Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 7, 2019 2:00pm-4:59pm GMT

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at two. theresa may holds talks with eu leaders, to try and secure changes to her brexit withdrawal agreement. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with hugh. there is no horse racing today in the uk, afteran there is no horse racing today in the uk, after an outbreak of equine flu. more atjust after 2:30pm. thanks hugh, and lucy has all the weather — some wet and very windy weather to come, as storm eric moves in the atlantic. i will have the detail. welcome to afternoon live.
2:01 pm
theresa may has been meeting the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, in brussels to try to secure changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement both sides described the talks as robust but constructive. mrjuncker again insisted there could be no re—opening of the agreement, but both leaders have agreed to meet again before the end of the month. theresa may has to get changes to the agreement to have any hope of securing the support of mps, after her original deal was rejected by the commons. the labour leader jeremy corbyn has set out five demands for his party to support a brexit deal, including a permanent customs union and close alignment with the single market. let's go to brussels now — and ros atkins is there for us. well, what has been happening here in brussels very much depends on which way you want to see it, because on one level the mood music has been more positive, particularly
2:02 pm
more positive than some of the comments from donald tusk yesterday, and we had these commitments for further talks. we know michel barnier and the lead brexit negotiator for the eu will meet the brexit secretary steve buckley in the coming days as well so these outcomes for theresa may but actually if you look at some of the state m e nts actually if you look at some of the statements from jean—claude juncker and theresa may, it has been a restate m e nt and theresa may, it has been a restatement of their respected positions. so no major shift at all. after the meeting withjean—claude juncker here at the european commission, the prime minister went to the european parliament to meet president to yani, along with the parliament's chief president to yani, along with the pa rliament‘s chief brexit president to yani, along with the parliament's chief brexit negotiator guy verhofstadt. after they had had that meeting, mr ten one made this statement. it was a very good meeting but we are very concerned. this is the reality of a no—deal brexit. it
2:03 pm
should be a very dangerous solution, a no—deal brexit. the it is the only solution that grants and orderly uk exit, the only solution that protects peace in ireland and of the market. again and again the european union saying it won't open that withdrawal agreement but since willing to look at the political declaration. let's looked at this. i enjoy and by my guests. you will have heard me saying, you could feel positive about this or that he has woody changed. could feel positive about this or that he has woody changedlj
2:04 pm
could feel positive about this or that he has woody changed. i see it as nothing has really changed. but we put the theatricals out there for everybody at sea, which i think was the primary goal of theresa may anyway. i think she knew that the withdrawal agreement was not for negotiation, political declaration yes. i think she knew there would not be enough at her but she had to come here anyway because the drama of the situation requires so. all for the drama and all very good at the moment. the question is will this theatre work out, what should be to go back and convince a majority the drama we have seen, and from what i have heard so far i am very sceptical about this. i think these two weeks and the vote in the house of commons last week were actually a waste of time. we're running out of time. that is why the british government especially to may
2:05 pm
need to turn this around. but what would you actually like to hear from the prime minister, kenny goss of exa m ples of the prime minister, kenny goss of examples of what you think uk should do now? weeden think the problem is she has started these bigger issue and with a very divisive tone. instead of after the referendum bringing the country further apart from whichever she should have bought people together two years ago already. now she is in a very difficult situation, i acknowledge that but still she has to start now and instead of dividing further the position they are in the house of commons, she should try to bring people together and to find a majority for a possible brexit deal so majority for a possible brexit deal so they wouldn't have a no deal scenario in two months. the problem is even if she does believe in her withdrawal deal, parliament said no so withdrawal deal, parliament said no so she has to do something different. indeed she does but will she be to run down the clock and get a dealjust by pure fear of not having a deal in the house of commons? is she going to be to come back to london and say look, i got
2:06 pm
these breadcrumbs here and there. it is 20th of march so we might as well do something. people will say of course, do something. people will say of course , we do something. people will say of course, we don't want to have a no deal. i think that is her strategy. i think it is risky but it has a lisbon her intention to run down the clock to the 11th hour to force a come from eyes through the most eurosceptic and radical parts of her coalition. you could argue it is not just the prime minister running down the clock, the european union is also lacking a little urgency, bedside seemed to be quite happy to ta ke bedside seemed to be quite happy to take their time bedside seemed to be quite happy to take theirtime in bedside seemed to be quite happy to take their time in these negotiations. it has been nine days since the vote in parliament where she was told to get back and ask it a change, only today she is sitting down? to be honest, already before that boat and right after the vote as well, and stated their opinion about the situation and what has been promised to negotiate the
2:07 pm
backstop is not going to happen. this vote was taken on presumptions that would become a reality anyway. i suppose you're putting it all back on the uk but this is a european union problem as well, and if theresa may can't get her plan out through parliament, you need to help her, don't you, otherwise you will both end up with no deal?” her, don't you, otherwise you will both end up with no deal? i think the institutions have been very firm that we're not going to weird reopen the withdrawal conditions but at the same time everyone have spoken to has said if there is a plan and an idea of how to get out of this, we are really willing to extend the article 50 procedure so we're not running down the clockjust now but we have a bit more time. we talk a lot in london about how disruptive brexit is for the rest of politics, the uk government is struggling to get on with other things because of fix it. is it also disrupting the
2:08 pm
european union? absolutely, every conversation begins with ono, not brexit again. because of the body wants to get on with more pressing things. have elections coming up, oui’ things. have elections coming up, ourmp things. have elections coming up, our mp colleague here knows very welcome we have made a big challenge is coming from coming from china, from russia, from the us, we have a disinformation campaign, cyber security stuff, a lot of problems right now even with the member states migration and the likes, so you need to get on with it. brexit or no brexit. the problem is because of the drama going on in london most of the drama going on in london most of the drama going on in london most of the time we just have to drop everything and look at what is happening in the parliament. we don't have anything concrete coming up don't have anything concrete coming up so that is frustrating a lot of people in this town. as we get very close to brexit, do you too and the people around you here in brussels increasingly see the uk as a rival, someone increasingly see the uk as a rival, someone who you will be competing with, or do you think that friendship built through the european union could and you are
2:09 pm
this process? no matter what is good to happen, no matter when brexit comes, i will always fight for having a very close relationship with the uk. i think that brexit is wrong, to be very frank, but at the same timel wrong, to be very frank, but at the same time i think no matter what the next month is going to bring, we will stay neighbours and we should have as close a relationship as possible also in the future.|j have as close a relationship as possible also in the future. i am spanish, but i do work for a british organisation, and i cherish the contribution the uk has made to the european union. i am very sad to see it leaving. i think there are big hopes here in brussels that this won't happen. i think that is a bit delusional, but anyway. why do thing we need to have a very close russian ship with the uk on trade, security, research and many other fronts. so i do not wish them bad at all but on the contrary. both of you, very good to speak to you, thank you much indeed. one word we heard a lot todayis indeed. one word we heard a lot today is process. people saying this is part of a process, this is the beginning of the next age in the
2:10 pm
process. no one is suggesting that today was ever going to be the end of that process. but it is worth pausing to think that with the uk scheduled to leave the european union next month, the process of working out exactly what the uk is asking for, and whether the european union will accept that, is very much alive and continues. thank you very much indeed, ros atkins with the very latest from brussels. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has set out five demands for his party to support the prime minister's brexit deal — calling for ‘a sensible agreement that wins the support of parliament, and bring the country together‘. in a letter to the prime minister, mr corbyn said labour wants a uk—wide customs union, close alignment with the single market, "dynamic alignment" on rights and protections, "clear commitments" on participation in eu agencies and funding programmes and "unambiguous agreements" on the detail of future security arrangements. our chief political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster. interesting, these demands mr corbyn
2:11 pm
has sent to the prime minister, because they have infuriated some in his party. some mps are even talking about leaving the party, they are so angry, especially because there is no mention anywhere of another referendum. yes, and that is the point here that we know very well about the splits in the conservative party over europe, but labour has its own problems too. there are some in the party have been pressing for another referendum. they managed that the party conference last year to get that put in, that it would be one of the options, once a general election was ruled out, but it has been pretty clear thatjeremy corbyn is not too keen on the idea. we also know that len mccluskey, the leader of the largest union and really the one that funds the labour party, he is not very keen on the idea either.
2:12 pm
so this letter is significant partly too because it takes one of the previous conditions, which talked about having the exact same benefits we currently one it comes to the single market. so that has gone. i suppose the question is whether this isa suppose the question is whether this is a serious offer to theresa may, is a serious offer to theresa may, is it one she could consider, and i think the answer is not at the moment but it is something she can wave around really and say to her own brexiteers, look, this is something that possibly could get through the house of commons. that isa through the house of commons. that is a much softer brexit, if you like, and so those people in her party who are pushing her and opposing her deal will have to think very carefully about what it is exactly they want at the end of all this. this was the labour leader jeremy corbyn explaining exactly why he had written this letter to the prime minister. what we have set out in that letter is the principles behind the amendment that i put the parliament, which actually did include a requirement to legislate for a possible future referendum. mine was the only amendment that concluded that the you that was debated last
2:13 pm
week. the principal points are that week. the principal points are that we need a conference of customs union with the european union, we need a conference of trade agreement with the european union and we need what is called a dynamic relationship on rights at work, rights and environment protection, consumer protection, so this country doesn't consistently fall behind in the future. half of our trade is with europe, a lot of our manufacturing industries are very frightened and very worried at the moment that on the 29th of march there will be a cliff edge. there cannot be a cliff edge. we will do everything we can in parliament to prevent this cliff edge exit. everything we can in parliament to prevent this cliff edge exitm everything we can in parliament to prevent this cliff edge exit. if you look at the reaction from his own shadow cabinet, one, barry gardiner, saying this letter to the prime minister is about making a success brexit. clearly that won't go down well with mps in the labour party and lots of party members who want to stop brexit altogether, or at get another referendum. another member of the shadow brexit team said he had a theresa may accents what's
2:14 pm
joburg open is suggesting in full, we must move to support a public vote. but of course there is no mention of a referendum in that letter. it has prompted some to even speculate about their future in the party with one of them, owen smith, who of course challenged jeremy corbyn for the leadership and lost, when asked whether he would stay in the labour party, said that is a very good questions are clearly some of them considering what they are to do next. coming out to clarify the situation about another referendum was the shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer. what this letter does is to set out in clear terms that the prime minister needs to abandon her brexit redlines. it does not rule out the option of a second referendum, a public vote, and jeremy corbyn is going to be writing to members today to reassure them about that. jeremy corbyn trying to balance competing tensions in her party, as theresa may tries to as well.
2:15 pm
this morning the govenor of the bank of england mark carney warned that he expects growth this year to be the slowest since 2009 when the economy was in recession. it is forecasting growth of 1.2% this year, down from its previous forecast of 1.7% made in november. he also said that uncertainty over the outcome of the brexit negotiations was causing problems for companies trying to plan for the future. the fog of brexit is causing short—term volatility in the economic data and more fundamentally it is creating a series of tensions in the economy, tensions for business. although many companies are stepping up their contingency planning the economy as a whole is still not prepared yet for a no deal, no transition exit. asjust one example, half the businesses in the latest survey by the bank,
2:16 pm
agents are not ready for such a possibility, and on balance respondents expect output, employment and investment to contract substantially if it were to occur. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. theresa may holds talks with eu leaders in brussels to try to secure changes to her withdrawal agreement. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. and coming up — the mars probe that's been named after the dna pioneer rosalind franklin. in sport, the british horse racing authority says cancelling all racing today was essential after an outbreak of equine flu. three vaccinated horses in an active yard tested positive for the disease yesterday. jonathan davies will
2:17 pm
captain wales for the first time, as they make ten changes for their six nations match against italy on saturday. tottenham's wait to move into their new stadium goes on as the club confirmed the march two london derby with arsenal will take place at wembley. more on this story is just after place at wembley. more on this story isjust after 2:30pm. a body seen in the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer, emiliano sala and the pilot david ibbotson, has been recovered. it hasn't yet been formally identified. the light aircraft was found on the sea bed in the channel on sunday, two weeks after it disappeared during a flight from nantes in france to cardiff. the body has now been taken to portland in dorset — from where our correspondent duncan kennedy sent us this update. this is the latest stage in what has been an extremely difficult and sensitive process for everyone involved, particularly of course the two men's families. it is not yet
2:18 pm
clear whose body has been brought short here in portland this morning, whether it is that of emiliano sala or david ibbotson, but police say they are keeping both men's families fully informed. the red and white recovery ship that brought the body to shore doctor at portland just after nine o'clock this morning. a few minutes later, this team of forensics police officers and others went on board. they stayed on the ship for more than two hours. emiliano sala and his pilot david ibbotson died last month, though it's not clear which body has now been recovered. that operation here in portland will be watched by both men's families at their homes in argentina and in north lincolnshire. the two men had been flying from france to wales when their aircraft went down here in the english channel. the search vessel used a submersible to carry out the lifting operation in what was said to be as
2:19 pm
dignified a way as possible. the men's families have been kept informed throughout. accident investigators say the body was removed separate from the wreckage and that it wasn't possible to recover the plane itself, the cause of poor weather conditions on the surface. that operation has now been suspended for what is called the foreseeable future, although the enquiry team says it has already gathered valuable video evidence. throughout the past two weeks, cardiff city fans have made their grief known about the loss of emiliano sala. many were upset at this week's news that his former club, nantes, had asked cardiff city to pay his £15 million fans there the before the search for his body has been concluded. this lunchtime, a small convoy of vehicles carrying the body that has been recovered made its way out of portland port. the next stage will be for the dorset coroner to begin his work. duncan kennedy, bbc news in
2:20 pm
portland. a 24—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of abduction, in the connection with the disappearance of libby squire. the university of hull student has not been seen since leaving a nightclub in the city nearly a week ago. police says finding libby remains their priority. our correspondent, sarah corker is in hull. this is raglan street in hull where that 24—year—old was arrested last night at around 90. there has been a continued police presence here throughout the day, crime scene investigators going in and out of a property here, and humberside police say they are continuing to question that man on suspicion of abduction. speight nearly a week of search is now to try to find libby squire, her whereabouts remain unknown and this isa whereabouts remain unknown and this is a residential area, it is popular with students, it is close to the university of hull. i spoke to some
2:21 pm
of the neighbours here this morning, they told me there were around nine police officers here last night, they also saw a car being towed away as part of the investigation, and they say there is a growing feeling of anxiety and worry. it hasjust affected everybody, being such a young girl. when you have kids of your own. ijust can't imagine what parents are going through. as a mother yourself, how do you feel? sick. really upset. it asa do you feel? sick. really upset. it as a shock, it is awful things like that are still happening, it is. everyone is feeling quite shook up. asa everyone is feeling quite shook up. as a female, people are worried about the student areas not being the safest and this is just kind of contributed. i know of my friends, none of us are going out in the dark at the middle abu dhabi minute, it is just at the middle abu dhabi minute, it isjust a bit at the middle abu dhabi minute, it is just a bit scary for everyone. libby 21 years old, a philosophy student, originally from bucks and
2:22 pm
moved into a dissident in. she is in her second year of university, and there have been extensive searches over the past week. libby was last seen over the past week. libby was last seen leaving a nightclub last thursday, she got into a taxi, a dropped her off near her home but it is not believe chesley went into the property, because just before midnight she was seen on cctv sitting on a bench near her home and she has not been seen since. today, police are continuing their search ofa police are continuing their search of a park nearby. we saw them out with sticks looking in undergrowth, in woodland, and then yesterday the regional marine unit were wading waist deep into a pond near her home. later tonight, humberside police have also said they will be parking a billboard up on beverley road, which will have pictures of libby on, and they are hoping that could spur people on to come forward with information as they try to get some clues as to where they can be. as we've been hearing, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has
2:23 pm
set out five demands for his party to support the prime minister's brexit deal — calling for ‘a sensible agreement that wins the support of parliament, and bring the country together.‘ let's speak now to the labour mp, lucy powell — who support‘s jeremy corbyn's letter. she's in our salford studio. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. good afternoon. do you support this offer from us. good afternoon. do you support this offerfrom jeremy us. good afternoon. do you support this offer from jeremy corbyn to the prime minister? guess, i do. ithink this is a very significant move, both in terms of the substance of whatjeremy corbyn set out but also the tone and the politics —— yes, i do. i think this is a general abu dhabi a genuine offer to break the brexit paralysis and that is what the vast majority is crying out for. he wants a permanent customs union, and theresa may has set and again and theresa may has set and again and again that you doesn't want that, as one of her red lines that you won't have that. the prime minister really needs to come off
2:24 pm
some of her red lines. her red lines have got her into a situation where the house of commons has rejected her proposals with an absolutely huge majority. so those red lines really are now past their sell by date, a long time since. why is jeremy corbyn offering this now? we are 50 days away from brexit, he could have done this years ago frankly. to be fair, he did. it was the central message of his conference speech back in september. but he only recently went to have talks with the prime minister. he has had those talks and the prime minister has not been willing to engage with him. he did make a big offer in his conference speech back in september that he wanted to work with the prime minister to sort brexit out. what the country are crying for and what i sent in parliament over the last few weeks, i think parliament over the last few weeks, ithink mps parliament over the last few weeks, i think mps from all different sides, different parties, leave or remain or something in between,
2:25 pm
there is a growing mood now of people wanting to compromise, find a way through this deadlock, to avoid the catastrophe that would be no deal. have you been listening to what some of your fellow labour mps have been saying about this? if you haven't, let me tell you what chuka umunna for example, prominent pro—eu mp, he says this offer from jeremy corbyn is not opposition, it is the facilitation of a deal that will make this country poorer. says i hate to think what all those young voters who flocked to labour for the first time in 2017 will make of this. vote labour, get a tory brexit. they will feel like they have been sold down the river.|j understand where he is coming from. he wants to stay in the eu and he wa nts to he wants to stay in the eu and he wants to do that by whatever means necessary , wants to do that by whatever means necessary, but we had a referendum two years ago, that referendum did deliver a result. it was a fairly decisive result, and it is ourjob now to try and work that through.
2:26 pm
decisive result, and it is ourjob now to try and work that throughm is your party policy, isn't it, if you couldn't force a general election to keep open the option of campaigning for another referendum. jeremy corbyn hasn't mentioned that, has it? you are right, that is part of the conference policy that was agreed, that said we need to look at all other options. but times are changing very quickly. what was said at labour party conference back in september might not be to the absolute. and, the thing that is releva nt absolute. and, the thing that is relevant today. so you are bidding that party policy, are you? i'm not common no, we're not, but we try to break that policy... but you are saying it is now out of date? perhaps if you let me speak for a minute, i might explain? i don't think anybody could say that i haven't got genuine credentials in this area, but i recognise both the result of the last referendum. i
2:27 pm
also recognise the difficult parliamentary maths, some of the different opinions in parliament, and i, along withjeremy and other people, we are trying to find a way through this paralysis, this deadlock, which will mean people from all sides having to compromise. and i think it does mean we need to tone down the language a bit. i don't think we could be talking in terms of a tory brexit or a labour brexit or letting people down and that kind of thing. we have to find a way through this. then just a few weeks' time we are potentially leaving the eu without a deal. that would be catastrophic for this country. we are leaving the eu, that is what the country voted for and the vast majority of parliamentarians voted to trigger the article 50 process. so we do need to come together and i do welcome this move from jeremy corbyn to try and break that deadlock. but at the same time, you did just say effectively that your own party policy on campaigning for another referendum is effectively out of date, is that what your position is?
2:28 pm
iama date, is that what your position is? i am a backbencher, i don't speak for the front bench. personally, i think that a second referendum would be damaging for our democracy. i think it would be divisive and i don't think it would actually resolve anything. but it is party policy. party policy agreed at conference was to say we would keep all options on the table including a second referendum. there would be circumstances where i might vote for that, much further down the line, but i think we have a duty, an absolutely clear duty, as parliamentarians, as responsible people that are running the country to try and look at all the options available, and to break this deadlock. and i thinkjeremy hill is made another very generous offer here, where he has shown he is prepared to compromise, and i think this is a meaningful approach on his behalf and i really hope the prime minister will meet him halfway —— jeremy hill made another very
2:29 pm
generous offer. if she doesn't, i believe —— jeremy hayward is generous offer. if she doesn't, i believe ——jeremy hayward is made another. —— jeremy has. believe ——jeremy hayward is made another. ——jeremy has. i believe ——jeremy hayward is made another. —— jeremy has. i would prefer another. —— jeremy has. i would p refer full another. —— jeremy has. i would preferfull membership another. —— jeremy has. i would prefer full membership of the single market around a compper hence it customs union. these are the sort of issues conservative and labour mps from across the house can and will agree on even if the prime list doesn't want to lead that process. very grateful for your time, thank you for talking to us. the author rosamunde pilcher has died at the age of 94. she was best known for her record—breaking novel ‘the shell seekers', which sold more than five million copies in 15 languages. her agent confirmed the author had died following a short illness. time for a look at the weather. here's lucy. lee wind is a big feature. the next
2:30 pm
area of low pressure has been named storm eric. it is bringing strong winds. we have this area of low pressure passing under the jet strea m pressure passing under the jet stream and we will see the pressure dropping off quickly. you may have heard of it as a weather bomb. we see the pressure dropping away 2a millibars over 2a hours. this area of low pressure is expected to drop 40 of low pressure is expected to drop ilo millibars in 2a hours and bringing strong winds. we could see trees down and big waves. today has had a windy start. we have seen 79 mph in the isle of wight and as we go through this afternoon, we are starting to see the wind is easing.
2:31 pm
the area of low pressure clearing towards the north—east. the next area of pressure, storm eric, moving in towards the west. through this afternoon, the winds are easing. sunny spells, blustery showers with the rumble of thunder possible for western areas and southern coast. a south—westerly wind. highs of 10 celsius in the south. this evening, clear spells in the north—east. temperatures are dipping away quickly but then cloud will fit in from the west and outbreaks of rain. that is associated with storm eric, that area of low pressure coming in from the west. we have tightly packed isobars. the wind will strengthen through tonight and the outbreaks of rain pushing in as well. there is the potentialfor strong winds into friday and saturday. we could see localised...
2:32 pm
plenty of cloud and outbreaks of rain. it will have thunder and lightning perhaps. brighter skies and western parts of england and wales. persistent in scotland. if we ta ke wales. persistent in scotland. if we take a look at the wind gust, thus widely of 45 to 55 mph. stronger for western coast. up to 70 mph. temperatures tomorrow not doing too badly. between seven and 10 celsius in the north. up to 12 in the south. that area of low pressure works its way further east as we move into saturday. we will hold onto windy conditions. still there was isobars tightly packed across the uk. the stronger winds are across northern
2:33 pm
ireland and the central belt of scotland. showery outbreaks of rain into saturday. further south, scotland. showery outbreaks of rain into saturday. furthersouth, early brightness before cloud and outbreaks of rain from the south—west. the temperatures are fresher than tomorrow. 11 celsius. the potential for windy and wet weather and we could see some disruption. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. theresa may holds talks with eu leaders to try and secure changes to her brexit withdrawal agreement. it was a very good meeting but we are very concerned. this is the reality of a no—deal brexit. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. the bank of england says it expects growth this year to be the slowest
2:34 pm
since 2009 when the economy was in recession. a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. a man is arrested on suspicion of abducting student libby squire — who went missing in hull a week ago. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. first of all, no horse racing in the uk today. yes, none at all. outbreak of equine flu — three horses from one yard tested positive despite the fact they'd been vaccinated. the problem with racing is that the horses travel far and wide for meetings all over the country — the infected horses had raced at ayr and ludlow and could have potentially exposed
2:35 pm
a significant number of horses to the disease. it is not considered fatal. in fact, similar symptoms to what a human would experience in suffering from flu — very contagious but not to humans — the british horseracing authority insists it is an essential move to stop any meetings today. four meetings were called off today, and one already on saturday. it could affect the cheltenham festival which is just over a month away. 18 years ago around this time, the foot and mouth outbreak had a significant effect on racing and eventually cheltenham was cancelled. all will be hoping that does not happen this time around. let's go on to rugby. some team announcements ahead of the second weekend. we all enjoyed watching the results come in at the weekend. a raft of changes. wales have made 10 changes to their team for the six nations match against italy on saturday.
2:36 pm
centrejonathan davies will captain the team for the frist time as normal skipper alun wyn jones is on the bench. four players will make their six nations debut as coach meanwhile, scotland have made four changes for their match against ireland on saturday, with wing blair kinghorn being dropped to the bench despite scoring a hattrick in the win over italy. that's becuase sean maitland is back from injury. he is very much a first choice for scotland. rob kearney‘s return at full back is one of five changes made by ireland coachjoe schmidt for the game against scotland. keaney replaces robbie henshaw, who picked up a knock in training while chris farrell is in for injured centre garry ringrose. tottenham's wait to move into their new stadium goes on after the club confirmed their home north london derby with arsenal on march 2nd will take place at wembley. construction and safety problems have delayed the opening of spurs' new home from back in september and all their matches have been at the national stadium. although, there won't be
2:37 pm
a cap on the capacity with nearly 90,000 able to attend. aleksander ceferin has been re—elected as uefa president after running unopposed. he'll now serve a further four year term as the man in charge of european football's governing body. meanwhile, fa chairman greg clarke has been elected as a fifa vice president — also for the next four years. it's a position that's reserved for a british representative and clarke beat irish fa boss david martin to the role where he replaces david gill — the former manchester united chief executive. sarah taylor has been recalled to the england squad for their tour to india and sri lanka. the wicketkeeper—batter missed the team's run to the world t20 final as part of the ongoing management of her anxiety. but she's been named in teh squad alonside bowler katherine brunt, who's back from injury. iam i am well. i'm very well. i've had a
2:38 pm
long winter. yes, training hard. it is nice to be back with all the girls. the are a lot more here than there was a few months ago. i am proud what they did in the west indies. it is nice to be back in full kit and training again. british runner susannah gill has broken the women's record for the world marathon challenge which is seven marathons in seven days across seven continents. fewer than 200 people have completed the event, which ended in miami overnight. gill came second in the first race in antarctica, but then won the other six in an average time of 3 hours 22 minutes. i haven't got used to the fact i haven't got another race to plan. it has been about trying to find a shower, get warm clothes on and go to the next race. now i have a chance to sit down and think about things. it is quite nice,. some
2:39 pm
sleep, i think is on her agenda. that is all for now. thank you. see you later on. the number of fatal stabbings in england and wales has hit its highest level since records began in 1916. the office for national statistics says 285 people were killed with a knife or sharp instrument in the year to last march. 36% of victims were under 25 years old. and the number of victims who are black is also at its highest level. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw is here. it is shocking, isn't it, the worst figures since the second world war. in terms of fatal stabbings, yes. the experience in terms of talking to police, talking to ministers and so on that knife crime is the most serious law enforcement problem now facing communities, police forces and the government across england and the government across england and wales. this isn't something that isa and wales. this isn't something that is a ten or 20 year high, it is the
2:40 pm
worse since the second world war in terms of the number of victims died having being stabbed. the increase year on year, well, it was a significant rise. the previous high was 268. 285 is a significantjump they are. in terms of who the victims are, we are seeing more younger people being victims than before. the biggest rises were in the 16 to 24 before. the biggest rises were in the 16 to 2a age bracket. up 84%. among black people, 25% of stabbing victims who died were black. that is the highest number and percentage since 1997, since those figures were first compiled. we can see it as a problem that predominantly affects
2:41 pm
younger people, black people are disproportionately affected in terms of being victims of this. and the rise is considerable. thank you very much indeed. 0ur rise is considerable. thank you very much indeed. our home a fear correspondent with the latest on that. —— mccormick fears. ——home affairs. energy companies have been given the go—ahead to increase gas and electricity prices from april for customers on standard variable rates. it means more than half of uk households are set to see their bills go up. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. cooking, lighting, heating, you can't avoid paying for it, butjackie, from south manchester, bought the price cap on standard variable tariffs, would protect herfrom increases. now she finds it doesn't. in my mind if somebodyjust says to me, we are capping your price, i would think that's great, i don't have to worry about it and think about it, but it isn't, is it? it isn't true. the result of the cap being movable
2:42 pm
is that the maximum bill for the average home will go up to £1254 a year for those on standard rate, an increase of £117, although that will depend on how much you use because the cap is actually on each unit. the blame is being put on higher world energy prices but in stockport nearby there is worry about being able to cope it's ridiculous, theyjust keep on and on with this. it's just crazy. this changing your supplier all the time, we shouldn't have to be doing that. we spend a ridiculous amount, we were struggling at one point, we couldn't afford it, could we, because of that, but i don't think they should put it up. if there was no cap we have a lot of evidence to show consumers would have been paying a higher price, £75—100 more, so people are benefiting from the cap and can be assured they are paying a fair price for their energy. to customers, the idea of a price cap that can be lifted seems unfair. it looks like they are having to pay more so that the suppliers' profits can be protected.
2:43 pm
i don't get that argument, companies, because of competition, are having to force down costs, they are having to force through efficiencies and quite simply that is costing companies and it's costing jobs. there is a way out to shop around for a cheaper deal, which is what jackie is already resolved to do. ben bland is here — in a moment he will be telling us the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live theresa may holds talks with eu leaders in brussels, to try and secure changes to her brexit withdrawal agreement. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. here's your business
2:44 pm
headlines on afternoon live. twitter has reported a jump in profits to £197 million for the final quarter of 2018, despite a fall in the number of people using the micro—blogging platform. the bank of england keeps interest rates on hold at 0.75% but cuts its growth forecast to 1.2% — the lowest in a decade. more than half of british households are likely to see an increase in the cost of energy in april. this is after the regulator, 0fgem, raised price caps. twitter is reporting some interesting results — there numbers are falling. yes, the social media platform said its profits jumped in the last three months of last year. it made £197 million —
2:45 pm
that's more than double the profit it made a year ago. in large part that's down to making more money from selling adverts around video content. but as you say — user numbers are down. twitter says that's because it has deleted millions of abusive accounts. social media companies have come under pressure to police the content of their sites more closely after scandals over mental health, user privacy, hate speech and political campaigning. twitter said it had removed millions of abusive accounts as part of its clean—up effort. hence the fall in user numbers. let's pick over all of this. michelle fleury, north america business correspondent. a lot of conflicting news for investors to weigh up — how is this being received by them? just look at the share prices, down 996 just look at the share prices, down 9% when i checked a minute or so ago. you are right to point out, the company is making more money but
2:46 pm
there are reasons for investors to be anxious. part of that is monthly average users, not as strong as investors would like to see. another thing as expenses, that rose 20%. people are wondering, hang on, how does this work? that is why we are seeing while street reacting negatively. twitter downgraded its revenue forecast for the current quarter — any reason? they have been trying to look at the user experience and trying to make ita user experience and trying to make it a more enjoyable one. the head of the company has talked a lot about this. that is one of the reasons we are seeing these monthly averages and figures declined. they are trying to get rid of robots on the service. we do not want to be as aggressive in advertising as some
2:47 pm
other social media companies. they are going to drop using these monthly active users going forward and start to have daily active users. this touted to date revealing they have 126 million daily users. users are using it every day, that is the metric they are going to focus on going forward. there was other people who are going to be most valuable to advertisers. it does mark a shift in the company's trajectory. i suppose, as some a nalysts trajectory. i suppose, as some analysts and investors have observed, following user numbers should come as no surprise, given the pressure on companies to clean up the pressure on companies to clean up the content on their sites. well, imean up the content on their sites. well, i mean there is a huge amount going to compare them to snapchat.
2:48 pm
that is a better comparison to facebook. if we look at that, twitter daily active users are a smaller number than snapchat. we will hear more about that going forward. the engagement seems to be there, just not as much as investors had anticipated. michelle, for the moment, thank you very much. jaguar have made a loss and are quite considerable one. yes, £3.4 billion loss in the last three months of 2018. the bulk of the loss was due to an accounting charge, reflecting a decline in the value of assets, such as equipment and property. however, even without that charge, the company still lost 273 million pounds, largely due to a steep fall in sales in china. that was once its biggest market.
2:49 pm
there has also been the factor of diesel sales falling in europe. many of the current models are diesel powered. they are now having to put money into investments in new technology, things like electric and hybrid cars to technology, things like electric and hybi of :ars to technology, things like electric and hybi of a rs to technology, things like electric and hybi of a restructuring programme. part of a restructuring programme. jaguar land rover employ 39,000 people at sites including castle bromwich, solihull, and merseyside. they are trying to cut costs by two and a half million pounds. most of the cuts are expected to be in the uk and the voluntary redundancy programme being launched. all right, let's have a look at the markets. the ftse 100 let's have a look at the markets. the ftse100 is down this afternoon. don't by one fifth after the holiday company was hit by slower summer
2:50 pm
sales, a weak pound and changes where we are going on holiday. these shares have fallen. there was a fire at one of the warehouses and firefighters dealing with the fallout from that. the pound going towards the bank of england statement, it was lower earlier but has picked up, despite the more gloomy forecast from the bank and the decision to keep interest rates on hold. it has recovered the losses and is trading flat against the dollar. up slightly against the euro. we will keep an eye on that. if anything changes, we will keep you up—to—date. if anything changes, we will keep you up-to-date. thank you, then. thank you very much indeed. the british space rover that will be sent to mars in 2020 has been named after the english scientist, rosalind franklin. a panel chose the name from more than 36,000 suggestions
2:51 pm
submitted from across europe. rosalind franklin played an integral role in the discovery of the structure of dna. the astronaut tim peake unveiled the name at the airbus factory in stevenage where the robot is being put together. reeta chakrabarti has this report. in around two years' time the six—wheeled robot will travel across the red planet in search of life. equipped with a state—of—the—art drill capable of digging two metres down, the rosalind franklin rover will look for organic life deep below the surface. last november, scientists agreed she should land in an area of mars called oxia planum, a surface plain containing clays and minerals formed by ancient seas billions of years ago. it's thought that any sign of life is likely to be in a place where there once was water. 0nce safely landed, the rover will drive autonomously on mars for at least seven months, allowing scientists to focus on collecting data rather than directing its every move. the mission, led by the european space agency, is due to launch next summer at around the same time as nasa's separate exploration programme, mars 2020. with fewer than half of all missions
2:52 pm
sent to mars ever successful, scientists will be hoping luck is on their side for rosalind's launch. well professor nigel henbestjoins us now from near high wycombe. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. tell us more about this space rover that is going to mars and what it is going to be doing. searching for signs of life. that is what it is doing. the name is very important because it was the measurements on the earth that led to the discovery of the dna molecules. what is going to be happening is that the mission will land on mars on a landing platform, built by the russians. it is being launched by a russian rocket. when the platform gets down on mars, rosalind the rover is going to travel off and go across the
2:53 pm
terrain of mars searching for places where life is most likely to be. the thing about life on mars, it is the most likely place in the solar system because mars has got a solid surface, it has a thin atmosphere, like the earth, we know it is warmer and wetter in the past. we can see signs of rivers. this place where rosalind is going to be trundling is looks like a place where they were rivers. if there was aquatic life, we are not looking for fish swimming around or anything like that, they will be trapped in the sediments. rosalind will drill down looking for signs of life that existed on mars in the past. it may possibly be that there is still life on mars buried down into the ground where the water is still liquid. 0n the surface, it is still liquid. 0n the surface, it is called and frozen to ice. it is
2:54 pm
exciting. what are the chances of finding life now are evidence of previous life? i think there is going to be evidence of life in the past. the reason is, if you go back to the early solar system, there we re to the early solar system, there were big rocks and asteroids coming into the planet. 0n were big rocks and asteroids coming into the planet. on earth, we have pieces of mines that have landed on the earth and we can take a look inside them. we call them martian meteorites. in the past, pieces of rock from the earth must have landed on mars. those pieces of the early earth must have had life from the earth on it. we might have signs that came from the earth and travelled on these interplanetary taxis. what would be more exciting was to find signs of life that were different and started off on mars. that is quite likely because mars was warm and wet in its early days, just like earth, there were volcanoes. if life started on the earth, it could have started
2:55 pm
independently on mars. it is going in 2020, rosalind the space rover. she, as you call it. when do you think we might get some answers? well, it will certainly be weeks and months because she has to trundle across, find the right place, get the rocks out and analyse them and send the signals back to earth. life on mars is controversial. back in 1976, nasa sent a pair of rovers, landers, called viking. they drilled into the soil and there were some tentative signs on mars. the experts on earth argued about it. that was in era of controversy and nasa came down on the conservative side and said we did not have strong enough evidence. 0ne said we did not have strong enough evidence. one of the experiments
2:56 pm
give a positive result for life on mars, although the others contradicted it. there is a possibility that there is current living life on mars. the experts will be arguing for a long time about what the evidence means. nigel, great to talk to you. thank you for being with us. let's see what the weather is like here on earth. lucy has that for us. wet and windy weather and the potential for disruption. we have seen windy conditions. 79 mph here. that is courtesy of low pressure. it is working its way towards the east. the winds are easing. it is a deepening area of low pressure. it has been named star eric and it is going to bring wet and windy conditions. —— storm. tonight, the cloud will increase, showery
2:57 pm
outbreaks of rain. if frost for eastern parts of scotland and north—east england. outbreaks of rain will push on from the west and the winds will strengthen. as storm eric works its way in, tightening ice buyers, the winds will start to pick up into tomorrow. with strengthening winds, the potential for disruption. friday into saturday could see disruption to travel. do look at your local forecast. outbreaks of rain. heavier rain working its way through the day. with that, the potentialfor thunder and lightning. persistent rain for north—west scotland. the potential for a localised flooding. let's take a look at the wind gusts. at three o'clock in the afternoon, 35 to 55 mph inland. up to 70 in coastal areas. the temperatures aren't going
2:58 pm
to be doing too badly. in the south, nine to 11 celsius. coolerfurther north. seven to nine celsius. when you add in the wind, not particularly mild. 0vernight into saturday, the area of low pressure works its way east. strong winds for northern ireland, the central belt of scotla nd northern ireland, the central belt of scotland and into northern england as well. saturday, outbreaks of rain in the north. a drier and brighter start for england and wales. the cloud increasing with rain moving into the south—west. a maximum of 11 celsius. there is the potential for disruption. stay across the forecast. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at three. theresa may holds talks with eu leaders, to try and secure changes to her brexit withdrawal agreement. mrs may today in the meeting assured
2:59 pm
us mrs may today in the meeting assured us that there will be a backstop, that watches said already in belfast, there is no question to remove the backstop. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. the bank of england forecasts the slowest growth for the uk economy in a decade. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with hugh. yes, good afternoon again, and equine flu outbreak has meant no horse racing today, four meetings have been cancelled with more potentially to come. more after 3:30pm. lucy martin has all the weather. storm eric is set to bring wet and
3:00 pm
very windy conditions as we move through into friday and saturday. i will be here with the detail. thanks lucy, also coming up — no phones at meals or bedtime... new advice to parents to protect children using the internet and social media from the uk's chief medical officers. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm ben brown. theresa may and the head of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, say their brexit talks this morning were "robust but constructive". the prime minister is in brussels, asking for changes to the withdrawal deal. but the commission president has again ruled that out. in the past hour, the european parliament's brexit co—ordinator, guy verhofstadt, has said mrs may reassured him that the backstop to prevent a hard border on the island of ireland will remain in the agreement. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas reports. arriving in brussels today, a prime
3:01 pm
minister hemmed in on all sides, left and right at every turn hiding opponents. outside european commission headquarters, another. bundled out of the way. his aim, shared with mrs may, was to prevent the uk exiting the eu with no deal injust 50 the uk exiting the eu with no deal in just 50 days' time. the uk exiting the eu with no deal injust 50 days' time. seeing a the uk exiting the eu with no deal in just 50 days' time. seeing a way through is the problem. she agreed a deal withjean—claude through is the problem. she agreed a deal with jean—claude juncker in december. now she is demanding the eu must change it, in particular seeking a legal guarantee that the uk when to be held forever to the conditions of the irish backstop. do you have new proposals, prime minister? if all this looks familiar, it is because it is. yet
3:02 pm
againa familiar, it is because it is. yet again a crisis point, yet again mrs may in brussels seeking concessions, concessions the eu has said it is not prepared to meet. so the eu's question for mrs may, does she have any new ideas? mrjuncker told her again the eu will not renegotiate the backstop but the eu is willing to rewrite the accompanying a little declaration if the uk wants to seek a closer future relationship, declaration if the uk wants to seek a closerfuture relationship, and offer apparently ta ken a closerfuture relationship, and offer apparently taken up. the discussion was robust but constructive, despite the challenges the two leaders agreed that their teams should hold talks as to whether a way through can be found that would gain the broadest possible support in the uk parliament and respect the guidelines agreed by the european cancel. one blockage in brussels may have shifted and back in london movement too. jeremy corbyn has laid out condition the would want to see
3:03 pm
in the future relationship, a uk wide customs union, alignment with roles in the single market, and alignment with protection such as workers and the environment too. half of our trade is with europe, a lot of our manufacturing industries are very frightened and worried at the moment on 29th of march double bea the moment on 29th of march double be a cliff edge. there cannot be a cliff edge. we will deliver thing we can in parliament to prevent this cliff edge exit. when you ask them what on earth they mean when the say they want to be in the customs union but also have a say. that is not allowed under the treaties. may has got the eu to eu to agree to more negotiations, which means more time, but that's not the same securing a new deal, that alone one short of winning the backing of her party and parliament back home. joining us now is our brussels correspondent adam fleming. so, adam, the word from jean—claude
3:04 pm
juncker apparently is that these talks today were robust but constructive, some sort of amicable language being used, a bit different from all of that talk about health we had yesterday. worth remembering yesterday donald tusk‘s remarks were aimed not at the prime minister but at some of the people involved in the leave campaign in the referendum. he was very careful to leave the door open for theresa may to come and resent some alternative solutions. she has not done that but she has prevented a process that the eu has signed up to, and it is more talking. if you thought the brexit negotiations are over, they sought of formerly are that there is a bit more to go. brexit secretary stephen barclay will meet the eu chief negotiator in strasbourg in france and that is where michel barnier is going to be. the resort a slight difference of emphasis about what this process is though. uk sources
3:05 pm
say the withdrawal agreement and a backstop is on the table to be discussed, in other words could you put a time limit on, could you put an escape clause on it, could you put an an escape clause on it, could you putan in an escape clause on it, could you put an in their alongside it. the eu is saying actually this process is more a platform for them, the eu, to listen to the uk's ideas, rather than reopening their withdrawal agreement. as damien moore saying in that piece, the focus of the eu really is the political declaration, the separate hochman that goes alongside the brexit treaty, which sketches out the shape of the future relationship. it sounds like one of the things the two sides will look at is what additional language committed in there, particularly about the speed of the next phase of negotiations. the idea behind that being if you can talk about how quickly you want to get the future relationship and the trade deal in place then it makes the backstop look less likely to come into force, so look less likely to come into force, so it seems a bit less scary audit less awful. so if there are to be any eu concessions or any budging
3:06 pm
from the eu side it will be a political declaration, it is not in any sense going to be reopening the withdrawal agreement? at the moment that looks like the case, the joint statement was issued after the talks betweenjohn claude statement was issued after the talks between john claude juncker and theresa may only talked about the political declaration being open for negotiation, not the withdrawal agreement. having said that though, there is lots of speculation around brussels about what other things you could put in the withdrawal agreement and what sort of legal trickery, coda sills, whatever legal words you want to use that to be put into change how the withdrawal agreement is perceived and that is what we're talking about here, changing how the backstop is perceived, rather than what theresa may seems to be talking about and many of her backbenchers are talking about, actual changes to the text of the withdrawal agreement. i just don't see the eu budging on that, certainly not at the moment. this is
3:07 pm
the scene in brussels at the moment where we are just waiting for theresa may to come and give us her latest account of that meeting she has had with jean—claude juncker. those talks were described as robust but constructive. the prime minister in brussels asking for changes to the withdrawal deal, butjohn claude juncker again ruling out any reopening of the withdrawal agreement but as adam was suggesting, if there is going to be any movement it would be on the political declaration that goes with the withdrawal agreement. the prime minister is due out at some point in the next few minutes. we will bring it to you live as soon as we hear from theresa may. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster. some important element is on brexit from the labour side. jeremy corbyn
3:08 pm
in particular. just tell us about this offer effectively that he has made to the prime minister. this is the letter he wrote to the prime minister last night, setting out what he would need to be in that deal in orderfor labour to get behind it. there was a slight shift. he is not talking about getting the exact same and if it's of the single market, which they have had before in there, some are saying that as a slight watering down. the question is though the a lot of labour mps about what happens about another referendum, which is of course the policy that was thrashed out at the conference last year. i am joined by the labour mp peter kyle. you support the idea of another referendum, what do you make for the letter from jeremy corbyn? it doesn't mention that. it doesn't, but the problem i've got is that almost all of it refers to the political declaration. we know the eu thinks it is nebulous, winner michael fallon former tory cabinet ministers think it is vacuous. that is non—binding. nobody thinks
3:09 pm
theresa may will be prime minister ina year's theresa may will be prime minister in a year's time which means any political declaration is not binding. so what we need is to make sure we get something that is in fa ct. sure we get something that is in fact. we have a deal on the terms of leaving and i think now we have gone so leaving and i think now we have gone so far when the politics of this has become so confused and rancorous that i don't think any deal from either the labour side or the tory side, particularly to theresa may's deal, will have legitimacy unless it has been authorised and signed off by the british people. but it doesn't look like you have the numbers in the house of commons to big that happen, so how do you achieve it, particularly ifjeremy corbyn seems reluctant to back it? we have to get over this argue with the hazard commons. there is known about anything. when we have a 2—party about anything. when we have a 2— party system and about anything. when we have a 2—party system and both leaders are stopping any opposition to the front bench lines of edging, you can never have a majority for anything. so we have a majority for anything. so we have to do at the moment is to find a sensible way through. we have to win the eichmann and understand.
3:10 pm
people like me who believe passionately about things have got to really listen to people on the other side of the honoured with an open hearted way and i have been trying rarely how to do that with colleagues, particularly in the last week andl colleagues, particularly in the last week and i think in the run—up to these next set of next week we can come up with something that can please both sides of both sides are willing to give. that means making sure we can allow rebuild to go past the house of commons provided it is confirmed by the british people and we need to find things that need to reassure people that we condemn this once and for all. it won't have to come back to parliament afterwards and we can have a clear set of endings, and endgame to this enormous challenge facing with the public and parliament and nothing we can do that. i think we can find political solutions as well. as you say, it is about compper myers, i thinkjeremy corbyn is not willing to back a second referendum in some saying they are considering their positions in the party. saying they are considering their
3:11 pm
positions in the partylj saying they are considering their positions in the party. i have seen people throughout this whole process who after the referendum became very concerned, then very anxious, and now that anxiety has come to anger, particularly the way theresa may has been running things through parliament that she had no backing for in the public. only 8% of the public actually think deal is good for our country. there is a lot of anxiety in the party and beyond. i understand completely there are some anxiety and also some anger within the party that jeremy has anxiety and also some anger within the party thatjeremy has not been more enthusiastic for the adapted labour policy of moving for a second referendum but i think right now we need to allay the concerns people have an show that this is about reconciling our communities and our country after we have a boat passed and after brexit happens or not. i believe right now if a bill is rammed through parliament, it will
3:12 pm
ta ke rammed through parliament, it will take a generation to heal. i speak as someone take a generation to heal. i speak as someone in a 70—30 remain constituency. similarly if we tried to renege article 50 without going to renege article 50 without going to the people, the opposite will happen. we think of the contributors brexit, either way it happens, i will stand up and do i best to reconcile the country, which ever way it goes. speaking as a remainer, thatis way it goes. speaking as a remainer, that is my promise to be ball. thank you very much. lfb on brexit, it is ha rd to you very much. lfb on brexit, it is hard to imagine right now. the govenor of the bank of england mark carney has warned that he expects growth this year to be the slowest since 2009 when the economy was in recession. it is forecasting growth of 1.2% this year, down from its previous forecast of 1.7% made in november. he also said that uncertainty over the outcome of the brexit negotiations was causing problems for companies trying to plan for the future. the fog of brexit is causing short—term volatility
3:13 pm
in the economic data, and more fundamentally it is creating a series of tensions in the economy, tensions for business. although many companies are stepping up their contingency planning here is the prime minister in brussels. their leaders don't seem to think you have anything new in the eu? i have had a good series of meetings today, we have had robust concessions but they have been constructive. i have set out our clear position that we must secure legally binding changes to the withdrawal agreement to deal with the concerns that parliament has over the backstop. and taking that changes to the backstop, together with the other work we are doing on workers' rights and other issues, will deliver a stable majority in parliament, that is what i will continue to push for. that is not going to be easy, but crucially presidentjuncker going to be easy, but crucially president juncker and i have going to be easy, but crucially presidentjuncker and i have agreed that talks will now start to find a
3:14 pm
way through this, to find a way to get this over the line and to deliver on the concerns the department has, so we get a majority in parliament. and i am clear that i am going to deliver brexit, i am going to deliver it on time, that what i'm going to do for the british public. i will be negotiating hard in the coming days to dojust public. i will be negotiating hard in the coming days to do just that. you keep asking the changes to the divorce deal, the european union keeps very firmly saying no. donald tusk said some of your colleagues should be sent to hell in the end yesterday, aren't you stuck in some kind of purgatory? no, first of all i have raised with president tusk the language he used yesterday, which was not helpful and caused widespread dismay in the united kingdom. the point i made to him is that we should both be working to ensure that we can deliver a close relationship between the united kingdom and the european union in the future and that is what he should be focusing on. but wider you believe that in the end they may change their minds, because
3:15 pm
everything that comes out of european leaders mouse here says they will not change that part of they will not change that part of the agreement, the divorce deal?” have set out very clearly the position from parliament that we must have legally binding changes to the withdrawal agreement in order to deal with parliament's concerns over the backstop. what i see and hear from leaders is a desire for us to work together to ensure we can deliver the uk leaving the european union with a deal. my work is to deliver brexit, to deliver it on time andl deliver brexit, to deliver it on time and i will be negotiating in the coming days to dojust time and i will be negotiating in the coming days to do just that. there is the prime minister in brussels, just saying that the eu are going to have more foxconn as we knew, that they will find a way through this. she is still looking to secure legally binding changes to the withdrawal agreement. it is not going to be easy, she said, but she is going to be negotiating hard. also interestingly say that she had talked to donald tusk, the president
3:16 pm
of the european council, about those very controversial remarks yesterday, in which he said, he talked about a special place in hell being reserved for those brexiteers who had campaigned to leave the eu without a plan on how to leave, and she said she had raised with mr task the language he had years, which she said was not helpful and had caused widespread dismay at —— mr tusk. the northstowe the prime minister repeating her mantra really that she is going to deliver brexit and deliver it on time. but more talks on the way as she was saying to deliver to tread find a way through the impasse at the moment between her government and the european union. you are watching afternoon live and these are the headlines. theresa may holds talks with eu leaders in brussels, to try and secure changes to her brexit withdrawal agreement. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer
3:17 pm
emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. coming up — the uk's four chief medical officers urge parents to set limits on their children's use of screens. the british horse racing authority says cancelling all horse racing today was essential after an outbreak of equine flu. three vaccinated horses in an active yard in cheshire tested positive for the disease yesterday. jonathan davies will captain wales for the first time, as they make ten changes for their six nations match against italy on saturday. tottenham's wait to move into legit new stadium goes on as they confirm a home derby with arsenal on the 2nd of march will ta ke arsenal on the 2nd of march will take place at wembley. more on this story is just after 3:30pm. anybody seen in the wreckage of the
3:18 pm
plane that was carrying the footballer emiliano insua allah and pilot david ibbotson has been recovered. it has not yet been formally identified. the light aircraft was found on the sea bed in the channel on sunday, two weeks after it disappeared during a flight from nantes in france to cardiff. the body has now been taken to portland in dorset — from where our correspondent duncan kennedy sent us this update. this is the latest stage in what has been an extremely difficult and sensitive process for everyone involved, particularly of course the two men's families. it is not yet clear whose body has been brought short here in portland this morning, whether it is that of emiliano sala or david ibbotson, but police say they are keeping both men's families fully informed. the red and white recovery ship that brought the body to shore docked at portland just after nine o'clock this morning. a few minutes later, this team of forensic police officers and others went on board. they stayed on the ship for more than two hours. emiliano sala and his pilot
3:19 pm
david ibbotson died last month, though it's not clear which body has now been recovered. that operation here in portland will be watched by both men's families at their homes, in argentina, and in north lincolnshire. the two men had been flying from france to wales when their aircraft went down here in the english channel. the search vessel used a submersible to carry out the lifting operation in what was said to be as dignified a way as possible. the men's families have been kept informed throughout. accident investigators say the body was removed separate from the wreckage and that it wasn't possible to recover the plane itself, the cause of poor weather conditions on the surface. that operation has now been suspended for what is called the foreseeable future, although the enquiry team says it has already gathered valuable video evidence. throughout the past two weeks, cardiff city fans have made their grief clear about the loss of emiliano sala.
3:20 pm
many were upset at this week's news that his former club, nantes, had asked cardiff city to pay his £15 million transfer fee before the search for his body has been concluded. this lunchtime, a small convoy of vehicles carrying the body that has been recovered made its way out of portland port. the next stage will be for the dorset coroner to begin his work. duncan kennedy, bbc news in portland. a 24—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of abduction, in the connection with the disappearance of libby squire. the university of hull student has not been seen since leaving a nightclub in the city nearly a week ago. police says finding libby remains their priority. 0ur correspondent, sarah corker is in hull, she gave me this update. this is raglan street in hull where that 24—year—old was arrested
3:21 pm
last night at around 9pm. there has been a continued police presence here throughout the day, we've seen crime scene investigators going in and out of a property here, and humberside police say they are continuing to question that man on suspicion of abduction. despite nearly a week of searches now to try to find libby squire, her whereabouts remain unknown and this is a residential area, it is popular with students, it is close to the university of hull. i spoke to some of the neighbours here this morning, they told me there were around nine police officers here last night, they also saw a car being towed away as part of the investigation, and they say there is a growing feeling of anxiety and worry. it hasjust affected everybody, being such a young girl. when you have kids of your own. i just can't imagine what parents are going through. as a mother yourself, how do you feel? sick. really upset. it as a shock, it is awful
3:22 pm
things like that are still happening, it is. everyone is feeling quite shook up. as a female, people are worried about the student areas not being the safest, and this hasjust kind of contributed to that. i know of my friends, none of us are going out in the dark at the middle abu dhabi minute, it is just a bit scary for everyone. libby's 21 years old, a philosophy student, originally from bucks and moved into a dissident in. she is in her second year of university, and there have been extensive searches over the past week. libby was last seen leaving a nightclub last thursday, she got into a taxi, a dropped her off near her home but it is not believed she went into the property, because just before midnight she was seen on cctv sitting on a bench near her home and she has not been seen since. today, police are continuing their search of a park nearby. we saw them out with sticks looking in undergrowth, in woodland, and then yesterday the regional
3:23 pm
marine unit were wading waist—deep into a pond near her home. later tonight, humberside police have also said they will be parking a billboard up on beverley road, which will have pictures of libby on, and they are hoping that could spur people on to come forward with information as they try to get some clues as to where they can be. parents are being urged to stop their children from using mobile phones during meal times, and take them out of their bedrooms at night. the advice comes from all four of the uk's chief medical officers — they recommend that children go no more than two hours without taking a break from screen—based activities. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. learning about internet safety starts early. important lessons for these liverpool primary school children around information and identity. the dos and don'ts
3:24 pm
of the online world. the issue of consent is one of the areas covered by new advice from the uk's chief medical officers. it includes talking about safely sharing photos and information online, keeping phones out of bedrooms to help with sleep, and taking a break to get moving after a couple of hours on screens. advice designed to help parents navigate their way through a new and unfamiliar landscape. the advice we give is based on strong evidence about good, healthy development of children and young people. why have we given it related to this issue? we had a careful discussion among the chief medical officers and we believe that we should adopt, in this country, a precautionary approach to protecting our children. so, how many hours of screen time do these children have each day? six! two and a half. it depends.
3:25 pm
it's very hard to get off it, because you just want to carry on watching it over and over again. if you're playing a game, and you're in the middle of the game, then i feel like it's hard to come off it. do you take your phone into your bedroom at night? i don't have one. and what about their teacher? six! six. on a work day, six. for stacey feenan, it's important her pupils' lives have a healthy balance. they should have opportunities to engage in technology but they're also just getting that variety in life so that they understand the opportunities that are available for them in real life as well as online life. how to police and balance their children's use of screens can be a challenge for many parents, so for mum kate any guidance from experts is welcome. ifeel like, being a parent, you're constantly learning and informing yourself, and getting the best advice you can. so i think that's enormously helpful. i can imagine for some parents
3:26 pm
they'd feel like they are just being told what to do and they feel they've got it sorted and they might resent that. but personally speaking, yeah, i'm really glad somebody‘s going to give me a bit of input there. the advice also contains a voluntary code of conduct for industry, something that will no doubt be explored when health ministers meet bosses from instagram later today. dominic hughes, bbc news, liverpool. we are going to discuss this now with belinda palmer, a campaign against tech addiction. thank you for being with us. what do you think about this advice we are hearing now run the chief medical officers?” was very run the chief medical officers?” was very disappointed when i read the advice, because it was very obvious stuff, like we need to get our children to move around. you know, we know that as parents. the difficulty is, we are competing with is amazing technology that gives such good dopamine hits to our children that me as a mum, i can't compete with that. so you think it is of these youngsters, teenage,
3:27 pm
teenagers, are actually addicted in some way to this technology? absolutely. my nephew was one of the first to be diagnosed with games addiction in this country, and i've seen addiction in this country, and i've seen the impact that technology can have on families, on relationships. then i think with my own children, so then i think with my own children, soi then i think with my own children, so i have an 11—year—old and a 12 rod, that a lot of my time is spent arguing and removing the device, and i don't want my relationship to be based on that. and i'm also worried about the next generation having a lack of empathy, you know, having a conversation, be being able to read body language and verbal cues, we are missing out, our children are missing out and i think it has become a real problem. let's remind ourselves of what this advice is, we can see some of it on the screen, not using mobile phones at the dinner table is one. keeping screens out of the bedroom at bedtime, and then another piece of advice is
3:28 pm
talking as a family, parents should give their children proper attention and talk as a family about giving safe online and about cyber bullying and about what charge should do if they are worried. a lot of parents would say all of that seems no sensible. it is sensible, iwould say it is bordering on patronising. very few parents don't give their children proper attention. the difficulty is not the rules, it is actually implement them, because the problem when the children are little, it was very easy to take the devices of my kids. but now iphone is part of their identity, for someone is part of their identity, for someone at secondary school, a child, it is part of who they are. that is row difficult to remove that device. so yes, i agree with all that. if you have compliant children who do all the ratings, this is great but what i was looking for here was some real concrete advice. how many hours a day, what sort of things should we be asking the
3:29 pm
technology companies to do? i would love to have addictiveness ratings on the games that we give our children. because of the same way when you are buying food from you now how many calories, salt content, ifi now how many calories, salt content, if i had known how addictive fortnight, and yes i have to mention it, was, would i actually have let my children play it? i don't know. but who is going to come up with an objective definition of how addictive or not addictive a game or any piece of technology is, certainly the manufacturers aren't going to do that, are they? they have to take some responsibility, if you have the volume of products they are making, and the ride indeed budgets, google's r&d budget was around $60 billion last year. for every dollar they make they pour it into making the algorithm better so that our kids get more and more addicted and more and more dopamine hits. what they should be funding is mental health research. we have a mental health research. we have a mental health epidemic in this country. we are seeing young people, 40% of under 25—year—old saying they
3:30 pm
are lonely. this has to be correlated to technology. they need to ta ke correlated to technology. they need to take some responsible at it. i'm sure the manufacturers would say they are just ran to make better games, not trying to make more addictive games. if that were true, why do the ceo of netflix when he was asked who was the competition, he didn't say other broadcasters, he said sleep. this the purpose of these companies is to better connect us, to bring us closer. the reality is, families every day that i talk to are struggling with how to navigate this and it is changing so fast, it's really ha rd to and it is changing so fast, it's really hard to navigate it. you mention the difficulty of talking to older children. so you have a teenage son or daughter who is 17, 18 or 19. how do you talk to them about limiting their screen time, not taking the phone into their bedtime at night? you can stop them
3:31 pm
at meal times but it is hard to say you are not allowed it in the bedroom. it is really hard. what do you say to parents? i have formed a pa ct you say to parents? i have formed a pact with some of the other parents, admittedly my children are younger. we have got together and said, what is realistic, and so the technology does not come about pressure, but pleasure. technology is a wonderful thing. we came up with guidelines and then communicated that to the children. you are all doing the same, that took the sting out of it. for a 17—year—old, it is harder. it is difficult, we need to recognise that. the more i have researched it, the more i have looked at the impact on the brain, the levels of dopamine that i produced and you compare that to gambling, you start to realise it is serious. i think with a 17 or 18—year—old, you can give them real fa cts . 18—year—old, you can give them real facts. what these guidelines did not
3:32 pm
do is they did not give us the facts of the impact of technology. we have some research out there that is provocative, that i would want our children to be aware of. thank you. very interesting to talk to you. let's see what the weather is doing. lucy has the forecast for us. some of us saw a wet and windy weather today. the next wet and windy weather is not far off. the next arm is storm eric, the deepening area of low pressure coming in from the west. bringing wet and windy conditions into saturday. clear spells tonight for a north—east england and scotland. a touch of frost but we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west. tomorrow, plenty of cloud around. outbreaks of rain initially. heaviest in the west but it will
3:33 pm
work east. thunder and lightning possible. persistent for north—west scotland. the risk of a localised flooding here. 11 celsius. strong winds. gusts of 45 to 55 mph. and western coasts, up to 70 mph. due to care. goodbye. you are watching bbc news. the headlines... theresa may has insisted that legally binding changes are needed for the brexit withdrawal agreement after she held what she cold robust but constructive talks in brussels.” what she cold robust but constructive talks in brussels. i am clear that i am going to deliver brexit and deliver it on time. that is what i am going to do for the british public. i will be good negotiating hard to do that. jeremy corbyn has set out five demands that
3:34 pm
could see labour back in the brexit deal in parliament. a search team recovers a body from the plane. a man is arrested on suspicion of abducting the student who went missing in hull one week ago. let's get all the latest sport for a year now. let's start off talking about the sport that isn't happening and thatis the sport that isn't happening and that is horse racing. no horse racing in the uk today. none at all. there has been an outbreak of equine flu and there is concern in the horse racing industry because the three horses that tested positive for the disease yesterday had already been vaccinated. if you think how much a horse travels on a
3:35 pm
day—to—day basis, takes one to pass the infection and they go back to the infection and they go back to the stables across the uk. it has been shut down and the infected horses have been at scotland. they we re horses have been at scotland. they were at the yard of donald mccain. the son of ginger mccain, the trainer of red rum back in the 70s. no suspicion he has done anything wrong. it is not considered fatal, horses suffer similar symptoms to a human. it is contagious, but not to humans. it is an essential move to stop any meetings today. one was due to be at doncaster. very different pictures coming in from there, with nobody attending. another has been called off saturday at wolverhampton. the economic consequences of an uncontrolled
3:36 pm
outbreak are potentially significant. that is why we have acted swiftly late last night to cancel the racing today. we understand the importance of acting in sucha understand the importance of acting in such a way, in an appropriate way to protect the industry. they also say it is too early to say or speculate whether the outbreak could affect the cheltenham festival. it is just over affect the cheltenham festival. it isjust over one month affect the cheltenham festival. it is just over one month away. affect the cheltenham festival. it isjust over one month away. from racing to rugby, more six nations coming up. yes, we are looking forward to it after the first weekend. a raft of changes amongst some of those teams, particularly those that did well, including wales, who have made ten changes to their team against italy on saturday. a world cup in mind perhaps. the normal skipper is on the bench. four players will make
3:37 pm
their tournament debut as warren gatland decides to rest some who played in the first game at the weekend. scotland have made four changes for their match against ireland also on saturday. kinghorn has been dropped to the bench, despite scoring a hat—trick over italy. sean maitland, a first choice, he is back from injury from the game. rob carney‘s return is one of five changes made by the manager for ireland. he replaces robbie henshaw who picked up a knock in training. tottenham's wait to move to the new stadium goes on. their game against arsenal will take place at wembley. it was meant to open in september and all of their matches have been at the national stadium. there will not be a cap on capacity, with nearly 90,000 as a result able
3:38 pm
to attend. aleksander ceferin has been re—elected as uefa president after running unopposed. he'll now serve a further four year term as the man in charge of european football's governing body. meanwhile, fa chairman greg clarke has been elected as a fifa vice president — also for the next four years. it's a position that's reserved for a british representative and clarke beat irish fa boss david martin to the role where he replaces david gill — the former manchester united chief executive. sarah taylor has been recalled to the england squad for their tour to india and sri lanka. the wicketkeeper—batter missed the team's run to the world t20 final as part of the ongoing management of her anxiety. but she's been named in the squad alonside bowler katherine brunt, who's back from injury. i am well. i'm very well. i've had a long winter. yes, training hard. it is nice to be back with all the girls. they have been away in the winter. i am proud what they did in the west indies. it is nice to be back in full
3:39 pm
kit and training again. that is all your support for now. thank you. see you later. the number of fatal stabbings in england and wales has hit its highest level since records began in 1946. the office for national statistics says 285 people were killed with a knife or sharp instrument in the year to last march. 36% of victims were under 25 years old. and the number of victims who are black is also at its highest level. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw has given me more details. this isn't something that is a ten or 20 year high, it is the worse since the second world war in terms of the number of victims died having being stabbed.
3:40 pm
the increase year on year, well, it was a significant rise. the previous high was 268. 285 is a significantjump there. in terms of who the victims are, we are seeing more younger people being victims than before. the biggest rises were in the 16 to 24 age bracket. up 45%. 25-34 up 23%. among black people, 25% of stabbing victims who died were black. that is the highest number and percentage 70, since 1997, since those figures were first compiled. we can see that it as a problem that predominantly affects younger people, black people are disproportionately affected in terms of being victims of this. and the rise is considerable. energy companies have been given
3:41 pm
the go—ahead to increase gas and electricity prices from april for customers on standard variable rates. it means more than half of uk households are set to see their bills go up. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. cooking, lighting, heating, you can't avoid paying for it, butjackie, from south manchester, bought the price cap on standard variable tariffs, would protect herfrom increases. now she finds it doesn't. in my mind if somebodyjust says to me, we are capping your price, i would think that's great, i don't have to worry about it and think about it, but it isn't, is it? it isn't true. the result of the cap being movable is that the maximum bill for the average home will go up to £1254 a year for those on standard rate, an increase of £117, although that will depend on how much you use because the cap is actually on each unit. the blame is being put on higher world energy prices but in stockport
3:42 pm
nearby there is worry about being able to cope it's ridiculous, theyjust keep on and on with this. it's just crazy. this changing your supplier all the time, we shouldn't have to be doing that. we spend a ridiculous amount, we were struggling at one point, we couldn't afford it, could we, because of that, but i don't think they should put it up. if there was no cap we have a lot of evidence to show consumers would have been paying a higher price, £75—100 more, so people are benefiting from the cap and can be assured they are paying a fair price for their energy. to customers, the idea of a price cap that can be lifted seems unfair. it looks like they are having to pay more so that the suppliers' profits can be protected. i don't get that argument, companies, because of competition, are having to force down costs, they are having to force through efficiencies and quite simply that is costing companies and it's costing jobs.
3:43 pm
there is a way out to shop around for a cheaper deal, which is what jackie is already resolved to do. workers on the south western railway are to stage fresh strikes. this is strike action that is planned for february 22. march the 9th and march the 16th. this is the rmt union saying they will have fresh strikes on those days. february 22, march nine and 16th. they voted in favour of industrial action for guards on trains dispute. south railway trains. march the 9th and 16th and february the 22nd. also, another
3:44 pm
line of breaking news coming in to us line of breaking news coming in to us from donald tusk. a tweet they from brussels saying... we heard from theresa may earlier on saying she is going to negotiate hard, that she still believes she can deliver brexit and brexit on time. donald tusk, who got into hot water yesterday with his controversial remarks for a special place in hell for brexiteers who campaigned for brexit without spelling out how brexit would be achieved, he has just spelling out how brexit would be achieved, he hasjust tweeted spelling out how brexit would be achieved, he has just tweeted they are saying there is no breakthrough in sight but that the talks will continue. theresa may having said she talked to theresa may about the
3:45 pm
hell remarks and said that they had caused widespread dismay and that she was not happy with them. more from brussels later on. also more coming up from then bland. that is in one minute. let's have a look at our headlines. theresa may has said she has had robust but constructive discussions in brussels. jeremy corbyn has set out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. a search team has recovered a body from the plane carrying the footballer. i am then bland with the business headlines. jaguar land rover has announced a pre—tax loss of £3.4 billion for the last three months of 2018, most of that down to an accounting charge.
3:46 pm
the company lost that down to an accounting charge. the com pa ny lost £273 that down to an accounting charge. the company lost £273 million. the bank of england has kept interest rates at hold but cut its growth forecast to 1.2% for this year, the lowest a ny forecast to 1.2% for this year, the lowest any decade. more than half of british households are likely to see an increase in cost of energy in april, after regulator of gem raised price caps. we are going to talk about reviewing businesses online. i'm sure if you leave a review, you are very i'm sure if you leave a review, you are very fair. meticulously fair. very kind to say so. not everybody is. this is the problem, review sites find that somebody leaves malicious or unfair reviews and so sites like trust pilots will allow firms to flag those that are suspicious or unjustified. those are temporarily hidden while they are
3:47 pm
investigated. the problem is, the pendulum can swing the other way and some companies may be abusing that and cheating the system, flagging up all negative comments whether justified or not. i reading something about this? trust pilot has decided to make it easier to decide when companies are trying to suppress legitimate complaints. the service is going to reveal how many reviews companies have flagged over the last year. also it will reveal how many. we are back online and how many were deleted. we can get into the detail with glenn, the senior vice president. he in our is business room and joins us live. vice president. he in our is business room and joins us livem this a widespread problem? it is quite a small problem. the vast majority of companies is the platform the way it is meant to be used, to listen to reviews and opinions and respond and do that in
3:48 pm
an open and transparent space. there are companies, you mentioned unjustified reviews, that is subjective. companies cannot remove if you because we do not like it. only if it is breaks a rule, has fowl language, slanderous in some way. they can report on them then. what we are doing is making the behaviour transparent. you are seeing even if a company says that a review has been left that is factually untrue, they cannot then flagged that have it removed?m factually untrue, they cannot then flagged that have it removed? if it isa flagged that have it removed? if it is a legitimate customer that has had an experience and the say something that is untrue, the smart thing for a company to do is to respond openly and have a dialogue for all to see that they have corrected it i corrected the customer or made good what the complaint was. where they cannot do is censor that view because they cannot like it. is there any
3:49 pm
evidence to how much of an impact, positive and negative, review sites have on the fortunes of a business? yes, we in a world where the internet is an open space and therefore consumers have power, the power to share their views, and others to listen to them. it does impact companies. gone are the days when you can simply make claims about who you are and what you stand for through advertising and it is a one—way street. consumers have that voice and companies need to respond. the vast majority of companies are using voice to innovate faster and show the world that they listen to customers and care. it is a positive thing apart from the few cases where companies are trying to be manipulative. something else i want to pick up with you. some people have complained that if they leave a negative review, it is flagged for concerned by the company, gets hidden. if it is investigated and it
3:50 pm
is found the review should be up there for all to see, gets reinstated but it is hidden under my recent comments. some people say is it not fairer to reinstate it at the top so it has the prominence it did top so it has the prominence it did to begin with? we discuss that. what most people will do is look at the negative reviews. i know when i go on to negative reviews. i know when i go ontoa negative reviews. i know when i go on to a website and i want to look at the company and what people are saying, you can filter it by the one, two, three, four orfive saying, you can filter it by the one, two, three, four or five star reviews. they tend to flow in chronological order, rather than the point of the eye reinstated. it can be discovered easily, particularly if something that was a bad experience and it sits in the category of the one or two star reviews. just before you go, and elaine, if you were reviewing this programme for us, elaine, if you were reviewing this programme for us, how many reviews would you give us? what is the
3:51 pm
review of our programme? 4.5 stars. i think we will take that.” review of our programme? 4.5 stars. i think we will take that. i was hoping forfive, i think we will take that. i was hoping for five, definitely. close. we will have to find out from him later. when you go through online reviews, you tend to go with the majority. if there is one bad one or one good one, you think that is not representative. discount the outliers, don't you? that is a smart approach. it is all subjective, isn't it. it is hard to see what is an unfair review. let's review the market. the ftse100 down not as much as earlier but firmly in the negative. they pull it down by a fall in some shares. regarding changes in customer behaviour last year. a big fire at one of the warehouses. the pound is stronger against both the euro and the
3:52 pm
dollar, despite the bank of england keeping interest rates on hold. the feeling is that perhaps investors are focused on brexit developments and have priced in the expectation of interest rates staying on hold. we will keep an eye on any movements and update you in about an hour. thank you very much indeed. the british space rover has been named after the british scientist. been named after the english scientist, rosalind franklin. a panel chose the name from more than 36,000 suggestions submitted from across europe. rosalind franklin played an integral role in the discovery of the structure of dna. the astronaut tim peake unveiled the name at the airbus factory in stevenage where the robot is being put together. reeta chakrabarti has this report. in around two years' time the six—wheeled robot will travel across the red planet in search of life. equipped with a state—of—the—art drill capable of digging two metres down, the rosalind franklin rover will look for organic life deep below the surface.
3:53 pm
last november, scientists agreed she should land in an area of mars called oxia planum, a surface plain containing clays and minerals formed by ancient seas billions of years ago. it's thought that any sign of life is likely to be in a place where there once was water. 0nce safely landed, the rover will drive autonomously on mars for at least seven months, allowing scientists to focus on collecting data rather than directing its every move. the mission, led by the european space agency, is due to launch next summer at around the same time as nasa's separate exploration programme, mars 2020. with fewer than half of all missions sent to mars ever successful, scientists will be hoping luck is on their side for rosalind's launch. 0ur science correspondent was at the announcement earlier today finding
3:54 pm
out more about the unsung science pain it will be honoured. i am here at mark—up myers were this prototype rover has been put through its paces. it is designed to go through the martian domain. 0ne vital element is missing and that is the name. it is the rosalind franklin rover. i am joined name. it is the rosalind franklin rover. iam joined by name. it is the rosalind franklin rover. i am joined by tim name. it is the rosalind franklin rover. iam joined by tim peake. why is this rosalind the rover?” rover. iam joined by tim peake. why is this rosalind the rover? i great british scientist who did so much to unlock the secrets to human life, dna. it is only fitting that the rover is named after rosalind because it will be searching for signs of past life on mars. you have got the public involved with this naming process. it was opened up to the public. over 36,000 naming process. it was opened up to the public. over36,000 entries, a huge response. there is so much public appetite for these
3:55 pm
expeditions. this is a big mission for the european space agency. why is it so vital to get out there and get to mars? it is an exciting mission. it is going to drill two metres under the surface of mars, thatis metres under the surface of mars, that is where we stand the best chance of finding molecules on mars. it is going to an ancient landing site where there was once an ocean. we know that 3.7 years ago mars and earth were similar. life could have evolved on mars as well. thank you, tim peake. this is an robotic mission heading to myers. it is being assembled together at the moment. scientists are working around the clock. —— to mars. it will be a fitting honour for the women who was an unsung hero and will have this legacy on mars. he wonderful tribute to her. let's see if it finds any evidence of life on
3:56 pm
mars. let's see what the weather is doing to us. we have wet and windy weather. the potentialfor some disruption. very windy conditions. these are the strongest wind gust. 79 mph. that is courtesy of an area of low pressure. the wind is easing through the afternoon. the next area of low pressure is hot on its heels. a deepening area of low pressure. it has been named star eric. windy conditions as it moves towards us. here we are through to night. showery outbreaks of rain. frost for eastern parts of scotland and north—east england. outbreaks of rain. you can see the isobars are tightening as well. fairly close
3:57 pm
together. the winds will start to pick up as we move into tomorrow. there is the potential for pick up as we move into tomorrow. there is the potentialfor some disruption friday into saturday could see some disruption for travel. here we are first thing on friday. outbreaks of rain. another heavier band of rain working its way east through the day and the potential for thunder and lightning. persistent rain for north—west scotland. the potential for localised flooding. let's take a look at the wind gust. here we are at three o'clock in the afternoon. around 45 to 55 mph in line. up to 74 western coastal areas. the temperatures aren't going to be doing too badly in the south. 11 celsius. cooler in the north. 0nce you add in the wind, not feeling mild. 0vernight into saturday, the
3:58 pm
area of the pressure works further east. we will hold on to strong winds, particularly for northern ireland, the central belt of scotla nd ireland, the central belt of scotland and northern england. saturday, some outbreaks of rain in the north. it drier and brighter start for the night. rain moving into the south west. a maximum of 11 celsius. the potentialfor some disruption. stay across the forecast. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at four. theresa may says she's had a series of "robust" but "constructive" discussions with senior eu figures in brussels. she criticises the comments made on
3:59 pm
brexit. i raised the language that he used yesterday which was not helpful and caused widespread dismay in the united kingdom. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal in parliament. a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. i will tell you about a raft of changes for the six nations matches this weekend. thank you and lucy will have the weather for us. some wet and windy, potentially destructive weather courtesy of storm eric tomorrow. i will bring you up to date. hello everyone, this
4:00 pm
is afternoon live. i'm ben brown. theresa may says she has held a series of "robust but constructive" meetings with senior eu officials in brussels, including the head of the european commission, jean claude juncker. mrs may has been asking for changes to the withdrawal deal. but the commission has again ruled that out. donald tusk tweeted there was no breakthrough in the discussions. let's go to my colleague in brussels. theresa may has come to brussels with a message that the european union would have expected. she has told them that he withdraw deal has told them that he withdraw deal has to change if it has a chance of getting through the uk parliament. in return, the eu has given theresa may a message she would have
4:01 pm
expected, the withdrawal agreement cannot be opened but the eu is willing to continue to listen to the uk. so, talk of listening, talk of further talks but on the fundamentals, no major shift and a little bit earlier the prime minister spoke. i've had a good series of meetings today, we've had robust discussions that they have been constructive. what i set out is our clear position we may seek you a legally binding changes to the withdrawal agreement to deal with the concerns that parliament has over the backstop. taking that changes to that backstop together with the other work we're doing on workers' rights and other issues, we will deliver a stable majority in parliament and that is what i will continue to push for. it is what i will continue to push for. it's not going to be easy but president junkerandl going to be easy but president junker and i have agreed that talks will start to find a way through this, to find a way to get this over the line and to deliver on the cancer is the parliament have so we get a majority in parliament. i am clear that i am going to deliver an
4:02 pm
exit, deliver it on time, that is what i'm going to do to the public. you keep asking for changes to the withdrawal agreement, the divorce deal, the european union firmly keeps saying no. donald tusk says some of your colour should be sent to hell. and you stuck in some kind of purgatory? i have raised with president tusk the language he used yesterday which was not helpful and caused widespread dismay in the united kingdom. the point i made to him is we should both be working to ensure we can deliver a close relationship between the uk, the european union in future and that is what he should be focused on. why do you believe in the end they may change their mains? everything that comes out of malice here say they will not change that part of the agreement. i've set out clearly position from parliament that we should have legally binding changes
4:03 pm
in orderto do should have legally binding changes in order to do with partners's concerns with backstop. what i see and hear from leaders is a desire for this to work together to make sure we can deliver the uk leaving the eu with a deal. my work is to deliver brexit, deliver it on time and i'm going to be negotiating hard in the coming days to dojust and i'm going to be negotiating hard in the coming days to do just that. dining me is a polish eu affairs specialist and another eu specialist, the bbc‘s at them framing. donald tusk has tweeted there is no end to the talks. the eu site, the ones who have been talking speaking have been less positive about how things are looking. i've just come back from the eu parliament, and they started off their remarks by saying we are just weeks away from a human political
4:04 pm
and economic catastrophe which is no deal. it is interesting that the emphasis coming from the eu side is less positive. that is repeated behind as well in that the eu talk about these further talks that will ta ke about these further talks that will take place between their negotiators and the uk negotiators as an opportunity to listen to british ideas. they are trying to dampen down the idea these further talks and we will see stephen barclay meeting with michel barnier on monday. today we could be talking about further talking. people watching would be thinking why can't they just thrash this watching would be thinking why can't theyjust thrash this issue out rather than thrash out when they are going to thrash it out? that is what the eu wants theresa may to do. they wa nt the eu wants theresa may to do. they want a the eu wants theresa may to do. they wa nt a cross— party the eu wants theresa may to do. they want a cross—party consensus in the houses of parliament for a more come a closer future relationship with the eu than the one she's been pursuing. they wanted to turn her back on her extremely eurosceptic collea g u es back on her extremely eurosceptic colleagues in the tory party who are
4:05 pm
demanding changes to the backstop, they wanted to say no to that i want her to embrace jeremy corbyn they wanted to say no to that i want her to embracejeremy corbyn on the other parties for a closer future relationship. that is what they are still pushing for. you are a man in demand, you need to go and speak on bbc radio, i will let you go. let's talk about your view on this. how do you describe what we have seen today in brussels? we will probably find leaks from behind the scenes, meetings we still don't know. from observing the two meetings, especially in the commission and in the european council, i think you can say that the atmosphere of this visit was extremely cold from the start. when theresa may arrived in brussels she didn't receive the famousjuicy case brussels she didn't receive the famous juicy case of the president of the commission, during the meeting with donna tesco there was
4:06 pm
no media opportunity. strangely, just when he met the prime minister of romania, the opportunity was there. things do get cold before agreements because this is a negotiation and everyone has their own tactics. in reality, the european union is going to give the uk something, is not going to open up uk something, is not going to open upa uk something, is not going to open up a withdrawal agreement but it will look at that political declaration and add something mortar that to help the uk out. but it will not be law binding. the compromises needed from the british site also. cani needed from the british site also. can i ask you about it donald tusk? what you do make of a special place in hell, and yesterday? it is not the first time that he is putting this kind of strong statement. it is not the first time he is directing it to the british prime minister. here in brussels, we all understand the brexit negotiations is a living hell for him because it is for him
4:07 pm
to finish them. in a few months ago in salzburg, he published a picture of theresa may eating the cake and suggesting the british wanted to have their cake and eat it. also, for example, to was donald trump in the future come in the past he was also making these tweets that were controversial. before the nato summit he said that having friends like america today, when you have friends like america you don't need enemies. he likes to put these kind of statement that on not a diplomatic from time to time. he was like that as the prime minister of poland in the past. those of you watching, if you're expecting any resolution to this any time soon, almost everyone i've spoken to in brussels expect these talks with the uk and the eu to go well into march. you could be there for a long time! the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has set out five demands
4:08 pm
for his party to support the prime minister's brexit deal calling for a sensible agreement that wins the support of parliament, and bring the country together. in a letter to the prime minister, mr corbyn said labour wants a uk wide customs union, close alignment with the single market, "dynamic alignment" on rights and protections, "clear commitments" on participation in eu agencies and funding programmes and "unambiguous agreements" on the detail of future security arrangements. 0ur chief political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster. these are the five demands from jeremy corbyn. looking at them, customs union for are to something the prime minister has said again and again she would not agree to, it is one of her red lines. exactly. 0nce is one of her red lines. exactly. once she is not prepared to move on.
4:09 pm
i suppose the question is, if it gets to the point in barge some time when the options are no deal because she can get her deal through, because she at that point than shifted to what is a much softer brexit? could be useful to her in some ways to have this letter from jeremy corbyn which you can wave in front of the brexiteers and her party who are refusing to back her deal. she might say this is the only option. it's not one she wants to go down because she knows it could split her party. she would rather get the support of her own sight and the dup. jeremy corbyn has divisions in the party, he is reluctant to go toa in the party, he is reluctant to go to a second referendum, the policy was thrashed out at the labour party conference last year as a compromise saying if there is no general election, we are not going to back in as deal but all options will remain on the table including
4:10 pm
another referendum. the problem with the latter is that there was no sign ofa the latter is that there was no sign of a second referendum. that caused unhappiness in the party. this is jeremy corbyn explaining why he wrote the letter to theresa may. what we have set out in that letter is the principles behind the amendment that i've put to parliament which included a requirement to legislate for possible future referendum, mine was the only amendment that including that. it was debated last week. principal points are, we need a customs union with european union, we need a comprehensive trade agreement with the eu and a dynamic relationship on rights in work, environmental protection and consumer protection to this country doesn't consistently fall behind in the future. half of our trade is with europe, a lot of our manufacturing industries are very frightened and worried that on the 29th of march they will be a cliff edge. they can't be a cliff edge. we
4:11 pm
will do everything we can to prevent this cliff edge exit. there was clarification there from jeremy corbyn mentioning another referendum, keir starmer also coming out to say this letter doesn't mean that another referendum is off the table, it is part of the policy but there are a group of labour mps who are pushing for the so—called peoples votes, who are very mistrustful ofjeremy corbyn. they think he doesn't want to go down that route and one of them, 0wen smith, was asked whether he could even consider leaving the labour party. i think that is a question that i will have to consider. the truth is, brexit i don't think it is compatible with my values, it is a right—wing ideological project, it isa right—wing ideological project, it is a nativist project, it was fuelled by lies, delivered
4:12 pm
deceitfully in 2016. we've got to be truthful about all of those things, we got a challenge for the tories are currently doing and we've got to be honest with people. there is going to be bad for britain. owen smith's point is he thinks brexit will make people poorer, he doesn't think the labour party should have and if place in time to facilitate brexit happening. as we have seen from jeremy corbyn so far, he's not opposing brexit because he is mindful of all those millions of labour voters who voted for brexit. thank you, our chief political correspondent there from westminster. earlier, the labour mp, lucy powell told me why she supported jeremy corbyn's letter. this is a significant move both in terms of the substance of a jeremy corbyn set out but also the tone and
4:13 pm
the politics. this is a genuine offer to try and break the brexit paralysis. i think that's what the mark vast majority of the country are crying out for. he wants a permanent customs union and theresa may has said again and again she doesn't want that, it is one of her red lines. the prime minister really needs to come off some of her red lines as her red lines have got into a situation where the house of commons has rejected her proposals with a huge majority. those red lines really are now past their sell by date. why is jeremy corbyn offering this now? we have 50 days from brexit. he could have done this yea rs from brexit. he could have done this years ago. to be fair, he did. is a central message of his speech at conference. he has had talks with the prime minister, and the prime
4:14 pm
minister has not been wanting to engage with him. to be fair, he did make a big offer in his conference speech back in september that he wa nted speech back in september that he wanted to work with the prime minister to sort brexit out. what the country is crying out for, and what i sense in parliament now, mps from all different sizes, different parties, whether they are leave or remain or something in between, there is a growing mood of people wanting to compromise, find a way through this deadlock, to avoid the catastrophe that would be no deal. have you been listening to what some of your fellow mps have been saying about this? let me tell you what took una said. he has been saying, this offer from took una said. he has been saying, this offerfrom jeremy took una said. he has been saying, this offer from jeremy corbyn is not opposition, i hate to think that all those young voters who flock to labourfor those young voters who flock to labour for the first time in 2017 will make of this, vote labour, get a tory brexit, they will feel they've been sold down the river.”
4:15 pm
understand where he's coming from. he wants to stay in the eu and he wa nts to he wants to stay in the eu and he wants to do that by whatever means necessary. we had a referendum two yea rs necessary. we had a referendum two years ago, that referendum did deliver a result. it was a fairly decisive result. it is ourjob now to try and work that through. lucy powell there, the labour mp talking to mea powell there, the labour mp talking to me a little bit earlier. the governor of the bank of england has warned he expects growth this year to be the slowest since 2009. the economy was in recession then. it is forecasting growth of 1.2% this year, that is down from the previous forecast of 1.7% made in november. he said the uncertainty of the outcome of the brexit negotiations was causing problems for companies trying to plan for the future. the fog of brexit is causing
4:16 pm
volatility and it is creating a series of tensions in the economy. tensions for business. although many companies are stepping up their contingency planning, the economy as a whole is still not yet prepared for a no deal no transition exit. it is just for a no deal no transition exit. it isjust one for a no deal no transition exit. it is just one example, half the businesses in the latest survey by the banks agents are not ready for such a possibility, and on balance respondents expect investment to contract substantially if it were to occur. let me bring you the latest on the study within reporting in other sports bulletins. they will be no horse racing in britain because of equine influenza. we are now hearing that racing will not resume until wednesday the 13th of february at the earliest. the decision will be made on monday, the 11th of
4:17 pm
february as to whether racing can resume on wednesday the 13th of february. this is from the british horse racing authority. it has taken the decision today racing won't resume in britain until next wednesday at the earliest. this includes fixtures, programmed by the pointer points authority, the bha's veterinary tea m pointer points authority, the bha's veterinary team has been in contact with more than 50 trainers and vets to allow it to make an informed assessment of the risk of equine flu spreading. they are saying no further positive tests have been received at least three more days are required before it is possible to make a decision about whether it is safe to resume racing. just to recap, there is no horse racing today across the uk and the british horse racing authority now saying
4:18 pm
that they won't be any until wednesday the 13th. that is at the earliest. they will make a decision on monday the 11th as to whether it can resume next wednesday. much more on that in other sports bulletin which is coming up in about ten minutes. a body seen in the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer, emiliano sala and the pilot david ibbotson, has been recovered. it hasn't yet been formally identified. the light aircraft was found on the seabed in the channel on sunday, two weeks after it disappeared during a flight from nantes in france to cardiff. the body has now been taken to portland in dorset from where our correspondent duncan kennedy sent us this update. this is the latest stage in what has been an extremely difficult and sensitive process for everyone involved, particularly of course the two men's families. it is not yet clear whose body has been brought short here in portland this morning, whether it is that of emiliano sala or david ibbotson, but police say they are keeping both men's families fully informed.
4:19 pm
the red and white recovery ship that brought the body to shore docked at portland just after nine o'clock this morning. a few minutes later, this team of forensic police officers and others went on board. they stayed on the ship for more than two hours. emiliano sala and his pilot david ibbotson died last month, though it's not clear which body has now been recovered. that operation here in portland will be watched by both men's families at their homes, in argentina, and in north lincolnshire. the two men had been flying from france to wales when their aircraft went down here in the english channel. the search vessel used a submersible to carry out the lifting operation in what was said to be as dignified a way as possible. the men's families have been kept informed throughout. accident investigators say the body was removed separate
4:20 pm
from the wreckage and that it wasn't possible to recover the plane itself, the cause of poor weather conditions on the surface. that operation has now been suspended for what is called the foreseeable future, although the enquiry team says it has already gathered valuable video evidence. throughout the past two weeks, cardiff city fans have made their grief clear about the loss of emiliano sala. many were upset at this week's news that his former club, nantes, had asked cardiff city to pay his £15 million transfer fee before the search for his body has been concluded. this lunchtime, a small convoy of vehicles carrying the body that has been recovered made its way out of portland port. the next stage will be for the dorset coroner to begin his work. duncan kennedy, bbc news in portland. workers on south western railway are
4:21 pm
to have a fresh strike starting this month. workers have voted in favour of continuing with strike action. in their dispute over guards on trains. it is the strikes will take place in february the 22nd and then on the ninth and 16th of march. a 24—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of abduction, in the connection with the disappearance of libby squire. the university of hull student has not been seen since leaving a nightclub in the city nearly a week ago. police says finding libby remains their priority. this is raglan street in hull where that 24—year—old was arrested last night at around 9pm. there has been a continued police presence here throughout the day, we've seen crime scene investigators going in and out of a property here, and humberside police say they are continuing to question that man on suspicion of abduction. despite nearly a week of searches
4:22 pm
now to try to find libby squire, her whereabouts remain unknown, and this is a residential area, it is popular with students, it is close to the university of hull. i spoke to some of the neighbours here this morning, they told me there were around nine police officers here last night, they also saw a car being towed away as part of the investigation, and they say there is a growing feeling of anxiety and worry. it hasjust affected everybody, being such a young girl. when you have kids of your own. i just can't imagine what parents are going through. as a mother yourself, how do you feel? sick. really upset. it is a shock, it is awful things like that are still happening, it is. everyone is feeling quite shook up. as a female, people are worried about the student areas not being the safest, and this hasjust kind of contributed to that. i know of my friends,
4:23 pm
none of us are going out in the dark at the middle abu dhabi minute, it is just a bit scary for everyone. libby's 21 years old, a philosophy student, originally from bucks and moved into a dissident in. she is in her second year of university, and there have been extensive searches over the past week. libby was last seen leaving a nightclub last thursday, she got into a taxi, a dropped her off near her home but it is not believed she went into the property, because just before midnight she was seen on cctv sitting on a bench near her home and she has not been seen since. today, police are continuing their search of a park nearby. we saw them out with sticks looking in undergrowth, in woodland, and then yesterday the regional marine unit were wading waist—deep into a pond near her home. later tonight, humberside police have also said they will be parking a billboard up on beverley road, which will have pictures of libby on, and they are hoping that
4:24 pm
could spur people on to come forward with information as they try to get some clues as to where they can be. rosamond pilcher has died at the age of 94. she was best known for her record—breaking novel, the shell seekers, which sold more than 5 million copies in 15 languages. her agent can form the author had died after a short illness. let's see what the weather is doing. what is the forecast? we have got some wet and windy weather to come. have you heard of where the bombs? explain all act like we got a deepening area of the pressure, it is called storm eric. it is
4:25 pm
deepening so the pressure is dropping, 24 millibars in 24 hours is what we need to call it explosive cycle genesis but it looks as if it will drop 40. that is a bit of a mouthful! it is bringing some severe weather. there is a potential of strong winds, we can see some down, some quite unsettled weather. i thought it was windy this morning andi thought it was windy this morning and i didn't realise it was explosive cycle genesis. i got some wind gusts here for you. the needles, 79 miles per hour. we have seen some needles, 79 miles per hour. we have seen some gusty winds over the past 24 hours. that was thanks to this area of low pressure, it is moving towards the east, it is this area of low pressure coming in off the atla ntic low pressure coming in off the atlantic that is going to bring the strong winds as we go into tomorrow. not looking forward to that. it is
4:26 pm
going to bring with it some wet weather as well. but we have seen the wind is easing today. we've seen some sunny spells around and some showers in the west but as we go through tonight we will see the cloud increasing, some outbreaks of rain as the storm starts to push on from the west. the when picking up as well. temperatures overnight staying in the low single figures so it will be a frost free night. if we look at the pressure chart we see the isobars packed. we have some outbreaks of rain. they will be some patchy rain to begin with across england and wales, heaviest in the west in the morning and is well pushed south eastwards and some heavy bursts there. we could see some rumble of thunder and lightning. in the north we could see some heavy bursts of rain in the west. in scotland that rain could possess so west. in scotland that rain could possess so they could be flooding. here at three o'clock, you look at the black circles, those of the wind
4:27 pm
gusts. we are looking at 55 mph. we could see a little bit higher, 60 or 70 on the western coast. temperatures tomorrow, not doing too badly, a maximum of around 12 celsius with a south—westerly wind. 0nce celsius with a south—westerly wind. once you add in the rain and strong winds, it isn't going to feel warm. 0vernight into saturday, that area of low pressure continues to work its way eastwards, we hold onto those tightly packed isobars so it will stay windy and it will be particularly windy across the central belt, perhaps into northern ireland, northern england as well. saturday bringing in some patchy outbreaks of rain to the north, some could be wintry. 0ne outbreaks of rain to the north, some could be wintry. one or two showers but the cloud will increase with outbreaks of rain spreading in from the south and west. temperatures, maximum of around 11 celsius for saturday. 0ver maximum of around 11 celsius for saturday. over the next 24 hours we have the potential for strong winds,
4:28 pm
there is the potential for have the potential for strong winds, there is the potentialfor some disruption since they across the forecast. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. theresa may says she has had constructive discussions with senior eu figures in brussels but criticises the head of the european council's comments on brexit. i raised with presidents is the language he used yesterday which was not helpful and caused widespread dismay in the united kingdom. a search team recovers a body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson. british is cancelled across the uk until the 13th of february. a pub in
4:29 pm
cornwall wins an award for helping stranded motorists during the snow last week. let us go to the sport desk now to get all the news. starting with the equine flu. an announcement in the last few minutes from the british horse racing authority. yes, you are right. no racing today. not until wednesday because of the outbreak of the equine flu. doncaster was one of the cards cancelled today. three horses ran atairand cards cancelled today. three horses ran at air and those at lund low —— ludlow has since tested positive. because the disease can take up to three days before symptoms are visible, they have to wait before having all the information. it is very contagious and could have significant impact. the economic
4:30 pm
consequences of an significant impact. the economic consequences of an outcome “— uncontrolled outbreak are significant which is why we have acted swiftly. last night and the decision we need today to cancel the racing today because we understand the importance of acting in such a way, an appropriate way to protect the industry. significant financial implications but also from sporting point of view. there are crucial races used to prepare for the cheltenham festival which have been cancelled. the key meeting at newbury. that has gone so there are lots of things to consider and the racing body has said it is too early to say this stage whether the outbreak will affect the festival. all right, i know you will keep us posted on that. meanwhile from
4:31 pm
racing to rugby, more six nations games around the corner and teen yea rs. games around the corner and teen years. yes, they say never change a winning team but that is an old adage and there are so many things to consider with professional rugby nowadays. players returning from injury which means even if you scored a hat—trick on the opening weekend you might not keep your place. that is exactly what happened to blair kinghorn who has been chopped for the match. sean maitland is back. you can change a losing team however. rob kearney is one of five players coming in for ireland for that game at murrayfield. he replaces robbie henshaw who picked up a knock in training while chris farrell is in for injured centre garry ringrose. 0nce garry ringrose was ruled out,
4:32 pm
it was trying to keep a bit of continuity as best we can from past campaigns and try to be as cohesive as we could be in a short period of time. we did not have the cohesion we would have liked at the last game. and wales have made ten changes to their team for the six nations match against italy on saturday. centre jonathan davies will captain the team for the first time as normal skipper alun wynjones is on the bench. four players will make their six nations debut as coach warren gatland rests several of those who helped him to a winning start france last week. alexander shevlin has been re—elected as uefa president. he will now serve another four years in charge. meanwhile fa chairman tim clark has been elected as a fifa vice president. clark beat the irish and the bass for the role and will replace david gill. that —— beat the
4:33 pm
irish boss. mark allen could land a big fine after conceding his second—round match mid frame at the world grand prix. the northern irishman was trailing ali carter by three frames to one in cheltenham and after he missed this yellow early on in the fifth frame, frustration got the better of him and he conceded the frame and match in the best—of—7 contest. it is against the rules to forfeit a frame while it is still mathematically possible to win. and that is all your support for now. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what is happening around the country in our daily visits to bbc newsrooms around the country. horse racing across the uk has been affected today by an eight peak of equine flu, including a fixture which was due to take place at doncaster. harry gration in leeds will tell us all about it. justin leigh is in
4:34 pm
plymouth to tell us about the cornish pub recognised with an award after helping stranded motorists in last week's snow. harry, festival, tells more about this equine flu and the impact it is having on horse racing in doncaster in particular. as you havejust heard a year sports news, the british purchasing authority have acted quickly to try and get a grip on this outbreak. to give you a perspective, if you get hundreds of horses as you would have done in doncaster today are getting together and one of them was infected, that infection can be transmitted very quickly. that is what the british horse racing authority have tightened to prevent. apparently it
4:35 pm
is rather like having human flu you have a temperature and a sore throat and yourlimbs have a temperature and a sore throat and your limbs feel lifeless sulforaphane to play at horse that isa sulforaphane to play at horse that is a difficult situation. everyone is a difficult situation. everyone is mindful of the cheltenham festival which is just over 30 days away. so what happens next because they bha have put out a timetable? the problem is you have to go back to 1967 and 2001 when the foot—and—mouth outbreak decimated the industry. this is a multi—million pound industry and has has been pointed out, there are a lot of big races which were due to ta ke lot of big races which were due to take place this weekend ahead of the cheltenham festival. thread of mine was going to have one of his horses racing this weekend. he was devastated by the news that bha have said there will be no racing until february 13 but he is also mindful and respectful of their decision
4:36 pm
because he says the whole of the racing situation is far more important and just to the race meetings cancelled. it is important this outbreak is brought under control very quickly. indeed, thank you very much indeed. let us go to plymouth, tells more about this pub. we reported on it last week, the jamaica inn, which was a sanctuary for stranded motorists. absolutely, it made worldwide headlines. around this time last week heavy snow was sweeping this time last week heavy snow was sweeping across this time last week heavy snow was sweeping across the south—west and it caught many people out, especially drivers in cornwall. people sought shelter at the remote jamaica inn, demons in the daphne du maurier stories. the hotel managed to find rooms for people, the ended up to find rooms for people, the ended up sleeping on the restaurant floor or ceiling rooms. not only were
4:37 pm
drivers provided with shelter but the lead on food and junk and kept people safe. —— food and drink. great —— example of british adversity. they did such a wonderful job, i is england thought they deserve some recognition so at a special ceremony today they presented the pub with a custom award for welfare to motorists. —— highways england thought they deserved. this was the reaction of the manager. incredibly proud, we weren't asking for anything, we just wanted to help. credit really does go to the whole team. without then, i could not have done it.” go to the whole team. without then, i could not have done it. i should point out that this is the first time highways england has presented this award. they felt the staff at the jamaica inn had gone above and
4:38 pm
beyond the call of duty so they felt they deserved the award. also the pub did not charge anyone for food and bedding and shelterfor pub did not charge anyone for food and bedding and shelter for the night so i think they do deserve extra recognition. a free bet on the floor! fantastic. thank you both very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them on the bbc iplayer. we do nationwide every weekday afternoon at 430 here on bbc news. parents are being urged to stop their children using mobile phones at meal times and take them out of their bedrooms at night time. that comes from all four of the uk's
4:39 pm
medical officers. i have been discussing this with belinda palmer who is a campaigner against the addiction and she says it could be a real challenge for some parents to implement the advice.” real challenge for some parents to implement the advice. i was very disappointed when i read the advice because it was very obvious staff, like we need to get our children to move around. we know that as pa rents. move around. we know that as parents. the difficulty is we are competing with amazing technology which gives great dopamine hits to our children which i cannot cope with as a mum. do you think some of these children are addicted to this technology? absolutely. my nephew was one of the first to be diagnosed with games addiction in this country. i have seen the impact technology can have on families and relationships. with my own children, i have an 11—year—old and a
4:40 pm
12—year—old, a lot of my time is spent arguing and the device. i do not want my relationship to be based on that. i am also worried about the next generation having a lack of empathy, having a conversation and me being able to read body language, children are missing out. it has become a real problem. let us remind ourselves of the advice. we can see some of that on the screen. keeping screens out of the bedroom is another. talking as a family, pa rents another. talking as a family, parents should give their children proper attention. they should talk about keeping safe online and cyber bullies and what children should do their wadded. more parents would say thatis their wadded. more parents would say that is very sensible. —— if they are worried. i would say it is
4:41 pm
bordering on patronising. very few appearance don't give their children proper attention. it is not the rules about implementing them. when the children were little, it was easy to take the device of my children but no microphone is part of their identity. for a child that set —— secondary school, it is part of who they are. —— but now they are pa rt of who they are. —— but now they are part of their identity. actually what i was looking for was an actual, real concrete advice. how many hours a day? what sort of thing should we ask technology companies to do? i would love to have addictive ratings on the games we give children. the same you buy third, you know how many calories and salt content, if i had known how addictive fortnight was, which i have let my children play it?”
4:42 pm
addictive fortnight was, which i have let my children play it? i do not know. belinda palmer talking to me earlier. then we'll be giving us the latest business news in just a moment but first the headlines. theresa may says she has had a series of robust and constructive discussions with senior eu figures in brussels. meanwhile jeremy discussions with senior eu figures in brussels. meanwhilejeremy corbyn has set out five demands which could see labour backing a brexit deal in parliament. a search team recovered the body from the wreckage of the plane carrying the footballer and union a seller and the pilot david ibbotson. hello, business headlines. jaguar land rover has announced pre—tax loss of £3.4 million for the last three months of last year. most of that into an accounting charge. strip out the charge and they still lost £273 million. the bank of
4:43 pm
england kept interest rates on hold. growth first cast has dropped to 1.2% this year, the lowest in a decade. more than half british households are likely to see an increase in the cost of energy in april, after of gem raised price caps. let us discuss one of the stories, interest rates. no change in interest rates but also from the bank of england, quite a grim forecast, what has been the reaction of the pound ? forecast, what has been the reaction of the pound? it has been a volatile day for sterling. eating up to the announcement, the painted fallen more than half a percent. —— leading up more than half a percent. —— leading up to that announcement the pound had fallen. the pen then rose following the announcement which is surprising. it is up firmly against
4:44 pm
the dollar and euro. it could be that investors are now focusing on the progress being made in brexit talks than the bank outlook which is on the nose which they could have expected the bank to say or do. let us expected the bank to say or do. let us talk about jaguar expected the bank to say or do. let us talk aboutjaguar land expected the bank to say or do. let us talk about jaguar land rover because they have made massive losses. yes, you are talking £3.4 billion. the bulk of that is due to what they call an accounting charge. some of their assets have fallen in value and they had to reflect that voice, things like equipment and property. the film still lost two points —— £273 million in the three months before that. it is down to a big drop in sales in china, one of their biggest markets. there is also their biggest markets. there is also the falling diesel sales in europe. most land rover models are diesel
4:45 pm
powers and they are having to invest in new technology like electric, hybrid and self driving cars to meet regulations. let us go through that with richard margaret. the pound is doing quite a lot of somersaults today, how do you view its movements? as you said what happens it isa movements? as you said what happens it is a little bit unexpected. interest rates are not likely to go up interest rates are not likely to go up on the whole, that would be positive for the currency. we are just ina positive for the currency. we are just in a holding pattern. the markets are waiting to see what happens over the next few months with brexit negotiations. no one was going to move dramatically on what the bank of england said today probably. the other study we have been covering, jaguar land rover, not good news for the firm to
4:46 pm
protect mildly, especially given they have announced massive job losses earlier this month. yes, a lot of the uncertainties are around what the car market is going to look like going forward. posted the cars that jaguar land rover makes are diesel and people are uncertain as to what shade of the market diesel will command in the future. to what extent people would take up with electric cars so there is a lot of uncertainty going forward which is giving you the right dying in asset values. people are not certain whether the investment in factories have now will be as valuable in the future. —— the right down in asset values. there are problems notjust leasing the car industry but the world economy, slowdown in growth in china, trade wars going on,
4:47 pm
uncertainty of brexit, the target of emissions in the car industry, tighter rules in europe. as always, markets do not like uncertainty. it makes it hard to plan for business and for investors to assess business models going forward so uncertainty will always give rise to volatility and tough decisions for business. thank you very much for talking us through that. you can talk through the markets. let us have a look. the ftse100 ending the dealer, weighed down by shares including 0cado. tui suffering a drop in sales. the pound against the euro is up during the
4:48 pm
day. in frankfurt, fairly sharp losses against warnings from the european commission about a more pessimistic growth assessment for the euro zone. so notjust the bank of england giving a grim forecast, the european commission as well which is sending a ripple of unease among investors. that is where we will leave the business for today. good to have you with us. thank you. councillors in edinburgh have voted in favour of introducing a tourist tax, the first of its kind in britain. the first of its kind. the plan is to charge an extra £2 a night in hotels and b&bs and hostels. 0ther night in hotels and b&bs and hostels. other cities in britain have been looking at similar schemes. 0ur scotland correspondent has this report. arriving in edinburgh, one of the hottest tourists places in the uk,
4:49 pm
gets more popular every year but what difference would a tourist tax make? i do not see how today's tax will in -- make? i do not see how today's tax will in —— encourage people, that it is taxable make it more expensive. i think it would discourage more people. there are strong arguments for and against. visitors and residents acknowledge something needs to be done but is this right way to do it? i would hope the council would think about spending it on keeping the streets clean. tourist tax, that is terrible. it is a lot for the people so it is good to pay the money. t think it would discourage people from coming to your city? yes, definitely. but council leaders believe there may be no other way to cope with the course that mass tourism brings to the city. it is about how we make sure
4:50 pm
the city continues to function through the relatively organised chaos of the festival. that is there isa chaos of the festival. that is there is a concern about the impact on young travellers on a budget. the two point per person per booking will disproportionally affect hostel guests. people who tend to travel on a budget, £2 on top of a booking, could be 20% on a ten time picking. the tourism tax will not be enforced while, the scottish parliament still has to pass enabling legislation but many cities in the uk will be watching the progress of this new attempt to make mass tourism sustainable. the british—based rover that will be sent to mars in 2020 has been named after the english scientist, rosalind franklin. a panel to the name
4:51 pm
from more than 36,000 suggestions submitted from across europe. rosalind franklin played an integral role in the discovery of the structure of dna. the astronnaut tim peake unveiled the name at the airbus factory in stevenage where the robot is being put together. 0ur correspondent was there earlier. iam here 0ur correspondent was there earlier. i am here where this prototype robot is being put through its pieces, designed to cross the rocky martian terrain. everything is almost ready but one vital element is missing and that was the name of their over and todayit that was the name of their over and today it was called the roseland franklin. why is this the name of their over? roseland franklin was a great british scientist who did so much to unlock the secrets of human
4:52 pm
life, with dna. it is no surprise this is named after her because it will be searching for life on mars. the public were involved in this process. absolutely, the competition was opened up to the public, over 36,000 entries which just shows how much public appetite that is for these missions. this is a big mission for the european space is could “and mars. could “and
4:53 pm
s 7 the a“ will land weff'" 7 the 55- will land on 7.57.77" 7 more. the mission will land on master, there is the landing platform built by the russians. 0nce the platform gets down on the ground on march, the rover will trundle over and go across the terrain of mars searching for places where life is most likely to be. the thing about life on mars, it is the most likely place on the solar system because it has a solid surface like the earth, it has a thin atmosphere and we knew it was warmer and wetter in the past. we can see signs of rivers. where the rover will be, we can expect sediment from previous rivers. when missing life, we are
4:54 pm
talking about single cell creatures. it should be trapped in the sediment and roseland will drill by —— down to look for signs of life. it may possibly be that there is still life on mars buried deep down underground is where the water is still liquid but at the surface it is cold and has frozen to ice. it is exciting, what are the chances of fighting life now previous life?” what are the chances of fighting life now previous life? i think there is evidence of life in the past because if you go back to the early system, there are big asteroids blasting into the planet but on the earth we have pieces of mars which have been blasted out from the planet. in the past, pieces of rock from the earth must‘ve been blasted out and landed on march. they would have had microbial life from the earth on it so we might get
4:55 pm
signs of life which came from earth and taxied across to mars. what would be more exciting whitby to find signs of life on mars which started on mars and this is quite likely. nigel bess talking to me about the possibilities of life on mark. that's it from us. before that a film weather forecast. hello there. we have some wet and windy weather and the weather forecast with potential for disruption. we have seen when the conditions. these are the strongest gusts of wens. you can see this area of low pressure working towards the east. the next area of low pressure hot on its heels, it has been cold
4:56 pm
storm eric and will bring wet and windy conditions as it moves towards us. windy conditions as it moves towards us. tonight, claude will increase with showery outbreaks of rain. perhaps an early frost in eastern scotland. outbreaks of rain pollution from the west. the winds will strengthen. as the storm work since we're in, the isobars tightened. the winds will start to pick up as we move into tomorrow. this planes the potential for disruption. trader into saturday could see some disruption to travel, check your local forecast. —— could see some disruption to travel, check your localforecast. —— friday into saturday. pics of rain on friday, another band of rain working its way eastwards. the potential for thunder and lightning and persistent rainfor thunder and lightning and persistent rain for north—west scotland. localised flooding possible. here we are at the clock, wind gusts of 45
4:57 pm
to 50 miles per. 0n land it could reach 60 or 70 at the coast. temperatures in the south of nine to 11 degrees. 0nce temperatures in the south of nine to 11 degrees. once you add in the wind, it will not feel mild. 0vernight and into saturday, this area of low pleasure works east. we all don't is strong wins, especially for northern ireland and central scotla nd for northern ireland and central scotland and perhaps northern england. saturday brings outbreaks of rain in the north. agile outlook for england. some rain moving into the south—east. temperatures are maximum of 11 degrees. that is the potential for disruption, maximum of 11 degrees. that is the potentialfor disruption, keep maximum of 11 degrees. that is the potential for disruption, keep your eye on the forecast. today at five, theresa may holds talks with eu leaders, to try to secure changes to her
4:58 pm
brexit withdrawal agreement. the prime minister says she will negotiate hard and that she's committed to delivering brexit on time. i'm clear that i am going to deliver brexit. i'm going to deliver it on time. that's what i'm going to do for the british public. i'll be negotiating hard in the coming days to do just that. but the president of the european council donald tusk said there was no breakthrough in sight. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn sets out five demands that could see labour back a brexit deal parliament. the head of instagram pledges to "remove all graphic images of self harm" from the platform. i think we have an immense amount of responsibility. i think that it's clear that we aren't where we need to be on the issues of self—harm and suicide.
4:59 pm

51 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on