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tv   Our World  BBC News  February 9, 2019 4:30am-5:01am GMT

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juan guaido, has called on the military to let us humanitarian aid enter the country. trucks carrying food and medicines donated by the us have arrived in a colombian border town but have been blocked from entering venezuela by soldiers. local authorities in rio dejaneiro say they have detected a series of irregularities at a training centre for one of brazil's most popular football clubs, flamengo, where a fire killed at least ten people. youth players aged between 1a and 17 are among the dead. the king of thailand has denounced his sister's candidacy for prime minister — saying that such a move is inappropriate and unconstitutional. he said his elder sister should not be allowed to run for office because it was against tradition, even if she'd given up her official royal title. lung cancer screening trucks, will be appearing in supermarket car parks, under a new scheme across england. hundreds of thousands of people are to be tested in the next four
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years, as part of an nhs drive to catch the disease early, and improve survival rates. the 70 million pound initiative will target areas, with the highest lung cancer death rates. here's our health editor, hugh pym. maria's arriving for what they're calling an mot for her lungs and it's in the car park near some local shops. i'm going to get you to take a big breath in, in a moment. pop the tube in your mouth and then blow as hard and as fast as you can into it. keep going, keep going. there we go, that's it. i prefer this than the hospital. i don't like the whole hospital thing — i don't like going into hospital. it was easy enough to come here. i mean, i normally come shopping around here, so it's nice tojust come in here. if you've had your lung health check here and there is a potential area of concern, you don't have to wait very long or even go very far. in fact, you can go straight over
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here and have a scan. sophisticated equipment usually in a hospital — in this case, accessible in a retail park. once inside, the scan takes place. the results and analysis come a few weeks later. 55— to 7a—year—olds at risk of lung cancer, including smokers, are invited to come along for a screening. the early pilot schemes that we ran showed that the detection of the earliest stage of lung cancer rose from about two in ten people up to about seven in ten. early detection means earlier and better treatment and ultimately leads to better survival and fewer deaths. the new investment in early detection of lung cancer has been welcomed, though some are arguing a lot more needs to be done to improve cancer care and survival rates. it's important because it's notjust about screening for lung cancer, it's all the other respiratory diseases that you might find. however, we have to have the right staff and the right services to be
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able to give patients what they need for better outcomes. the scheme will cover areas of england with most patients at risk. it'll be the first lung health check programme of its kind in the uk. hugh pym, bbc news. now on bbc news, our world. this week young palestinian dj's, rappers and musicians, living in israel and the occupied west bank, share their personal views on how the political situation affects their lives and their music. depression decreases creativity. the young generation, there is a lot of resistance in art. some of them
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fight it with rocks, some of them fight it with rocks, some of them fight it with poetry. fight it in music. i find music, fight it with poetry. fight it in music. ifind music, it is fight it with poetry. fight it in music. i find music, it is very connected to war in a way. the only way palestinians are still going to survive is that they let out the anger otherwise they are going to go crazy. we are under apartheid. how cani crazy. we are under apartheid. how can i accept that as a native, as indigenous? impossible. here in palestine, you are under occupation. people don't have their rights at all. i don't feel safe. i do feel safe in my home, i don't feel safe in my work, on the roads, anyway. the only place that i feel
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free is the stage. by by existing here, we are resisting. my grandfather, he is well known as one of the old freedom fighters. they had their way to fight and we have are away to fight. for me, i think music is the answer. i think art is the answer. some of them fight it with rocks, some of them fight it with rocks, some of them fight it with poetry, fight it with music. i cited with what i do. the zionists came here, 1948, is not about the religions at all. palestinian christians, palestinian deuce, palestinian muslims, they we re deuce, palestinian muslims, they were all living together. —— dues.
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—— jews. iama i am a producer, dj, iam a producer, dj, engineer, a bunch of stuff. and i party a lot. i never chose to be political. i'm just palestinian so politics is part of your name. when i was a kid, i thought i was going to free palestine but i was 13. just to get further and stuff. then all is not andi further and stuff. then all is not and i was joined further and stuff. then all is not and i wasjoined to further and stuff. then all is not and i was joined to ashley get it out of my life because it is very depressing and now i am a palestinian dj, touring, so. politics is back. even a basic thing in clubs, people say what is this palestine? i say that is a country and they cma, but way? as they do unite israel? yeah. we get many
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people that originally lived there and they are trained to kick us out. like you that you look like a terrorist and it is light, yeah. but you are not. —— like. you can find everything. everything. i started in 2014. everyone wants to dads. people
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choose may be religious events to go down too. we choose parties. you have got to dantz to let go. it helps to let go. —— dance. there was the greatest music scene in palestine in the 805 and 905. and that'5 with my father, be used to go throw rock5 that'5 with my father, be used to go throw rocks and party in the same night. the young generation, want to move forward. there is a lot of re5i5tance move forward. there is a lot of resistance in art. 02 i5a
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02 is a traditional dance that comes from palestine, syria, lebanon, jordan, bit5 from palestine, syria, lebanon, jordan, bits of iraq. linking it with garb and dance hall —— dub. jordan, bits of iraq. linking it with garb and dance hall —— dubm i5 with garb and dance hall —— dubm is about freedom and happiness and gathering everyone together in a circle. the idea of a producer stock i5 circle. the idea of a producer stock is breaking it down into two. it is theirdub and the is breaking it down into two. it is their dub and the key. it is the key that our grandparents kept in their hands, hoping that one day they will come back to their homes that they
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we re come back to their homes that they were displaced from in 1948 as pale5tinian5. but they still kept the key and they pass it on and it like all very traditional, like it's one of the core foundations of identity as people because what made us as identity as people because what made u5a5a identity as people because what made us as a people. we are refugees in oui’ us as a people. we are refugees in our own land and the class citizens at the same time. this is a way of reclaiming identity and rick green —— reclaiming routes. —— roots.
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reclaiming identity and rick green -- reclaiming routes. -- roots. we are underapartheid. how -- reclaiming routes. -- roots. we are under apartheid. how can i acce pt are under apartheid. how can i accept that as a native, a5 indigenous? impossible.” accept that as a native, a5 indigenous? impossible. ifind mu5ic, indigenous? impossible. ifind music, it is very connected to war, ina music, it is very connected to war, in a way. it was re5i5ting and going and doing something else. you need to survive the next day and the only
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way that pale5tinian5 are still going to survive i5 way that pale5tinian5 are still going to survive is that they lack out all the anger otherwise we are going to go crazy. —— let out. when people hear down from their hearts, they want to express themselves, they want to express themselves, they want to let go. then go back to reality because this is how you ru5h 5tay reality because this is how you ru5h stay sane. —— 5tay reality because this is how you ru5h stay sane. —— stay sane. i make hip—hop but i put a palestinian twist to it. we have palestinian twist to it. we have palestinian lyrics talking about people living here. depression
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increases creativity. —— decreases. ifi if i make something about love, it's political. because i live here. because we are an oppressed minority. whatever we say is an act of resistance. it is love in the name of resistance. friendship in the name of resistance. because with war, come5 love. it is really hard. you have your mind alway5 occupied with things. you know, with other thing5. with things. you know, with other things. they love. —— than love. so you try to reach for it in the
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5malle5t thing5, so you try to reach for it in the 5malle5t things, you know, and live oi'i 5malle5t things, you know, and live on it, like, by, you know, the alps. —— the alps. the attacks with weapons went down, art is going up. there are so many artists right now. and at the time they used to be so many people who use guns. so i think this came in stead of that. yeah. not as a complimentary thing... as a replacement. but as a replacement. my my parents don't agree with all the movement ironmaking. they think it's filled with drugs and the whole
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party till four filled with drugs and the whole party tillfoura.m.. filled with drugs and the whole party till four a.m.. they don't understand the resistance in it. we have a different message than our pa re nts' have a different message than our parents' generation had. no—one goes to throw rocks any more. there is no, absolutely no outcome in that. there's just small kids go and get killed. my parents my pare nt5 knew my parents knew the world, the area without checkpoints. they knew how it was. i don't. we don't. thi5 it5elf, it was. i don't. we don't. thi5 itself, not only checkpoints, the whole political logi5tic5 5ituation i5 whole political logi5tic5 5ituation is different from grandparents to parent5 is different from grandparents to parents to us. so it affects everything, not only mu5ic. they lost the palestinian interest.
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they lost the palestinian interest. they are the ones who put on genes, not us. they lost our culture. we arejust building on not us. they lost our culture. we are just building on what they gave us. are just building on what they gave us. of course we are just building on what they gave us. of course we are are just building on what they gave us. of course we are creating something new. this is what the older people don't know. so this is what we know, right now, this is our contribution to society, whether they like it or not. i'm born and raised in haifa. my family is originally from eyre creek, which is in the north of the galilee. —— iqrit. i
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creek, which is in the north of the galilee. —— iqrit. late grew creek, which is in the north of the galilee. —— iqrit. i ate grew up alway5 galilee. —— iqrit. i ate grew up always the idea that i must return back to iqrit and the destroyed and displaced village of my grandparents. —— back drop alway5. it actually gave me the ability to be an insider it actually gave me the ability to be an in5ideror it actually gave me the ability to be an insider or out5ider. you can see that, everything behind thi5 you can see that, everything behind this mountain is lebanon. on a clear day you can see haifa all the way from there. it was bombed on chri5tma5 from there. it was bombed on christmas eve 1951. a palestinian arab chri5tian village. we are allowed only to return back to the
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cemetery, where all our loved ones are buried. so the only way for iqrit person to return to iqrit i5 actually in a coffin. but we as a young generation, we changed that equation and we actually decided to live here before we die here. and that'5 live here before we die here. and that's why we still come here and we 5till plant tomatoe5 that's why we still come here and we 5till plant tomatoes and still try to do ma55e5 here and pray in this church. so we are still alive, you know? 20%, almost, of the population of
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israel palestinian people living within the borders of the state of israel, holding israeli pa55port5. we used to have a different name for haifa. the mother of the strangers. it was always like haifa gathering eve ryo ne it was always like haifa gathering everyone in sight together. when i used to live in my village, there we re used to live in my village, there were parties. when they reached entrance i was rejected since it says i am an arab on my 80. we thought, ok, if everyone is rejecting us, so we should gather together and find our own places and start producing our own parties. thi5
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this place is a music bar. when you are occupied, you really need your owi'i are occupied, you really need your own space. so that's why we created it here. every one of us, even me, we live for at least two different live5. i'm a different person when i am in haifa. i'm a different person when i go to nazareth to visit my parents. i'm a different person when i go to tel aviv. like when went there at fir5t, tel aviv. like when went there at first, when i talked in arabic, everyone looks at you like you are going to explode any minute. i rarely talked in arabic. i rarely read arabic, heard arabic. and you 5ta rt, read arabic, heard arabic. and you 5tart, like, feeling like you're nothing. like who am i, what am i doing here, why am i here? the difference between the scene here and be seen in the west bank,
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sometimes i feel like a bit of jealousy of them, because you feel like if we are re5i5ting here, they are really re5i5ting. so because of that, we are trying so much not to prove only to the worlds we are palestinian, but first of all i have to prove to myself that i deserve it. we are messed up. and we are not even aware of that. a lot of women around me, for years and years, they want to be djs, they wa nt to and years, they want to be djs, they want to do music, and they always expressed that desire, you know. but
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they have their own fee is also about it, like some of them they really wa nt about it, like some of them they really want to do music, but they don't want to be known at all, they don't want to be known at all, they don't want to be known at all, they don't want their name anywhere —— their own fears about it. ijust i just walked down the street, i ijust walked down the street, i see it, sexual harassment, i have experienced since the age of six yea rs experienced since the age of six years old, you know. so whether it you are a child or a woman in this society, that comes back in may lyrics a lot of times. —— comes back in may lyrics. i have one piece for a talk about sexual harassment. some people even suggested that a come with another name and publish it anonymously, you know, like in a way that's how much women can be scared from talking about these things
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also, you know. but this is actually the reality of the society in itself, because they watch women as if they were glass. as if they are going to shatter if they try anything different. lam not i am not just i am notju5t a female, i'm a person. it makes a lot of difference. a5 i always say, people might come to the party because i'm a girl, and they want to see that palestinian female who wants to play. but they're not going to dance for three hours because i am a girl palestinian. the going to down5 because the music made them dance. —— dance. this feeling of partial freedom that we get here, i wish that other people in palestine also can feel it, because for us it's keeping us positive and it's keeping us
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breathing and it's keeping us going. we build this dance floor and being together and being connected to each other, in everything, in sharing everything that we love in music, in art in general, that is the close of everything, to show that we still exi5t. i believe that life is good and bad. it's not one thing or the other. i believe in this place. i believe it can heal. hello there. storm erik still not done with us
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yet, there is more wind to come — in fact it looks like we could see some very gusty conditions through the early part of this morning. storm erik passes to the north of the uk with a swathe of 60—70 mph gusts likely for northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england first thing on saturday, gradually those winds will turn light into this afternoon. this swathe of potentially damaging and disruptive winds will affect the northern half of the country for a while this morning, some heavy rain and snow on the tops of the pennines and the scottish hills, further south some blustery showers, we will start the day with temperatures of around 6—8 degrees. a windy start this morning, further heavy pulses of rain, but eventually the rain becomes confined to the north—east of scotland and the northern isles, as storm erik continues to pull away into the north sea. further south there will be plenty of sunshine, a few showers across western areas, and a good deal of dry weather across eastern areas. it will be a gusty day, those winds gradually easing down into the afternoon. temperature wise, england and wales are seeing double figures again, 10—11 celsius, closer to 7—9 across scotland and northern ireland. something a little
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bit fresher there. there could be some disruption from the winds through today, particularly early on, keep tuned in to the latest weather forecast and bbc local radio for the latest updates. storm erik pushes off in towards scandinavia, we look to the south, this next feature could bring a spell of very wet weather to southern parts of the country on saturday night, maybe on sunday some strong winds, but the strongest winds will be across the channel into the near continent. we could see some snow over the higher ground of wales for a while, but slowly this rain will ease away through sunday, it could hang back to east anglia and the south—east. colder air will be pouring south eastwards behind it, these showers across northern areas will be turning increasingly wintry as temperatures back into single figures for all of us. we will have showery burst of rain through saturday into sunday night, and then we see a ridge of high pressure building in which will settle things down but it will feel cold as we start
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monday off on a cold note. a little bit of frost around. but we have this ridge of high pressure which should see a good deal of dry weather, winds lighter than we have had for the past few days. temperatures 5—9 degrees, so it will feel a little chilly to how it has felt at the start of the weekend. high pressure building in next week, temperatures will come down considerably, with dry weather and the return of chilly nights. welcome to bbc news — i'm reged ahmad. our top stories: president maduro refuses to allow aid into venezuela. he says the country doesn't need foreign handouts — not everyone agrees. translation: i want this aid to get in because people are dying. mr president, we are dying. families are dying. at least ten people, including teenage players, are killed after a fire sweeps through a building at one of brazil's biggest football clubs.
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thailand's king denounces his sister's unprecedented bid to try and become prime minister — calling it ‘inappropriate'. and apple's bug bounty — we'll tell you about the teenage boy who got paid for finding a facetime flaw.
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