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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 9, 2019 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: new allegations of sexual and racial harassment by former employees of the retail tycoon, sir philip green are published in the telegraph — he denies any crime or misconduct. no ships and now no contract — the government cancels a controversial agreement to provide extra ferries in case of a no—deal brexit. counting the cost of knife crime — the number of young victims admitted to hospitals in england has risen by more than 50% in the past five years. it's a big six nations weekend. scotland are top of the table at the moment but can they stay there, ireland are heading to murrayfield this afternoon. hello, good morning. we still have windy weather around in some areas this morning. the winds will gradually ease down today and we are left with a day of sunshine and showers. tomorrow it won't be as windy. there will be sunshine, rain at times. it will feel chillier than
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today. more details later on. good morning. it's saturday, 9th february. our top story: a former executive at sir philip green's arcadia group, was paid more than £1 million after accusing him of groping her, according to new claims in the daily telegraph. several other former employees received six figure payments after alleging inappropriate behaviour, the newspaper says. sir philip categorically denies he is guilty of any unlawful sexual or racist behaviour. caroline rigby reports. sir philip green, the boss of topshop, is one of britain's best—known businessmen. yesterday, a judge allowed him to drop his injunction against the daily telegraph after a legal battle lasting six months. today, more claims about his conduct appear in the newspaper. the telegraph says one senior female executive at sir philip green's arcadia group was paid more than £1 million after he called her "a naughty girl", slapped on the bottom, and groped her. another executive, who's black,
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received around £1 million after sir philip allegedly made derogatory remarks about his dreadlocks and told him he was "still throwing spears in thejungle", the paper claims. the paper says two other women received 6—figure pay—outs after complaining of inappropriate behaviour. the telegraph still hasn't named the five complainants, who are still bound by nondisclosure agreements or ndas. it claims some of the events were witnessed by other staff and reported to hr. sir philip has accused the newspaper pursuing a vendetta against him and his employees, as well as harassing staff. he denies any of his behaviour amounted to any kind of crime or misconduct. carolyn ridley, bbc news. the department for transport has terminated a controversial contract to provide extra ferries in the event of a no—deal brexit. ministers have faced strong criticism since seaborne freight was awarded a £13 million contract in december to operate from ramsgate in kent — even though it had never run a ferry service or had any ships.
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we can speak now tojon donnison who joins us from our london newsroom. this sounds a rather remarkable, doesn't it, contracts that were put in place with no experience. no deal, this is the thing people have been screaming about an worried about. it is fair to say that awarding a contract to run a ferry service to a company with no ferries raised some eyebrows. but seaborne freight assured the government that they would be able to do this, despite having no experience with running a ferry service. they planned to run services from ramsgate in kent to ostend in belgium. they said they would be ready to do so via the end of march in the event of a no—deal brexit. however, the government today said it has become clear that seaborne freight would not be able to meet
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its contractual requirements and that that has happened because another company, who we were not really aware lower —— whereof, arklow shipping have withdrawn their hacking off the seaborne freight deal. the mayoral ostend has said he is port won't be ready to support a new very line. —— the mayor. there been concerns raised in govett as well. it is in advanced stages of negotiating with other companies to provide additional freight service in the event of a no—deal brexit. never have negotiations been so crucial. thank you very much, jon donnison there. we stay with brexit. theresa may continued her efforts to secure a brexit deal, meeting the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, in dublin last night to discuss her hopes of securing changes to the agreement. the irish government insisted the talks were not part of the official eu negotiations and the meeting was described by sources as "very warm".
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we're joined now by our political correspondent matthew cole. good morning, matthew. she had, what was it, it was a dinner, officially, and there were various clues as to what they would or would not be talking about. are we any the wiser this morning? not hurt too much about the conversation itself. good morning. we know more about the dinner. apparently a rather nice stea k dinner. apparently a rather nice steak and potatoes and green beans. we understand the conversation was warm and friendly. there they are going in to have that dinner. as for what went on inside, no hard negotiations. leo varadkar comedy irish prime minister comedy taoiseach made it clear that the eu is doing the negotiating on this, not ireland. this was a chance to share perspectives on where they are by that. both taoiseach theresa may and the irish have been shuttling around this week. trying to discuss this thorny issue of the northern ireland backstop. the insurance
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policy that is designed to kick in to resolve the border between northern ireland and the republic of no further trade deal is better is sorted for the issue. no progress, but warm words ahead of a big week when there could be more votes this week on thursday in parliament. that could change the perspective of things by the end of the week. mathew, for the moment, thank you. just over a thousand stabbing victims, aged between ten and 19, spent at a least one night in hospital in the 12 months to last march. there's been a 54% rise in the number of young people treated for knife wounds in england over the past five years, according to nhs figures. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. the youngest victim to die in a knife attack this year, jaden moodie, was stabbed to death after being knocked off a moped. an 18—year—old man has been charged with murder. jaden wasjust14. doctors say they're treating increasing numbers of people for knife wounds and the victims are getting younger. what has changed is that we are seeing a lot more adolescents and young people who
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have severe injuries. that used to be an occasional occurrence and it is now the norm. i expect to admit somebody of school age in the care of our service this week as a matter of course. the figures for hospital admissions for injuries from knives or sharp objects show there were almost 5000 people treated for stab wounds last year. over 1000 of them were aged 10—19. that's a rise of 54% compared with five years earlier. another trend doctors have observed is more girls are involved in knife crime. some victims face threats that footage of the stabbing will be posted online. there's a shift in what we're seeing. i'm seeing young women who have come in having had their mobile phones taken off them in an attack and having the attack filmed. it is part of a humiliation and this is what will happen to you — if you say anything,
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we will put it on the internet. doctors say the rise in knife crime is putting extra pressure on emergency services. the home office has set up a serious violent strategy to tackle the problem and has launched a review of the links between violent crime and the trade in illegal drugs. danny shaw, bbc news. seven militants have been sentenced to life in prison in tunisia for attacks at a museum and a beach resort in 2015. 30 british tourists were shot dead on the beach at sousse and at least 20 people were killed in an attack on a museum in tunis. islamic state militants claimed responsibility at the time. inquests have been taking place in london to establish what happened. the family of the pilot whose plane crashed with the footballer emiliano sala on board, are trying to raise £300,000 to find his body. the aircraft disappeared off the channel islands on 21 january and yesterday a body recovered from the wreckage was confirmed to be that of the footballer. david ibbotson's family say they want to be able to lay him to rest and are appealing for donations to an online fundraising page. us president donald trump has
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announced he will meet north korean leader, kim jong—un, in the vietnamese capital hanoi, later this month. the two leaders met for the first time in singapore last summer, following decades of hostilities. mr trump, previously referred to mr kim as "little rocket man" — but they have since reconciled and the president tweeted that, under his leadership, north korea would become "a different kind of rocket — an economic one". more tests for equine flu are taking place at racing yards around the country this weekend, after six cases were confirmed at a stables in cheshire. five race meetings have been suspended today and a total of 174 yards are in lockdown, as the authorities work to contain the highly contagious illness. all meetings in britain have been cancelled until at least wednesday. it's the plane that transformed aviation and made air travel available to the masses. 50 years ago today the boeing 7117 took to the skies for the very first
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time — heralding the start of the "golden age of travel". the jumbo jet offered passengers more space, more seats and greater luxury than ever before, as adam woods explains. newsreal: the jumbos are coming. 1969 and the jumbo jet is unveiled to the world. newsreal: one observer commented that it seemed as though the qe2 had taken to the sky. bigger than anything else at the time, it transformed air travel for millions of people. newsreal: the jumbo jet has brought a new dimension to air travel, space, more room for more passengers. more seats meant more tickets, it shrank the world. america, africa, australia — now all within reach of the masses. the 7117 was a massive risk for boeing, it nearly bankru pted the company. orders for the new plane were slow to come in. but half a century later it's still in service and more
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are still being built. yet thejumbo's days are numbered. british airways plans to retire its fleet within five years. all airlines in america have already grounded theirs. smaller, quieter, more efficient planes are now the future passenger flight. instead, jumbo jets are finding a new life ferrying freight. the queen of the skies for 50 years. and, perhaps, for you more to come. aaron woods, bbc news. there are times when you look at a jumbo jet there are times when you look at a jumbojet in the sky and you still think how does that happen?m jumbojet in the sky and you still think how does that happen? it seems like a miracle every time. theresa may and the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, met last night for dinner of beef and dauphinoise potato to discuss her changes to the brexit deal. hugh 0'connell, political correspondent for the sunday
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business post, joins us now from dublin. good morning to you. the chat. neither side said that it was going to bear fruit. but neither side said that it was going to bearfruit. but at least neither side said that it was going to bear fruit. but at least they are talking. well, exactly. as the taoiseach said yesterday in belfast, it is always good to talk and have these engagements, even though, from these engagements, even though, from the irish government's perspective, there was not much expected from la sarre's dinner. it took place in the state g u est sarre's dinner. it took place in the state guest house in dublin, the joseph —— closest thing we had to chequers. the dinner lasted about two and a half hours. relations were described as very warm, by the i side, at least. this stands in contrast to previous engagements they have had, which have been a little frosty and awkward and difficult, because they are so far apart on certain issues when it comes to britain trying to negotiate its withdrawal from the european union. they dined on a salmon starter, a beef men, and each is desert. there were others in the
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room. the chief brexit negotiator for the prime minister was there, chief of staff was there, and officials on me that to's side as well. in terms of negotiating brexit, that was not on the table last night because the irish government's position has always been that britain can only be negotiated between the british government and the eu 27. there was a discussion, i suppose, about where people stand on this issue. 0bviously people stand on this issue. obviously the prime minister has been doing some shuttle diplomacy this week, she was in brussels, belfast, as to whether she has achieved anything or not is unclear. i think is heading back to brussels next week for talks. you said, very farapart in issues, next week for talks. you said, very far apart in issues, i would like your insight into how different they are in terms of personality as well. and the difficulties they have had in the past. well, it is well known in britain orat in the past. well, it is well known in britain or at least in the british political press that the prime minister is prone in meetings to awkward silences, is not afraid
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of august silences, but that creates tension with other participants in the room. there is this caricature of her as sticking to print headlines and scripts and not deviating from that. the irish prime minister comedy taoiseach, leo varadkar, has a reputation as a straight talker, someone who says it as it is. not too long ago he adds that a very direct question about what the implications of a hard border between northern ireland and the republic would be. and he talked about this idea border checks and the idea of the army or police being on the border. this was a very straight answer to a very difficult question. it is not the kind of a nswer question. it is not the kind of answer you get from the prime minister. just in terms of their engagement and approach to these of issues, i think the whole approach issues, i think the whole approach is somewhat different. that has made, i gather, is somewhat different. that has made, igather, previous is somewhat different. that has made, i gather, previous engagements between the pair quite difficult and quite icy. but last night seemed to
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be warmer. we got an insight into that when the prime minister arrived at farmleigh house. it was all smiles and handshakes. can you give us some smiles and handshakes. can you give us some insight, as the journals that, to tell of how people are reacting at the moment. he we talk about how frustrated people are with the political process and there is uncertainty. we are talking about certain deals that are not coming through in terms of a no—deal brexit. people in ireland, what are they doing in terms of spending all worry or are they simply cracking on, waiting to see what happens? i think people who are following this in ireland are looking at the political situation somewhat aghast at the fact that the british political establishment has been unable to sort out brexit effectively. irish people, broadly, are very worried about brexit. there
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was a consumer confidence survey published just at the end of last month which showed that 84% of irish people were concerned brexit would have a bad impact on the irish economy. what that does is create worry so if people are more worried,, —— worry so if people are more worried, , —— worried worry so if people are more worried,, —— worried about their colliery, they would be worried about their wages in theirjobs. —— icahn and if that is bad for the retail sector. the retail sector is already worried about imports. —— economy. what comes in comes a cross over the uk or continents of europe. it is travelling through the uk before it comes into the ports in ireland. there is genuine concern that if britain was to crash out of the european union on the 29th of march without a withdrawal deal,
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there would be serious indications for ireland in terms of the over arching economy in the long—term that in the short term, food shortages and certain products. the ordinary irish person is worried and can't understand why a british politicians can't sort it out. can't understand why a british politicians can't sort it outlj imagine they are not the only ones. here's darren with a look at this morning's weather. pretty windy in a lot of places today. it will be windy for us all. we will gradually see the really strong winds easing down. this morning in particular, the chance for storms and damage from storm eric. it will head towards scandinavia after scotland. drawing your attention to this area. —— storm eric. —— storm erik. it is
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tracking across northern england at 50 kilometres or more. it then heads out of the north sea and we are left with sunshine and showers. most of the showers coming in across western areas, it does become a bit dry in scotla nd areas, it does become a bit dry in scotland is the day goes on but we keep the rain in the far north. still windy afternoon and the temperatures 9— 11 degrees, pretty good for this time of the year. noticing the sun turning hazy across parts of england and wales. during the open afternoon and overnight, it turns wet and windy. north of it, brea ks turns wet and windy. north of it, breaks in cloud and we will see temperatures perilously close to freezing. there is still outbreaks of rain hugging the far north of scotland. we have a weather front sliding its way down to northern ireland. the wet weather flies its
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way down and there is slow improvements. sunshine following on and then it turns wet and windy in parts of northern ireland and the wet weather sinks more further south into northern scotland. in between some sunshine, the windsor will not be as strong tomorrow but it will feel colder with temperatures lower at six or seven degrees. 0vernight tomorrow night, the system will take wet and windy weather southwards across parts of southern england and parts of wales and then high pressure builds in so chilly start of the new week with a touch of frost around and maybe early mist and fog. stronger colder winds around north sea coast. 0therwise monday should be a dry day. a fair bit of sunshine around as well. still on the chilly side away from the south—west, the cabbages six or seven but with high pressure into next week, things are going to be
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settling down. a lot of dry weather and sunshine. not too cold at night and sunshine. not too cold at night and decent averages by day. back to you guys. divorcing couples will no longer have to allocate blame or mutually consent to ending their marriage, under plans to change the law in england and wales. currently, a speedy separation can only happen if one party is blamed — but the overhaul could make it simpler and less confrontational. we're joined now by divorce lawyer, emma gill. good morning to you. this has all come to the fore because of one particular case where one woman wa nted particular case where one woman wanted a divorce and was refused a divorced by her husband and it made, it made it feel almost like will backin it made it feel almost like will back in the days of slavery. where you were asking to be freed. very much so. this particular lady took her court —— case all the way to court last autumn and was told, we are court last autumn and was told, we a re really court last autumn and was told, we are really sorry, we would like to help you but the law as it is
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currently framed means she has to stay in this marriage because a judge lower down the chain didn't think that the page —— didn't think the behaviour that she alleged wasn't unreasonable. that is because there are specific areas under which you can be granted a divorce against the wishes of your partner? that's right. you need to evidence the breakdown. it is the evidence that creates the issue. adultery, somebody playing a round or behaviour and if you are moving forward on the unbeatable behaviour ground, you need to set out particular after particular, mining your marriage for all the awful bits and pieces that your spouse has done to you and setting it out at an early stage of your separation. which would be a very damaging process. the change effectively brea ks process. the change effectively breaks away the irretrievable breakdown. the fact one of you is going to court and are saying that is over, that is going to be
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sufficient to get a divorce. why is it so difficult to divorce? doesn't come down to the whole moral history? at the moment, basically, lots of people aren't getting married. it kind of almost negates the need for these archaic laws. the social landscape has changed so much. in our current law, it came out of 1973, but it harks back to the 19605 so out of 1973, but it hark5 back to the 19605 so if you think how much 5ociety the 19605 so if you think how much society has changed in 19605, in the last 50 yea r5, society has changed in 19605, in the last 50 years, and the lawju5t hasn't caught up with it yet. have you had an occasion in your professional life were you have someone come to you this said, "i really wa nt someone come to you this said, "i really want to get divorced", and you have been in that situation where you say, you know what, you don't really have the grounds for it? almost warned them offered because they don't have the evidence? it's a difficult position to begin. it is hugely difficult and what i have found, not necessarily bad, but there is an unwritten rule between divorce lawyer5
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bad, but there is an unwritten rule between divorce lawyers that you have two parties that want to 5eparate, you will let things go one on relatively mild particulars. the difficulty comes when you have one party, in the wins case, 5aying, difficulty comes when you have one party, in the wins case, saying, i'm not going to let this happen. have you had it played out? —— winds. not going to let this happen. have you had it played out? —— windsm i5 you had it played out? —— windsm is rare but people have said that they want to do it quickly and they don't want to sling mud. can one of us don't want to sling mud. can one of us just say that we have had an affair? would you can't do because you can't lie to the courts. this might not be good news for divorce lawyer5 because recently the reason that divorce lawyer5 do so well, that divorce lawyer5 do so well, that process is so protracted that you are that process is so protracted that you a re lots that process is so protracted that you are lots of money. it is another reason why people avoid divorce.“ there is a fight to be had, the fights usually happen about money, rather than the divorce proce55. fights usually happen about money, rather than the divorce process. in the majority of cases, i think 99%, go through on their son richard unspoken rule agreement ——go through
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on this unspoken rule. it i55ued unspoken rule agreement ——go through on this unspoken rule. it issued and to do what you said because that is at four everybody. nobody wants a protracted divorce. one of the unspoken reasonings behind it not being easy to get a divorce is precisely that, that it shouldn't be easy. it is something you should have to think very carefully about and notjump into. is there a sense that this could encourage more people to get divorced, if you like, without thinking it through?” people to get divorced, if you like, without thinking it through? i have had a very long career as a divorce lawyer and i have never had anyone sit acro55 lawyer and i have never had anyone sit across to me that hasn't already been to hell and back to decide whether their marriage is over. that under the current system, though. this might change it, with this current argument? i doubt anybody would come at you know, a simple law would come at you know, a simple law would undermine the emotional
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process that somebody has to go to to decide they want to separate and once you have made that decision, you should be able to exit gracefully. good to see you this morning, m. —— emma. around 40,000 children seriously injure their brain every year and without support, they can become isolated, angry and fall behind at school. now an nhs centre in cambridge, is the first in britain, to combine expertise in one place, in order to rehabilitate children back into family life. here's our 5cience correspondent richard we5tcott. buying some cake ingredients would bea buying some cake ingredients would be a doddle for most teenagers but 15—year—old zac i5 be a doddle for most teenagers but 15—year—old zac is just a learning to shop alone. high, darling. are needed to make sure i have the right things, granulated sugar and self raising flour. leno no, plain flour. he is trying his hand at baking for the first time, too. did i hear my
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name? it didn't work! what about the payment we agreed earlier? did you manage to get it? a decade ago, jack was at —— zach wa5 manage to get it? a decade ago, jack was at —— zach was an everyday 5porty kid and then he banged his head at school, permanently damaging his brain. i had a highly intelligent child with a photographic memory, he was a natural sportsman, very happy all the time and to a child that was angry, toa the time and to a child that was angry, to a child that was physical, toa angry, to a child that was physical, to a child that screamed, to a child that had to learn how to use his limbs again. good catch! zack is to beat me up daily and say it was my fault. he wanted to die. zack wouldn't have shopped alone 5ix month5 wouldn't have shopped alone 5ix months ago and then he started coming here. this is the keynsham ——
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cambridge centre for psychological rehabilitation. the complex name for a bright idea. it is britain's only nhs1—stop shop to rehabilitate children with brain injuries back into family and school life. combining expert5 into family and school life. combining experts on emotions, language, medication, body movement and education. when a young person has had an injury like zack's, they need all the expertise and what is great for the families if they get to come to the service and see everybody who they might need to see in one place on the rather than having to go to multiple different 5ervice5 having to go to multiple different services which can take years of sometime5. services which can take years of sometimes. brain injuries happen through accidents, a55ault5, infections, tumour5 through accidents, a55ault5, infections, tumours and strokes. without help, people can become isolated and 5truggled without help, people can become isolated and struggled to control their impulses. incredibly, around 60% of young adult pri5on their impulses. incredibly, around 60% of young adult prison inmates report having had a brain injury. the effects can lay hidden for long time. jetta 5—10 years down the
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line, you might see an adolescent that uses inappropriate language _-5_ that uses inappropriate language ——5— ten. his behaviour is not like the situation, misjudges social cues and that might be put down to that person's behaviour, if you like. really, it is a consequence of the injury that had back when they were five. their child will never be the old self again but with this combined help, they can learn to cope with the simple, everyday life. i've done a lot on my going, yes, and got quite fast but i've always felt very isolated. now i don't feel alone. richard wescott, bbc news, cambridge. really good to see. we will talk more about issues raised in that piece a bit later this morning. and you can see the full story on inside out on bbc1 on monday evening at 7.30. we will be back with the headlines ina we will be back with the headlines in a moment. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning.
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here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a former executive at sir philip green's arcadia group, was paid more than £1 million after accusing him of groping her, according to new claims in the daily telegraph. several other former employees received 5ix figure payments after alleging inappropriate behaviour, the newspaper says. sir philip categorically denies he is guilty of any unlawful sexual or racist behaviour. the department for transport has terminated a controversial contract to provide extra ferries in the event of a no—deal brexit. seaborne freight was awarded a £13 million contract in december — even though it had never run a ferry service or had any ships. an irish shipping line that was planning to back the company has pulled out. the government says it is already in advanced talks with a number of companies to secure additional freight capacity in the event of "no—deal". more than 1000 stabbing victims, aged between ten and 19, spent at a least one night in hospital in the 12 months to last march.
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nhs figures show there's been a 54% rise in the number of young people treated for knife wounds in hospitals in england over the past five years. the home office has vowed to take action against retailers selling the weapons to children. what has changed is that we are seeing a lot more adolescents and young people who have severe injuries. and that used to be an occasional occurrence and that is now the norm. i expect to admit somebody of school age under the care of our service this week, as a matter of course. seven militants have been sentenced to life in prison in tunisia for attacks at a museum and a beach resort in 2015. 30 british tourists were shot dead on the beach at sousse and at least 20 people were killed in an attack on a museum in tunis. islamic state militants claimed responsibility at the time. inquests have been taking place in london to establish what happened. the family of the pilot whose plane crashed with the footballer emiliano sala on board, is trying to raise £300,000 to find his body. the aircraft disappeared off the channel islands on 21 january
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and yesterday a body recovered from the wreckage was confirmed to be that of the footballer. david ibbotson's family wants to be able to lay him to rest and is appealing for donations to an online fundraising page. us president donald trump has announced he will meet north korean leader, kim jong—un, in the vietnamese capital hanoi, later this month. the two leaders met for the first time in singapore last summer, following decades of hostilities. mr trump, previously referred to mr kim as "little rocket man" — but they have since reconciled and the president tweeted that, under his leadership, north korea would become "a different kind of rocket — an economic one". those are the main stories this morning. it is time for the sport this morning. what have you got?|j this morning. what have you got?” am looking forward to the rugby again. just as i was last weekend.
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the opening of the six nations. the second weekend is always interesting. you try to work out we re interesting. you try to work out were ireland really that bad, were england that good, can scotland sta ke, england that good, can scotland stake, they had a big win against italy. most teams to have big wins against italy —— can scotland stake top. sorry if you are into —— and italy fan. england take on france tomorrow — the first of today's two matches is at murrayfield. scotland will be looking to stay top of the table. defeat for ireland would almost certainly end any hope they have of retaining their title. scotland ran in four tries last week for a bonus point win at home to italy. while favourites ireland were humbled in dublin by england. and the last time the irish went to edinburgh, two years ago, they were beaten but the scots know that this would be a massive win. if we want to go and compete and take the next step, you need to win against quality opposition. ireland are certainly that. they have proved that of the past couple of years in the championship. there are one of the best teams in the world.
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got a lot of respect for them. if we are going to win tomorrow we have to play one of our best games. we have a few players coming in that didn't play last week. they will be wanting to make a point that they should have been involved last week. we have to make sure we get things right, for sure. if we produce something similar then the scots are a great team and they have shown us, most recently he two years ago. wales should have it much easier than last week. they looked down and out in paris but came from 16 points to beat the french. they are in rome to face the italians and they've rung the changes, ten in all. george north is rested. centrejonathan davies will also captain wales for the first time in his career. and there are four players starting a six nations match for the first time. in the women's six nations, ireland beat scotland 22 points to five in glasgow last night after a big defeat to england last
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week, ireland bounced back with a bonus point victory. they ran in four tries against a tough scottish defence — prop leah lyons powering over for their second. saracens are still on for the treble after reaching the final of the premiership rugby cup. they beat worcester warriors 38 points to 22 at sixways. sione vailanu scored the last of theirfour tries. they will face either northampton or newcastle, who play later today. black armbands will be worn in today's premier league and football league matches in memory of cardiff city striker emiliano sala, whose body was recovered from the wreckage of a plane in the english channel. there will also be a minute's silence at st mary's where cardiff face southampton — their first game since sala's death was confirmed. the former nantes striker never got to play for the club but the manager is sure he would have been a great success. he was a scruffy, scruffy type of player that for me would score
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10—15 goals every year at the top level. not just that, work hard as a team player. just fits the criteria, really, for what i look for in a player. somebody who can do something special, but at the same time is a very good lad. he was a very nice lad. that would be my memory of him. here are today's matches in the premier league. manchester united, who still haven't lost under 0le gunnar solskjaer, are at fulham in the early kick off. with manchester city playing tomorrow, all eyes are on liverpool, at home to bournemouth, a point would take them back to the top of the table but they've drawn their last two, and the manager knows that they need more than that. i don't think that anybody thought that we would be top of the league with 12 points between us and another team in three games to go, it would be end of april or something like that. it was clear that we would be tight until the end. good news is still that we are
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night. but of course we have to, for the only chance to improve our position, even though it is a good position is by winning football games. sheffield united fans look away now. you were 3—0 up with eight minutes to play at villa park. billy sharp had scored a hat—trick — the win that was going to take you top of the championship. but then this happened — an incredible comeback from villa, pulling two goals back. then this from substitute andre green in the fourth minute of injury. 3-3. sheffield united remain third. villa are still in touch with the playoffs. what a game. wow. that is heartbreaking. loads of villa fans had left the ground. you would have, thinking it was all over. it's a cup weekend in scotland, four fifth round ties — the pick of them sees rangers
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travel to kilmarnock. we are in the middle of a six day shutdown of racing because of an equine flu outbreak. five more meetings cancelled today. including a big one at newbury. three more cases have been confirmed at the stables of trainer donald mccain to make it six in total, including one that raced on wednesday. over 170 yards are in lockdown. racing won't resume until wednesday at the earliest. it, potentially, can be incredibly and the economic and equine health consequences of an uncontrolled spread of an infectious disease, you know, can be incredibly severe. so we are doing everything we can do, first of all, control and limit any further spread, put in place surveillance measures, and then plan
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around what we know and how we manage the situation. great britain's fed cup team have had a brilliant week to reach the europe africa zone play—off final in bath. jo konta won her singles rubber against hungary, that's after katie boulter had also won hers in three sets. great britain remain unbeaten in the tournament. a victory against serbia later today would earn them a place in april's world group two play—off where they will get the chance of promotion to the second tier of women's team tennis. wigan warriors are celebrating the curious achievement of rising to zero points in super league. they started the season on minus two after breaking financial rules. they lost last week but recovered to beat leeds rhinos 34—16. leeds go bottom, without a win in their opening two games. england's final test gets going in the caribbean later. they've already lost the series but will be looking to avoid a whitewash against the windies.
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after losing the first two tests in barbados and antigua, they're in st lucia. ben stokes is expected to be fit but ben foakes — the wicket—keeper — has been dropped in favour of keaton jennings. cheerleading might conjure up images pom—poms and bra roscoe is, but it is an team sport requiring agility “ ra-ra is an team sport requiring agility —— ra—ra skirts. mike bushell, amen, has been to newbridge to train with one of the best teams. music plays. acrobatics and gymnastics, in time with the music and each other, at a breathtaking pace. what started out as a way to cheer on sports teams has become a global sport in its own right. so the general stereotype still is pom—poms and girls wearing frilly skirts.
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to tell you how different it is, our girls wanted to play rugby, so we sent them out to play rugby. we have had a rugby team come in and they have lasted 15 minutes doing cheerleading. that is the level of fitness you need. you have to work really hard. yeah. what i like about all the noise is that you think you are inside like a special cage and everyone is supporting you. cheerleading started in the late 18005 and it was an all—male activity, used to cheer on the early college teams. by the time it turned professional, though, in the 19505 in america, it had become predominantly, like it is now, an all—female activity and you can see how quickly it has spread across the uk. many clubs to have men and boys out competing, too. but crimson heat all stars really want to keep their world championship sessions all female. the idea was that they could come
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in and feel comfortable. they could come in and be sweaty and wear no make—up. they can be idiots and come in and train. that is what they are coming in to do. it is about more than just sport. they find that the cheerleading team can help the athletes deal with pressures outside, be it bullying, school, family, anything thrown up by social media. it certainly helped aisha when she arrived in uk from hungary and did not speak a word of english. it has absolutely changed my life. i'm more open. my skills have improved. girls get bullied outside and come here and it is like a family. it diminishes the effect of the bullying because you know you have people behind you. if someone is down we get there. it is the strength in the cheerleading family that builds the trust that enables such daring acrobatic regime that routines. it is about building from the bottom of the structure, building the foundations, the first move is the crunch. even with the pressure
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of the world championships coming up, they were willing to show me their strength. don't panic about the leg kicking you in the face. you'll be fine. with one move only they let me into the inner circle of trust. thank you! yes, they survived intact to go on safely now to compete against tens of thousands of others at the worlds in america this spring. mike bushell, bbc news. very, very impressive. pep guardiola, we get back to the football. he is a natty dresser. people look at what he is wearing. that is what he was wearing at a news conference, people said he looks... ernie. that's funny. i did
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not mind his jumper. looks... ernie. that's funny. i did not mind hisjumper. i thought it looked 0k. not mind hisjumper. i thought it looked ok. it is better than the coach people make fun of. --he has an enormous visit affair that he wears on the touchline. he likes knitwear. he lacks a chunky knit. he sported some rather interesting christmas to this ——he likes a chunky knit. it is probably still jumperweber. chunky knit. it is probably still jumper weber. with all those winds. are they going to go down? they will gradually eased today. probably the strongest are right now. the potential for some damage and disruption. it will be windy everywhere but becoming less windy. that is because our storm, storm erik, is moving away. it is at the northern scotland are moving towards scandinavia. look at this cloud, it has brought heavy rain overnight. this is where we have the core of strongest winds. it is moving across southern scotland and northern england. gusts of 50 mph or more for
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a while this morning. we still have rain as well. that rain will push to wait out into the north sea. we still have strong to gale force winds even into the afternoon. a day of sunshine and showers. quite a few in northern ireland, wales, the south—west of england, the showers becoming few in scotland but it stays within the far north of scotland. the temperatures are good for the time of year, 9— 11 degrees even with the strong winds. sunshine across other parts of england and wales, turns hazy through the afternoon. the cloud because up this evening. 0vernight we get wet weather coming in, as far north as north wales towards the humber and to the north of that more tenuous cloud and the threat of a touch of frost, where is towards the far north of scotland we have more cloud and some outbreaks of rain. it is on that weather front there. that will tend to head towards northern ireland during tomorrow. this weather system is bringing the wet start to parts of england and why is. there may even be over the tops
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of the welsh hills. you can see the wet weather sliding away towards east anglia and the south—east. so improvement. elsewhere sunshine coming through. it turns wet and windy across northern ireland in the afternoon. the rain pushes further south into the northern half of scotla nd south into the northern half of scotland as well. in between, sunshine coming through. not as windy tomorrow. you will notice a chilly feel with temperatures around six or seven degrees. cold as we head towards the start of the week. wet and windy weather towards wales and southern england overnight. gone by monday. a ridge of high pressure moving in. it will be a cold start. a touch of frost. 0ne moving in. it will be a cold start. a touch of frost. one or two icy patches. goldar strong winds down the west coast. they shall rot too. essentially monday is a dry day sudden turnaround, early mist and fog. away from the south—west it will be chilly with temperatures around 5—7d. but as we head into the early pa rt around 5—7d. but as we head into the early part of next week, beyond monday, it becomes a little less cold. the weather settling down,
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high pressure in charge, probably more towards the south—east of the uk. southerly winds around that, decent averages by day. not too cold at night. dry weather and some much—needed sunshine. at night. dry weather and some much-needed sunshine. that sounds so much-needed sunshine. that sounds so much better. if you have started that. you need to sell the story with the best light. i know how to sell the story. i have been doing it for years. we'll have the headlines at 8:00. first though, it's time now for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me samira ahmed. donald tusk‘s comments about hell this week annoyed many people, but did bbc news pour oil on the flames by distorting his words in their headlines? and liam neeson has also caused a storm this week. was the bbc unfair in how it reported what he said too? provocative statements have been at the heart of news coverage for the last seven days. and how they have been reported has
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been exercising newswatch viewers. take wednesday's carefully worded gibe from european council president donald tusk at a press conference in brussels. i've been wondering what the special place in hell looks like for those who promoted brexit without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it safely. those comments immediately, tweeted by mr tusk‘s office, were widely condemned by brexit—supporting mp5 as george alagiah reported at the top of that night's news at six. —— immediately tweeted. the president of the european council stands accused of insulting british politicians. earlier today, donald tusk said there was a special place in hell for leave—supporting politicians, those were his words. but some viewers pointed out that those weren't quite his words,
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or at least not all of them. mr tusk spoke of those who promoted brexit without even a sketch of a plan of how to carry it out safely, but that last thought, though it featured elsewhere in the programme, was not included in george alagiah's introduction. steve martin was watching and told us... "this is not what he said. not the same thing at all and highly inflammatory at this time." iain stewart agreed. "the bbc‘s manipulation of what he actually said gave a clear suggestion that tusk had used an aggressive tone, whereas what he actually said was a reflective comment on what he and i'm sure many others of you as a sad situation". those who felt the shortened version of the quotation distorted its meaning also pointed to its use on thursday morning's today programme. and the initial headline on the news website, "special place in hell for brexiteers," later deleted. and on the bbc
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politics twitter feed. stephen kingsnorth felt compelled to contact the bbc for the first time ever and recorded this video for us about how mr tusk‘s words were reported. he spoke of those who had promoted brexit without a sketch of a plan to carry it out safely. the essential theme of his remark, which was rarely mentioned, "safely", he was talking of those who had promoted brexit, not as you variously reported or implied either all brexit supporters or brexit voters. he was musing on a question, "i have been wondering," whereas it was repeatedly reported without reference to that pondering. both flowing subtext on the screen and reporting oversimplified the comment. it was very difficult to understand because it was so misleading. making things simple can be at the cost of truth. i accept absolutely that the remark was worthy of attention,
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but i expect better of the bbc which, by using shorthand and half quotations, spread misinformation on a sensitive subject. and it is simply poorjournalism. well, we want to discuss those points with someone from bbc news, but our invitation was declined. instead, we were given this statement which did acknowledge the points. if there was an outraged reaction to mr tusk‘s bombshell, there was just as much of a backlash to an interview given by the actor liam neeson and reported on bbc news on tuesday. the hollywood actor liam neeson has denied he's racist afterfinding himself at the centre of a global media storm. in an interview to promote his latest film, he described how a0 years ago when someone close to him had been raped by a black man, he then set out to kill any innocent black man in revenge. he says he quickly came to his senses and was appalled
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by his behaviour and that it was not motivated by racism. but some viewers thought that wider context of what liam neeson had said was not fully reflected in the coverage that followed. jeanette lewis e—mailed. and clem 0'mara echoed that. the bbc gave us this statement in response. one man whose remarks are always guaranteed to provoke a heated
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response is president trump. who this week delivered his delayed state of the union address in washington, dc. no issue better illustrates the divide between america's working class and america's political class than illegal immigration. simply put, walls work and walls save lives. applause. mick warren felt there was a lack of balance in the way bbc news covered that. your correspondent in america reporting on trump's address focused more on the democrats stance on wanting more immigration than on why trump wants it controlled. trump and their majority on the us want controlled immigration to reduce their negative impact of illegal immigration. the left in america and the uk view any controls as racist and ignore any argument to the contrary.
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the bbc should report both sides of the argument. for others, coverage of the state of the union address, along with reporting last week of extreme weather in the united states, was signs of an obsession with the usa on the part of the bbc. the last straw for maurice pankhurst came with reporting of the highlight of the american sporting calendar, the super bowl, in which, for those who are interested, the new england patriots defeated the los angeles rams. his reaction... do let us know your thoughts on any of those issues or on any aspect of bbc news. details of how to contact us coming up at the end of the programme. now, on thursday night, police confirmed that the body recovered from the wreckage of a crashed plane is that of cardiff city footballer emiliano sala. the plane, piloted by david ibbotson, who has not been found,
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disappeared over the english channel almost three weeks ago. bbc news has been following developments closely since then withjohn donaldson reporting here. emiliano sala's family and friends will have known this moment was coming. but it's now been officially confirmed he is dead. after being recovered from the wreckage of the small plane on wednesday, police say his body has been formally identified by the dorset coroner. denise walker e—mailed us on thursday to say... and jane johns agreed. last week's snowy and icy weather
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across much of the uk which continued into the weekend prompted the familiar sight of bbc reporters braving the conditions across the country. that prompted a familiar complaint voiced here byjoe moon. and a different objection was articulated by kathleen critchlow. finally, it is sometimes pointed out
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to us that for all the complaints and suggestions you make about bbc news, instances of them being addressed and things changing as a result are few and far between. well, last month, we aired objections that the news at ten was moved on to bbc two when a live football match shown on bbc one overran because of extra time. we can't be sure that newswatch can claim all the credit, but when the same thing happened this week with another fa cup match going to extra time, the boot was on the other foot. this time it was the football that switched channels. although some viewers objected to the disruption that caused, others were delighted that the news stayed in its rightful place on bbc one. here's jane burchfield. dear bbc, three weeks ago, i wrote to complain because the ten o'clock news had been relegated
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to bbc two in favour of an overunning football match. this week, i would like to thank the bbc for maintaining its usual schedule by moving an overrunning football match to bbc two and allowing the ten o'clock news to be on bbc one where it belongs. thank you. at least one satisfied customer. and perhaps we had a little influence there. thank you for all your comments this week. if you've got an opinion about something you have seen, heard or read on bbc news, you can share it by calling or e—mailing us. you might even appear on the programme. find us on twitter and do have a look at our website. that is all from us. we will back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage next week. goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today... new allegations of sexual and racial harassment by former employees of the retail tycoon
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sir philip green are published in the telegraph — he denies any crime or misconduct. no ships and now no contract — the government cancels a controversial agreement to provide extra ferries in case of a no—deal brexit. counting the cost of knife crime — the number of young victims admitted to hospitals in england has risen by more than 50% in the past five years.
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