—ups, and they're used to wearing nappies, it feels the same, really. sometimes in nurseries and other places i see children who get themselves into such stresses. that has negative impacts where the children can become fearful of using the loo. the first one, i was reading about all the cues and what happens, what are the signs of potty training. and as i've had more children, i've been very much busier. i'm just so busy to commit a week to potty—training her. the official nhs guidance on potty training acknowledges that some children find it easy, some children find it hard. setbacks are common,
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but a recent report by 0fsted has raised concerns. it says a growing number of children are starting school unable to use the toilet. children will show signs, but the important factor is that the parent or nursery needs to know when the signs are there. so once a child is doing one soft poo a day, and then nappy is dry for an hour and a half at the time, those are critical signs of potty training, and that's the time to start thinking about it. once it's done, potty training can soon become a distant memory. samantha has a message for all parents were not quite there yet. don't give up. there are a couple of times we thought we can't carry on with this. yeah, just keep going with it. that's brought back some memories. we're joined now by potty training expert amanda jenner and purnima tanuku from the national day nurseries association. and any parent will be remembering
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these days, and you have seen a real difference in the age that children are being potty trained. children are being potty trained. children are being potty trained. children are being potty trained much later that needs to be, 20 years ago. has it all down to busy life and putting things off which you are able to put off, and also i am sure teachers watching this morning are thinking this isn't a hard job, but they are looking up to children when they get to school —— looking after. looking up to children when they get to school -- looking after. there has deftly been a change in the shift where both parents are going to work, more children going into nursery schools all day. what about the nappies themselves? back in the day, they were quite different, won't they? yes, the technology of nappies is not helping, because they
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are not feeling the weather seymour, they are not noticing they have done something and they are happy to stay in it all day. that doesn't help at all. what are the sort of tell-tale signs that a child is ready to start potty training? i think children have to be ready physically and emotionally as well. first of all, they need to be able to sit steadily and safely, and sometimes parents can pick up the behaviour, sometimes they want to pull up their nappy, and go. in the nursery, nursery staff work closely with parents, and thatis staff work closely with parents, and that is the most important thing, a partnership between staff and pa rents to partnership between staff and parents to work together to get them to train. but they have to be ready, and what we don't want is more pressure on parents, and they lead very busy lives. equally, staff needs to understand when a child is ready as well. and presumably because somebody might have a different decision at home than a nursery might have, do nurseries discuss that? they do, because
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nurseries have key workers, and they are attached to specific children. they can actually discuss with pa rents they can actually discuss with parents in terms of what the routine is at the nursery. sometimes when a practice that at the nursery, when they actually go home at the weekend, they may be a way, they may be on holidays, so those routines do get disrupted. that is why it is important for them to work together. we have both passed through the potty training phase without children, which is good news. two questions i had this morning, how much fluid should children be drinking? how many cups of water? because quite a few studies when you look at them, parents don't know how much water they could should be having. it is important because a lot of parents say we are reducing their liquids, so five to six cups a day, it is hard chasing your toddler to try and get them to drink sometimes, but it is so important we keep theirfluids sometimes, but it is so important we keep their fluids flushing through. if you stop, then obviously it can cause other problems as well. so it is really important to keep them
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hydrated and keep those fluids going. i know toddlers can be a bit difficult sometimes, trying to get the fluids in them, but it is really important, so about five to six. and i know you help parents all the time, and we talk about the child being ready, and there is no quick fix, iam being ready, and there is no quick fix, i am sure, otherwise we would all do it, but what are your top tips? really important, like we were just saying, that they've got to be ready. you can't force toilet training ona ready. you can't force toilet training on a child. if you think they are getting near to four years old, and they are starting school, then you can speak to a health visitor. there are loads of places you can contact. but definitely top tips are putting on a nappy, stopping in their tracks, being able to communicate with you is really important as well. and then when they have actually done something in their nappy and sitting on it, being changed, they are starting to notice their bodily functions, which is really important. and presumably, you know, if a child is going to school, school—aged children, it can have quite an impact on them if they
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are not. yes, i am seeing a lot of that, a lot of worried parents contacting me. a huge increase in children going to school with pullups children going to school with pullu ps underneath a children going to school with pullups underneath a uniform, which is just terrible. it is terrible for the child, hard for the teacher, it is also hard for the parent as well, maybe they have started too early, they have regressed, and then they have just had to send them to school ina have just had to send them to school in a pullups are having accidents during the day. quite a few people getting in contact, sarah saying daughter was a nightmare because we waited too long. long. scarlets saying all mine were potty trained by 11 months. and hanna says as soon as they can walk, get them on the potty, pull some —— pour some apple juice on it, and prearranged applause. i think we used to use chocolate buttons. absolutely, it
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was a rewarding, not putting them in the toilet. i think there is a lot of support when it comes to things like breast—feeding, but when it comes to potty training, there is an enough support. and what we are doing is notjust doing a survey, but helping nurseries and parents with resources, like policy on potty training and some training. so i guess, yes, talk to your friends as well. work together, help each other. collaboration. carol is with us this morning. this morning, some in the north, it's a cool start of the day. a marvellous start here as well. we have some mist and fog and the dregs of some rain that has been crossing the uk through the night. behind it, hazy sunshine and a few showers. this is the culprit. it's been moving steadily south—west woods. almost cleared the south—east. it's going to way back into the south—east through the course of the afternoon.
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a breezy day in prospect especially around the channel islands. showers continuing across the north and of scotland. heavy and thundery with hale, wintry on the hills. the showers easing across northern ireland. you can also catch one or two. the bulk of england, wales and northern ireland into the afternoon, dry with some hazy sunshine but the channel islands you still have that rain. through the course of the evening and overnight, the rain in the channel islands spreads that bit further northwards. meanwhile, a new system coming in from the west. but the clouds, rain and hill snow. there was cross and northern ireland in scotland and north wales. in the northern half of the country, it's going to be a cold night. in rule areas, temperatures will fall. also
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the risk of ice. 0nce areas, temperatures will fall. also the risk of ice. once again, on untreated surfaces. tomorrow we start off with that band of cloud and rain. also the hill snow, continuing to edge off slowly into the north sea. as it does so, skies brightened behind it. once again, a peppering of showers in the west but it's going to be windy. now talking of wind, we will get towards this area of low pressure. as it comes across us, area of low pressure. as it comes across us, it will bring not only rain but some very strong winds, gales, especially with exposure in the west but still very windy wherever you are. carol, thank you very much. some serious wind on the way. in the last half—hour the competition watchdog has announced it's secured a victory for holidaymakers forcing a number of online hotel booking sites to change their practices. expedia, booking.com
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and trivago are amongst firms who have agreed to change their ways. steph can tell us more. they have agreed to these new rules around how they actually promote their hotels. let me tell you a bit more of the details. expedia, booking.com, agoda, hotels.com, ebookers and trivago have now agreed to stop using pressure selling tactics and stop making misleading discount claims. they've also agreed to always display the total amount a customer has to pay upfront. michael grenfell is executive director, enforcement, at the competition and markets authority. i was talking about this earlier, lots of different examples of where basically, these hotel booking sites are misleading customers. can you tell us a bit about what you found? you are exactly right. we investigated six of the biggest hotel booking sites in britain and we found a number of practices that people who use those sites weren't
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being told the whole truth, were being told the whole truth, were being misled. let mejust being told the whole truth, were being misled. let me just say straightaway, a lot of us use these sites. they are extremely useful and convenient. you can compare prices. you can get good bargain sometimes. and so for example, sometimes we found that you were told the price but it turned out that there were hidden extra charges which were compulsory like city taxis or resorts fees. you are told a discount or it wasn't all that it seems. you are told messages about room availability and scarcity, like only two rooms that. that meant only two rooms at that hotel on that that 15 people are looking at that room and it didn't mean right now, it
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meant over the past week. it's very important that people should be able to trust those sites. i'm really pleased to say that those big six sites, including those names that you mentioned, they have today given us you mentioned, they have today given us formal commitments that they will make sure there are no such misleading practices and people can trust those sites. it's all very well to get these formal commitments but shouldn't they be in more trouble? well, the late works, we don't have the power to impose fines. what we do have the power to do is, if we find there are breaches of consumer protection law, to investigate them and it misses three, to go to court and it misses three, to go to court and take legal proceedings to enforce them. some of your viewers might know that recently, we took action against some of the secondary booking websites and one of them, viagogo, that didn't give us
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commitments, we secured a court order. in this case, it is always open to us to secure a court order. i'm pleased to say the six sites concerned cooperated with us may have agreed to give us these formal commitments. those were the biggest sites. we are also writing to the other sites to cover the whole market to tell them that this is the position, we expect them to comply with the law. and if people are not fully compliant, by the first of september, it remains open to us to ta ke september, it remains open to us to take legal proceedings. michael g re nfell tower take legal proceedings. michael grenfell tower thank you very competition in michael grenfell thank you very much, competition in markets authority. the discounts they tell you about. it will be more transparent now. thank you to those who got in contact with others. if anyone knows their william shakespeare
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inside out, it's sir kenneth branagh, who returns to the silver screen with his film all is true. it takes us through the bard's retirement years in stratford—upon—avon, and stars sir ian mckellen and dame judi dench. and when i met him, sir kenneth confessed to me he was a bit nervous about keeping up with his impressive co—stars. kenneth branagh, welcome to brea kfast. kenneth branagh, welcome to breakfast. we are here to talk about your film all is true, which i've seen your film all is true, which i've seen and i came out that filmgoing, which bit is true? i didn't know it misses terribly ignorant, he had a son who died called hamnett. his son died at 11 years old and even though the infant mortality rate was diet —— was high at the time, it makes no difference to a family that loses a child like that and he, in his life and work, that loss haunts him. went to london and became this great
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writer with a wife at home. you hardly hear. to us, you are a guest. good night, husband. apparently, when somebody phoned up danejudi dench, and you asked her, she said yes, i will do it, whatever it is. she said that with the petrol by coming down to see me. what she the script? what was the reaction? someone who subsequently said, you are doing the film about canon. she likes surprising people. people found that unusual. this strip casting in television has mostly had that equation the other way around. to turn it upside down to what was a genuine disparity in age but it also proves, i think, genuine disparity in age but it also proves, ithink, in genuine disparity in age but it also proves, i think, in life and in art,
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there can be, it's not a cliche, a timeless vitality and people. judy has that. she has that ageless quality. the youthful quality. age isa quality. the youthful quality. age is a non— issue. quality. the youthful quality. age is a non- issue. when you think about shakespeare in this country, you think about mail actors. we both play together in this. what was that like for you? it was impossible then, henry the, i asked to be in it. it was impossible, he said no. it was a long—time ambition to do something with him. people like ian and judy are ready like thoroughbreds —— thoroughbreds to be up thoroughbreds —— thoroughbreds to be up and you have to be so ready or you will be taken to the cleaners. 0ne you will be taken to the cleaners. one of my favourite scenes is when
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he meets a super plan.|j one of my favourite scenes is when he meets a super plan. i don't have a favourite play, i admire all my dramatist is equally and i think all females should be allowed, as is the practice on the continent.” females should be allowed, as is the practice on the continent. ijust wanted to ask how you knew. knew what? everything. what is the super than question to you? is gilderoy lockhart still imprisoned somewhere in hog warts? did i get back from dunkirk eventually? was i as miserable as wallander was? those are miserable as wallander was? those a re really miserable as wallander was? those are really good questions. you are brilliantly miserable. i loved sweden, i loved that sweden and the wonderful poker—faced humour. they ta ke wonderful poker—faced humour. they take the mickey out of you ten minutes before you know why but i loved it. lovely to see you, thank you so much. really, thank you so much. i'm going to ask that
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question. what is the super than question. what is the super than question to you? he is so watchable. the film is in cinemas this weekend. plenty more between now and 19. good morning from bbc london news, im charlott franks. an investigation has been launched after a teenager was stabbed to death in in battersea last night. he was treated by paramedics but died at the scene. two men have been arrested. almost 155,000 of london's hospital
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admissions may have been linked to alcohol last year, according to new figures. a report by public health england reveals that ealing and brent were the london boroughs that saw the highest number of alcohol related admissions, with numbers there rising year on year. the report also shows there were 2,a80 alcohol related deaths in 2017. a public consultation is currently underway into plans to drill four new oil wells at a site in surrey. two wells have been drilled and tested at horse hill in recent years and the company behind it, believes its possible to extract 500 tonnes of oil a day for up to 20 years. the consultation closes on the 18th february. battersea dogs home is urging people to think carefully before they get a dog after a rise in the number of french bulldogs being handed in. vets at the centre say that while the breed is one of the most popular at the moment, their flat—face means they can't breathe properly and owners can be unaware of the health problems they face. it's fairly typical of the dogs we are seeing at battersea now. he's having problems with his breathing, you can see why, its nostrils are quite restricted, his soft palate is overlong which is very typical and he has these little pouches of tissue at the back of the larynx. let's take a look at
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the travel situation now. 0n the tubes the circle line is part suspended and the district line has severe delays. 0nto the roads: in aldgate east — commercial street is closed northbound and down to one lane southbound. that's due to gas works. in battersea, westbridge road is closed following a police incident. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. we had some rain overnight which has left a damp feel to the morning but the rain has cleared so it's largely dry with some bright spells, maybe even a sunny spell or two as well. largely dry — we could get a spot of light rain or drizzle on the thicker areas of cloud. towards the north and west, the cloud thinning and breaking so we might see little bit of sunshine at least for a time ahead of cloud increasing in the afternoon. temperatures today between 10 and a mild 12 celsius. 0vernight, this train tracks back northwards and we will see some more heavy and persistent rain arriving.
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it will gradually start to break up and fizzle out, still some showers in its wake, still quite cloudy and overnight tonight, the wind will also strengthen. the minimum temperature between a and 6 celsius. for thursday, could still get a little bit of light rain and some cloud first thing but gradually that will start to clear, it will break up and we'll get some sunny spells. it's a windy day for thursday but a deep area of low pressure tracks across the uk on friday bringing some very windy weather and potentially some spells of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: president trump themes his state of the union address on "choosing greatness", as he announces a second summit with north korea's leader this month. if i had not been elected president of the united states, we would right now, in my opinion,
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be in a major war with north korea. theresa may says she's seeking to change rather than remove the irish border backstop ahead of talks with stormont leaders. lawyers say five men due to leave today on the first deportation flight to jamaica since the windrush scandal have been given a reprieve. expedia, booking.com, and trivago are among the booking sites who have been told to stop pressure selling and misleading customers. i'll have more in a moment. today great britain hosts the fed cup for the first time in more than a quarter of a century. i caught up with the team ahead of their first match — to talk about how much the home crowd helps. good morning. for many others, it will be dry today with hazy sunshine but there are showers in the north and west and although the rain is clearing in the south—east, it is coming back later. i'll have more 15
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minutes. and we'll bejoined by the hairy bikers as they hit the road to cook up a storm on their uk tour. it's wednesday, february 6th. our top story: donald trump has announced he'll hold a second nuclear summit with north korea's leader kim jong—un later this month. the comments came during his state of the union address, in which he also appealed for a compromise with the democrats to build his border wall with mexico. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler reports. the president of the united states! it's a sign of the political state of this union that this address had to be delayed. democrats initially withdrew donald trump's invitation to speak amid a partial government shutdown. we must reject the politics of revenge and retribution and embrace the boundless potential of
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cooperation, compromise and the common good. but after two years, during which some critics have called mr trump america's most divisive president, the action of many democrats was telling. mr trump invited as some of his guests the family of a couple allegedly killed by illegal immigrant, an emotive attempt to get funding for his long promised wall with mexico. i will get it built. cheering this was a speech in which america came first, but mr trump made one significant international announcement, giving details of a second summit with the north korean leader. chairman kim and i will meet again on 27 and 28th february in vietnam. but mr trump needs to show he can build relationships in washington as well as internationally. we have correspondents in washington
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and seoul this morning. we'll speak to laura bicker injust a moment, but first let's get reaction from our washington correspondent chris buckler. i'm sure people are picking out their individual responses, but how do the speech go down? this speech was really intended for the american public and is given prime time and covered by all of the main us television networks, and this was president trump trying to present himself as a statesman, trying to change the way he has been talking over the last two years. he's really going into the second half of this presidency and he says he wants to try and have some better relationship between republicans and democrats, and it's important in this pitch for greatness by the country as he was giving that the two sides work together. and of course there was an element of that details of the summit being given and which was 20 give that
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statesman—like approach as well, but then again if you listen to the democrats they say that they listen very carefully to his speech and the issue of immigration he was very clear. he is still demanding that $5 billion for a body well, and he was still scapegoating some immigrants. as far as they're concerned, his words need to be met by actions. thank you. let's talk now to our seoul correspondent laura bicker. laura, mr trump made it clear he thinks his election stopped a war between the us and north korea. is that how things are viewed there? well, i think analysts here will say, hang on just well, i think analysts here will say, hang onjust a second. it was president trump himself who was threatening to rain down fire and fury. however, he does get a lot of credit here in south korea for starting up talks with kim jong—un and for bringing him to the negotiating table and for bringing north korea to this point. when it comes to a second summit, there are several things we are looking out
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for. what exactly is north korea prepared to do. since the last summit in singapore lastjune, very little to place. there was a very vague agreement. so this time many people will be looking for details. what exactly is north korea prepared to give up, and what is the us willing to give in return. what other people have said here in seoul is some kind of end to the korean war. they are helping these talks are assigned that sometime down the road there will be a declaration to end at work. —— to end that war. five men due to be deported to jamaica this morning have been granted last minute reprieves to stay in the uk, an immigration lawyer has said. up to 50 people are believed to be leaving on a plane from an raf base later today — the first such flight since the windrush scandal. the government has said they are all foreign nationals who have criminal convictions. ben ando reports. 0wen haisley, known as dj mad rush, is well—known in manchester for his music and his work with young people.
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he arrived in britain aged four in 1977. his children are british. but he was told he would be put on a deportation flight to jamaica, but his lawyer now says he's off the list. 0thers taken of the controversial flight include three men who witnesed the death of another inmate here at morton hall immigration centre in lincolnshire, and are needed to give evidence at the inquest. another is a former soldier suffering from post—traumatic stress disorder. it would be breaking the law. in the commons, the home secretary said the uk borders act is clear. foreign convicts must, by law, be deported. the home office says everyone on the plane is a foreign nationalfrom jamaica. but some are questioning their definition of foreign nationals, saying they could be british if it wasn't for problems with their paperwork potentially caused by the home office.
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there's no one place where anyone can go to and find out who are these 52 people, have they all been, you know, considered properly, do we know the facts and figures about them, and is there anyway that these people should be given the right to stay the uk. a5 are still set to fly. campaigners are urging the government to suspend all such deportation flights until the conclusion of the report into learning the lessons of the windrush affair. the prime minister is to hold talks with the five main stormont parties on the second day of her visit to northern ireland. she's suggested that she'll be looking to change, rather than remove, the irish border backstop proposals from her brexit withdrawal agreement, which have long divided opinion. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page is at stormont for us this morning. chris, what sort of reception will mrs may get? well, i think not for the first time here the parties will be trying to
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pull the prime minister in different directions. this is theresa may's third visit to northern ireland in several months. she has been here so often because two and a half years after the brexit‘s referendum the process is still all about the budget and the backstop. this insurance policy, if you like, which is designed to guarantee that they will never be any checkpoints on the frontier between here and irish public under any circumstances, even if there isn't a big free trade deal between the uk and the eu in future. now, yesterday the speech in belfast, mrs may said she didn't wa nt belfast, mrs may said she didn't want the backstop to be scrapped altogether, she wants changes to it. in particular she spoke about the concerns mps had expressed about the backstop having no end to it. nobody could be sure when it would come out of the backstop arrangement. the dup says she should stand strong in brussels and argue for changes to the withdrawal agreement. sinn fein have already accused her of huge act of bad faith in wanting those
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changes. thank you very much. you'll speak to you later on. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a 19—year—old was fatally stabbed in south—west london last night. emergency crews were called shortly after 8 o'clock following reports that a teenager had been attacked in battersea. a 19—year—old and a 27—year—old man were arrested after handing themselves in at a central london hospital. both men are now being questioned. council tenants in england, scotland and northern ireland owe local authorities more than £300 million in rent arrears, new figures show. that's risen by a quarter injust four years, and debt charities believe changes to the benefits system are to blame. the government says no one single factor is causing rent arrears to rise. it's been confirmed the oscars ceremony will take place later this month without a host for the first time in 30 years. the comedian kevin hart stepped down in december, after apologising for homophobic comments he'd made a decade earlier. the network that hosts the ceremony, said it would instead have various celebrities presenting the trophies.
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11 minutes past eight. it's wednesday morning and we will turn toa wednesday morning and we will turn to a story that we have spoken about a lot in the last 2a hours. the actor liam neeson has sparked a race row after making comments about once wanting to kill a black person after someone close to him was raped by a black man. last night, a red carpet event for his new film was cancelled amid outrage over the comments he made during an interview. he appeared on good morning america programme to explain his comments. would you have had the same reaction if it had been a white male? oh, definitely. if she had said an irish or definitely. if she had said an irish ora definitely. if she had said an irish or a scot or a briton or a lithuanian, i know! or a scot or a briton or a lithuanian, i know i would have had the same effect. i was trying to show honour to my and stand up for my dear friend, show honour to my and stand up for my dearfriend, in show honour to my and stand up for my dear friend, in this terrible medieval fashion. and i'm a fairly intelligent guy, and that's why it
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kind of shocked me when i came down to earth after having these horrible feelings. luckily, no violence occurred ever, thanks be to god. that was liam neeson explaining his comments on good morning america. we're joined now by kehinde andrews, who's a professor of black studies at birmingham city university. what are your thoughts? well, it ta kes a what are your thoughts? well, it takes a lot to shock me but this was actually horrible to hear a hollywood actor talking about wanting to kill a black person and what he's talking about is lynching and there have been thousands of black people in america who have been lynched because the same accusations. it is horrifying the way this glibly comes out of his mouth. i am not sure glibly is the best way to describe it. he talked about the fact that it was a0 years
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ago. he also said that... he was appalled by the way that he felt and he was an angry young man and he has processed that anger and he has tried to deal with it and there are a lot of people out there this morning and in the last 2a hours saying that he is giving an honest opinion and now he is being torn to pieces. how do you react to that?“ we put it in the context of what he actually said, a0 years ago i went out to lunch a black person. the fa ct out to lunch a black person. the fact that he never saw a black person is irrelevant. that is a crime. that is serious. he didn't say the word lunch. but that is what we are talking about. the dialogue and this is wrong. that is a lynching. and this is a country where thousands of people were lynched. next month, we are having a celebration to commemorate that issue. so for someone to say that they were going to commit this kind of racial violence and because he says he grew from it this is somehow 0k, chose the lack of seriousness with which we take racial violence in this country. we talk about sex
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abuse and other scandals, this is a crime, going out armed to go and find someone to kill is a crime. prison is what you would usually do, andi prison is what you would usually do, and i don't why we are saying it is 0k and i don't why we are saying it is ok because he came tojesus a bit. in the good morning america interview, he did also say that he wa nted interview, he did also say that he wanted to kind of open up the discussion about racism, which he certainly has. if your discussion about racism opens up about a0 years ago wanting to lunch a black man, i don't think that is the kind of dialogue we need to have and honestly really is this terrible way that we understand racism in this country is that back in the day it was this kind of overt violence and then people learned and became sorry about it and now it is ok. he also said this was not because of race. this is maddening. if he was a white person, i would this is maddening. if he was a white person, iwould have this is maddening. if he was a white person, i would have done the same thing. that shows a level of ignorance i don't think we can tolerate. he didn't use the word lunch. they are your very powerful words that you are imputing to him
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and he did not say that. can i also play a clip from john barnes who disagrees with you. he was speaking yesterday to a tv audience and this is what he had to say about what liam neeson said. the reason is not talking about black people. he is talking about black people. he is talking about black people. he is talking about revenge. listen to the context. he is talking about the film revenge that he made. the woman asked him about his revenge and he is talking about northern ireland and how revenge is never correct and he went on to talk about the troubles and he given example of when he felt like revenge. he is not coming to talk about black people. he is talking about an incident when he wanted to take revenge on someone. he wanted to take revenge on someone. a friend of his was raped and that rape happened to be a black person. he was not talking about black people. he was talking about how revenge is wrong and he also said that he was wrong in the way that how he felt about black people. i was wrong, and i was horrified. so he is making a very passionate
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defence of liam neeson, saying it was about something different. well, i think that is really the problem. he is talking about this and defending him. what you are describing and use can say it is my words, but if you go out to murder a black person because of someone that raped someone, that is a lynching, and so the idea that this wasn't about race and isn't about race is madness. his comments afterwards have actually made it far worse because it has shown just how ignorant years of his actions then and his actions now. you think he has done a greatjob of moulting this film? i think we're talking about it, but i think the backlash should be quite swift and the african—americans are a big movie audience and i know that black twitter has been very clear that he is cancelled now. so i think it has properly had a negative impact. do you think yet should apologise? he has not apologised. he has clarified. dealing apologise —— my teething apology would help?”
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clarified. dealing apologise —— my teething apology would help? i think it is too late. and also the kind of violence is talking about is very ha rd to violence is talking about is very hard to apologise for. this is historic abuse. when you're talking about historic abuse, someone can come and say sorry and that is it. have you seen his films before?” actually liked him. you think you will watch his films again? no. this isa will watch his films again? no. this is a thing in hollywood of having some actors. the film taken looks very difficult now because it is about foreigners coming and stealing his home and to start a. good to talk to you. thank you for your time. fascinating. thank you very much for your time. 70 minutes past eight. should we get the weather? it is going to be windy. that is right. 0n is going to be windy. that is right. on friday. good morning, everyone. we have some hazy sunshine. we have lost all the snow. we have got some
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rain. we have got some showers in the forecast. so let's put it altogether. what we have festival is this weather front which has been pushing south—eastwards and taking its rain with it. it is clear now but still the channel islands. it is a waving front, so later on it will come back and take another swipe at england, bringing more rain. mistan fog in the south which will linger and over the channel islands. a lot of dry weather with hazy sunshine and showers in the north and the west. some showers will be heavy and some will have hail and thunder. 12 celsius in london, seven celsius in the north. through the evening and overnight, we have all of this rain coming back in across the south—east. we also have a weather front coming from the west, introducing rain and also hail snow, not just introducing rain and also hail snow, notjust in introducing rain and also hail snow, not just in scotland introducing rain and also hail snow, notjust in scotland but also in the hills of northern ireland, north wales, and northern england. where the temperature false low enough, we
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are looking at touch of frost with the possibility of ice on untreated surfaces. tomorrow, we start off with all of this rain and hail snow slowly pushing off into the nazi, leaving brighter skies behind, once again with some hazy sunshine. a peppering of showers across the north and west. tomorrow it will be windy so some showers will blow further east. temperatures not quite as high for some others as they are going to be today. 6—10dc. thursday night into friday, this deep area of low pressure is coming our way. it is going to introduce rain, but look at the isobars. where we have the centre of the low pressure, it will not be as windy but as it crosses the winter will pick up. if we deal with the rain, you can see how it will be moving steadily north—eastwards as we go to the course of the day with some dry slots in between. we look at the gusts of wind, we are looking at 77
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mph gusts. 0n the west, we are looking at about 70 mass per hour. as the low pressure continues to push north—eastwards through the day, later on the winds with exposure across western scotland will also pick up. inland, we are looking at 50—55 mass forever. these are damaging gusts and could lead to some disruption. to keep in touch with the forecast, especially if you are travelling. thank you very much for that. we will see you a little bit later on. 0h, oh, that was carroll coughing. 0r carol. she obviously needs a cup of tea. crime rates, property prices and transport links are all things people often consider before moving to a new area. but how do these differ for young people?
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the radio1 newsbeat team has been looking into what matters to people under the age of 26 — and it's factors like the number of bars and clubs in an area and ag coverage. it's launched a calculator so you can rate your area, as daniel rosney explains. esme's 18. she's a home carer and lives in bridport, west dorset. it's one of the bottom five areas to live in britain if you're under 26. that's what this new bbc analysis suggests. people tend to retire in towns like bridport, which is why there's a demand for carers like esme. i've seen a few documentaries and stuff about people living in cities and it's just they meet up with their friends and they can just go out and do whatever, whereas when i was growing up, if i wanted to meet one of my friends, then our parents had to drive us to each other‘s houses and we had to wait there because there's no way you could walk there, and as soon as i learned to drive, that's when i could actually do stuff for myself. there's only so many words you could use to describe dorset. it's so simple. everyone knows each other. everyone grows up with each other. if you do something stupid,
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then the chances are that someone will find out about it and tell everyone else, and i think that you can't really do much unless you can drive. i want to leave, and i don't mind coming back because i love it here, but i don't think i could just stay here forever because i think i need something to mix it up a bit. this analysis covers local authority areas in england, wales, and scotland. it looks at 11 factors for under 26—year—olds including the number of bars, clubs, and music events, as well as access to sports facilities and ag. average rent prices and levels of unemployment are also used. 60 miles away from bridport is bristol. and that's one of the top five areas for serving its younger population, according to this research. sham describes himself as a proud bristolian, born and bred. every corner that you go to has history about it, has some sort of culture about it and has something unique, and it's just so
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nice because everyone here has a different background and a different story about them and i just love that about bristol. esme plans to move to gloucester in september to study nursing, but for her west dorset will always be home. an interesting idea. and we'rejoined now by newsbeat‘s ben mundy to explain more. just tell us which places came out highest. the top five were three boroughs in london, westminster, islington and camden. 0utside boroughs in london, westminster, islington and camden. outside of london, bristol, cardiff, and then in the bottom five we are looking at places like west dorset, aloe dale. we're not saying that those places bad places to live. it is just those factors. some people who live there will love those areas. we will be hearing from someone later on today
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who is a bbc introducing artistic lives in west dorset and she says it is just the lack of live music venues which is the problem for her in that area but it is a beautiful pa rt in that area but it is a beautiful part of the country to 11. you have got this information now. how might people best use that? there are two ways to use it. you can find it online. you can search for your area by doing a postcode search but also you can put in the things that you wa nt you can put in the things that you want out of your area and it gives you the best suited place to live, seek and find this just by searching online on newsbeat. it's a wonderful piece of genoa and that brings together newsbeat‘s storytelling but also bbc information. what factors we re also bbc information. what factors were most important? you can talk about music venues and sports facilities. what were you struck by, what they were concerned with? i think the ag coverage is so important to an under 26—year—olds. but also from our newsbeat audience,
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we no that factors like health services and sports facilities and busesis services and sports facilities and buses is one of the 11 variables we looked at because of public transport in some of these areas. and that is why probably the three london boroughs look quite good because of the transport links, but if you move outside of london buses become extremely important, know that. i suppose it does show you the differences in how you judge where you live and what you do depending on your age and what you have got used to as well. yes, this is why thatis used to as well. yes, this is why that is important to the under 26—year—olds because there are at a stage in a life where they're having to make really important decisions whether that is where they are going to rent or which university they are going to and so the calculator is a really useful tool. it might be interesting to do it for different age groups as well because you might find that it is completely different. it is not restricted. go and look at it now and check it out. it is just useful and interesting to see how your area ranks. where i
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grew up doesn't rate too well, but i kind of know that, but i wouldn't change it for the world. it's a great place. even my mum couldn't survive without ag these days. she's a silver surfer. it is nice to see you. thank you very much indeed. you can find that h on the bbc news website. it is good to go and find out how your place of residence rates. coming up, we have hairy bikers and also kenneth branagh. i don't know if you know, but louise has met sir kenneth branagh. she has mentioned it about 12 times. that interview is coming up later. it is a really good one. i'm kidding. news, travel, and weather wherever you are and we will have the headlines and if you minutes. this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock.
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some wet and windy weather for the end of the week but for today it will be mostly dry, hazy sunshine across many parts. there are some shower to contend with and those are mainly down towards the south—east of england through this morning. showers across northern ireland and the north and west of scotland. a bit of fog in the south—west but for many, it will be dry. some sunny spells. but some further rain spreading into the south—west later on. maximum temperature is getting up on. maximum temperature is getting up to about nine to 12 degrees. the rain will turn heavy towards the south—east overnight tonight. and then a band of more persistent rain spreads through northern ireland, through wales and northern ireland and across scotland, over the high ground there will be some snowfall which could be a bit heavy. mostly frost free night, temperatures dipping down to two to a degrees in the south. during thursday, we will
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have the rain across northern parts of england and scotland initially, it will break up into some showers and clear way. there could be some snow into the higher ground. on thursday dry fall many with sunny spells, any showered in the far south—west coast, western areas of england wells and scotland. the end of the week, we have an area of low pressure developing and moving across the uk. look at the isobars, close together. particularly windy conditions with heavy rain spreading its way right across the country throughout the day on friday. there could be some temporary snow over higher ground of scotland and northern england. but the wind, all of us seeing gusts of a5 to 55 miles an hour but around coastal areas, the hills in the west, the winds could be up to 70 mph, leading to some disruption. but i'll stay, maximum of ten to 12 or 13 celsius. this is business live from bbc news
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with ben thompson and sally bundock. the us president trumpets his economic achievements in his state of the union address. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 6th february. in his state of the union address, donald trump describes the us economy as "the hottest in the world, period". fact or fake news? we'll examine the claim. also in the programme. six online hotel booking sites agree to major changes to end misleading sales tactics and hidden charges, following a uk investigation. and markets were on edge for any surprises in president trump's speech.
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