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tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  February 7, 2019 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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you're watching bbc news at nine, with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: theresa may travels to brussels, where she'll press eu leaders for legally binding changes to the brexit deal. lam in i am in brussels, where in one hour's time, the prime minister will begin three vital meetings as she tries to persuade the european union to change tack on brexit. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn has written to theresa may, setting out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. search crews recover a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the cardiff city footballer emiliano sala and his pilot, david ibbotson. police investigating the disappearance of hull student libby squire arrest a 24—year—old man. no phones at meals or bedtime — new advice to parents to protect children using the internet and social media, from the uk's four chief medical officers. the cost of energy is set to rise for 11 million customers after the regulator,
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ofgem, raised price caps. the average user will pay nearly £120 more a year from april. and in sport, we'll have the latest on the outbreak of equine flu, which has led to the cancellation of today's horse racing meetings in britain. hello, very good morning to you and welcome to the bbc at nine o'clock. theresa may has arrived in brussels to tell senior eu officials that she wants changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement — negotiated over the past two years — with just 50 days to go until brexit. the prime minister will tell them that the uk won't be "trapped" in the backstop —
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the guarantee that would prevent the return of border posts in ireland if there's no trade deal. her visit is being overshadowed by the comments made yesterday by the president of the european council president, donald tusk. he said there was a "special place in hell" for those who campaigned for brexit without a plan to deliver it. well, mrs may is due to meet mr tusk, as well as the european commission president jean—claude juncker and other seniorfigures today. meanwhile, labour leader jeremy corbyn has set out five demands for his party to support a brexit deal — calling for them to be enshrined as objectives in domestic law. let's go to brussels now, and ros atkins is there for us. good morning. well, theresa may arriving in brussels in the knowledge that the eu has said, again, that it won't reopen individual agreement. again, that it won't reopen individualagreement. if
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again, that it won't reopen individual agreement. if not that, then,is individual agreement. if not that, then, is there anything for eu can do to help her sell a deal? well, i think everyone has been focused on those comments by donald tusk and the special place in hell phrase which has prompted a huge reaction. in that same statement, he reiterated the fact that the eu is open to finding a way of guaranteeing peace on the island of ireland and of finding a way for the uk to leave the eu, but in a way that maintains the current status of the irish border. so there was a message in amongst that statement is that they are still open to talk about this, but they are not quite sure what the uk is suggesting. and those three meetings you are referencing earlier, they will be theresa may's first opportunity in brussels for a few days to explain to them in detail what she is suggesting. we will have to see how those meetings go. once again today, we are seeing the politics of brussels and westminster becoming com pletely
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brussels and westminster becoming completely intertwined. so before i give you more from the eu's perspective in brussels, let's bring ourselves up—to—date from westminster. what can theresa may achieve when she returns to brussels today? the pm knows she needs significant changes if she's to have any chance of getting a deal through parliament. the eu, though, continues to say it won't revisit the legally binding part of the brexit deal. and yesterday, the european council president wasn't mincing his words. i've been wondering what that special place in hell looks like for those who promoted brexit without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it safely. that provoked some anger at home. the man has no manners. i think it's extremely regrettable, not at all helpful, but it's a matter for him. but amidst the controversy, europe was making clear it isn't budging for now. i'm repeating myself by saying we are sticking to the line. the prime minister knows her trip
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here will not be easy, but she does say she wants to work with europe to find a solution. but what about working with labour too? jeremy corbyn has set out five demands that could see his party back a brexit deal. they would involve a closer relationship than the pm is planning. and he wants further talks to discuss them. today marks exactly 50 days until the uk is due to leave the eu. we're still working out exactly what that will involve and it's proving far from simple. nick eardley, bbc news. so behind me in brussels is the european commission where theresa may will be arriving in under one hour to meetjean—claude juncker. it is fairto hour to meetjean—claude juncker. it is fair to say there is no one in the bbc who goes to and watches more eu meetings that adam fleming, is that a reasonable claim? my collea g u es that a reasonable claim? my colleagues work pretty hard as well! three meetings, run us through them and which ones we should be focused on. the first is with jean-claude juncker, the president of the european commission, that is the
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organisation that has run the brexit talks on a day—to—day basis. then she will go to the european parliament, ten what —— a ten minute walk that way, she will see the president of the parliament and the european parliament point man for brexit. they get to have a vote on the final deal as well and it does not go through unless meps approve it. and the last meeting of the day is in that building over there with donald tusk, the president of the european council he represents the 27 heads of state. we were both up bright and early in brussels before most others got in and i walked in and he said, keep your expectations low. yes, sorry, both the uk and the eu are telling us to not expect a big breakthrough today. from the uk side, theresa may wants to explain her interpretation of the various votes that have happened in westminster, her vision for getting the deal through parliament, which involves changes to the withdrawal
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agreement, the legally binding divorce treaty, and changes to the irish backstop. she is very much focused on the backstop because of that brady amendment which she and parliament supported last week, is the european union happy to accept those terms that it is the to occur it needs to focus on? the eu has so farsaid it needs to focus on? the eu has so far said there will be no changes to the withdrawal agreement, the legally binding divorce treaty which includes the backstop. that does not mean they are not open to more instruments and letters which interpret and clarify that in train —— their intentions with the withdrawal agreement, although they have done that already with a letter to the theresa may and a communique in december. is there more they can do along those lines? they have a com pletely do along those lines? they have a completely different diagnosis for the problem at westminster. they think the way to get the deal through is not by changing the backstop or the withdrawal agreement, it is changing the direction of the future relationship. they think there is a
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sta ble relationship. they think there is a stable majority in westminster where a closer future relationship stable majority in westminster where a closerfuture relationship between the uk and the eu than the one theresa may has pursued. they would like theresa may to turn away from her eurosceptic colleagues in the conservative party and the democratic unionist party and forge a cross—party coalition in favour of a cross—party coalition in favour of a closer future relationship, a cross—party coalition in favour of a closerfuture relationship, that is how they see the deal getting through but not how theresa may sees the deal getting through. a quick word about donald tusk and his special place in hell comments, he knew that would cause albums, did your colleagues welcome that intervention in brussels? donald tusk has done them a favour in saying something a lot of them find quite unsaleable and they say, maybe i would not have use that language, but they did not have to because donald tusk has done it for them. he has been frustrated about brexit for a long time and even though the place in hell gets all the headlines, the most meaningful thing headlines, the most meaningful thing he said yesterday was that he has given up hope of there being another referendum in the uk that could
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reverse this process. in his heart of heart, hoping against hope, that is what he was wanting and he has given up on that now. thank you very much for that, adam. i am lots of other bbc colleagues in brussels will be watching this very closely and we will answer questions on twitter and reporting on the bbc news channel. three big meetings and immediately afterwards, we expect the eu to brief us on how they went so we the eu to brief us on how they went so we should get a feel of what theresa may asphalt when she sat down with presidentjean—claude juncker, antonio tajani and president tusk. definitely a day to watch closely what is happening in brussels. thank you very much. time to catch up with developments here. back at westminster, the leaderjeremy corbyn has set out five demands for his party to support a brexit deal. in a letter to the prime minister, he said labour wants a uk—wide customs union, close alignment with the single market, "dynamic alignment" on rights and protections, "clear commitments"
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on participation in eu agencies and funding programmes, and "unambiguous agreements" on the detail of future security arrangements. let's go live to westminster and our assistant political editor, norman smith. good morning, norman. some labour mps none too pleased about this. they sayjeremy corbyn is not acting like the leader of the opposition and is giving theresa may a big helping hand, how do you assess the significance of this letter?|j helping hand, how do you assess the significance of this letter? i think it is reach out to mrs may. it is a diving down of some of the rhetoric and a to mrs may's deal. and it is and a to mrs may's deal. and it is an awfully long way from where mr corbyn was a few weeks ago, demanding a general election, refusing to meet mrs may. and certainly, the tone of the letter, it talks about the need for
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flexibility and compromise and how he is willing to take a constructive approach and how he is looking forward to further discussions with mrs may. and in terms of the detail, yes, it restates some of labour power smack red lines, but they refer to the future declaration —— labour's red lines. in other words, the eventual exit deal in years to come, not the withdrawal agreement thatis come, not the withdrawal agreement that is in the firing line at the moment. and amongst labour remainers, it has provoked fury, they believe mr corbyn is running up they believe mr corbyn is running up the white flag. chuka umunna said, this is not opposition, it is the phyllis —— the facilitation of the deal. what do mr corbyn's supporters say? listen to barry gardiner. what we're trying to do in the letter, i think, generally, is trying to set out what we believe is needed to make a success
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of brexit and to move on from the present impasse. it's really trying to set clarity about our future relationship with the european union. is it different from the six tests? look, it's not about tests now. what we're doing is saying, we believe that these are the options that are available that would actually secure a majority in the house of commons. and there is no mention in the letter of a second referendum. or indeed the previous suggestion that any deal mrs may secured would have to ensure exactly the same benefits as we currently enjoy in the single market. that is gone. so are the tories likely to welcome the suffer from mr corbyn? well, this was the cabinet office minister david lidington speaking on the wireless this morning. i will be saying to labour, look, what is it that you don't like about what's in the political declaration at the moment? because what we have there is an idea for a customs
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arrangement with the european union which still allows us to have an independent trade policy on top of that, but while getting access, er, tariff—free, quota—free for our goods and services, goods and agriculture, to the european markets. i'd be asking what on earth they mean when say that they want to be in a customs union with the eu but, also, for britain to have a say in eu trade policy with other countries. that's not something that's allowed under the european treaties. so, this seems to be wishful thinking. so, you know... but let's get down and have those talks with them. so commit mr corbyn perhaps waving a bit ofan so commit mr corbyn perhaps waving a bit of an olive branch in the direction of theresa may. significant of course what impact that will have in future votes, could it perhaps give those labour mps in leave supporting the feeling that perhaps it would be ok to vote with the government because mr corbyn is not quite so dead set against mrs may's deal? 0k, norman,
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interesting developments, thank you very norman smith. a vote that could prevent ramsgate reopening as a ferry port in the case of a no—deal brexit is due to take place today. the government handed seaborne freight a £118 million contract to run a service to ostend, in belgium, under contingency plans to alleviate any delays at dover. but thanet councillors in kent are considering cuts to port spending that would make roll—on, roll—off services impossible. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may is travelling to brussels, where she'll press eu leaders for legally binding changes to the brexit deal. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn has written to theresa may — setting out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. and in other news, police investigating the disappearance of hull student libby squire arrest a 24—year—old man. in the sport, manchester city have
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wiped out a seven deficit in just over a month, their 2—0 win at everton takes them top of the premier league above liverpool for the first time this year, but they have claimed a game more. rangers move above aberdeen in the scottish commissioner, alfredo morales gets his third red card of the season against the same team whilejermain defoe polishes things are. all british horse racing meetings have been cancelled because of an outbreak of equine flu, three vaccinated horses tested positive for the disease yesterday. more on those stories later. air accident investigators have recovered a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and his pilot, david ibbotson. the light aircraft was found on the seabed in the english channel near guernsey on sunday, two weeks after it disappeared
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on a flight from france to cardiff. the body has not yet been identified, asjon donnison reports. three days after being spotted in the wreckage of the small plane, investigators say a body has now been recovered. the air accident investigation branch has not said whether it's that of emiliano sala or his pilot, david ibbotson. specialist underwater equipment was used to locate the body, which will now be transferred into the care of the dorset coroner for formal identification. but the plane is lying under more than 60 metres of water, and investigators said difficult weather conditions meant an attempt to recover the wreckage failed. and the aaib says with the forecast poor for the foreseeable future, it has now taken what it called "a difficult decision" to bring
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its operation to a close. tributes to emiliano sala, who had onlyjust signed for cardiff city, have continued to be made, but it's emerged that his former club — nantes, in france — has demanded city pay a $15 million transfer fee for the player. a source at cardiff expressed surprise that the demand was made as efforts to recover and identify a body were continuing. jon donnison, bbc news. let's get more now on theresa may's trip to brussels, where she is to tell senior eu officials that she wants changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, negotiated over the past two years. legally binding changes. we are joined from athens by esteban gonzalez pons, an mep who sits on the committee on constitutional affairs (os) backin back in 2017, you said that they
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come in the uk, is wrong if it thinks that europeans prefer good a fight to a good agreement. do you think it is still possible at this stage, with the brexit date so close, to get a good agreement? yes, there is no other option. i mean, we will have to work at the very, very last minute, but a hard brexit is not acceptable. i think it is not a cce pta ble not acceptable. i think it is not acceptable for the uk, but it is also not acceptable for the european union. we have been through many yea rs union. we have been through many years very, very, very close friends and we will still be brothers after brexit. no deal brexit is not a cce pta ble brexit. no deal brexit is not acceptable in any case. brexit. no deal brexit is not acceptable in any caselj brexit. no deal brexit is not acceptable in any case. i know you have spoken about your belief in the solidarity of europe and that brexit will be on the wrong side of history, i think was the phrase used, but what more can the eu do to
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facilitate a deal, given that theresa may is obviously having significant difficulty commanding a majority for any deal in the house of commons? we have to understand that we have a different view about brexit. on one side and the other side. i think theresa may should come to brussels with an offer. we know what the british politicians don't want. but we don't know what they want. we need a clear offer from the british government. and on the other side, the european union has to understand this is not only union issue, this is also a uk issue. and we have to understand what are the reasons for the brexit? and we have to understand the british government situation. is that your view that that has been a problem all along, there has not
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been a clear position put forward by the uk about what exactly it does want? i mean, i am missing a political approach in the negotiations. i think the european union has arrived as far as it was possible and the uk has also arrived as far as it was possible, and 110w. . . as far as it was possible, and now... i mean, we need pro—european point of you to solve this situation. i hope that we will find a solution. i wish we find a solution. i don't want the uk to leave in a bad manner. you said at the beginning of this conversation that a no deal scenario can't be allowed, but we see the solidarity with the rest of the eu and ireland. and if a deal cannot be reached that ireland is happy with in terms of the border between the republic of ireland and northern ireland, can
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you envisage a situation where there will be no deal? yes, that can happen, always can happen. that is pa rt happen, always can happen. that is part of life. i come from spain. it suffered a lot during the last yea r‘s suffered a lot during the last year's in the basque country. the thing that we should avoid at any case is a hard border between ireland and northern ireland. after that, we as the european union don't wa nt that, we as the european union don't wantan that, we as the european union don't want an open door to the single market. so having these two things and understanding the position the uk holds, i am sure that we are the politicians that we want to be, then we should find a solution. of course, a bad scenario, a bad end a lwa ys course, a bad scenario, a bad end always has to be on the table and we should avoid it. that is the worst for the future of the uk, the future
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of europe and of course for the future of the relationships, the relationship between the uk and europe. two parts that only can be joined. thank you very much for your time today, a spanish mepjoining us from athens this morning. thank you very much. a 24—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of abduction in the connection with the disappearance of libby squire. the university of hull student has not been seen since leaving a nightclub in the city last thursday night. police says finding ms squire remains their top priority. our correspondent, katy austin, is in hull. is there anything more you can tell us is there anything more you can tell us at this stage about that arrest? well, today, we are entering day seven of the search for libby squire and there is an update, but it is not the update family and friends of libby will be hoping for, the news that a 24—year—old man was arrested in hull last night on suspicion of
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abduction. libby has not been seen since thursday night, she was out in the beverley road area of hull and her disappearance has sent shock waves through the city and the student community in particular. we have seen a gathering at the university of hull this week where hundreds turned out to express their solidarity in the search to find her. libby's parents have also issued an emotional appeal this week saying how much they miss her and appealing for any information. we understand they have been informed about the arrest that people have made and that a 24—year—old man remains in police custody for now, but police say their efforts really remain on trying to find libby squire come up with concern for her welfare growing all the time. thank you for that update. from hull. energy companies have been given the go—ahead to increase gas and electricity prices for customers on standard variable rates. the energy regulator, ofgem, raised the price cap by more than 10% because the wholesale cost of gas and electricity has gone up. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz.
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11 million people like jackie, from south manchester, are on the expensive standard variable prices, which are capped. to her, it makes no sense that a cap on gas and electricity costs can be raised. in my mind, if somebodyjust says to me, we're capping your price, i would think well, that's great, i don't have to worry about it, i don't have to think about it. but it isn't, is it? it isn't true. but ofgem will reset the cap every six months, causing worry in stockport, nearby, about coping with higher bills. we spend a ridiculous amount, to the point where we were struggling at one point, and we couldn't even afford it, could we? no. because of that. but, no, i don't think they should be put up. it's ridiculous, theyjust keep on and on with this. it'sjust crazy, you know, i... and this changing your supplier all the time, we shouldn't have to be doing that. gas and electricity bills, it's a massive issue for us
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here in stockport. .. steve, from citizens advice, accepts the explanation that world energy prices have gone up, but warns about the impact. the choice between food and heating often then comes back. if you haven't got a lot of disposable income, you're going to have to make a choice, a difficult choice, to either put the heating on or put food on the table, potentially. to customers, the idea of a price cap that can be lifted seems unfair. it looks like they're having to pay more so that the supplierss profits can be protected. there is a way out — to shop around for a cheaper deal, which is what jackie's already resolved to do. simon gompertz, bbc news. well, ofgem chief executive dermot nolan told the bbc that the change reflected the underlying costs of energy. what i can assure to all your listeners and all your viewers is that the price that is changing is only a fair and efficient price. it reflects the true and underlying costs of supplying energy which,
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unfortunately, have increased. but i can absolutely promise that there will be no profiteering by any company in this, and people will feel that they are paying a fair price for their energy. our business presenter, dominic o'connell, is here. interesting that he is saying consumers shouldn't think that energy companies will be profiteering around this. and it is true, isn't it, the big energy suppliers have tended to group their pricing around that cap that has been set? it is a bit too early to say that for sure, but which the consumer group did look at that. the price cap has only been in place since january and has already been changed and it will be changed every six months, or it could be. which? said it looks like the big energy companies were groping in and around that price cap, which puts the onus on ofgem to set it in a way they
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will not profiteer from. ofgem says it saves on average about £70 a year from that average customer. he pays under this cap a national average, that means you are using gas and electricity from a single supplier and have an average rate of use, they are putting that up by £117, going up to 1224, it could go down again in september because wholesale prices are falling. let's talk about something happening later today, the bank of england announcing its latest interest rates decision and also giving its quarterly inflation report. i guess interest rates, we would be surprised if they shifted? everybody would be extremely surprised if there was any movement, the base rate is three quarters of a percent at the moment and is really not expected to change. the interest is in what they are saying in the inflation report about the health of the uk economy. yes, economic growth. in the last report, they say
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the uk will go about 1.7% this year and they are expected to get —— to downgrade that certainly buy a couple of percentage points. and there will be big interest in what marked —— mark carney says about brexit and i can forecast in the papers there will be a lot of gloom about brexit headlines. you have looked in your crystal ball, thank you very much! in a moment, the weather, but first, let's join victoria derbyshire to find out what she's got coming up in her programme at ten. good morning. good morning. we will talk in—depth about your children and their mobile phone use. for the first time today, official guidance on social media and screen time has been issued by the uk's chief medical officers. follow this advice of getting your children to have good sleep, to eat properly, to get exercise, be safe, have family time, share sensibly, then they will be
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all right. however the evidence base develops. in the studio, as you can see, we have brought together teenagers, parents, experts and social media influences. we will get their reaction to the new guidance and we will ask if the government should be doing more to protect young and vulnerable uses of social media. and let's know your reaction to this official guidance for the very first time today, jonas at ten o'clock. thanks, see you soon. now it's time for a look at the weather carol kirkwood. good morning. a very windy morning across parts of england and is, the wind moderating as we go through the morning. but friday and saturday, very strong winds and the risk of disruption so if you are travelling, keep up—to—date with the forecasts. with strong winds, we also have a band of rain and hill snow which pushes into the north sea leaving dry and sunny conditions behind and
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a packet of showers into the west, some of them blowing in the wind towards eastern areas, likely to be heavy with hale and thunder and wintry in the scottish hills. an early frost across eastern scotland and north east england big —— before low pressure and north east england big —— before low pressure comes and north east england big —— before low pressure comes in from the west introducing cloud and rain and by the end of tonight once again commit the end of tonight once again commit the wind strengthens towards the west with exposure. these are the temperature values to expect. tomorrow, heavy rain moving across all areas. the risk of flooding across north west scotland, gusts of wind with exposure in the west and south, up to 70 mph. even england, 45-55 south, up to 70 mph. even england, 45—55 mph. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: theresa may is travelling to brussels where she'll press eu leaders for legally binding changes to the brexit deal. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn has written to theresa may
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setting out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. and in other news — police investigating the disappearance of hull student libby squire arrest a 24—year—old man. search crews recover a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the cardiff city footballer emiliano sala and his pilot david ibbotson. no phones at meals or bedtime. new advice to parents to protect children using the internet and social media from the uk's four chief medical officers. the cost of energy is set to rise for 11 million customers after the regulator, ofgem, raised price caps. the average user will pay nearly £120 more a yearfrom april. and we'll be finding out why edinburgh could become the first place in the uk to charge
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a tourist tax. the uk's four chief medical officers have issued their first advice on the use of screens and social media by children and young people. they have urged parents to put their children's phones outside the bedroom at night, to ban the devices at meal times and never assume a child is happy to have their photo published online. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. learning about internet safety starts early. important lessons for these liverpool primary school children around information and identity. all: let's start with c. the dos and don'ts of the online world. all: consent! the issue of consent is one of the areas covered by new advice from the uk's chief medical officers. it includes talking about safely sharing photos and information online, keeping phones out of bedrooms to help you sleep,
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and taking a break to get moving after a couple of hours on screens. advice designed to help parents navigate their way through a new and unfamiliar landscape. the advice we give is based on strong evidence about good, healthy development of children and young people. why have we given it, related to this issue? we have a careful discussion among the chief medical officers, and we believe that we should adopt in this country a precautionary approach to protecting our children. how to police and balance their children's use of screens can be a challenge for many parents. so, for mum kate, any guidance from experts is welcome. ifeel like, being a parent, you're constantly learning and informing yourself and getting the best advice you can. so i think that's enormously helpful. i can imagine for some parents they'd feel like they're just being told what to do, and they feel they've got it sorted, and they might resent that. but, personally speaking, yeah, i'm really glad somebody‘s going to give me a bit of input there. the advice also contains a voluntary
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code of conduct for industry, something that will no doubt be explored when health ministers meet bosses from instagram later today. dominic hughes, bbc news, liverpool. with me is the pyschologist and ambassador for the online safety organisation, internet matters, doctor linda pa padopoulos. good to have you with us, this is significant because it's the first official advice to parents about their children's use of mobile devices, social media, etc. parents know children should not be online too much but it's useful sometimes too much but it's useful sometimes to have guidance, specific tips. too much but it's useful sometimes to have guidance, specific tipsm is. this is such an interesting area because for parents, they have an idea of what their kids should eat, how much exercise they should do, but because kids are growing up with social media it's constantly changing and there are questions of how much is enough? what kind of
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platforms are ok? we are finally getting clarity. of course we don't have a smoking gun, a link between a certain amount of time on social media causing vest, but there is good common sense advice you had in your report. things like having a balance in life, sleep, eat, move, that's so important. of the phrase common sense is that's so important. of the phrase common sense is very that's so important. of the phrase common sense is very important because as you say, professor dame sally davies, says a review of evidence has not proven a link between the use of social media and put a mental health and i have noticed interesting comments online this morning from some people are saying where is the evidence. but it's common sense isn't it? children need to do other things and learn how to interact socially at meal times and not have their face stuck on their phone. it's notjust about time spent online it's time spent doing what online? if your child is
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spending an error and a half at night setting up a go find me page to help a friend, great. if they are spending an hourand to help a friend, great. if they are spending an hour and a half online looking at images which are unhealthy, then clearly that's not 0k. unhealthy, then clearly that's not ok. so it's absolutely about ensuring you are not spending too much time online but also the time you're spending you are spending well. i think it's these more nuanced discussions we need to have. from the perspective of internet matters what does the organisation feel about the responsibility of social media companies towards young users? we know the health secretary is talking to instagram today on the subject. at internet matters we feel there needs to be a different starter of help and that with the child, the parent, the home and the school, but the internet companies need to pitch in as well. is the will is there or are these internet
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companiesjust will is there or are these internet companies just seeing what they think people want them to see?|j don't think it is in their interest to not address this. i think there isa to not address this. i think there is a genuine will. the motivation hotly co m es is a genuine will. the motivation hotly comes from a good place, i don't think they are out to do any harm but the harm comes in we don't look at these things. we are seeing them look at these things more seriously. snapchat is still a child, facebook as a teenager, these are young companies. as we get information on what we want from these giants is to listen and respond and i think this is the first step towards that. thank you very much for your thoughts. the city of edinburgh is about to decide whether it should become the first place in the uk to introduce a so—called tourist tax. the plan is to charge an extra £2 per bed per night in hotels, b&bs and hostels. our scotland correspondent, james shaw, explains. arriving in edinburgh, the scottish capital and one of the hottest
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tourist destinations in the uk. it seems to get more popular every year. but what difference would a tourist tax make to the cities appeal? i don't see how it's going to encourage more tourists coming into the country because scotland, the uk, beautiful country but if there is more tax and the accommodation will be more expensive then i think it will definitely discourage more people from visiting the country which is a shame because it's such a beautiful place here. there are strong arguments for and against. visitors and residents acknowledge that something needs to be done, but is this the right way to do it? well i would hope the council would think about spending it on keeping the streets clean. that's terrible. a tourist tax? there is a lot of culture, they offer a lot for the people. so it's good to pay for it. do you think it would discourage people coming to your city? yeah, i think it would,
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definitely. but council leaders think there may be no other way to cope with the costs which mass tourism brings to the city. it's about how we make sure the city continues to function through the relatively organised chaos the festival becomes and makes it in but at the most vibrant place on the planet in august. it's looking at how people get around the city, making sure they are safe, making sure residents are not having to deal with the consequences of enhanced times on public transport and all those kinds of things and make sure the city continues to function. i am from london. some visitors will be more able to pay than others and there is a concern about the impact for young travellers on tight budgets. you just want to make our voice heard at a hostel specifically. the two tax per person per booking will disproportionately affect hostel guests. people who tend to travel on
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a budget, for us it's a 20% increase and that needs to be clarified. the tourism tax will not be enforced for a while. the scottish parliament still needs to pass legislation but many cities will be watching the progress of this new attempt to make mass tourism sustainable. and, james is in the city for us this morning. when are you expecting the decision? we expect the decision sometime after 11 o'clock this morning, that is when the council will vote and it looks highly likely it will pass, all the parties apart from the conservatives look to be on board. but the conservatives are not the only people who have concerns, we are joined only people who have concerns, we arejoined by gary only people who have concerns, we are joined by gary clark from the federation of small businesses, what are your members think of this proposal? we have asked small
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business members in edinburgh about this tax and consistently over the past few years they have said they are against, large numbers, three quarters of them, are against this tax. they are worried notjust quarters of them, are against this tax. they are worried not just about the administrative impact on the businesses themselves but also the wider economic impact this could have on the city. there is a problem in edinburgh isn't there? anyone who has been in edinburgh in the middle of the summer the centre can be gridlocked, it's hard to have a normal life in edinburgh when the festivals are on. is there an alternative answer? we are fortunate to have a great attractive destination for tourists from across the world and across the uk. that is to be celebrated. tourists come here and spend about £1.4 billion every yearin and spend about £1.4 billion every year in the city. what we don't want to lose some of that investment going into businesses and jobs across the city. 35,000 jobs in edinburgh supported by tourism,
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which grow that sustainably rather than driving some of it, some of the job site. but it does leave the question of what to do about the problems as well as the good things tourism brings to edinburgh, you are simply saying you think there should be an alternative solution and this is not the right way to deal with the problem? i tourism tax is hitting particularly small businesses hard at the time they can least afford it. there's a degree of uncertainty in the sector going into brexit and everything the summer might bring. this is the wrong time to look at a tourist tax which would cost businesses and cost tourism. thank you. it's clearly a controversial issue, not everyone agrees and it will be some time before a tourism tax comes into force in edinburgh, perhaps in 2020, if everyone agrees, or maybe a bit later than that. thank you james in
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edinburgh, said site a subject that there will be continual disagreement about. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh ferris. starting with the equine flu outbreak causing a lot of concern. all british horse racing meetings today have been cancelled because of an outbreak of equine flu. let's get more on this with our corrrespondent cornelius lysaght. what has happened? a number of positive tests for equine influenza confirmed from horses that had worryingly been vaccinated against it. they were from a stables which sent out runners at ayr and ludlow yesterday and this surprised shutdown affects full fixtures which was announced in a pretty dramatic late night statement from the british horse racing authority last night. it's not fatal, it's described as similar to that of a nasty case of flu in a human but it's highly contagious and the
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authorities are supervising swabs of horses from the infected stables to decide what to do next. what are the implications? we understand what is happening today but perhaps more long—term? happening today but perhaps more long-term? the actual answer is we do not know, an important fixture due to take place at newbury on saturday and we are only five weeks away from the cheltenham festival. think of it like this, if it was a school, and there was a serious case of flu, hundreds of children might be affected, they go home and get back to normal but here we have horses which travel around the country, thousands of them, connections between horses in different stables which gets connections to a third stable, so it's a far bigger thing, runners yesterday from ireland as well as the uk. at the moment they are hoping that with the swabs coming back from the concerned yard today that the best case scenario is they will not be too many serious
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repercussions and it will not be right the way through the yard otherwise they will have to work out what to do in all the other yards which could effectively be affected. thank you, cornelius. the premier league has new leaders but it's a familiar name. manchester city have gone top for the first time this year. they scored an injury time goal in either half to win 2—0 at everton last night. aymeric laporte opened the scoring with this header on the stroke of half time. they had to wait until the 97th minute for the second with gabrieljesus sealing victory. city have played a game more than liverpool but move above them on goal difference. top of the table, we have to wait, liverpool go to old trafford and if they win we are not top of the table, we have an important game, now we have another tough game against chelsea without much time to prepare for it. it's nonstop. in
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many things we were solid and good game. and the latest twist in the title race dominates the back pages of this morning's papers. starting with the telegraph — city storm back to top is their headline. it was just over a month ago liverpool had a seven point lead. the sun — lap top: aymeric powers up city title bid. with quotes from goal—scorer gabrieljesus saying it's really, really important to be top. the guardian — storming back to the top. city have never won back to back pl titles and play chelsea next. it took extra time before brighton booked their place in the fifth round of the fa cup. they're only the seventh premier league team to get this far, less than half of those remaining. brighton came from behind at west brom to keep it level after 90 minutes. then glenn murray was the hero — he came off the bench to score two goals to give them a 3—1win
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and a match against derby in the last 16. rangers striker alfredo morelos was sent off for the third time this season against the same team but they still moved five points ahead of aberdeen following a 4—2 victory in the scottish prmeiership at pittodrie. morelos had already scored twice before getting involved in a tussle with scott mckenna. both were shown red cards. jermain defoe scored then scored the fourth in injury time for rangers who are second in the table. so morelos sees red again against a team who plays in red. match of the day have tweeted the story. the colombian has actually been sent off four times this season overall but he has scored 23 times. now, if running one marathon is hard, try running seven in seven days across seven continents. that's the world marathon challenge and the women's record for the event has just been smashed by britain's susannah gill after the event finished a few hours ago in miami.
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i haven't got used to the fact that i haven't got used to the fact that i haven't got used to the fact that i haven't got another race to plan. for the last week every time we have finished one race it's about trying to find a shower, get warm clothes on and start travelling to the next race and suddenly i got a chance to sit down and think about things so it's quite nice. i think it will sink in eventually. don't forget to stay tuned to bbc news for all the latest sport over the course of the day. and on sportsday at 6:30 we'll have live build—up to the continental cup semifinal between arsenal and manchester united. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 1115. breaking news, figures released by the office for national statistics seeing the number of fatal stabbing is across england and wales without its highest level ever recorded last year. this detail coming in from our home affairs correspondent danny shaw who says the figures for the 12 months ending march 2018 sure there
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we re months ending march 2018 sure there were 285 killings by a knife or sharp instrumentjust were 285 killings by a knife or sharp instrument just to were 285 killings by a knife or sharp instrumentjust to repeat, the highest number since the home office murder index began in 1947. these details are contained in an analysis of murder and violent crime. the rise in cases of murder and manslaughter in recent years has been most pronounced in male victims and those in younger age groups. a baby girl who made medical history after being born with her heart outside her body has finally been allowed to return home after spending 14 months in hospital. vanellope wilkins‘ rare condition was first diagnosed in pregnancy and her parents were told she had less than a one in ten chance of survival. our health correspondent rob sissons has the story and a warning that his report contains images of vanellope just after her birth. vanellope, born with one of the world's rarest conditions. she's the little girl who defies the odds, surprises the experts and always amazes mum and dad.
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she really is incredible. she's enough to melt all your blues away, isn't she? she's a fighter, she's proved it. and she still continues to fight, so we will. it's such a special time as they prepare to go home for good after 14 months in hospital. they've only done short trips until now, and are getting ready to take over much of her care. it's a bit like, whoa, it's happening, it's exciting, but it's daunting at same time with, you know, it's on us. it's a scary thought as well as much as it is, like, overwhelming. vanellope's condition was revealed in the womb — her heart was growing outside her body. they call it ectopia cordis. hugely complex surgery followed with a specialist team in leicester. they made space for the heart and put it inside her chest. nine months ago, vanellope moved
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to another nhs hospital much closer to her family. we met vanellope in the spring last year and i've been with her on that journey to get her home, so, from day one, the plan is always to get home safely and timely with the right care package support around you. now, it's time for a fond farewell. parents are amazing, they can meet all her needs, there's a care team at home ready to help them out. bye — bye! bye! see you soon! bye — bye! when we go home, it's a bit sad on one level, but it's a fantastic day for them, and that's the whole point of what we do. there is, of course, no place like home, and the chance to be with her brothers feels great. oh, amazing. a massive relief. but she's not an inpatient no more. she's an outpatient, so...yay!
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back in leicester, one of the team that helped bring her into the world is so pleased she's doing well. they're investigating reconstructive surgery. she'll definitely need more surgery. it's just a case of when and how many. the front of her chest isn'tjoined up. she doesn't have a breastbone, and that's why she's needed to stay in hospital so long. it's certainly made us. a lot of people don't know that dean proposed the day before she was born. so, we're hoping — hoping when she's settled that we will look on now booking the date for our next step in life, isn't it? yep. completing everything. and the memories. yes, they plan to get married. vanellope will be top of the guest list. rob sissons, bbc news, nottingham. a record number of anti—semitic hate incidents were reported in the uk last year,
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new figures have revealed. jewish people, organisations or property were targeted more than 1600 times in 2018, according to the community security trust, which is an increase of 16 percent compared with 2017. the reason for the rise in anti—semitic incidents can best be explained by talking about the state of british society overall. there is a lot more hatred, a lot more anger and a lot more division. some of that is played out as racism, some of it as anti—semitism. that's the way these things work and that's what's happening today. around 20 families have spent the night in emergency accommodation after being evacuated from their homes, following a large fire at the online supermarket ocado warehouse in hampshire. 200 firefighters were drafted in to tackle the blaze at the site in andover, which started in the early hours of tuesday morning. a 500 metre exclusion zone has been set up due to the risk of toxins or an explosion. ocado says the fire caused
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substantial damage, but confirmed no one was injured. four men have been taken to hospital after a gas explosion and fire in a flat in batley in west yorkshire. police said a number of people suffered burns but their injuries are not thought to be life—threatening. emergency services were called just before 7pm after reports of a loud noise. people from the immediate area have been evacuated as a precaution. latest crime figures show the number of fatal stabbing across england and wales were at their highest level ever recorded last year. figures for the 12 months up to march last year show there were 285 murders by a knife or sharp object. with me is our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. remind us the figures? these are figures for england and wales covering the 12 month period to the end of march 2018. they are not the latest stats we've got on crying that they are from an analysis by the office for national statistics
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of violent crime and homicide statistics and what the show is the number of fatal stabbings, the number of fatal stabbings, the number of fatal stabbings, the number of people killed at the hands ofa number of people killed at the hands of a knife or other sharp instrument has now hit 285 and that was the largest on record since the homicide index began in 1946. more fatal stabbings in that 12 month period than any period since the war. and the office for national statistics are seeing the rise has been most pronounced in male victims and younger age groups which fits with the stories of stabbings we have heard about? exactly, that's right, in the 16—24 age group, 45% increase, 25—3423% up, and there was a large increase in the number of victims who were black according to the figures. 25% of victims in this category were black, that's the
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highest number since that detail was first elected in 1997. and this ta kes first elected in 1997. and this takes us through the 12 months ending march last year, we know throughout the rest of 2018 and already in 2019 it seems certainly anecdotally the trend, the u nfortu nate anecdotally the trend, the unfortunate trend of knife crime is continuing, what will be home office do with data like this? it will reinforce that they have a serious strategy to tackle knife crime and other types of violence by clamping down on the drugs trade they believe is fuelling a lot of this and they are also consulting on a public health approach which is what has been used in glasgow in order to try to tackle some of the causes at an earlier stage, to get early intervention. but something we will be consulting on as well. i think
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this will simply reinforce the strategy and the approach they are taking but these are very worrying figures. ok, danny, thank you very much for that, danny shaw with those details on the latest figures from the office for national statistics on the number of fatal stabbings across england and wales. let me remind you we are waiting to see theresa may arriving in brussels for meetings with donald tusk, jean—claude juncker and others. this after the controversial comments from donald tusk yesterday saying there was a special place in hell for those who had promoted brexit without a plan. david lidington this morning saying that donald tusk was not talking about theresa may who as you know voted to remain in the referendum back in 2016. interesting to see what comes of those talks.
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but let's get a look at the weather. we've had a windy night, gusting across the far south of england up to 79 mph. the winds have moderated slightly so not quite as windy as it was but still looking at 40—50 across wales, the midlands and eastern and southern parts of england. the rain clearing away, showers in the east and a few showers in the east and a few showers pushing their way into the west. lighter winds for many, sunny spells, a big improvement compared to this morning and temperatures 7-10. to this morning and temperatures 7—10. through the ceiling and to mate initially there will be clear skies, looking at this next batch of cloud and rain spreading its way from the south—west and it will turn increasingly windy into friday morning. this deep area of low pressure developing and moving its way in quite a racy picture as we go into friday morning, widespread gales expected on friday, when these conditions and travel disruption likely throughout the day. goodbye.
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hello, it's thursday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. good morning. new official advice on how your children should use screens has been issued by the uk's four chief medical officers for the first time. follow this advice of getting your children to have good sleep, eat properly, get exercise, be safe, have family time, share sensibly, then they will be all right, however the evidence base develops. but the advice stops short of telling parents how much is too much screentime. we've brought together teenagers, parents, experts, politicians and social media influencers to talk about the effect our devices are having on us. iam i am elizabeth, 14, iam elizabeth, 14, i i am elizabeth, 14, i use my phone every night. but i think that the advice to put my phone down before i
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