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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 12, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you re watching bbc newsroom live 7 it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: the 1966 legendary england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. what a save! gordon banks! his 1970 goalkeeping heroics are often described as the greatest save in world cup history. theresa may will urge mps to "hold their nerve", when she updates them on the brexit talks this lunchtime. tougher criminal checks for taxi drivers in england, plans to give better protection for vulnerable passengers are set out by the government. getting rid of rubbish — nearly two million complaints were made last year, about bins not being collected the bereaved family of a nurse, repeatedly given the all—clear for cervical cancer, fight for a wider inquiry into her case. and — the local community group that wants to take over the struggling funicular railway, at the cairngorm
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mountain in scotland. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. england's 1966 world england's1966 world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died aged 81. regarded as one of the game's greatest, he was named fifa goalkeeper of the year six times and earned 73 caps for england. he played in every game of the 1966 world cup campaign, culminating in that 4-2 world cup campaign, culminating in that 11—2 victory over west germany in the final at wembley. tributes have started coming in to him. sir geoff hurst, who scored a hat—trick in that world cup, described him as
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one of the very greatest, and paid his condolences to his family. former england striker gary lineker said:. manchester city forward raheem sterling said... andy swiss looks back on his life. it remains a footballing miracle... 1970, england against brazil, and that save. what a save. gordon banks. the greatest ever from one of the greatest ever. gordon banks first made his name in the 1950s with leicester city. sheffield united attack but banks was safe in the goal. soon, though, he attracted
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england's attention and by 1966 he was lining up for world cup glory. portugal try to hit back. only to find banks showing the form he has shown all along. banks again gets the ball away. banks did not concede a single goal before the semi—finals, his reliability pivotal to england's triumph. among the celebrations, though, his sportsmanship towards his opponents shone through. i played him in two fa cup finals at wembley and lost on both occasions, so i knew how the loser felt, and i went over and tried to lift him as best i could. although england fell short at the next world cup in 1970 banks was at his peak, famously against brazil, in what is being described as the save of the century. how he denied pele has dumbfounded everybody. not least the striker himself.
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not least the striker himselfli not least the striker himself. i had the ball. i jumped not least the striker himself. i had the ball. ijumped towards the goal to go... goal! 0h! and then i looked. chuckles his brilliance helped stoke city win the league cup in 1972, their first major trophy, but later that year a car crash cost him his sight in one eye and with it surely his career. amid emotional scenes he retired and amazingly a few years later in the us he made a comeback. as it worked out the good eye started to pick up the ball very clearly, much clearer, and i was able to react much quicker. i started to make saves again. the manager played me in one or two friendly matches, and after a couple of years i was being asked to go out to america. although he retired for a final time in 1978, his fame
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and popularity proved enduring, his achievements at stoke and his incredible feat with england. in 2012 he carried the olympic torch at wembley stadium where decades earlier he had conjured such wizardry as a player, defying gravity and opponents, gordon banks, the man with the golden touch. let's speak to our sports reporterjo currie. to be named fifa goalkeeper of the year six times is quite a feat, what was it about his skill that led to that? yes, thatjust sums up gordon banks, the six time fifa goalkeeper of the year. it wasn't what he brought onto the pitch, and we have seen plenty of that footage, particularly that of 1970 world cup save against pele, and he also helped england win the world cup in 1966. did not concede a single goal
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until the semifinal. it was also the way, though, he played the game, the way, though, he played the game, the way he approached the game, the way he approached his opponents, he will go down as one of the greatest ever sportsman. he passed away this morning at the age of 81. his family announced that it is with great sadness that gordon passed away peacefully overnight. we have so many happy memories and could not have been more proud. it's clear from those tributes coming in how much of an inspiration gordon banks has been to other football players, not just a has been to other football players, notjust a goalkeeper, of course. after his professional career ended he kept very close links to the sport. absolutely, always very much involved in football. we've used a lot on the bbc for punditry, as well. one more to be that has come in. gordon was a fantastic
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goalkeeper, without doubt one of the best england has ever had, i was proud to call him a team—mate, we shared that great day in 1966, but it was more than that. even though i was on the pitch, i have seen it many times since, i still don't know how he saved that header from pellow. gordon will be deeply missed, and our thoughts are with his family at this sad time. we have already had people passing comment, such as gary lineker and raheem sterling, and i imagine many footballers will give their comments throughout the day. thanks very much. we will be at stoke city's stadium shortly, where a statue of gordon banks proudly stands, and also we are hoping to speak to peter shilton, who has said today that he has lost his hero. theresa may will urge mps today to "hold their nerve" when she updates them on the latest developments in the brexit negotiations. number ten says the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, had a "constructive" meeting with the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels last night.
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but the european union is continuing to insist it won't re—negotiate the withdrawal agreement. later today, the prime minister will make a statement to mps updating them on the brexit process, as she continues to seek backing for her deal. and later this week on thursday, mps will again debate the next steps as the brexit deadlock continues. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster for us now. the leader of the commons, andrea leadsom, saying earlier today that the next meaningful vote could possibly not happen until after the eu summit on march the 21st. a little over a week before brexit is due to happen. is it really going to go that close to the wire, or will mps do something about that? go that close to the wire, or will mps do something about that7m go that close to the wire, or will mps do something about that? it is certainly not impossible. we seem to be in certainly not impossible. we seem to beina certainly not impossible. we seem to be in a familiar waiting in, waiting for mrs may to bring back a deal. the statement we will get from the pm today will contain little knew a
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plea for mps to her a bit more space to pursue negotiations, we expect. that means, in turn, it is doubtful whether mps will try to make a stand on thursday when we are expecting a series of votes on mrs may's approach. because she is also expected to say that she will allow mps another crack at taking amendments at the end of the month. we wait, we wait, and we continue to wait, albeit at the leader of the house, andrea leadsom, denied mrs may was just running down the clock. no, no, it's not running down the clock. we've just had this discussion that what the prime minister is seeking to do is to resolve the issues around the backstop, which is what parliament made very clear would then enable parliament to support her deal. what we are trying to do is to get a good deal that works for the uk and the eu. and those talks are under way
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absolutely flat out right now to ensure that we can meet the terms that parliament has set out, and bring forward the meaningful vote as soon as possible. so, when will we reach the crunch? i am joined by owen smith, prominent support of so—called peoples vote. let's talk about mrs may one, how would you characterise her strategy? blackmail, and trying to bully mps into voting for her deal. 0r risk the cataclysm of a no—deal brexit. i don't think she intends to go through with no—deal brexit, but andrea leadsom statements that —— but andrea leadsom's statement they are not running down the clock, but thatis are not running down the clock, but that is exact what is going on and we are engaging in phony activities. i expect she wants to run this right down to the last second. isn't there a sign that actually it is working? mrs may is playing for time and mps are giving her time. my theory is it will work and she is anticipating
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that mps will blink at the last minute, because they cannot countenance having no deal done to their constituents. it would be a cata clysm their constituents. it would be a cataclysm for our business and industry and for jobs cataclysm for our business and industry and forjobs and livelihoods everywhere across the country, but i think one of the things i do agree with, we have got to hold our nerve. those of us who don't believe she has gone completely crackers, and isn't going to push herself over the cliff, need to push herself over the cliff, need to hold their nerve, and that her deal is hard brexit. that is going to knock between four and 5% off our gdp, and that is also going to hit livelihoods and opportunities right across the country. has the option of another referendum now gone? we have seen mr corbyn seemingly moving away from that, so does that mean, in effect, there is no longer a serious run—up? in effect, there is no longer a serious run-up? definitely not. we need to keep holding up the
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possibility that there is a way out of this, whether she delays article 50 or not. that means we put it back to the public. there is an interesting compromise idea which has been floated about by some of my colleagues, including peter kyle and mr wilson, is that we have a vote after parliament votes for it. people like me, who want the uk to remain within the eu, people like jacob rees mogg who want the uk to leave the eu, could both vote for mrs may's deal on the proviso that once it passes parliament it will go back to the people to be finally ratified. to do that you need mr corbyn to be on board. all of the indications indicate he is not on board for another vote. you say that. i don't know yet. i am worried, as you know, that might be the case. what he has put to the prime minister last week, the
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suggestion of staying within a customs union, has been rejected by her in the exchange of letters yesterday. i'm not sure where we go with labour. if there isn't to be a brexit deal that we know will damage our constituents, and we know is at odds with our internationalist values, if we know that the alternative, then surely we have got to grasp with both hands the only way which we can stop that happening to the country, and stop our values being destroyed by brexit, and that is to put it back to the people in a confirmatory vote, ratification vote, whatever you want to call it, but basically taking parliament out of the equation, passing her deal, but putting it back to the people at the end to say whether they want it or not. you were quoted yesterday that you were mulling about staying in the labour party, because you we re in the labour party, because you were not impressed with the approach to all of this, do you have any more comment on that? i said last week that it isn't about me. it's about much bigger things, it's about the future of our country. there is still a fight to be had in the labour movement for our values, but what i am keen to point out to
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jeremy corbyn is that brexit is not reconcilable with our values, because we are a party that believes in growing the economy, looking after people, and being an actor on an international stage. patriotic, yes, but outward looking. brexit is inward looking, it isn't patriotic, it wants us to be a smaller country in the world, and crucially it will reduce the size of our economy and hamstring any future labour government, stopping the very things myself and jeremy corbyn want. it stops us having a more equitable society and an equitable economy. we cannot have that. and that means standing up against brexit. thanks very much. it'll be interesting to see the prime minister when she gets to her feet see the prime minister when she gets to herfeet in see the prime minister when she gets to her feet in the commons later. interesting to seejeremy corbyn and how he pitches his approach. i have no doubt many of his own backbenchers will be watching closely. thanks. just before the headlines, another tribute to gordon banks, the legendary england
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goalkeeper, and stoke city goalkeeper, and stoke city goalkeeper, who has died at the age of 81. sending davis says a very sad news today, the loss of gordon banks, an english football legend. his contribution towards the 1966 world cup victory and that save against brazil in the 1970 world cup, have truly cemented his place in history as one of the great goalkeepers of all time. thank you, gordon, rip. that tribute from the sports minister, minns davies, to gordon banks. the time is now 11:15am, the headlines on bbc news... the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. theresa may will urge mps to hold their nerve when she updates them on the brexit talks this lunchtime. tougher criminal checks for taxi drivers in england, a plan to give better
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protection to vulnerable passengers set out by the government. in sport, tributes coming from across the game to england's world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks. team—mate geoff hurst has called him one of the greatest. we will have more reaction to his death at our past. shannon gabriel has been warned about his language after an on field exchange with the england captain joe root in the final test. england are in control. joe root is on 111. racing will resume tomorrow after a 60 shut down after an equine flu outbreak. the authority says stricter controls will be put in place. back with much more in the next 15 minutes. anyone who has a serious criminal conviction will be barred from getting a taxi license under plans being set out today. the government wants to introduce stricter background checks in england and is even considering forcing cabs to have cctv to protect vulnerable passengers. 0ur transport correspondent tom burridge has the details.
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hello, just from licensing, emma. how are you? spot—checks in newcastle. here, they have tightened the rules for issuing taxi licences, after private hire cabs were used by a gang over a number of years to groom and abuse girls and young women. 18 people were jailed in 2017, and 29 drivers have had their licences revoked in the past year. four of them had been previously convicted of sexual offences. in response, newcastlejoined ten other councils in the north—east of england to create a single licensing body, so the same standards and checks are applied when issuing licences. i think the local authorities are all cognisant of the fact that
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vehicles and drivers will work across authority areas, and therefore its vital that we share information between ourselves to ensure that any public safety issues that we identify with drivers are made available to all. now, the government wants a common rulebook so if someone is denied a taxi licence in one area, they wouldn't be able to get one from another council which is more lenient. that is still possible today. under the plans, criminal background checks would also be compulsory. mandatory cctv in all taxis is being considered, but privacy is an issue. a government consultation will now run for several weeks. the government is being sued for its decision to charter firms to run extra ferries, including one with no ships, in the event of a no—deal brexit. channel tunnel operator eurotunnel,
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said the contracts, revealed after christmas, were decided in a "secretive and flawed procurement process". the move comes days after seaborne, one of the firms chosen, had its contract axed after its funding fell through. our business presenter dominic 0'connell said that at a high court hearing eurotunnel claimed the government contracts were awarded without any public notice. the government awarded three contracts, one to brittany ferries, 12 dfds, and seaborne freight, the famous ferry company that didn't have any ships. that has been cancelled. it was a secretive and flawed process that might amount to unfair state subsidy. we didn't get a decision on the court yesterday, that has been put off to a four day hearing which will start on the 1st of march, so should be out of the way before brexit is decided one way
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or another. this is another embarrassment for chris grayling. and the department's attempts to cater for what and the department's attempts to caterfor what might and the department's attempts to cater for what might happen after brexit, and what might happen for the short crossing between dover and calais, which is really important to british industry. there are other legalities in this, and as you say it raises wider questions about the government's handling of preparedness for brexit and a no—deal brexit. indeed it does, and an interesting memorandum was published yesterday, which was done by the national audit 0ffice, which was done by the national audit office, which looked into the background of this ferry contract. i went through it carefully. it shows that the department for transport was quite worried about awarding this contract and sought legal advice at each stage of the process. the legal advisers who gave the advice, and they want to know what the grounds were for awarding it. they have wide discretionary powers. eurotunnel will be able to show that those powers were not exercised properly, that awarding these
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contracts wasn't right, and that is what thejudge has contracts wasn't right, and that is what the judge has to decide. they need to take the correct legal advice and execute the awarding of these contracts correctly. let's cross over to westminster and speak to transport and maritime minister nusrat ghani. i'd like to ask you a question on theissue i'd like to ask you a question on the issue of those contracts, those very contracts for the event of a no—deal brexit. eurotunnel, the operator of the channel tunnel, now ina operator of the channel tunnel, now in a legal dispute with the government over this. was this an a cce pta ble government over this. was this an acceptable lapse of judgment government over this. was this an acceptable lapse ofjudgment by chris grayling, and as he now need to consider his position? not at all. the department for transport has been planning for this for quite a while. he's quite right that we should prepare for all outcomes, including no deal. chris grayling does a fantasticjob. the department for transport is at the forefront of brexit because as we know 95% of everything that we consume comes in and out of our ports, and he is doing a fantasticjob in difficult
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circumstances, trying to prepare for brexit. were there any errors with the procurement process, could it have been handled in a different way, the handing out of those co ntra cts ? way, the handing out of those contracts? chris grayling gave a robust statement to the house yesterday. he answered questions from across the house on this issue and made it clear that all of the due diligence has taken place. and we are preparing as we should for brexit and indeed we are. the subject of making taxis safer for all of those who use them, it seems that there is widespread support from taxi drivers, both black cabs and private hire companies for the sort of plans that you are consulting on. but one area that was raised as an area of concern this morning by the private hire association was the use of cctv. what are your thoughts on that at the moment? there is concern about
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privacy, how data is stored, and so on? absolutely. we have conducted a huge amount of work on taxis and private hire vehicles. we are committed to ensuring that passengers have the safety they need when getting into a private hire vehicle or taxi, so we are setting minimum standards for licences having a national data base, minimum standards for licences having a national database, and also national enforcement policies up and down the country. the issue of cctv, their arguments on both sides, those who are arguing for them to be mandatory, and other people who are talking about it being an infringement of privacy, and if somebody was going to abuse a power they have they may switch off the camera in the cab. we need to make sure we get this right between... which is why we will be consulting over the next couple of weeks to make sure any decision that we make fits the sector. and that it is viable, too. what is your view? should safety come before privacy? safety will be dealt with by having
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the national minimum standards. at the national minimum standards. at the moment licensing authorities up and down the country, like local authorities equivalent of, can issue licences to their standards, but enhancing those standards and making sure the national minimum is reached, which includes crb checks, will enable confidence for passengers that any private hire vehicle or taxi someone gets into has already got those standards. those who have their licences removed, they cannot go and shop around where a licence might be handed out to a lower standard. already by us doing those two things will ensure that we have got better standards in the private hire vehicle sector and taxis, as well. is it your understanding that the welsh government will come if these standards are accepted, use that system until the assembly itself in wales legislates there? we are keen to make sure we are delivering best practice. quite often we are ahead of the game in transport compared with other countries in europe and the rest of the world. it is important for us to get this right which is why the consultation period
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is key. but national minimum standards should be there. if we are enabling other parts of the uk to better develop their licensing practices that they could as well. thanks very much. a nurse whose cervical cancer was repeatedly missed, made a final plea before she died — to try to stop others having to go through the same thing. julie 0'connor passed away in st peter's hospice last week aged 49. she'd been given the all—clear by southmead hospital in bristol several times — and was campaigning for an inquiry into the treatment of other patients. matthew hill reports. right up to the end, julie was keen to tell her story. this was recorded by her family
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in st peter's hospice just three days before she died. what's the prognosis now, julie? it was very emotional, it was full of love and happiness, she was surrounded by the people that she loved. she said she does not want this to happen to anyone else. in 2014, she had a routine smear test. southmead's pathology lab gave her the all clear but the slides should have rung alarm bells as they were abnormal. the next year, julie was referred by her gp back to southmead gynaecology for investigation of persistent bleeding but was taken off the cancer pathway after a biopsy was reported as normal. over the next two years she was sent back to southmead four times because her gp was worried about the bleeding. eventuallyjulie went private
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and was given the devastating diagnosis not only that she had cancer but that it had spread out of control. within 30 seconds of being examined by the consultant, he diagnosed me with cervical cancer. he took me in the week after and he could not even get the camera into the womb, it was completely blocked. i was horrified. southmead have accepted that the care thatjulie received was negligent and that had they correctly reported her smear, she would not have developed cervical cancer and died. an independent investigation is being carried out into her treatment, butjulie and her husband wanted a much wider report as they believed there was systematic failure. julie was contacted on social media by ladies who had had similar experiences. they had signs, they had challenged it and had been
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backwards and forwards. 0ur concern is whether there are more victims out there. i believe it is a systemic failure. i believe we need to go further back than 2014. in a statement, the trust reiterated apologies and condolences to the family, saying we are committed to fully understanding the circumstances of the care we provided so any lessons can be learned. they said we will be publicly open about the overall findings of the investigation. julie always went for her smear tests, but with cervical cancer screening targets being missed, her other hope is to encourage other people to come forward. now it's time for a look at the weather. a much cloudier day across the uk
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today, but across many southern areas it'll stay dry with some sunshine at times. cloudy weather further north. we will continue to see splashes of rain come and go. but it will be milder. it is already feeling that way folsom. the breeze will push out the outbreaks of rain for scotland and northern ireland towards the east. —— that way for some. northern england and north wales will stay on the cloudy side. fairly dumb, as well. some burst —— on the cloudy side, and fairly damp as well. into tonight, still some damp weather over the northern pa rt some damp weather over the northern part of england and wales, but it works north across northern ireland and back into scotland later. staying breezy overnight. joy is to further south, and just about all will be frost free tonight with temperatures in the west staying
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around nine or 10 degrees. —— driest further south. hello. this is bbc newsroom live with annitta mcveigh. the headlines... the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. what a save! that save against pele in 1970 is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history. theresa may will urge mps to "hold their nerve", when she updates them on the brexit talks this lunchtime tougher criminal checks for taxi drivers in england. plans to give better protection to vulnerable passengers are set out by the government. nearly two million complaints were made from people across the uk last year, about bins not being collected. that's according to bbc figures. the bereaved family of a nurse, repeatedly given the all—clear for cervical cancer, fight for a wider inquiry into her case.
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time for a sports update. 0lly foster is here. the sad news of gordon brown is dead. so many tributes coming in. less than two hours ago stoke city, one of the four clubs confirmed he had died at the age of 81. so many tributes. across social media. 0ne the age of 81. so many tributes. across social media. one of his former team—mates sir bobby charlton in that 66 world cup side said he and his wife lady norma are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of gordon banks. he says gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper, without doubt one of the best england ever had. he saidi one of the best england ever had. he said i was proud to call him a
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team—mate. another man who played in the final sir geoff hurst, who scored a hat—trick, says ray sad to hear the news... the official social media account of england posted this... and this is a lovely touch from the german football association, posting a picture of gordon banks and their beaten players in 66 saying... we will have more reaction to the story later on. sharon gabriel has
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been warned about his language after the stump microphone picked up an exchange between him and joe root. the england captain respond to an allegedly, public slur by saying there's nothing wrong with being 93v- there's nothing wrong with being gay. the on field umpires want gabriel but refused to elaborate on what was said. and said the matter was closed. route will resume on 111 on day four, england leading by 4118 runs, looking good for victory but the series already lost. the british horse racing authority said strict bio—security control measures will be put in place when racing resumes tomorrow. meetings had been suspended for the past six days in britain following an outbreak of equine flu. the sport governing body said a return to action will be in a controlled, risk managed manner and they will intervene to stop any horse running who looks like it could be at risk of infection. horse running who looks like it could be at risk of infectionm was the right decision we feel to
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lock this down and get a clearer picture and get a chance to move the song. of course there were pressures to put things back on but we went by the recommendations of the dead meat committee, all the scientific evidence, rather than being pressured into it the wrong reasons but we are acutely conscious of the need to ensure we have racing in a clear space so the flagship meetings can go ahead. the arsenal and wales midfielder alan ramsey has agreed a move to the italian champion juventus. he said to become one of the highest—paid british players in world food well. he's been at arsenal since moving from his boyhood club at cardiff 11 years ago. he's made a preliminary agreement with the italian club for around £a00,000 a week. he announced the move to fans saying he leaves with a heavy heart that hopes to finish the season with arsenal strongly before heading on to the next chapter in his career. some by next chapter in his career. some
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rugby union news. leigh halfpenny returns to wales training tomorrow as they prepare to take on england the six nations. the british and irish lions layer hasn't played since suffering concussion against australia back in november during the autumn internationals. wales face england in cardiff a week on saturday in what could be the six nations decider. there are the only two unbeaten teams after two rounds of the six nations. that's all you sport for now. i will be back in the next hour. thank you. more now on the death of the former england goalkeeper and world cup winner, gordon banks. he played in every game of the 1966 world cup on home soil — but he's also remembered for this action against brazil in 1970 — which has become known as perhaps the greatest save of all time. . .. that's dangerous. and he left cooper standing. what a save!
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gordon banks. takes that out of the net. phenomenal save. we can now speak to the former england goalkeeper, peter shilton. thank you so much forjoining us, i know you have been saying you have lost a n know you have been saying you have lost an absolute hero of yours in gordon banks so how did he inspire you? i was gordon banks so how did he inspire you? iwas a gordon banks so how did he inspire you? i was a young lad at leicester, at the age of ten then i went and watched football and he had watched —— andi watched football and he had watched —— and i had watched leicester and is supported leicester. i was going down and training at the club tuesday and thursday evenings. sort of on the car park outside on the filbert street ground and i had met gordon on quite a few occasions. i watched him train 2—3 times as well. you know, isigned
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watched him train 2—3 times as well. you know, i signed for leicester fan i was 15 as an apprentice. quickly became his understudy at 16. that was, i had the opportunity to watch him train and obviously, you know, i played when he went away with england, i made my debut at the age of 16. i knew gordon pretty well at that time and he was my hero. growing up. you know, being able to train with him, i think the big thing i would say about him, he had, in an era different today, great positional sense, there were no goalkeeping coaches and he went out and did the extra training. i which remember he used to train really hard, go back in the afternoon when isaid hard, go back in the afternoon when i said there was no goalkeeping coaches and do it himself and that was his dedication. what advice did he give to you as a young goalie? when i signed is 15, i was in the
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youth team, i did not train with the first—team and when i got to the reserves we had a session together every week. we were kind of rivals ina way, every week. we were kind of rivals in a way, it wasn't so much advice, we we re in a way, it wasn't so much advice, we were rivals but obviously, i used to watch him and that was the big thing. i always felt he always had time, he was always in control of himself and of course, when you make a save like that, which is, the the greatest world cup save of all time, the hard work it came off in that one moment. there was such a magic around the world cup winning team, that has never paid a hazard, more than 50 years later? he was such a big part of that magic. the thing about gordon, i have met all of the squad up 66. they are all so down to earth. good, professionals, good
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characters. i think that had a big effect on why they won the world cup and gordon, you know, he could get angry on the pitch, if you times i saw him lose his temper with people in the days when you were allowed to challenge is the goalkeepers, i remember him saying a couple of times, iam remember him saying a couple of times, i am not happy, remember him saying a couple of times, iam not happy, he remember him saying a couple of times, i am not happy, he did remember him saying a couple of times, iam not happy, he did have remember him saying a couple of times, i am not happy, he did have a bit of a temper but he was just a genuinely nice fellow and he always had time for people. i worked with him, we did after dinner speeches and we worked together on a few occasions and we always got on, we we re occasions and we always got on, we were always rivals but we got on very well. tell us a bit more about his life after his professional football career was over. many of our viewers will know his commentary and his punditry forfootball games but tell us a but more about that post professional life and his reflections on that amazing time in 66. yes, you know, he made that said
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and bobby moore touches it is to say, well done and gordon always said, bobby says, you should have called it, something like that, that was the line he put into his after—dinner, and you know, it was difficult for the lads of 66. i don't think we really appreciated until recently, what they had done and they were really celebrated for many years. the last 10—15 years that people have really, they have actually made a little bit of money out of that. but also, people have really appreciated what they did and i think, there has been talk about one or two of them should have got knighthoods and that type of thing andi knighthoods and that type of thing and i have always said, yes, ithink gordon and the other lads should have got a knighthood. so, you know, but i think, generally, they did a lot of after—dinner speaking and obviously the money the players get
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today, it is just ridiculous the sort of money they make. peter, thank you so much for talking to us and sharing your memories of gordon banks. peter shilton. the time is coming up to a quarter to 12. last year there were nearly two million complaints from people across the uk who said their rubbish wasn't being collected by the council. that's according to a bbc freedom of information request. responses from more than two hundred authorities suggest the number of complaints has increased by a third since 2014. but the local government association says councils collect over ninety—nine percent of bins without complaint as david rhodes reports. piled high and going nowhere. life for residents on this street in leeds has been pretty grim in recent weeks. the bins haven't been collected for a while, it's been about three to four weeks. as you can see, it's overflowing. we've had this issue for a while and it's just really disgusting, we see rats everywhere. since we filmed here last week, leeds city council say they've been back to empty these bins
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but councils across the uk have seen growing numbers of complaints about waste not being collected. last year, 1.8 million complaints were made to councils about rubbish being left uncollected and figures from over 200 councils across the uk show the number of complaints has increased by one third since 2014. waste collection teams go out in all weather and bad winters coupled with councils making it easier for residents to complain online can contribute towards a rising number of complaints. here in barnsley, the number of waste collection complaints has been falling but there are now warnings that budget cuts are now making the job harder. there is considerably less money. probably going back to around sort of 2008-2009, i think every year from that, we've been saving money. the local government association said over 99% of bins are collected without complaint, whilst the government said councils will receive £1 billion in extra funding in the coming year to provide all services. a regulator should be appointed to oversee tech giants
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like google and facebook and prevent the spread of fake news, according to a government—backed report published today. it's one of several recommendations by dame frances cairncross, aimed at protecting local newspapers — 245 of which have closed since 2005 in the face of digital competition. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. based in leeds, the yorkshire post is yorkshire's national paper. as editor, you become acutely aware that you are merely a custodian. 100 years ago, people got their news from the local paper. today, many of us get our news online, while the internet has destroyed the market in classified advertising. according to the press gazette, 245 local newspapers have shut since 2005 alone. so what we have is essentially a business model that's acutely challenged by declining revenues, but the dichotomy of more people demanding our
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content than ever before. local papers have been asking government for help, particularly from what they see as the predatory behaviour of technology firms like google and facebook. the government response was to ask dame frances cairncross to publish a review on the future of high—quality news. it suggests a regulator to oversee the quality of news on online platforms, tax relief to encourage online subscription models, and that 0fcom investigate the size of bbc news and its impact on the comercial sector. i asked dame frances why she resisted lobbying from the industry to classify tech platforms as publishers and make them pay for news content. there's no way that the platforms are going to pay for content. i think they would rather stop carrying news directly, and that would do no good to any newspaper. there is, as dame frances says, no silver bullet. but while the presses are rolling, there is cause for hope, so long as people are willing to pay for news. amol rajan, bbc news. taking over a struggling business
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can be an uphill struggle especially if it's a funicular railway. the one which takes skiers and snowboarders to the top of the cairngorm mountain in scotland is currently out of action, which is putting a dent in tourism. now a community group wants to step in, as lorna gordon reports. cairngorm mountain, the winter landscape and stunning views meant in years past, the runs here were amongst scotland's busiest. some of the skiers here grew up on these slopes. is this place important to you? very, i have been fortunate enough to come up here since i was a bairn with my parents, i would not be that happy living here without it on my doorstep, i can't get enough of it. but there's a problem. the mountain's funicular is out of action. it has been a slow start to the season and the track's closure has not helped. it is billed as the country's highest railway, when it is open it will take
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you through the clouds, close to the summit of the mountain. but there is a weakness in the structure and they need to strengthen the beams supporting the track, as well as the foundations. katie runs a local business. she says the closure was initially a cause for concern but she adds that in an area dependent on the boom or bust of winter snow, people here always find a way through. lots of coach parties would come to go up on the train, have a hot chocolate at the top and take in the views, and with the train not running, those coach parties can't come. visitor numbers probably are down. is it worrying for you? life is worrying and you have to get on with it, take the snowballe you are thrown and deal with it as best you can. so, now a local community group want to buy the site and run it not just as a winter resort, but through the summer too. it is our work, our play,
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our heritage, our children's future. we believe this mountain is sustainable, we see no reason why it can't be done by introducing summer aspects like mounting coasters, zip wires, mountain biking. those we spoke to out enjoying the white stuff, said it's an idea worth exploring further. it needs to be back in the hands of the community and those that know the mountains. a community bit is fine, but the community then takes on all the debt, which, as it stands, would not be great. i don't know, would you be happy if i put money in? aha. yeah. i would be quite happy to be part of it. the owner of the site says the slopes are open for business as they work on getting the railway running again. any buyout could take years, but those behind it are hopeful they will take back their mountain for the community who live close by. in a moment we'll have
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all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. theresa may will urge mps to "hold their nerve", when she updates them on the brexit talks this lunchtime tougher criminal checks for taxi drivers in england — plans to give better protection to vulnerable passengers are set out by the government. here's your business headlines on newsroom live. struggling department store chain debenhams has secured a cash injection of £40m to buy it extra time as it battles to secure a longer—term deal with lenders. the firm issued three profit warnings last year. travel giant tui, which owns what used to be called
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thomson holidays, has reported a loss of 84m euros for the last three months of 2018 — that's up from 37m a year before car giant nissan has reported a 76% fall in profit for the three months to the end of december — but a large part of that was to account for previous salaries and other charges that hadn't been deducted in previous years. these are the first results since the arrest of former chief executive carlos ghosn over an accounting scandal. hello. taxi and private hire drivers could have to pass enhanced criminal record checks under government proposals. the department for transport has launched a consultation on new licensing guidelines to protect vulnerable passengers. the consultation will also consider whether cabs and private hire vehicles should be fitted with cctv. last year a government report found that the laws regulating drivers
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were not "fit for the modern world". wes streeting is the mp for illford north and chair of the all—party parliamentary group on taxis. good morning to you. let's look at these proposals because they are quite wide reaching but i'm surprised a lot of the things that we are addressing are not in place already. exactly. i think we are addressing are not in place already. exactly. ithink the we are addressing are not in place already. exactly. i think the ambit of the government's own review into taxi and private hire reform shows reform of this nature is notjust necessary but urgent and long overdue. it's shocking, really, in an industry like taxis and private hire vehicles, we don't have national minimum standards that guarantee the safety standards that any passengers should be able to expect in any part of the country. it's welcome government is going to move on that, if overdue. a couple of big issues they have ducked. it
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is the case as we found through a report, my own cross—party group did, that some taxi drivers and operators, minicab drivers and operators, minicab drivers and operators are flouting the rules and regulations in some parts of the country by getting their vehicles registered in other parts of the country. but was a big issue particularly around rotherham were quite rightly in the wake of the appalling sexual exploitation taking place there, the local authority had in place very stringent licensing conditions on minicab drivers including cctv in vehicles but we find evidence drivers were continuing to operate in rotherham by getting their licence issued by another licensing authority, that issue known as cross—border harring, flouting regulations in one area by being regulated in another, is an issue the government says it is moving but not fast enough to address. i definitely welcome the thrust of what the government says but i think there is reform still to be one. most people will agree with
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the need to make these changes as you cited there, some awful cases where wrongdoing was allowed and actively encouraged given that the rules that permitted this. many will be surprised that it is still allowed for people to as you say, work cross—border and be able to get licensed in onejurisdiction work cross—border and be able to get licensed in one jurisdiction and moved elsewhere but i wonder whether these proposals will catch law—abiding taxi drivers, add cost to their operating and frankly, they could much more difficult for them to bea could much more difficult for them to be a cab driver because we know they are already facing a lot of costs a nd they are already facing a lot of costs and concerns with rivals like uber. the rival taxis, costs and concerns with rivals like uber. the rivaltaxis, that costs and concerns with rivals like uber. the rival taxis, that is already a highly regulated system, drivers have to go varey stringent tests a nd drivers have to go varey stringent tests and checks. i think the issue is really more in the private hire industry, we need to improve safety standards and i think it's ultimately an issue of passenger safety a nd
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ultimately an issue of passenger safety and i think we've got to raise the bar right across the industry. you are quite right to highlight the case of uber, which i'm afraid, as a company, flagrantly flouted the rules that already exist and you know, even to the extent that metropolitan police criticised them forfailing to that metropolitan police criticised them for failing to hand that metropolitan police criticised them forfailing to hand over in that metropolitan police criticised them for failing to hand over in for them for failing to hand over in for the would think would be a responsible and timely manner, exa m ples responsible and timely manner, examples and complaints of serious complaints by passengers including sexual assault. there are clearly issues here in the industry that need to be addressed. i think the government has announced today some welcome changes but i think there is still further to go and the other issue, particularly in big cities like london, where the streets have become saturated with private hire vehicles, i think it is wrong for the government to say they will not give licensing authorities like the mayor of london, the powerfurther necessary to cap the number of private hire vehicles. i think that's something that would work in the interests of drivers, passengers
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and the wider travelling public. not least by reducing congestion on streets and toxic fumes. what to do. absolutely, good to talk to you. think you. just let me show you what the markets are doing, we touched on debenhams earlier, shares up but don't get too excited, they are worth just four don't get too excited, they are worthjust four p. don't get too excited, they are worth just four p. a lot of concern about what the rescue deal means for the ailing high street retailer. the ftse100, upa the ailing high street retailer. the ftse100, up a little higher. despite the weak figures we got for growth yesterday coming at zero of the final quarter of last year. why is the market up, 6% so far this year, that the 3100, despite brexit and all the concerns because frankly, europe is just and all the concerns because frankly, europe isjust as bad. any ripples from the figures yesterday? concern about what that means that the start of the year given the uncertainty surrounding brexit but asi
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uncertainty surrounding brexit but as i said, europe are pretty terrible at the moment, growth in germany not great, france not great, even though the uk is not great, it's not alone. thank you. a newborn baby has been saved from a storm drain in the south african city of durban after a three—hour rescue operation. crowds cheered as rescuers pulled the baby girl out from the drain. the baby's cries had been heard by a passer—by who alerted the emergency services. police are investigating how the little girl came to be in the drain. local reports say she has only a mild case of hypothermia and ‘a few minor abrasions'. now it's time for a look at the weather. let'sjoin let's join matt taylor. hello, let'sjoin matt taylor. hello, good morning. it's valentine's day in a few days but it's notjust love in
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the air. this was the scene yesterday, in the moray firth, sunshine overhead on thursday, by this stage temperatures rocketing up to 15 degrees, a feel of spring in the hour. today temperatures on the rise, that's because we have went from the south—west, the satellite revealing in the crowd, some breaks spreading into the west, sunshine for the rest of the day, it breaks of rain in scotland and northern ireland. the odd heavy burst as well before the sky is bright and in the afternoon. cloudy and damper song in northern england and north wales, the odd heavy burst of rain, most of england and wales is dry, the odd sunny spell, the wind lightest in the south, noticeable breeze in the north. the breeze coming from the south—west. temperatures reaching a possible 14 degrees. tonight the rain in northern england and north wales sits for a time and pushes northwards, northern ireland the first half of the night, spreading
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back across scotland, keeping the temperature are, quite breezy in the north and west, temperatures no northern 7 degrees. most of us frost free tonight as we go into wednesday. a fairly bright day across england and wales, increasing sunshine breaking through after initial rain in the north of england. scotland and northern ireland, rain in the morning, brighter in the afternoon. temperatures for all will be in double figures. that flow of warm aircontinuing double figures. that flow of warm air continuing from the south, the wind shifting into thursday, it will bring clear skies, valentine's day, some rain across shetland, elsewhere, cloud breaking up quite quickly, mist and fog will be short list, a day of largely blue sky, some care whether cloud, someone in the air. temperatures for most 11-13d. the air. temperatures for most 11—13d. around the mori firth, it reach 15 degrees. friday we start
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sunny, the atlantic weather fronts pushing back in, parts of western scotla nd pushing back in, parts of western scotland and northern ireland clouding over, the highlands and ireland is prone to rain, rain coming into northern ireland in the evening. by the end of friday, the high temperatures in the south—east, london sitting at 14 degrees. that's how it's looking. see you soon. the 1966 world cup winning goalkeeper gordon banks has died at the age of 81.
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that save against perley in 1970 is often described as the greatest piece of goalkeeping in world cup history. ijumped to i jumped to say ijumped to say goal, then i looked, andi ijumped to say goal, then i looked, and i went for chuckles theresa may will urge mps to hold their nerve when she updates them on their nerve when she updates them on the brexit talks in about half an hour's time. —— against la. tougher checks for taxi drivers in england, plans to give protection to vulnerable passengers are set out by the government. the bereaved family of a nurse repeatedly given the all clear that cervical cancer call for a wider enquiry into her case. getting rid of rubbish, nearly 2 million complaints were made last year about
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bins not being collected. and it may be more graspy than grand prix, but nor mirroring international is still going! —— grass prix than grand prix. england's1966 world cup—winning goalkeeper gordon banks has died aged 81. regarded as one of the game's greatest banks was named fifa goalkeeper of the year six times and earned 73 caps for england. he played in every game of the 1966 world cup campaign, culminating in the 4—2 victory over west germany in the final at wembley. some tributes have started coming in on twitter sir geoff hurst — who scored a hat—trick in that world cup described him as one of the very greatest — and paid his condelences to his family. former england striker gary lineker said: "an absolute hero of mine,
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and countless others, england's world cup winner was one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time, and such a lovely, lovely man." and manchester city forward raheem sterling said — "of course there was that save, but it's so much more we are mourning today. rip gordon banks. england legend, your legacy will live on." andy swiss now looks back on his life. it remains a footballing miracle, 1970, england versus brazil, and that save. what a save! gordon banks! the greatest ever from one of the greatest ever. gordon banks first made his name back in the 19505 first made his name back in the 1950s with leicester city. sheffield united attack, but gordon banks was
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in goal. soon he attracted england's attention and by 1966 he was lining up attention and by 1966 he was lining upfor attention and by 1966 he was lining up for world cup glory. portugal tried to hit back, only to find banks displaying the form he has showed all along. banks, banks displaying the form he has showed allalong. banks, again, had the ball away. he did not concede a single goal before the semifinals, his reliability was pivotal to england's tryon. along his celebrations, his sportsmanship towards his fellow opponents also shone through. —— england's triumph. i knew how it felt to be the loser, soi i knew how it felt to be the loser, so i quickly went over and, sort of, tried to lift him a little bit as best i possibly could. although england fell short in the next world cup in1970, banks england fell short in the next world cup in 1970, banks was at his peak, most famously against brazil in what has been described as the save of
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the century. quite how he denied pele has dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himself. pele has dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himselflj pele has dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himself. i had the ball. i had jumped to say goal, but then i looked, i went oh! chuckles banks's brilliance helped stoke city to win the league cup, the greatest ever victory, but a car crash in the same year meant he lost the sight in one of his eyes. he retired. but amazingly a few years later in the us he made a comeback. as it worked out the good i started to pick up the ball very clearly, much clearer, andi the ball very clearly, much clearer, and i was able to react much quicker. i started to make the saves again. the manager played me in a couple of friendly matches. after a couple of friendly matches. after a couple of friendly matches. after a couple of years i was being asked to go out to america. although he
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retired for a final time in 1978 his fame and popularity proved enduring. honoured for his achievements at stoke city, as well as his unforgettable stoke city, as well as his u nforg etta ble feat stoke city, as well as his unforgettable feat with england. in 2012 he carried the olympic torch to wembley stadium where decades earlier he had conjured such wizardry as a player, defying gravity as well as opponents, gordon banks, the man with the golden touch. gordon banks, who has died at the age of 81. this tribute is just in from the former manchester united and denmark goalkeeper peter schmeichel saying, so sad to hear that gordon banks, one of my heroes and a true legend in life and football, has passed away. an inspiration, a winner, and a true gentleman. my thoughts are with his family and friends. rip gordon banks. gordon banks forever associated with stoke city football
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club. his statue stands proudly in the club grounds. let's go there now. our correspondent is outside the stadium. there is the statue. i am sure that will become a focal point for people who want to pay tribute to gordon banks. absolutely. you can see already that a few tributes have been put down here, flowers a nd tributes have been put down here, flowers and scarves have been laid down. the term legend is thrown around a lot, particularly in sport, but that certainly applies to gordon banks. still the only english goalkeeper to win a world cup medal. and at the peak of his powers he was the best goalkeeper in the world, winning the fifa goalkeeper of the year six years in a row from 1966 to 1972. it was around here in the midlands where he really made his mark. here at stoke, before that at leicester, and his career began in chesterfield. that 1970 save in guadalajara, still probably what he is remembered for the most, the
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iconic save, the headerfrom la, and bank somehow clawing it over the bar. —— from pele. that save will define a lot of the tributes being paid to him. speaking of tributes, we've had a lot of people talking about gordon banks over the course of this morning. the current england goalkeeper, jordan pickford, who had such a fantastic world cup himself last summer, said he was a true legend of the game. gary lineker described him as an absolute hero of mine. sir bobby charlton, his fellow 1966 world cup winning team—mate said, iwas 1966 world cup winning team—mate said, i was proud to call him a team—mate, gordon will be deeply missed. how about this for respect, the german national football team tweeting a few hours earlier, a fierce opponent and a good man, that's how they describe gordon banks. that is the tenure of a lot of the tributes being made to him, a gentleman, humble, sportsmanship, these are the words being associated
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with gordon banks. i imagine the tributes we are seeing here will continue to grow over the course of the day and the next couple of days, as well. just giving an idea of the mark of the man who will be mourned here in stoke, across the country, and around the footballing world. really lovely words. thank you for that. earlier we spoke to peter shilton, who trained with gordon banks at leicester, and had fond memories of him. he was my hero obviously growing up. being able to train with him. the main thing! being able to train with him. the main thing i would say about him is that he had this great positional sense. there were not any goalkeeping coaches. he was the one he went out and did the extra training. —— great positional sense. there were no goalkeeping coaches, used to go out and do it himself, and that was his commitment, really. 0n the line is the former
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arsenal and scotland goalkeeper, bob wilson — who played against gordon banks many times. give us your perspective as to why he was the goalkeeper of the year six times. the game has changed dramatically. we have a goalkeepers union. you hear the term legend and... sometimes it is misplaced, perhaps, but with gordon it is never misplaced. here is a guy who all these years on from the 66 world cup, and the time i used to play against him on a regular basis in semifinals of cups and things like that, he was an inspiration, and remains and would remain an inspiration. ask any aspiring goalkeeper, you show them the famous pele save, it encapsulates everything a goalkeeper needs,
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positional play, agility, extraordinary reading of the game. beyond that, on and off the field, i know this is being said by everybody, he had such humility. i am privileged and proud to have both played against him and to have got to know him. and only about six months ago in london i was at a luncheon where gordon was the main guest alongside me. and the stories came up. and it wasjust incredible to see the reaction and the, sort of, the idolising of this guy. all these years on from the 1970 world cup. just an additional thing with me is that i was born in chesterfield with very scottish parents. i was an aspiring goalkeeper a few years younger than gordon. he played for chesterfield. i used to stand behind that goal thinking, how did he do that? at half time, and in those days it wasn't all seater stadiums, i would
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walk around the other end sol wasn't all seater stadiums, i would walk around the other end so i could watch him in the second half up close and personal, as it were. we had many a laugh about me saying, you know when you were young you we re you know when you were young you were flash, and he said at times, bob, you have got to entertain the crowd, as well. what a lovely story, ican imagine crowd, as well. what a lovely story, i can imagine you standing there and analysing what he was doing. i spoke to peter shilton earlier. he was reflecting that when gordon was starting out there were not goalkeeping coaches, there wasn't a sense of overall training like there is now. that's interesting peter mentioned that. i would say that i was the first goalkeeping coach in the country at arsenal. after i had finished playing. ifinished in 74 andl finished playing. ifinished in 74 and i was the goalkeeping coach. now every club has a couple. it was at a time when you had to do things by
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yourself, but you would always have somebody to look up to. initially me, my hero, when i was a young kid, was bert trautmann, who broke his neckin was bert trautmann, who broke his neck in the 56 final. i am then having tojudge against neck in the 56 final. i am then having to judge against the guys who are at the other end to me, like gordon banks. it would be pat jennings, extraordinary greatness, gordon banks, who had a totally different style of play to pat jennings, but then you realise, goodness, you can do things in a different way. any goalkeeper of my era... andl different way. any goalkeeper of my era... and i think it could continue now if people just looked at footage, particularly that save which embraces everything. 0n footage, particularly that save which embraces everything. on and off the field, certainly the greatest england goalkeeper because of the fact they won the world cup, and are the only team to win the world cup, but beyond that, on and off the field, this is and has been an extraordinary human being, and we
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will miss him. thank you so much for sharing your reflections on gordon banks today. bob wilson, the former arsenal and scotland goalkeeper on the death of gordon banks at the age of 81. the time is 12:13pm. anyone who has a serious criminal conviction will be barred from getting a taxi license under plans being set out today. the government wants to introduce stricter background checks in england and is even considering forcing cabs to have cctv to protect vulnerable passengers. although the proposed guidelines would apply only to england, they are also expected to be used in wales until the devolved welsh government sets its own statutory guidelines. more on today s main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the government is being sued for its decision to charter firms to run extra ferries, including one with no ships, in the event of a no—deal brexit.
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channel tunnel operator eurotunnel, said the contracts, revealed after christmas, were decided in a "secretive and flawed procurement process". the move comes days after seaborne, which was chosen to run a freight service between ramsgate and 0stend, had its contract axed after its funding fell through. theresa may will urge mps today to "hold their nerve" when she updates them on the latest developments in the brexit negotiations. number ten says the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, had a "constructive" meeting with the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels last night. but the european union is continuing to insist it won't re—negotiate the withdrawal agreement. in the next hour — the prime minister will make a statement to mps updating them on the brexit process — as she continues to seek backing for her deal. and later this week on thursday — mps will again debate the next steps as the brexit deadlock continues. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster for us now.
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we are expecting that breathing to come quite soon, norman, aren't we? and it is looking increasingly like this process is going to go right up to the wire. all of the signs are that mrs may in the next hour or so with appeal to mps the next hour or so with appeal to mstust to the next hour or so with appeal to mps just to give her the next hour or so with appeal to mstust to give her a bit more time to continue the negotiations, even though, of course, we know so far the eu has refused to blink over the idea of reopening the withdrawal agreement. mrs may is expected to say to mps, do not force my hand, i'm in the middle of the talks, but also do not press some of those critical amendments to give mps control of the process, possibly to delay article 50, which some have been threatening to do on thursday. because mrs may will offer to hold a further vote at the end of the month. in other words, further vote at the end of the month. in otherwords, bearwith further vote at the end of the month. in other words, bear with me, don't press the nuclear button now,
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hang on until the end of the month. this morning andrea leadsom vehemently denied this was just mrs may running down the clock. no, no, it's not running down the clock. we've just had this discussion that what the prime minister is seeking to do is to resolve the issues around the backstop, which is what parliament made very clear would then enable parliament to support her deal. what we are trying to do is to get a good deal that works for the uk and the eu. and those talks are under way absolutely flat out right now to ensure that we can meet the terms that parliament has set out, and bring forward the meaningful vote as soon as possible. so, will mrs may get more time? i'm joined by the former northern ireland minister who quit in process over the backstop. this has been going on and on. surely we need to make some decisions now, we cannot keep putting off d—day. make some decisions now, we cannot keep putting off d-day. eu negotiations always go to the wire.
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the prime minister has been given a clear mandate, saying please go away, back to brussels, and try to renegotiate, and come up with alternative ideas to the backstop. i hope my colleagues will not put undue pressure on her this thursday. dude you suspect that you are all being strung along until we get right up against exit day, when you are faced with no option but to accept mrs may's deal, or to leave with any agreement. —— don't you suspect. i hope that isn't the case. these are important negotiations. she has a difficult task. we are asking for legally binding changes. in the past that you have said no on a regular basis, but they have caved in. go back two years, they said they wanted £100 billion from us. they have settled for less. they said the 3 million plus eu citizens
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living in the uk should be subject to eu laws, they have caved in on that. just because the eu says no it doesn't mean to say that we should blink and walk away and say that's it. we have to be there. we have to fight until the bitter end. it. we have to be there. we have to fight untilthe bitter end. one other possibility is the eu banks a bit and other possibility is the eu banks a bitand mrs other possibility is the eu banks a bit and mrs mabel exhibit, in other words she doesn't get a reopening of the withdrawal agreement, but she may be some sort of legal document to sit alongside that. with that, sort of, halfway house compromise on the backstop be sufficient for you? know, we would need to have legally binding changes. i am afraid if we don't have that we will get a repeat of what the —— of the defeat the prime minister had before. many loyal conservatives like myself, i have been a member of parliament for nearly 14 years, i have never rebelled, but this is a big issue and a matter of national importance. my and a matter of national importance. my colleagues will want the legally binding change and a halfway house
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will not do. is that there a bigger issue and a threat to the economy if the uk doesn't have a deal at all? —— isn't there a big issue. whitehall is in conversations about a managed no deal. we also have the fa ct a managed no deal. we also have the fact that article 24, provided the eu agree with us, then we can continue trading on zero tariffs. it isn't in the eu's interest, it isn't in our interest, to go out on a no deal basis. if we get to a stage of no deal hopefully common sense will prevail. we can then go out on the basis of article 24 and continue trading on zero tariffs. it isn't all doom and gloom. it's possible. it's common sense. it is in the eu's interest, as well, to make sure we leave with a deal because there are lots of countries there. you have car manufacturers in germany. you
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have a washing machine makers in italy. you have fruit and vegetable growers in france, spain, portugal, all of these people need certainty as much as we do. thank you for your time. interesting to get mrs may's ta ke time. interesting to get mrs may's take on the state of negotiations but i think the bottom line is that we are in a waiting game. thanks very much, we will bring that to you when it happens but for now let's get some more sport with 0llie foster. remembering gordon banks. yes, good afternoon, it isjust foster. remembering gordon banks. yes, good afternoon, it is just a reminder of his standing notjust in this country but across world football. so many tributes have been paid to the former england goalkeeper since his death was announced this morning. a legendary figure at stoke and leicester city, the two clubs where he spent most of his playing career. sir bobby charlton, one of his england team—mates in that 1966 world cup
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winning side said he and his wife are deeply saddened to hear of his passing. he said that he was a fantastic goalkeeper and without doubt one of the best england has ever had. sir bobby charlton said he was proud to call him a team—mate. sir geoff hurst who scored a hat—trick in that world cup final said he was sad to hear the news gordon banks has died. england have posted this, the official english fa, the team social media pages... and this was a really lovely touch from the german fa, the dfb... we will continue to bring you
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reaction to his death throughout the afternoon. shannon gabriel has been warned about his language after the stump microphone picked up an exchange with joe root microphone picked up an exchange withjoe root during the final test in st lucia yesterday. the england captain responded to an allegedly homophobic slur by saying there is nothing wrong with being homosexual. that was picked up by the microphone. 0n field umpires want him butjoe root refused to elaborate on what was said exactly. he finished on 111 on day four. england are in the lead and looked set for victory. although the series is already lost. the british horseracing authority says strict bio—security control measures will be put in place when racing resumes tomorrow. meetings have been suspended for six days in britain following an outbreak of equine flu. sports governing body
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says the return to action is going to be ina says the return to action is going to be in a controlled, risk managed manner, and they will intervene quickly to stop any horse running that looks like they could be at risk of infection. that is all of the sport. i will be back just after that is all of the sport. i will be backjust after 1:30pm. i will see you then. thanks very much. venezuelan president nicolas maduro has compared president trump to the head of the ku klux klan. the embattled president said the white house was being run by white supremacists that were engaging in a political war to try and oust him from power. mr maduro continues to defy efforts by western powers to recognise his opponent juan guaido as acting president. he has been speaking to our international correspondent, 0rla guerin. translation: listen, please, it's a war, and i pray
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that god enlightens you. it's a political war of the united states empire of the interests of the extreme right that today is governing of the ku klux klan that rules the white house to take over venezuela. and they have created a political communications and diplomatic strategy. they are warmongering in order to take over venezuela. do you really think the ku klux klan are ruling america? translation: i believe that the extremist sector of the white supremacists of the ku klux klan is in charge of the united states. i believe it is a gang of extremists. so, is president trump a white supremacist? translation: he is, publicly and openly. he has encouraged the fascist tendencies, the neofascists and neo—nazis within the united states, in europe, in latin america. it's an extremist tendency that hates the world. they hate us. they belittle us, because they only believe in their own interests. and in the interests of the united states. so in this battle that we are living through in venezuela, i will tell you, it's a battle that goes beyond our country. i call upon the people of the world to wake up, open your eyes, to see that it is an aggression against the peaceful country.
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that venezuela has many problems like many other countries in the world, and if you really want to help venezuela, you have to support peace, say no to the intervention. tell the united states, hands off venezuela, in support venezuela in its own efforts to resolve its own problems through dialogue. last year there were nearly two million complaints from people across the uk who said their rubbish wasn't being collected by the council. that's according to a bbc freedom of information request. responses from more than two hundred authorities suggest the number of complaints has increased by a third since 2014. but the local government association says councils collect over ninety—nine percent of bins without complaint as david rhodes reports. piled high and going nowhere. life for residents on this street in leeds has been pretty grim in recent weeks. the bins haven't been collected for a while, it's been about three to four weeks.
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as you can see, it's overflowing. the bins haven't been collected for a while, it's been about three to four weeks. as you can see, it's overflowing. we've had this issue for a while and it's just really disgusting, we see rats everywhere. since we filmed here last week, leeds city council say they've been back to empty these bins but councils across the uk have seen growing numbers of complaints about waste not being collected. last year, 1.8 million complaints were made to councils about rubbish being left uncollected and figures from over 200 councils across the uk show the number of complaints has increased by one third since 2014. waste collection teams go out in all weather and bad winters coupled with councils making it easier for residents to complain online can contribute towards a rising number of complaints. here in barnsley, the number of waste collection complaints has been falling but there are now warnings that budget cuts are now making the job harder. there is considerably less money. probably going back to around sort of 2008-2009, i think
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every year from that, we've been saving money. the local government association said over 99% of bins are collected without complaint, whilst the government said councils will receive £1 billion in extra funding in the coming year to provide all services. lawnmower racing is a rather niche sport but the premise is simple — convert your gardening equipment into a small vehicle — and then drive as fast as you can. but, as the bbc‘s tim allman reports, lawnmower racing has gone international. this has been described as, not a lwa ys this has been described as, not always with a straight face, as the lawn mower le mans. teams with names like mowforit, and pain in the
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grass, race around here in norway. despite this being a lawn mower race, there isn't a single blade of grass in sight. it should be a quite cheap motor sport. i think about how we do erase with lawn mowers. that is what it started from here in finland. this is a test of both speed and endurance. the races were supposed to be out on the track for up supposed to be out on the track for up to 12 hours, but conditions were not conducive to high velocity mowing, and the race was abandoned. believe it or not this can be a dangerous sport. 2017 i came off in a sprint race. unluckily i smashed eight ribs, broke my collarbone and break my neck into macro places. i am out here racing again. i raced here last year, so i had six months off. despite the early finish there we re off. despite the early finish there were still winners and losers. —— my
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neckin were still winners and losers. —— my neck in two places. this might be more grass prix than grand prix, but everybody wants to have a go. surely they need a really big lawn rather than a frozen lake. not quite lawn mowing weather yet, let's see what ben richards has for us as we head across the newsroom. you might be tempted over the next couple of days, because dare i say it it'll feel a bit like spring. certainly springlike scenes out at the moment, that picture came from jersey, and some of us will get to see some sunshine over the next few days. not all of us, there is some cloud around, but it'll be mild across the uk. mostly dry, but not completely, we have a weak weather front over northern england and down into north wales in the afternoon. some patchy rain. brightening up in some areas of the uk. a lot of cloud developing. this evening and overnight, we have this band of patchy rain, it is pushing north
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again for northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland. generally cloudy. any clear breaks will allow for fog patches. generally cloudy. any clear breaks will allow forfog patches. but generally cloudy. any clear breaks will allow for fog patches. but it should be frost free across the board. patchy rain across the northern half of the uk. that will drift away to the north. skies should be brightening towards the south. all of us pretty much in double digits. for thursday and friday some places could get close to 15 degrees. lots of dry weather. some spells. and the chance of some rain eventually pushing towards the west. hello. this is bbc newsroom live with annitta mcveigh. the headlines... the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. what a save!
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that save against pele in 1970 is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history ijumped andi ijumped and i went to do... goal! theresa may will urge mps to "hold their nerve", when she updates them on the brexit talks shortly this is the scene live in the house of commons, where that statement from the prime minister is expected any moment now. tougher criminal checks for taxi drivers in england — plans to give better protection to vulnerable passengers are set out by the government. nearly two million complaints were made from people across the uk last year, about bins not being collected. that's according to bbc figures a nurse whose cervical cancer was repeatedly missed, made a final plea before she died — to try to stop others having to go through the same thing.
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julie 0'connor passed away in st peter's hospice last week aged 49. she'd been given the all—clear by southmead hospital in bristol several times — and was campaigning for an inquiry into the treatment of other patients. matthew hill reports. right up to the end, julie was keen to tell her story. this was recorded by her family in st peter's hospice just three days before she died. it was very emotional, it was full of love and happiness, she was surrounded by the people that she loved. she said she does not want this to happen to anyone else. in 2014, she had
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a routine smear test. southmead's pathology lab gave her the all clear but the slides should have rung alarm bells as they were abnormal. the next year, julie was referred by her gp back to southmead gynaecology for investigation of persistent bleeding but was taken off the cancer pathway after a biopsy was reported as normal. over the next two years she was sent back to southmead four times because her gp was worried about the bleeding. eventuallyjulie went private and was given the devastating diagnosis not only that she had cancer but that it had spread out of control. within 30 seconds of being examined by the consultant, he diagnosed me with cervical cancer. he took me in the week after and he could not even get the camera into the womb, it was completely blocked. i was horrified. southmead have accepted that
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the care thatjulie received was negligent and that had they correctly reported her smear, she would not have developed cervical cancer and died. an independent investigation is being carried out into her treatment, butjulie and her husband wanted a much wider report as they believed there was systematic failure. julie was contacted on social media by ladies who had had similar experiences. they had signs, they had challenged it and had been backwards and forwards. 0ur concern is whether there are more victims out there. i believe it is a systemic failure. i believe we need to go further back than 2014. in a statement, the trust reiterated apologies and condolences to the family, saying we are committed to fully understanding the circumstances of the care we provided so any lessons can be learned. they said we will be publicly
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open about the overall findings of the investigation. julie always went for her smear tests, but with cervical cancer screening targets being missed, her other hope is to encourage other people to come forward. well, in the next few minutes, the prime minister is set to address the commons to update mps on the latest developments in negotations with brussels and dublin. let's cross to the houses of parliament where we can speak to our assistant political editor, norman smith. is there be substantive detail for the prime minister to minister to relate to mps since the last time she stood before them and spoke? we will get the prime minister's take however, said that the eu leaders have gone, she met the key figures
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the back end of last week, and emerged it seems with not much beyond the promise of that keep talking. we will get her take on whether there be a bs in the chink in eu ranks, whether they are prepared to look at the negotiating the brexit deal but she's on her feet,. let's listen. commands the support of parliament and can be negotiated with the eu. 0n the 29th of january negotiated with the eu. 0n the 29th ofjanuary this negotiated with the eu. 0n the 29th of january this house negotiated with the eu. 0n the 29th ofjanuary this house gave me a clear mandate and sent an unequivocal message to the european union. last week to that message to brussels. i met president jean—claude juncker and donald tusk and the present —— president of the pm parliament and i told curly for parliament wanted in order to unite behind a withdrawal agreement, namely legally binding changes to the backstop and i explained to them three ways in which this can be achieved. first the backstop could be replaced with alternative arrangements to avoid a hard border
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between northern ireland and ireland. yesterday my right honourable friend the secretary of state for exiting the european union met with michel barnier to discuss the ideas put forward by the alternative arrangements working group comprised of a number of my right honourable and honourable friends. and to that group for their work and we continue to explore their ideas. secondly there could be a legally binding time—limit for the backstop or third could be a legally binding unilateral exit clause to the backstop. given both sides agree we do not ever want to use the backstop and that if we did it with the temporary, we believe it is reasonable to ask for a legally binding changes to this effect. mr speaker, as expected, president jean—claude juncker maintained the eu position that they will not reopen the withdrawal agreement and isaid reopen the withdrawal agreement and i said the uk position strengthened by the mandate this house gave me, that this house needs to see legally binding changes to the backstop and that can be achieved by changes to the withdrawal agreement. we both
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agreed that teams should hold further talks to find a way forward and he and i will meet again before the end of their breed to take stock of those discussions. so the work continues. the secretary of state and the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster or in strasbourg today and la st lancaster or in strasbourg today and last week the attorney general was in dublin to meet his irish counterpart and following my own visits to brussels, northern ireland and ireland last week, i welcome the prime minister of malta to downing street yesterday and will be speaking to other eu 27 metres today and throughout the week. the right honourable gentleman, the leader of the opposition, shares the concerns of this has on the backstop and ibook and his willingness to talk me and look forward to continuing our discussions. government ministers will meet with members of his team tomorrow. i think there are a number of areas where the whole house should come together. in particular i believe we have a shared determination across this house, not to allow the uk leading the eu to
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mean any lowering of standards in relation to workers rights, environmental protections are health and is the. i have met trade unions and is the. i have met trade unions and their bus across the house and my right honourable friend the business secretary is leading work to make sure we address these vital issues. we've already made legally binding commitments to no progression in these areas if he we re progression in these areas if he were to enter the backstop and we are prepared to consider legislating to give these commissions forcing uk law and in the interest of building support across the house we're prepared to commit to asking parliament whether it wishes to follow suit whenever the eu changes its standards in these areas and of course we do not need to automatically follow eu standards and ordered lead the way. as we have donein and ordered lead the way. as we have done in the past under conservative and labour governments. the uk has a proud tradition of leading the way in workers rights. the uk... the uk has a proud
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tradition of leading the way in workers rights. whilst maintaining a flexible labour market that has helped deliver unemployment rate almost six percentage points above the eu average. successive governments of all parties have put in place standards that exceed the minimum set by the eu. a labour government gave british workers annual leave and paid maternity leave entitlements well above the required by the european union. a conservative led government went further than the eu are giving all employees the right to request flexible working and i was proud to be the minister for women and equality is to introduce shared pa re ntal equality is to introduce shared parental leave so that... so that most parents are able to take on caring responsibilities for their
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child, something no eu regulation provides for. when it comes to workers rights, this parliament has set a higher standard before and i believe will do so in the future. indeed, we already have plans to repeal the so—called swedish derogation which allows employers to pay their agency workers less and we are committed to enforcing holiday pay for the most vulnerable workers, notjust protecting pay for the most vulnerable workers, not just protecting workers pay for the most vulnerable workers, notjust protecting workers rights but extending them. as i set out in my statement two weeks ago, the house also agrees that parliament has taba house also agrees that parliament has tab a much stronger and clearer role in the next phase of the negotiations. it is the political declaration cannot be legally binding and in some areas provides for a spectrum of outcomes, some members are understandably concerned they cannot be sure precisely what future relationship it would lead to. by following honour commitments and giving parliament a bigger say in the mandate we are determined to address those concerns. the secretary of state has written to
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all members of the exiting the eu committee seeking their view an engaging parliament in the next phase of negotiations. and we are also reaching out beyond the house to engage more deeply with business, civil society and trade unions. everyone in this house knows the boat for brexit was not just about changing our relationship with the eu, but changing how things work at home. especially forthose eu, but changing how things work at home. especially for those in communities who feel they have been left behind. addressing this and widening opportunities is the mission of this government that i set out on my first day as prime minister. and i will continue to work with members across the house to do everything we can to help old a country that works for everyone. but mr speaker, one area of the right honourable gentleman and the leader of the opposition and i do not agree, is in his suggestion in the uk should remain a member of the eu customs union. i would gently point out the house of commons has already voted against this. and in
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any case, and in any case... a lot of noise and heckling, the record shows that everyone gets a chance to question the prime minister, i think it is right that she should have a proper and respectful hearing and the same courtesy must be extended to the leader of the opposition in due course. the prime minister. mr speaker, first of all as i see other gently point out the house of commons has a ready blooded against the sand in any case, membership of the sand in any case, membership of the customs union would be a less desirable outcome than that divided for by the political declaration. that would deliberate no tariffs, please, charges or quantitative restrictions across all sectors are no checks on rules of origin but crucially it would also provide the development of an independent trade policy put the uk that would allow us to strike our own trade deals around the labour party wants supported. on thursday as promised in the house, we will bring forward
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an amendable motion. this will seek to reaffirm the support of the house but the amended motion from the 29th of january, mainly to but the amended motion from the 29th ofjanuary, mainly to support government in seeking changes to the backstop and to recognise the go asians are ongoing. having secured an agreement with the european union for further talks, we now need some time to complete the process. friendly... when we achieve the progress we need we will bring forward another meaningful vote. but if the government... but that the government has not secured a majority in this house in favour of the withdrawal agreement and a political declaration than the government on the 26th of february will make a statement and table an amendable motion relating to the statement and a minister will move that motion on wednesday the 27th of brick thereby enabling the house to vote on it and any amendments to let on that date. mr speaker, as well as making clear what is needed to change in the patrol agreement the house has also reconfirmed its view
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that it house has also reconfirmed its view thatitis house has also reconfirmed its view that it is not want to leave the eu without a deal. the government agrees but opposing the deal is not enough to stop it. we must agree, opposing no deal is not enough to stop it. we must agree a deal that this house can't support and that is what i am working to achieve. i've spoken before about the damage that would be done to public faith in our democracy if this house were to ignore the result of the 2016 random. in northern ireland last week, i heard against the importance of securing ever stroll agreement that works for all the people of this united kingdom. in belfast i met notjust with politicians, but with leaders of civil society and businesses from across the community. following this house's rejection of the withdrawal agreement any people in northern ireland are worried about what the current uncertainty will mean for them. in this house we often focus on the practical challenges posed by the border in northern ireland but for many people in northern ireland,
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what looms larger is the fear that the seamless border between ireland and northern ireland that helped make the progress which has followed the belfast agreement possible might be disrupt it. we must not let that happen and we shall not let that happen. the talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold her nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. by getting the changes we need to the backstop, by protecting and in housing workers rights and environmental protections and by enhancing the role parliament in the next phase of negotiations, i believe we can reach a deal this house can support. it can deliver but the people and the communities that voted for change to do years ago and whose voices are too long have not been heard. we can honour the result of the referendum. and we can set this country on course for the bright future that every part of this united kingdom deserves. but as this united kingdom deserves. but as this government's mission, we shall not stint in our efforts to fulfil it and!
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not stint in our efforts to fulfil it and i commend this statement to the house! order, order. thank you very much mr speaker, i usually thank the prime minister for very much mr speaker, i usually thank the prime ministerfor an advance copy of statement but it was handed to me just as advance copy of statement but it was handed to mejust as i advance copy of statement but it was handed to me just as i was leaving my office to come here so i can only assume she entrusted to the transport secretary to deliver it to me! laughter mr speaker, mr speaker, our country is facing the biggest crisis in a generation. and yet the prime minister continues to recklessly run down the clock. we were promised there would be a deal last torpor, it did not happen. we were promised a meaningful vote on a deal in december, it did not happen. we were told to prepare for a further meaningful vote this week, after the prime minister again promised to
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secure significant and legally binding changes to the backstop and that has not happened. now the prime minister comes before the house with more excuses and more delays. in her statement the prime minister has failed to answer even the most basic questions. what progress has she made on identifying and working up the alternative arrangements? have they been presented to the european union? if not, then will they be presented? and union? if not, then will they be presented ? and was union? if not, then will they be presented? and was she set them out before this house and ask for its approval of them? in truth, mr speaker, it appears the prime minister hasjust one speaker, it appears the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. this, mr speaker, is an irresponsible act. she's playing for time and playing with people's jobs, our economic security and the future of our industries. yesterday, growth
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figures show the lowest growth since 2012, are manufacturing sector mired into recession. the decision by nissan last week to pull its investment from the sunderland plant may only be the thin end of a very long wedge. uncertainty and failing confidence in this government to deliver are putting jobs at risk. the prime minister, the chancellor and the business secretary will be hearing the same warnings as i am. but several major large manufacturers, household names, employing tens of thousands of people, are poised to follow in nissan's footsteps. earlier today, we heard from the leader of the house that the next meaningful vote may not happen until after the eu summit on the 21st of march. just days before brexit is due to happen.
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if, mr speaker, this is not the case, can the prime minister tell the house today when the meaningful vote will be? we also learnt... we also learned from the leader of the house that any changes to the backstop won't be written into the legally binding withdrawal agreement, can the prime minister confirmed that? is the prime minister really prepared to risk people's livelihoods, jobs and investment in a desperate attempt to pressure deeply flawed and through parliament? the prime minister has just told members of this house to hold their nerve. tell that to nissan workers in sunderland and the thousands more worried about their job security and the future of their communities. mr speaker, no minister serious about protecting jobs in this country, would allow a prime
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minister to deliberately run down the clock and play chicken with people's livelihoods. to stand by and do not think would be a complete their election of duty. as i received, mr speaker, the prime minister's letter yesterday in response to labour's exit plan, it came clearer to me the prime minister is merely engaged in the pretence of working across parliament to find solutions. she has not indicated she would move one iota away from her rejected real or any of her red lines. 0n the backstop, the prime minister has pointed out labour also has concerns. but let's make no mistake about it, that has never been a major issue with the prime minister's deal. indeed, in order to stop the uk falling into the backstop, we need a permanent customs union, a permanent customs union, and a strong single market deal. that is the key, mr speaker,
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to maintaining an open border on the island of ireland. that is key to protecting jobs, industry and the bing standards in this country. that is why it's backed by businesses who employ and trade unions to represent, millions of workers in this country. and to correct the prime minister's claim in her statement, we want to negotiate a new uk eu customs union as i set out in my letter, the prime minister says there is no need to negotiate a customs union as her deal provides for the benefit of being in one. i'm afraid, mr speaker, that is simply not the case. the deal the prime minister negotiated means there will be barriers to trade in goods. and there will not be frictionless trade, pudding manufacturers across the country at a huge disadvantage. this is made quite clear in the political declaration, especially when it says and i called, the
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parties will for separate markets and the stint legal borders. and concedes that and i called, can lead toa concedes that and i called, can lead to a spectrum of different outcomes from administrative processes as well as checks and controls. nothing is secured. the prime minister is also trying to win support for her deal by promising to protect workers rights after brexit. well, mr speaker, just look at the record of the party opposite. they attacked trade union rights through the trade union act. they kept this house up all night, opposing the minimum wage in 1997. they are the party that introduced employment tribunal fees. and introduced the public sector pay cut. for many of them, mr speaker, ripping up rights is what brexit is all about. take the secretary of
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state for international trade, he once wrote, it's too difficult to hire and fire, too expensive to take on new employees. and went on to say, it is intellectually unsustainable to believe that workplace rights should remain untouchable. that was the secretary of state for it. no wonder trade union leaders like tim wrote of the gmb, frances 0'grady, the secretary of the tuc, have rejected the prime minister's inadequate pledges. and it's vital to, mr speaker, that we keep pace with the best consumer safeguards and environmental protections. as said the warnings of the destruction of our diverse, are bio diverse natural life are not serious enough, we had to be very serious enough, we had to be very serious about all environmental protections and indeed make them much stronger. mr speaker, there is
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a sensible way forward but the prime minister is refusing to listen. labour's alternative has been widely welcomed as a way of breaking the impasse. from... well... from business leaders, european leaders and even from some conservative mps. but the prime minister refuses to listen. mr speaker, i urge all members across this house to think about the damage the prime minister's strategy is doing. the threat to industry and skilled jobs and communities all across this country. now is not the time to stand idly by. now is the time to stand idly by. now is the time to stand up and do the right thing, to rule out no deal and back labour's alternative plan! thank you, mr
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speaker. first of all, the right honourable gentleman mentioned the announcement that has been made by nissan. i think that this has it's important to recognise that nissan have confirmed that none of the current 7000 jobs at the plant will be lost. they remain committed to the uk and indeed, they will be making more capital reinvestment in sunderland that was originally planned in 2016. right honourable gentleman asked me about progress on alternative arrangements asking whether these would be put before the european commission. can i remind him what i said in my statement which was yesterday i right honourable friend the secretary of state for exiting the european union met with michel barnier to put forward ideas put forward by the working group comprised by a number of my honourable and right honourable friends. i think that answers this question. he talked about labour's proposals, i reference the issue with the customs union in my statement. but he talks about being
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a memberof the statement. but he talks about being a member of the single market. being a member of the single market. being a member of the single market. being a memberof the a member of the single market. being a member of the single market. being a member of the single market. being a member of the single market means accepting free movement. one of the things, one of the things that people voted for when they voted to leave the european union on what was to bring an end to free movement and thatis to bring an end to free movement and that is what this government will deliver. he asked about dates for the process proposed that were going to take place in this house. i said those out in my statement. he reference business is quite a lot, businesses backed the deal, he did. he talks about uncertainty. of course the best way to end uncertainty is to vote for a deal. and he talked about, he talked about, he talked about running down the clock. no, iwanted about, he talked about running down the clock. no, i wanted to have this sorted before christmas, i bought a deal back... order, order. mr matheson... i have
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nurtured for a long time, an ambition to see you become a statesman. i think you are threatening that prospect by these noisy gesticulations. but like, the prime minister. thank you, mr speaker. the deal was negotiated before christmas. it is not me trying to run down the clock. and it's no good labour members who voted against the deal... pointing their fingers across the house. every time somebody votes against a deal come at the risk of no deal increases. and the right honourable gentleman talks about acting in the national interest. we should be acting in an acting dealt —— in the
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national interest and that is getting a deal agreed with this parliament through this parliament, thatis parliament through this parliament, that is why we are working with the european union in everything we are doing. in the right honourable gentleman made several references in his response. to the issues of businesses and the issue ofjobs and protecting jobs. the deal being negotiated with the european union, we are going back to deal with this issue of the backstop, the deal would negotiated, the political declaration that sets out the future isa declaration that sets out the future is a deal that protectsjobs. and the one thing we know would threaten jobs in this country would be a labour government! mr kenneth clarke. mr speaker, might right and noble friend the prime minister will re call noble friend the prime minister will recall firmly served together in the cabinet of the coalition government, that government was furry enthusiastic about the prospect of negotiating eu trade deals with important trading partners round the world. including the prospect of a trade deal with japan. on the 1st of
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february, the japan deal was concluded. and it is in fact, i think, a deal which covers a bigger proportion of the global economy than any other trade deal negotiated so far. does the prime minister seek a customs arrangement which enables us to us to continue to enjoy or begin to us to continue to enjoy or begin to get the benefits of this important deal, after the 29th of march, or is she insisting that we have got to leave it and have our own trade policy, and begin our own negotiations
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