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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  February 12, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: one of the legends of english football — gordon banks — has died at the age of 81. what a save. his save from pele was among the finest ever made — and he helped england to world cup glory in 1966. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she's running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just won a real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. the nurse who died because the nhs she worked for told her six times she didn't have cancer. and breaking news this hour: the health service says thousands
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of patients with broken bones may have had the wrong sort of metal plates inserted. sport. some wonderful tributes have been paid today from across the game after the death of gordon banks, we are going to be taking a look. we are going to be taking a look. we are going to have an update from the final test in st lucia, going well for england. you might want to head to the beach. you might be tempted anyway, because it is going to film out this week, more like spring. they winter, i have the uk for can't of course but a question for you, what is a ghost apple? what does it have to do with the weather because myi have to do with the weather because my i will answer those questions later. thanks also coming up — the moment a bbc cameraman is attacked by a trump supporter — while covering a campaign rally in el paso, texas. no one's hurt, but the president sees the incident and checks everyone is ok. you were right? everything 0k?
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hello everyone, this is afternoon live. gordon banks — one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time and a legend of english football — has died at the age of 81. he was part of the england team that won the world cup in 1966, and his save from pele in 1970 is seen as among the finest ever. banks was named fifa goalkeeper of the year no fewer than 6 times. his former club, stoke city, said his family were "devastated to lose him" but could not have been more proud. our sports correspondent andy swiss looks back at his life. it remains a footballing miracle, 1970, england against brazil and that save.
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pele! what a save! gordon banks! the greatest ever from one of the greatest ever. four years earlier, gordon banks had been a cornerstone of the england world cup triumph and those who played alongside him to date united tribute. sir bobby charlton said gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper and i was proud to call him a team—mate. sir geoff hurst described him as one of the very greatest, a sentiment echoed throughout the game. he was my hero obviously, growing up, and being able to train with him, the big thing i would say about him, in an era which is totally different to today, he had this great positional sense and that was his dedication. banks first made his name with leicester city. banks was safe in the leicester goal. it was not long before he attracted england attention.
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his reliability was pivotal to their 1956 triumph. winning the world cup he later said changed his life. tremendous. when we came back, you wouldn't believe the people in the streets, just incredible. we felt so proud. although england fell short at the next world cup in 1970, banks was at his peak, most famously against brazil and what has been described as the saviour of the century. quite how he compounded la as dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himself —— pele. i already jumped to score and i did this! banks‘s brilliance helped stoke city to the league cup
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in 1972, the club's first major trophy but later that year, a car crash cost him his sight in one eye amid emotional scenes, he was forced to retire from the game, although remarkably he made a brief comeback in the us. but his fame and popularity proved enduring. honoured for his achievements for stoke and england, in 2012 he carried the olympic torch at wembley stadium where, decades earlier, he had conjured such wizardry as a player. in a statement today, his family said, they could not have been more proud of him. for many, the greatest keeper english football has ever seen. gordon banks, who has died at the age of 81. gordon banks played 194 games for stoke city between 1967 and 1973, and was the club's president. our news correspondent navjetjohal is outside the club's stadium. as we can see, tributes already
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being laid there. that's right. the statue behind me was erected over ten yea rs statue behind me was erected over ten years ago and it shows gordon banks holding aloft the trophy. since it was erected, it's received as much attention, rarely as today. you can understand why. gordon banks played for stoke city 250 times, he w011 played for stoke city 250 times, he won the league cup with the team in 1972 and later became the club has met president as well. among the wider football community, he was best known for two things, 1966 world cup triumph where he cemented his place as the best goalkeeper in the world, winning the fifa goalkeeper of the year, six times from 1966 until 1972 and that remarkable save in 1970, the world cup where he somehow managed to claw pele‘s header away from the goal,
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regarded as a greater safe in football history. in terms of the tribute that have been paid over the course of the morning, some of the biggest names in football have been contributing. the current england goalkeeper said he was a true legend of the game. harry kane, england captain said he was very sad to hear the news. bobby charlton, his fellow 1966 world cup winning team—mate saidi 1966 world cup winning team—mate said i was proud to call him a team—mate. he will be deeply missed. how is this for a mark of respect? the germination of football team also tweeting earlier saying he was also tweeting earlier saying he was a fierce opponent and a good man. that really is the tenor of the tributes being paid to gordon banks today, whites like humble, modest, a true gentleman have all been used to describe him. i imagine they will all be used throughout the course of the day. thank you very much. we can speak now to gordon banks‘ agent, terry baker. hejoins me now via webcam. he was
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perhaps two more englishmen than any other, a hero. i guess he was. to me he was just my friend after knowing him for such a long time. but mostly was that he was the greatest english goalkeeper, if not the greatest goalkeeper, if not the greatest goalkeeper that ever lived. certainly pele said that after the 19705 save, but he in fact always said he had all of his achievements and wonderful things that he did, whenever it came to england, the only thing he ever got asked about was the gordon banks save. the irony is for the man that spent half his time in the air, he had his feet firmly on the ground. very humble. full of humility, really nice. from all of the staff in public we met, they all loved him. he had time for everyone. he was a genuinely nice chap. it was an area where footballers of that time what
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gentleman and as you say, they gave time to the fans. you perhaps don't see that now. there's a lot more pressure on the players. they always tell the story of the 66 world cup final, the night before the game, the whole team just walked from the hotel to the cinema and watch the movie and then walked back. that wouldn't be possible in the modern error, but that's how it was in those days. they have always retained a closeness to fans and it was just a different error. retained a closeness to fans and it wasjust a different error. he was good company. yes. we also had a joke and told the same stories. there are people you see from time to time. we only got together may be three orfour times a to time. we only got together may be three or four times a year. you don't have the same old stories and the things that happen to us when we we re the things that happen to us when we were doing shows, but he was great company. as most of the lads were
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from that time. it was always good fun. never any problems. the public would come up and there would always be pleased to see them. it was good times. we had great times through the years. it's a sad day today. what to make reflect. what was his favourite story? probably the pele one. i can't be precise, but around 1968, a penalty against him, gordon held his hand up to hold things up a moment, went to the back of the net to wipe the might of his gloves and was he was doing atjimmy thoughts we re was he was doing atjimmy thoughts were a joke he would draw the ball into the opposite corner which he did and the referee gave the goal and he scored and for the next a0 yea rs, 50 yea rs and he scored and for the next a0 years, 50 years even, whenever they came together, if i think gordon would say that was never a goal.|j
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don't know, as his agents, i suspect you must be ruing the fact that he was born when he was. when he was if he was playing football at that time today, he would be worth a lot of money. they say that a lot. i actually worked with retired footballers mainly. i'm currently working with harry redknapp. everyone says that and, what the record for a goalkeeper crowd call on: gordon, would be more money —— gordon, would be more money —— gordon banks. that car crash as we are hearing earlier, i remember watching that as a youngster, you just thought, think you can never play again. you can ever really do anything again. how wrong where you and me? another one his funny stories was that he had two new
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knees, replace shoulder, one i. four yea rs knees, replace shoulder, one i. four years ago, every time someone knees, replace shoulder, one i. four years ago, every time someone came up years ago, every time someone came up to me and says do you still play, his story, which obviously he didn't. we will always remember him and as he was and as good of you to join us, thank you. theresa may has told mps they need to hold their "nerve" over brexit , saying the on—going talks with the eu are at a ‘crucial stage'. in a commons statement a short time ago, the prime minister said she still believes it's possible to find a deal that parliament can support. she is still trying to persuade the eu to make changes to the most controversial element of the withdrawal agreement — the backstop — to prevent a return to a hard irish border. our political correspondent ben wright reports. she has a deal mps don't want, the eu says it will not be negotiated and we are just weeks away from brexit. but the prime minister appealed for patience in the commons this lunchtime possibly talks
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are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. by getting the changes we need to be back stop, by protecting and enhancing workers' rights and environmental protections, and by enhancing the role of parliament in the next phase of negotiations, i believe we can reach a deal that this house can support. there was nothing unexpected in the prime minister's summary and the labour leader accused her of deliberate delay. in truth, it appears that the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. and the eu side does not seem to be budging over the irish after talks with the brexit secretary in brussels last night, their chief negotiator said the deal was done. it is clear from our side that we are not going to the withdrawal agreement.
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we will continue our discussion in the coming days. it is hard to see where this crisis is heading. parliament and the government remain deadlocked. mps will again have the chance to try to shape the prime minister's strategy in votes on thursday but there is still no clarity about when the government will try to get its brexit deals with the comments again and that is why many mps think number ten is running down the clock. piling pressure on tory brexiteers as well as some labour mps to back an agreement, or let britain a fallout of the eu without a deal at the of march. supporters of another referendum have not given up and sprayed their frustration withjeremy corbyn over a poster in his constituency this morning. some labour mps want their leader to get on board. if there is not to be a brexit deal that we know is going to damage our constituents, that is totally at odds with our internationalist values, if we know that is the alternative then surely we have to grasp with both hands the only way in which we can stop that happening to the country and stop our values being destroyed by brexit
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and that is to put it back to the people. there is no sign of a majority for another referendum here. instead, they raise drift, division and uncertainty as the struggle over brexit goes to the wire. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminsterfor us. the prime minister is still taking questions from mps over all of this. effectively, she had said to them, give me more time, at least a couple more weeks. she will be having more meetings, the question is what can she achieve because much can she get the changes that the house commons once? they try to pin her down, because the feeling amongst many, not just those on because the feeling amongst many, notjust those on opposition benches is that they simply don't really know what her plan b as she has won. or is she forging ahead with plan a?
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hilary benn, wanted to know whether the pram and was coming around to the pram and was coming around to the idea that she was going to have to extend article 50, that means the idea that she was going to have to extend article 50, that ms delay brexit. strength in pursuit of a principle is to be admired, inflexibility and denial in the face of the fact is not, especially when the future of the country is at stake. the facts are alternative arrangements for the northern ireland border were examined extensively last summer and found wanting. the fact is the eu has made it clear, it will not reopen the withdrawal agreement. the fa ct reopen the withdrawal agreement. the fact is that the rolling over of the trade deals at the father of the house referred to is not very well and the fact is that businesses are spending millions of pounds and pulling their hair out because they say at the prospect of a nodal brexit on the 29th of march. i do not believe that the prime minister would do that to our country. she
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well. so why does she continue to make not willing to rule out a nodal brexit, if you don't want a nodal brexit, if you don't want a nodal brexit, you need to vote for a deal she is making the point that the only dough on the table as they were that she has already negotiated although she is still trying to get those changes to the so—called backstop. a question for the brexit is on the conservative side is what would it take for them to get behind her del? i congratulate my friend. according to the overwhelming wishes of this house, can she confirm that there is no point in having a time limit on the backstop unless that is written into the treaty itself and secondly unless the end state for
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substantially before the next general election? boris johnson saying he was there legally binding changes, but he was them in the withdrawal agreement, which at the moment, the eu buzzing is not going be reopened. i'm joined by the former conservative minister. you resigned in protest. you are backing another referendum. do you think that theresa may could lead to the country to a nodal brexit? all those around her don't know whether she will or not. sadly, yes. there isa she will or not. sadly, yes. there is a possibility of it and today's statement is a bit more can kicking. it is going to come to a point at the end of this month my conservative colleagues, ministers are going to have to make a stand and say, this is not acceptable. i'm expecting resignations in a couple of weeks' time. we have been hearing until sometime from conservative ministers privately and some of them publicly. it seems that high noon as
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they call it, the moments where they feel they have to act never seems to arrive. indeed. it has arrived. it is going to be in the next few weeks and this is why my campaign, right to vote, has issued a plea that we should take a timeout, to pause before we proceed with the most significant decision for britain in foreign policy terms since the second world war. you would want to pausemight have referendum? what with the ref limit questions be? we need the informed consent of the british public. i would take the deal that can be agreed by the house and put that versus remaining of the terms of membership of the european union to the british public in a final say referendum. there are votes on thursday, potentially, amendments could be put down by you or your colleagues. is that going to happen? why is that being delayed ain? happen? why is that being delayed again? there was a big fight over giving parliament the power to seize
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control over the brexit process, but those powers aren't being used. having listened to what the prime minister has said, she has made a commitment which has been consistent with the amendment that was going to be placed, to give parliament the opportunity to actually dictate to governments up opportunity to actually dictate to governments up a opportunity to actually dictate to governments up a way out if we get into the situation of having no way forward. i into the situation of having no way forward. lam into the situation of having no way forward. i am expecting a day's debate where further amendments can be placed and i think that is why the end of this month is the time when you are going to see some action from conservatives in government. are you confident they will act? you resigned several months ago are not many others followed you. indeed what i said unto thee twice last year, has stood the test of time. a number of colleagues have been in conversation with me ever since that point, who was ill and government. i would say to each and every one of them, look at yourself in the mirror and ask yourself the honest question about where we're heading at the moment which is probably a nodal brexit, whether that is acceptable to the future of britain and i don't it is.
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what scenario does the house of commons back another referendum given that those pushing for it haven't put amendments up to now? what is going to change that in the next six weeks? until we get to the stage where we are confronted with no deal, it was always the people wouldn't consider other options. from what we have had from the pamina do today, she remains personally opposed —— prime minister. it is up to the opposition leader who has had his idea rejected by the prime minister on the floor of the house. as i read that co nfe re nce of the house. as i read that conference resolution in october, the next port of call is to consult the next port of call is to consult the public and the sooner he gets control over that position, the better. thank you very much. on both sides, all sides arejeremy corbyn to see if he is to go down that road. everyone looking to thursday to see if mps in the house of
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commons are willing to put down the changes that they want. thank you very much. the nhs has admitted that wrong metal plates may have been inserted into patients who have broken bones. it's thought 5,500 patients could be affected. the regulator nhs improvement has set out an urgent alert asking all hospitals across england to review the x—rays of patients who have been treated with metal plates for the fracture of long bones. our health reporter john owen is here. what has happened here? as you say, injust the what has happened here? as you say, in just the last half hour the nhs has admitted the wrong plates have been used for patients undergoing surgery been used for patients undergoing surgery is for baroque bone fractures. seven cases have been found after one patient fell, and required further surgery when the mistake was discovered. these plates, fracture fixation plates come in several varieties. they have
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different strengths. patients treated at one trust had a more flexible plate inserted into them that was meant for reconstruction surgery that was meant for reconstruction surgery instead of a more rigid plate that is meant for fractures. the wrong type of plate for those patients who experienced fractures. how has that happened? the confusion has been made. it they used to be visually distinct from the other kinds of plate, but they have had a recent design change which means they look more alike to the others which has resulted in confusion. over the course of destabilising and selection, there is room for confusion in simply selecting the wrong implement for the type of surgery that a surgeon is undergoing. it sounds pretty grim. if you are one of the five thousand 500 people,... they are asking for a review of x—rays for people who have
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been treated with metal plates for fractures of arms and legs, people with fractures in larger bones in the body. the advises that hospitals will get in touch anyone who is affected. as you say, that is thought to be as many as 5500 people going back to february 2018. but we are being told that the risk of harm is very low and as a result, patients should not be too alarmed. lets see if that works out. thank you. a nurse whose cervical cancer was repeatedly missed by her local hospital made a final plea before she died — for others not to go through the same ordeal. julie o'connor died last week aged a9. she'd been given the all—clear by southmead hospital in bristol several times — and right up until the end of her life, she was campaigning for an inquiry into how the nhs failed her. matthew hill reports. julie o'connor worked as a nurse in the nhs for 13 years and never missed a cervical screening test, but was let down after her local hospital failed to spot cancer cells. right up to the end,
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julie was keen to tell her story. here she is speaking to her family in st peter's hospice just three days before she died. it was in 201a when she had a routine smear test. southmead's pathology lab gave her the all clear but the slides should have rung alarm bells as they were abnormal. the next year, julie was referred by her gp back to southmead gynaecology for investigation of persistent bleeding but was taken off the cancer pathway after a biopsy was reported as normal.
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over the next two years she was sent back to southmead four times because her gp was still worried about the bleeding. eventuallyjulie went private and was given the devastating diagnosis not only that she had cancer but that it had spread out of control. within 30 seconds of being examined by the consultant, he diagnosed me with cervical cancer. he took me in the week after and he could not even get the camera into the womb, it was completely blocked. i was horrified. southmead have accepted that the care thatjulie received was negligent and that had they correctly reported her smear, she would not have gone on to develope cervical cancerand died. an independent investigation is being carried out into her treatment, butjulie and her husband wanted a much wider report as they believed there were systematic failures. she was contacted on social media
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by ladies who had had similar experiences. they had signs, they had challenged it and been backwards and forwards. the concern is whether there are more victims and it is a systemic failure. the hospital said it is isolated and rare but i believe it is a systemic problem and we need to go back to at least 201a, may be further back than that. in a statement, the trust reiterated apologies and condolences to the family, saying "we are committed to fully understanding the circumstances of the care we provided so any lessons can be learned." they said, "we will be publicly open about the overall findings of the investigation." julie always went for her smear tests, but with cervical cancer screening targets being missed, her other lasting hope was to encourage other people to come forward. time for a look at the weather...
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here's ben rich. you talking about what's behind me? i'm going to introduce you to something that i've never heard of until today. this has been christened a gust apple. why are we talking about gust apples? it's been formed by the weather. in the united states. it doesn't take sherlock holmes to work this out. i reckon, the apple has got frozen but it's rotted and the insides have drained out and you are left with that. that is exactly what has happened. how did you know? you may not realise, we have a little chat before that and he has these keyboards in the desk with access to
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internet sources. he didn't know. it's cold journalism. it's a bit more complicated than that. it's freezing rain that you need to get this kind of event, because the rain freezes on impact. we've talked about freezing rain before. this is water. you do lessen. it freezes on the apple and the thing is, apple is when you get below minus five degrees, they start to decompose and rot. the other thing about apples as they have a freezing point lower than the freezing point of water. if you have an apple and you want to freeze it, you will need to get it down to —2 as opposed to 0 degrees. as it gets warmer, the body thrusts at —2, all of the mushy inside drops out of the bottom and you are inside drops out of the bottom and you a re left inside drops out of the bottom and you are left with this ice, which this man in michigan has christened
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the gust apple. that's five minutes of my life i won't get back. interestingly... they could be freezing rain once again in that area over the next couple of days. so for apple hunters in the states, you might get a gust apple. closer to home. actually, we've got something a bit more springlike on the way. this is how it looked further north in cumbria, a lot of cloud, misty, over the mountains, cloud on the satellite picture, working its way in from the north—west, bringing a little bit of rain for some of us but for most, dry. the other thing over the next few days, south—westerly wind, brisk south—westerly wind, brisk south—westerly wind, brisk south—westerly wind, it will bring ever milder air, the next few days
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bring temperatures above average, will be mostly dry. maybe clipping into the far north of wales. tending to cloud over. in the north, more in the way of sunshine. temperatures still around nine to 12 degrees. going through the evening, and a cloud band. some outbreaks of rain through the night, pretty cloudy, any breaks in the cloud may be encouraging some fog patches to develop, look at the temperatures, well above freezing, most staying frost free. dry but cloudy weather tomorrow, rain as we go through the first part of the day across the northern part of the uk, further south, looking closely, cloud
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starting to break up, better cloud of some hazy sunshine —— better chance of hazy sunshine, temperatures still pretty much across the board into double digits. moving out of wednesday into thursday, frontal system bringing cloud and rain into the north—west, pulling away northwards, high pressure a cross pulling away northwards, high pressure across the near continent, that will keep us largely dry, and with wind coming in from the south, bringing mild air but also drier air in ourguy bringing mild air but also drier air in our guy direction. cloud melting away. more of us seeing cloud, largely unbroken sunshine, always more cloud to the north—west, even that will tend to break up and this isa that will tend to break up and this is a pretty springlike chart. 11 to 13 degrees, some sunshine, that will feel quite pleasant. by friday, some places up to 15 degrees, north coast of devon, and most of us dry into the weekend, just a bit of rain at times into the west. this is bbc news,
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our latest headlines. one of the legends of english football, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. commentator: pele! what a save! his save from pele was among the finest ever made — and he helped england to world cup glory in 1966. theresa may updates the commons on brexit and denies claims that she's running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and
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we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. it's emerged a nurse who died last week was told six times by the nhs she worked for she didn't have cancer. calls for x—rays to be reviewed by the nhs after thousands of cases, where patients with broken bones had the wrong sort of metal plate inserted. and coming up, the moment a bbc cameraman is attacked by a trump supporter while covering a campaign rally in el paso, texas. lots of reaction through the morning
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to the death of gordon banks. the airsince the air since the news broke have been a reminder of his standing in the game. —— the hours. sir bobby charlton was a team—mate in the triumphant side in 1966, he said, "gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper, without doubt one of the best england has ever had, i was proud to call him a team—mate." we have been showing the save against brazil, from the 1970 world cup. bobby charlton says, i still don't know how he made the save. england posted this, they posted quite a few things, as you can imagine, on the official channels.
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i found this really touching, this was from the dfp com of the german association, posting a picture of gordon banks and their beaten players. he said that the german goalkeeper was one of the first of those german tea m was one of the first of those german team that he went to speak with after the final whistle went, he said he had been on the losing side a couple of times with domestic cup finals with leicester bet leicester city and he knew that an arm around the shoulder was what hans tilkowski would need. a reminding of his standing not just in would need. a reminding of his standing notjust in this country but in the world, having been a world cup winner. that tweet from the german team is quite remarkable,
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twitter does get a lot of stick. yes, it is a classy gesture.|j twitter does get a lot of stick. yes, it is a classy gesture. i never thought i would hear myself say this, england are in a reasonable position to declare. even they cannot blow it from here, you are right, they heard you say that and they have just declared on 361—5. that means the west indies need a85 to win the final test, that is a long shot, that would be a world record run chase, if it is successful. joe root resumed on 311, they had a coming together in the middle, gabriel was warned about some of the language he had used againstjoe root. some of the language he had used against joe root. ben some of the language he had used againstjoe root. ben stokes was left stranded on a8 not out, you would have thought they would let him get his 50 but england have declared, so it is a long way from the west indies to win that now, a85 required. even if england win if they have lost the series. that
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would only make it to— one to the west indies. looking to sign off on a high. the british horse racing authority say strict biosecurity measures will be in place when racing resumes tomorrow. meetings have been suspended for six days in britain following an outbreak of equine flu. the sport's governing body says the return to action will be in a controlled, risk—managed manner, and they'll intervene to stop any horse running that looks like they could be at risk of infection. we will be requiring trainers to provide health statements of their horse's health status in the prior 14 horse's health status in the prior ia days in require to —— in relation to equine influenza, and taking temperatures before the horses leave their stable yards. in addition to that, we will be requiring that all horses must be vaccinated within six months of the date of their racing trip. there's a boost for wales,
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full—back leigh halfpenny will return to full training tomorrow as they prepare to take on england in the six nations next week. he hasn't played since suffering concussion against australia in november. wales face england in cardiff a week on saturday in what could be a six nations decider. they are the only two unbeaten teams after two rounds of the championship. now, ronnie o'sullivan survived a scare to progress to the second round of the welsh open. the rocket looked very erratic in the early stages of the match against sanderson lam. he was trailing by two frames to one before coming back to win four two. his head looked all over the place as it sometimes is. a bit like mine. that's all the sport for the moment. around 3,000 cash machines
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were removed from high streets in the uk over the last six months of 2018. according to the consumer group, ‘which?’ about a88 atms disappeared per month in the second half of 2018, about half of which were free to use. it also had particular concern for so—called protected machines in more remote areas. it said 102 closed last year. there are subsidies aimed at keeping these protected machines open. link, the body overseeing the uk's atm network, said from april it will be paying operators a fee of up to £2.75 per withdrawal to persuade them to keep at—risk machines free. let's talk now to an independent retailer in oxford, joe williams, who has the only place to withdraw cash in his area within a four—mile radius. yes it is, the local post office is the sole place in which you can withdraw money in our area. presumably a lot of people are
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coming to you for the cash machine. yes, we find people are using us to buy goods and services and the post office, but in a rural community, with atm missing, forfour miles, it puts a strain on people in the local area, people rely on cash. do people, now, because contactless is now everywhere, isn't it? yes, but in rural communities like this, mobile phone signal can be limited in some places, for example we have a mobile fish and chip van that comes around on a friday, they solely take cash, you go to a school function, they solely take cash. i think this is where it has the knock—on effect, local businesses, local charities, people not carrying cash, they are not going to donate. you think it is important that this machine is protected ? you think it is important that this
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machine is protected? definitely, they can use card, they can use cash, low income families and pensioners in particular, they like to have cash in their pockets, they come to us, withdraw money from the post office, they budget every week, and because they physically have it in their pocket, they know exactly what they have to spend. except that now, many of these machines are charging, does that make a difference to people? we had a fee—paying atm the school, up until last year, they took it out and said it is no longer viable for us. people, when it is charging £185, in ourstore, it people, when it is charging £185, in our store, it does put people off, using those, and having cash, and they will make trips further afield, to get cash. when did you last ta ke afield, to get cash. when did you last take cash out? yesterday, from the post office counter, i carry both cash and cards, a lot of my
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supplies still deal with cash, i still pay my staff in cash. i think it should be around for a while to come yet. thank you very much. more now on the death of the former england goalkeeper and world cup winner, gordon banks. he played in every game of the 1966 world cup on home soil but he's also remembered for this action against brazil in 1970, which has become known as one of the greatest saves of all time. pele! what a save. gordon banks. still puts a smile on the face. let's speak now to the journalist and former professional goalkeeper david preece.
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let's talk about that goal, how special was it... or rather, it wasn't a goal. perhaps not the most important, some people would argue it is not the best save there has ever been but it is certainly the most iconic, and when we think of world cups and when we think of the likes of pellow, we also think of the likes of gordon banks making that save. —— pele. the likes of gordon banks making that save. -- pele. when we were all growing up, he was one of those heroic figures, wasn't he. yes, almost mythical in status, even beyond his playing generation, into the likes of my generation, he holds that stature and as long as england's old world cup winning team, and remain so, it will always be held up in such esteem as he is. he played in a different era, the players were different, many fans found the more approachable but also
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the game was different. it was, you can divide goalkeeping into pre—1992, before the backpass rule, and post. but somebody like gordon banks, even in his era, he stood out as head of his time. in traditional goalkeeping sense there was no question he would survive in the modern era, if you try to list his strengths, it would just be an index of what it takes to be a world—class goalkeeper. he was self-taught, did not grow up in the days of goalkeeping coaches, how much of what he learnt is still valuable to younger players today? well, i think as goalkeepers, because we have time to think during games, we are very analytical, more so than outfield players. i think that is what it was for him, he put thought into his game, particularly about positioning, if we picked out his strength, his real strength, positioning, if we picked out his strength, his realstrength, it positioning, if we picked out his strength, his real strength, it was
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his unerring ability to be in the right place at all times, which made saves easier for right place at all times, which made saves easierfor him. right place at all times, which made saves easier for him. somebody who makes thejob saves easier for him. somebody who makes the job look easier than it is. some of the tweets there have been today from around the world but one catches the eye, the one from pele, and wonderful picture of the two of them... he is not wrong. not at all, it is easy to sit here and eulogise on the passing of someone like gordon banks but in this case, it is well deserved. when we look at all the greats of world football, gordon will quite rightly take his place alongsidejohan will quite rightly take his place alongside johan cruijff, maradona, pele, and a terrific goalkeeper like
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lev yashin. he grew up in an era where players were not well paid, how much would he be worth in the modern game if he were here now? there has been a steep rise in the value of goalkeepers of late, and it is almost as if goalkeepers have only been appreciated in these modern times, you can argue he could become the first £100 million goalkeeper if he were around today, no question he would be able to adapt in the styles of someone like david de gea, similar as traditional goalkeepers, the modern day goalkeeper, we see a lot of use of the feet. one world to -- one word to describe him, what would your word be? the work would be,
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"outstanding", not only as a goalkeeper was he outstanding but as a person, as well, i can pay no greater accolade than to say he was a greater man than he even was as a footballer. as tributes go, that is not bad. thank you very much. democrats and republicans have reached an agreement in principle over border security to fund the us government and avert another partial shutdown. legislation must be approved by friday when funding runs out for some federal agencies. well, the news came as president trump held a rally in texas overnight. during the president's speech in el paso, a bbc camerman was attacked by a trump supporter. let's take a look at the footage. the lawless rabble... usa! usa! pretty testy affair, the man was tackled and this is how the
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president responded. thank you... you all right? ok? please... ok, ok, thank you. we will be speaking with our washington correspondent a little later on. as you can see, rebecca is here, we have all the latest business news. first, the headlines: gordon banks, one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time and a legend of english football has died at the age of 81. theresa may tells mps she believes a brexit deal can be reached which will win the support of parliament it's emerged a nurse who died last week, was told six times by the nhs she worked for, she didn't have cancer. and coming up, hitting the buffers in the cairngorms, debate over the future of the uk s highest passenger railway. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the struggling department store
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chain debenhams has been given a cash injection of £a0 million. it will buy it extra time while it tries to strike a longer—term deal with lenders. the firm is in such bad shape it made three profit warnings last year. the travel giant tui, which owns what used to be called thomson holidays, has reported a loss of 8a million euro for the last three months of 2018, that's about £73 million and is well over double what it made a year before. the car giant nissan said profits for the last three months of last year fell 76%. it said a large part of that was to account for previous salaries and other charges that hadn't been taken off in previous years. these are the first results since the arrest of former chief executive carlos ghosn over an accounting scandal. asi as i was saying, democrats and
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republicans, there seems to be some kind of agreement that they will announce. but he's not getting all that he asked for. he asked for more than $6 billion, he is getting over $1 billion, he is getting over $1 billion, he is getting over $1 billion, he wanted to build 2000 miles of wall, now he will build only 55 miles of wall... he wanted to build it in concrete, he will be able to build it in some kind of fencing, the kind of fencing you might have around your own garden! without the electricity i have on mine, yes... laughter sorry... you have got to keep your fa ns sorry... you have got to keep your fans at bay somehow...! sorry... you have got to keep your fans at bay somehow. . .! laughter he is not getting exactly what he wa nts he is not getting exactly what he wants but there is optimism in the air. we will get more from new york ina air. we will get more from new york in a moment. michelle, he is not getting what he wants but there seems to be optimism, where do we stand? we had senator richard shelby who said the congressional committee had reached an agreement, i think the takeaway from this is that
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lawmakers on both sides got something, for the democrats, they stop donald trump getting the funding he wanted for a border wall, if you look at the republicans they managed to stop republicans asking for limits on detention beds available for immigrants picked up. so, ithink available for immigrants picked up. so, i think there is a deal in principle, the big question that remains is what will donald trump say about this? will he sign off on it, given that it does not include funds for a border security wall. a short while ago you talked about the rally in el paso, he said, "just so you know, we are building them all a nyway" you know, we are building them all anyway" and that was a short time after news had spread that the deal had been reached at. terrible shutdown, 35 days, is there any sign... the longest... the next thing to look out for is what happens on friday. it was the longest in american history, and as
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you have said, this was all over funds for a border wall, he you have said, this was all over funds fora borderwall, he is you have said, this was all over funds for a border wall, he is not getting that, so the question is what does he do now? what has become apparent, during those 35 days, is that it did have a knock—on effect on his support. something donald trump is very acutely are tuned to. whether that means he will change his mind and approve this to avoid another shutdown we will find out over the next few days. seeing him pulled in two directions: hardliners, amongst his supporters, who say that if he does not anything short of a wall is a betrayal, and the other more moderate republicans are saying, they are put off by the shutdown. one thing that has been spoken about is whether he will declare a national emergency if congress does not give him the money. potentially dramatic days to come, thank you forjoining us.|j think it is snowing, is that
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snowing? yes, yes snowing this morning in time for rush hour and apparently it will turn icy later. full weather forecast from new york! you have earned your money. sorry, i just saw that. let's see if the optimism is spreading to the markets. the debenhams share price, a big lea p the debenhams share price, a big leap in percentage terms, 30%, but the shares are only ap, they have had a cash injection of £a0 million. more for you later. for skiers in the cairngorms, the funicular railway is one of the main ways they get up the slopes. but it's currently out of action, and that's hitting the tourist industry hard. so a community group wants to step in to try to get it up and running again.
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our scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. cairngorm mountain. the winter landscape and stunning views meant, in years past, the runs here were amongst scotland's busiest. some of the skiers here grew up on these slopes. is this place important to you? very, very important to me. i have been fortunate enough to come up here since i was a bairn with my parents. i would not be that happy living here without this on my doorstep, i can't get enough of it. but there's a problem. the mountain's funicular is out of action. it's been a slow start to the season and the track's closure has not helped. this is billed as the country's highest railway, when it is open it will take you through the clouds, close to the summit of the mountain. but the problem is there is a weakness in the structure and they need to strengthen the beams that support the track, as well as the foundations. katie runs a local business. she says the closure was initially
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a cause for concern but she adds that in an area dependent on the boom or bust of winter snow, people here always find a way through. there's a lot of coach parties that would come to go up on the train, have a hot chocolate at the top and take in the views, and with the train not running, those coach parties can't come. so visitor numbers, probably, are down. so, now a local community group want to buy the site and run it not just as a winter resort, but through the summer too. it's our work, our play, our heritage, our children's future. we believe this mountain is sustainable, we see no reason why it can't be done by introducing summer aspects like mountaincoasters, zip wires, mountain biking. the owner of the site says the slopes here are open for business as they work on getting the railway running again. any buyout could take years, but those behind it are hopeful they will take back their mountain for the community who live close by. lorna gordon, bbc news, cairngorm mountain. we may still be in the depths of
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february but dare i say it, it will feel a bit like spring, and it looks like spring for this weather watcher in east sussex, further north and west, not quite spring, a lot of cloud here earlier on today. cloud pushing in to the atlantic, they are developing a south—westerly wind, as we head through the next few days, dragging ever milderair we head through the next few days, dragging ever milder air in either direction, relatively high temperatures for the year over the next few days and with that, mostly dry, not completely dry, through the re st of dry, not completely dry, through the rest of the day, week frontal system bringing rain, down into north
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wales, for many other places, dry, quite a lot of cloud around and sunshine, best across the north west. temperatures between 12 and ia degrees. weak front moving south, starting to retreat north, taking cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain across northern ireland and scotland, some clear breaks, generally quite cloudy, temperatures not dropping too far, most places will be frost free, the odd fog patch around to start tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud, particularly at first, patchy rain drifting north, as the day wears on, down towards the south, we may see cloud breaking a little bit into the afternoon, some spells of sunshine, those temperatures still pretty much across the board into double digits. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, week frontal system is bringing a bit of rain in north—western areas will move away to the north, increasingly, picking up to the north, increasingly, picking upa to the north, increasingly, picking up a southerly feed of winds, bringing some drierair
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up a southerly feed of winds, bringing some drier air from the continent, watch the cloud, melting away, more and more of us will see sunshine. thursday, likely to be quite a sunny day, particularly in the south, even here, should brighten up. quite breezy especially across north—western areas, very mild indeed, 11, 12, 13 degrees, a few spots could get a degree higher than that. on friday, one or two places will get to 15 degrees. the weekend stays dry for many, there will be a bit of rain at times for some in the west. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm.
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the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. what a save! that save against pele in 1970, is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she's running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock, hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear herfather sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. an extreme body artist
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from wolverhampton, who removed parts of an ear, tongue and nipple, from his customers has admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. we are going to hear some wonderful tributes to gordon banks and also have an update on the cricket and would you believe it, it is getting even better for england. would you believe it, it is getting even betterfor england. thank you very much. looking at the weather, on the 12th of february, we ought to be in the depths of winter, but over the next few days, something much more springlike on the way. temperatures above where they should be. the full forecast is coming up. how around 3000 cash machines were removed from high streets in the uk, over the last six months of 2018.
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hello everyone, this is afternoon live. gordon banks — one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time and a legend of english football — has died at the age of 81. he was part of the england team that won the world cup in 1966, and his save from pele in 1970 is seen as among the finest ever. banks was named fifa goalkeeper of the year no fewer than 6 times. his former club, stoke city, said his family were "devastated to lose him" but could not have been more proud. our sports correspondent andy swiss looks back at his life. it remains a footballing miracle, 1970, england against brazil and that save. pele! what a save! gordon banks!
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the greatest ever from one of the greatest ever. four years earlier, gordon banks had been a cornerstone of the england world cup triumph and those who played alongside him today united in tribute. sir bobby charlton said gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper and i was proud to call him a team—mate. sir geoff hurst described him as one of the very greatest, a sentiment echoed throughout the game. he was my hero obviously, growing up, and being able to train with him, the big thing i would say about him, in an era which is totally different to today, he had this great positional sense and that was his dedication. banks first made his name with leicester city. banks was safe in the leicester goal. it was not long before he attracted england attention. his reliability was pivotal to their 1966 triumph. winning the world cup he later said changed his life.
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tremendous. when we came back, you wouldn't believe the people in the streets, just incredible. we felt so proud. although england fell short at the next world cup in 1970, banks was at his peak, most famously against brazil and what has been described as the saviour of the century. quite how he denied pele has dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himself , pele. i already jumped to score and i did this! banks‘s brilliance helped stoke city to the league cup in 1972, the club's first major trophy but later that year, a car crash cost him his sight in one eye amid emotional scenes, he was forced to retire from the game, although remarkably
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he made a brief comeback in the us. but his fame and popularity proved enduring. honoured for his achievements for stoke and england, in 2012 he carried the olympic torch at wembley stadium where, decades earlier, he had conjured such wizardry as a player. in a statement today, his family said, they could not have been more proud of him. for many, the greatest keeper english football has ever seen. we can now speak to rachel brown—finnis, the former goalkeeper who made 82 appearances for england. you are in a better position than most. for me, he was the iconic goalkeeper. like the godfather of goalkeepers. even though it was a long time after his playing career
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finesse that i was starting, he was a lwa ys finesse that i was starting, he was always somebody who you know as far as the name and iconic safely made. especially for someone like myself who at five foot eight, found it tough. he's not at this new breed of goalkeepers at six foot five. that's how he made that say. from a technical point of view i look at to him for inspiration. he was self—taught. he didn't grow up in the world of goalkeeping coaches. he learnt things that are still now being taught to others. it's as simple as that. he's almost written the text goalkeeping. before there was one. people would look to his performance as to how well and quickly covered the goal, how did you do that? broke it down, let the videos of how he did that, how he made that ridiculous save and it was
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all about footwork and about commands in yourarea, all about footwork and about commands in your area, the quick agility and the power he had, to be able to make states like that. that's really forced what goalkeeping originally started out as. it's modernised a bit now, but certainly, he was that founding father of goalkeeping. you speak about his footwork, he spent most of his time in the air. i think, you talk about goalkeepers being like cats and that may be how he was. he really seems to flow gracefully through the air. and, you just had that power, that agility, that gra cefulness that power, that agility, that gracefulness about goalkeeping. this is what i've got my hands full of now. don't let go. ishouldn't is what i've got my hands full of now. don't let go. i shouldn't have to tell you that, should i? he's safe with me. of all the mums in the world. there is a safe hands. when
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we talk about gordon banks, it raises the whole the era. it was different then. i can empathise with the lack of money, the lack of resources , the lack of money, the lack of resources, how basic things were in his era with... i was playing as football was 15 years ago, 20 years ago when i started. it was very much in its infancy than. women's's football. it didn't have the resources , football. it didn't have the resources, hand—me—downs and playing on terrible pictures. so, we can draw some similarities as to where football was when we both started our careers. he saw the game grow size and is now. as i've been a part
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of the projects of the transition of women's football as well which is full of professionals. certainly, some similarities. he balanced a job, as he did alongside playing football. that's what i did for the first ten — 15 years even my international career. times were difficult but basically, the crux of it all was we absolutely love the game. and we love goalkeeping. you've got your hands full and there is no one you could pass that little thing too, so i'm going to leave it there. really good to talk you. theresa may has told mps they need to hold their "nerve" over brexit , saying the on—going talks with the eu are at a ‘crucial stage‘. in a commons statement a short time ago, the prime minister said she still believes it‘s possible to find a deal that parliament can support.
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she is still trying to persuade the eu to make changes to the most controversial element of the withdrawal agreement — the backstop — to prevent a return to a hard irish border. our political correspondent ben wright reports. she has a deal mps don‘t want, the eu says it will not be negotiated and we are just weeks away from brexit. but the prime minister appealed for patience in the commons this lunchtime possibly talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. by getting the changes we need to be back stop, by protecting and enhancing workers‘ rights and environmental protections, and by enhancing the role of parliament in the next phase of negotiations, i believe we can reach a deal that this house can support. there was nothing unexpected in the prime minister‘s summary and the labour leader accused her of deliberate delay. in truth, it appears that the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. and the eu side does not seem to be
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budging over the irish after talks with the brexit secretary in brussels last night, their chief negotiator said the deal was done. it is clear from our side that we are not going to reopen withdrawal agreement. we will continue our discussion in the coming days. it is hard to see where this crisis is heading. parliament and the government remain deadlocked. mps will again have the chance to try to shape the prime minister‘s strategy in votes on thursday but there is still no clarity about when the government will try to get its brexit deals throught the commons again and that is why many mps think number ten is running down the clock. piling pressure on tory brexiteers as well as some labour mps to back an agreement, or let britain a fallout of the eu without a deal at the of march. supporters of another referendum have not given up and sprayed their frustration withjeremy corbyn over a poster in his constituency this morning. some labour mps want
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their leader to get on board. if there is not to be a brexit deal that we know is going to damage our constituents, that is totally at odds with our internationalist values, if we know that is the alternative then surely we have to grasp with both hands the only way in which we can stop that happening to the country and stop our values being destroyed by brexit and that is to put it back to the people. there is no sign of a majority for another referendum here. instead, they raise drift, division and uncertainty as the struggle over brexit goes to the wire. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminsterfor us. yes, most people here fear that the significant day of votes has moved to the 27th of february as the prime minister effectively asks for more time to get changes to her deal in
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order to get it through parliament. let‘s discuss this now. you represent a very appropriate set area. was there anything theresa may said that would help you get behind her deal? there was nothing specifically that stood out to me as being the moment for me, but it was positive steps in the right direction. she talked about potentially legislating for the protection is from europe, post brexit funding for those left behind communities and towns, but she does need to do, she needs to soften her own red lines and listen to the offer at the bottom of the table by the labour party, byjeremy corbyn. understanding that that is a sincere author and her refusal to consider a customs arrangement and to engage in some of the issues he has put forward make the likelihood of her getting a deal over the line much less likely. there have been talks between labour mps and ministers, do you think that is a genuine attempt to reach out to mp5 and other
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parties? i think it is. the government is trying to get a deal through it, but this is two years too late, they could have been having these conversations over the la st having these conversations over the last 18 months and this could have beena last 18 months and this could have been a much smoother process. what i fair is that the prime minister has reaffirmed her own red lines and she is not willing to take... she can't change the declaration, if you can't change the declaration, if you can't change the declaration, if you can't change the political declaration on the withdrawal agreement how is what she is going to put to us to vote on it this week or next month going to be any different to what we have already rejected? some people think she is running the club down. it‘s now a case of no deal or ideal. how would you axe then what would you say to your constituents? sooner than later, trying to run the clock down, backbenchers will take control of to prevent that. her attempt to run down the club, will be fought hardly and ultimately fail, but i've sat to my constituents all along, i
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wa nt sat to my constituents all along, i want to vote for a deal that creates an orderly exit from the european union, but mitigating economic damage and delivers on the spirit of the referendum. ithink damage and delivers on the spirit of the referendum. i think whatjeremy has put forward absolutely does that. if the parameter as there is, she can gauge to that. what is sad about today is that the exchange of letters between jeremy and the about today is that the exchange of letters betweenjeremy and the per minister were much more cordial than you premised upon my exchange in response today and —— the per minister's response today. we would be much closer to a deal that we can all support. the prime minister needs to get not just a majority for her motion, but she needs to sustain a majority for legislation that comes afterwards. she thinks she can cobble together a coalition that the conservative party, the dup and half of labourmps, she... conservative party, the dup and half of labour mps, she... she is going to have two soften her red lines and ta ke to have two soften her red lines and take labour's offer with this sincerity which was made. element thank you very much. this is not
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likely to happen until the 27th of february which people predict there may be a move for backbenchers to seize control of brexit process. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear herfather sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. and in sports, thousands of tributes from across the game have been paid to gordon banks following his death. pele said he was a goalkeeper with magic. england are closing in on victory in the final test in st lucia, chasing, the windies have slumped ten at three. 10—3 —— ronnie
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o‘sullivan is through to the second round of the welsh open. i‘ll be back with much more in the next 15 minutes. jurors in the trial of a teenager accused of killing a six—year—old schoolgirl have heard that her father sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. alesha macphail was found dead near her grandparents‘ house on the isle of bute last summer. the 16—year—old boy on trial who cannot be named for legal reasons denies raping and murdering her. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is at the high court in glasgow where the trial is taking place. yes, the court heard today from ales ha yes, the court heard today from alesha macphail‘s father, six—year—old, stayed with herfather every second weekend and for a large pa rt every second weekend and for a large part of each school holiday. she said it she loved her holidays on
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the isle of bute he said. going to the isle of bute he said. going to the park, the father went on to tell the park, the father went on to tell the court of the last time he saw his daughter alive. he said on the evening of sunday the 1st ofjuly, he had her getting out of her bed, going into the living room. this he said was at 1030 or 11 o‘clock at night. he said he took her back to her room, settled her and left out watching a peppa pig dvd. he said his last words to her work that he would see her in the morning. the next thing he knew, he was being woken up by her grandparents at seven or eight hours later who told him that she was missing. he said there was pandemonium when it emerged that the child was not on the flats. there was a frantic search for her, the father and his
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partner visited several places trying to find his daughter. her grandmother put out an appeal on facebook asking locals on the islands tojoin facebook asking locals on the islands to join in the search but that morning, six—year—old alesha macphail‘s body was found. she sold cannabis to the 16—year—old who is accused of killing his daughter the father. —— the father is accused... the 16—year—old denies abducting, raping and murdering her. he blames someone raping and murdering her. he blames someone else for the manager and the trial at the high court here in glasgow continues. thank you very much. in the united states, republicans and democrats have reached an agreement in principle to keep the us government running and avoid a second shutdown. legislation must be approved by friday when funding runs out for some federal agencies. well, the news came as president trump held a rally in texas overnight.
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during the president‘s speech in el paso, a bbc camerman was attacked by a trump supporter. let‘s take a look at the footage. the man was tackled, and the president responded. thank you. are you all right? is everything 0k? thank you. let‘s cross to washington and our senior north america reporter anthony zurcher. what we have just seen, many say the mood at that rally as we have seen before was fairly common. yes. that is typical of donald trump rallies.
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you will see some range at every rally, the media are in the middle of the arena, donald trump will stand up there and talk about the fa ke stand up there and talk about the fake news and how awful the press is and everyone in the crowd will turn and everyone in the crowd will turn and shake their fists and the at the media. what‘s different from each rally is the anger from the crowd. sometimes it‘s almost eight circus atmosphere like these are cartoon villains, but in certain instances it can get ugly and these appear to be one of these cases, isolated cases of people shouting insults, beating into the media pan, media personnel is having to be escorted from the arena, this is the first time someone has actually been able to get in and shove a cameraman. let‘s talk about the wider issue at the moment. that‘s the hope there are some deal being done to stop a shutdown. how likely is it? are some deal being done to stop a shutdown. how likely is mm doesn‘t look that likely over the weekend, but now we have both sides,
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democrats and republicans negotiating there saying they have a deal to reach an agreement to fund the government for the rest of the fiscal year. the details of this deal are starting to leak out, although there has been no formal text, it will include $1.375 billion for borderfencing. according text, it will include $1.375 billion for border fencing. according to some reports, about 50 miles of new wall. that can be claimed as a win by the president although he was asking for much more money. almost six billion dollars. he wanted hundreds of new miles. they also know democrats need it wanted to cap down on the number of migrants detained. down to a0,000. that cat could easily be broken by the trump administration. what the democrats feel there is that this has the ability to round up people that this could lead to a document it migrants all over the country being detained and taken out of the community. that
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was something they were pushing to have changed. that is not going to be the case. the big question is whether donald trump will support this agreement, there has been some criticism from his conservative supporters saying supporters who didn‘t want him to strike a deal last year and helped instigate him to shut down the government. the white out of the white house right now as they haven‘t seen the details of the agreement and so it is kind of the agreement and so it is kind ofa of the agreement and so it is kind of a wait and see whether donald trump canfind of a wait and see whether donald trump can find a way to claim victory and keep the government open. thank you very much. breaking news. just hearing that the european commission has published legislation that will allow trains to use the channel tunnel for three months if the uk leaves without a brexit deal. that will give the uk and france time to renegotiate the canterbury treaty under which the channel tunnel operates. the legislation does now be agreed by the european parliament and member
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states. given obviously the situation it will not be subject to normal eight week consultation period we are hearing european commission press have issued these latest details. they say, given the increasing risk that the uk may leave the eu on the 30th of march without a deal, the european commission has the proposal to help mitigate the significant impact that such a scenario would have on rail transport and activity between the eu and the uk. so, we will have more on that a little later. a nurse whose cervical cancer was repeatedly missed by her local hospital made a final plea before she died — for others not to go through the same ordeal. julie o‘connor died last week aged a9. she‘d been given the all—clear by southmead hospital in bristol several times — and right up until the end of her life, she was campaigning for an inquiry into how the nhs failed her.
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julie o‘connor worked as a nurse in the nhs for 13 years and never missed a cervical screening test, but was let down after her local hospital failed to spot cancer cells. right up to the end, julie was keen to tell her story. here she is speaking to her family in st peter‘s hospice just three days before she died. it was in 201a when she had a routine smear test. southmead‘s pathology lab gave her the all clear but the slides should have rung alarm bells as they were abnormal. the next year, julie was referred by her gp back
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to southmead gynaecology for investigation of persistent bleeding but was taken off the cancer pathway after a biopsy was reported as normal. over the next two years she was sent back to southmead four times because her gp was still worried about the bleeding. eventuallyjulie went private and was given the devastating diagnosis not only that she had cancer but that it had spread out of control. within 30 seconds of being examined by the consultant, he diagnosed me with cervical cancer. he took me in the week after and he could not even get the camera into the womb, it was completely blocked. i was horrified. southmead have accepted that the care thatjulie received was negligent and that had they correctly reported her smear, she would not have gone on to develope cervical cancerand died.
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an independent investigation is being carried out into her treatment, butjulie and her husband wanted a much wider report as they believed there were systematic failures. she was contacted on social media by ladies who had had similar experiences. they had signs, they had challenged it and been backwards and forwards. the concern is whether there are more victims and it is a systemic failure. the hospital said it is isolated and rare but i believe it is a systemic problem and we need to go back to at least 201a, may be further back than that. in a statement, the trust reiterated apologies and condolences to the family, saying "we are committed to fully understanding the circumstances of the care we provided so any lessons can be learned." they said, "we will be publicly open about the overall findings of the investigation." julie always went for her smear tests, but with cervical cancer screening targets being missed, her other lasting hope
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was to encourage other people to come forward. there were almost two million complaints last year, from people across the uk saying their rubbish wasn‘t being collected from their homes. the figures, obtained by the bbc, suggest the number of complaints has increased by a third since 201a. david rhodes reports. piled high and going nowhere. life for residents on this street in leeds has been pretty grim in recent weeks. since christmas, i‘m not actually sure if we‘ve had a collection. like, the bins haven‘t been collected and it has got worse. like, i‘ve lived in hyde park now for three years and i‘ve not seen it this bad. here, students live next to those who have called the streets home for decades. all agree, though, that the council could do a betterjob at collecting the bins. it‘s awful. they are not coming. and sometimes... too windy, they blow down, go everywhere. as you can see, it's overflowing.
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we've had this issue for a while and it's just really disgusting, we see rats everywhere. since we filmed here last week, leeds city council say they‘ve been back to empty these bins and that they collect over 99% of all waste on time. waste collection teams go out in all weather. here in barnsley, complaints about bin collections have been falling, and across the country, over 800 million bins are collected by councils every year. bad weather, the rise of social media, all reasons why complaints to councils about bins not being picked up are, yes, going up. but there is a clear trend. more of us feel our bins are not being collected on time. last year, 1.8 million complaints were made to councils about rubbish being left uncollected, and figures from over 200 councils across the uk show the number of complaints has increased by a third since 201a. we need to do better, but it‘s in the whole picture of austerity. 60p in every pound gone in government funding. that is going to have an impact
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on councils‘ ability to deliver services. the government said that in the coming year, councils would get £1 billion extra funding to provide essential services, but many households continue to watch whether one of these is picked up on time. david rhodes, bbc news, barnsley. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. dare i say it, it‘s going to feel a bit like spring over the next few days. temperatures higher than they should be at this time of the year. it will be mostly dry, mostly. there is a bit of rain around at the moment, it system moving its way across northern england down into north wales, fairly blustery across the rest of the uk, but temperatures between 11 and 1a degrees. as you go through this evening as a night, this area of cloud and patchy rain which has been moving southwards was not on with northwoods again, so some wet weather moving across parts of scotla nd weather moving across parts of
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scotland and northern ireland and northern england. further south, more dry, temperatures holding well above freezing. if you have a patch is the moving its way across northern england down into north wales, fairly blustery across the rest of the uk, but temperatures between 11 and 1a degrees. as you go through this evening and tonight, this area of cloud and patchy rain which has been moving southwards was not on with northwoods again, so some wet weather moving across parts of scotla nd some wet weather moving across parts of scotland and northern ireland and northern england. further south, more dry, temperatures holding well above freezing. if you four patches around as well. that should tend to clear, we are looking at a lot of tribe a cloudy weather, is a thing the south later on, temperatures in double digits, on thursday and friday, some of us could get close to 15 degrees. a lot of dry weather around, and some spells of sunshine. this is bbc news, our this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. what a save! that save against pele in 1970 is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and we all need to hold our nerve
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to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just won real tactic. —— hasjust won real tactic. to run down the clock helping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear herfather sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster one. lots of reaction to the death of gordon banks? absolutely. for members of that 1966 world cup winning site have now left us in the last few hours i‘ve been a reminder of gorndon banks‘ standing not injust his game in the reminder of gorndon banks‘ standing not in just his game in the country but around the world as well. so
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many wonderful attributes have been paid over the last few hours. that is the thing that has really struck us. obviously those close to him and who played with him, sir bobby charlton a team—mate in that side backin charlton a team—mate in that side back in 66 at wembley says gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper. without doubt, he says, one of the best thing that has ever had. he said he was proud to call him a team—mate. england posted this... and this from the german fa, posting a picture of banks and their beaten players in 1966... i know that you have read some of the pele tribute statement that he has released in the last half an
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hour. but it is notjust web seeing this goal yet again, but also hearing from pele. 1966 his finest hour but this save in the group stage against barzil at the 1970 tournament was perhaps the defining momnent of his, keeping out that pele header and the brazilian great has paid his own very moving tribute, he described banks as a... "blue phantom in making that save in mexico, i am glad he saved my header — because that act was the start of a friendship between us that i will always treasure. whenever we met, it was always like we had never been apart. rest in peace, my friend. yes, you were a goalkeeper with magic. but you were also so much more. you were a fine human being." that from pele in the last half
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hour. i had been waiting to see if you let say anything about gordon banks‘ death. you let say anything about gordon banks' death. he gets up and says i was celebrated and i look around. he turned away to celebrate and he just could not believe. that is when gordon, blue phantom, wearing blue, how quickly he got across his goal and to do what he did and flicked that ball over the bar. amazing. let‘s talk about something else that is amazing. england are actually on top in the west indies. why had they not played like this before? who knows. dodgy team selection against barbados and antigua. this is a very balanced tea m antigua. this is a very balanced team and it could be over by the day. joe root was out for 122 and declared leaving the windies an improbable a85 ben stokes was unbeaten on a8. you would have thought you would have let him get his half—century. so england need ten wickest and a day and half to get them, they‘ve already got three,
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jimmy anderson with all of them england have dropped a couple as well. it looks like they are going to win this with some ease. but they have lost the series. england prop mako vunipola has been ruled out of the rest of the six nations with an ankle injury. vunipola suffered ankle ligament damage during the aa—8 win over france on sunday. he is expected to be out for ten weeks exeter‘s ben moon and leicester‘s ellis genge are in the frame to replace him. the champions league first knockout stage begins tonight with a mouth—watering game between manchester united and paris st—germain. the first leg is at old trafford. the french champions are without a number of their superstars including neymar and edison cavani but will that make the task any easier for united? of course any team that are missing
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players like neymar will fill the effect. at that will give all the other player a chance. for me, it makes it may be more unpredictable for us, who they are going to play. because when you have seen that front three of the whole season, you know what to expect. so this time around we are guessing a little bit how they are going to come. but we have got a good cast and it on how they are approaching this game. all they gonna saucier, they say this will be his biggest test and it mightjust be the job interview for his doubtful time. mightjust be the job interview for his doubtfultime. he is mightjust be the job interview for his doubtful time. he is doing right at the moment. he is. thanks very much. around 3000 cash machines were removed from high streets
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in the uk over the last six months of 2018. according to the consumer group, ‘which?‘ about a88 atms disappeared per month in the second half of 2018, about half of which were free to use. it also had particular concern for so—called protected machines in more remote areas. it said 102 closed last year. there are subsidies aimed at keeping these protected machines open. link, the body overseeing the uk‘s atm network, said from april it will be paying operators a fee of up to £2.75 per withdrawal to persuade them to keep at—risk machines free. let‘s talk now to david clarke from the group positive money which campaigns for what it calls a ‘fair banking system‘. good luck with that. let‘s talk about atms in the meantime. the evidence is that people are not using as much cash as they where. how many people still rely on it? we are constantly fed this argument that cash is obsolete, we are all stopping using cash. that is an argument i will admit i kind of believed myself until i looked into
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the reality which is there‘s actually more demand for cash than ever before. the majority of us, said three quarters of people with access to an atm said it was essential to their day—to—day life. this was happening because of cost cutting by banks and car companies. that presumably happens because of where you live. while i can understand that in a row areas, i do not understand why people do not tape cash in bars or cafes or any where around here. i like most people choose to use a different —— a variety of payment methods. cards and mobile apps but i depend on cash ona and mobile apps but i depend on cash on a day—to—day basis and that is like a majority of people in this country. cash machines are disappearing not just because country. cash machines are disappearing notjust because of changing consumer behaviour but because banks have lobbied for a cut in the amount that they pay to maintain the atm network. the government is not doing enough to stop the alarming trend of cash
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machine closures. what you find out asa machine closures. what you find out as a machine that charges a part transaction. its frequent shaping of the past? we are seeing more and more machines moving from free to use to pay to use, that is a trend we can expect to continue because the companies that operate the cash machines are receiving less from the banks machines are receiving less from the ba n ks every machines are receiving less from the banks every time you make a transaction. some might say you are being a bit cynical, saying this is purely a move on barfor the banks. their evidence is that fewer people need cash. while that may be true in london, it is very different if you‘re down in cornwall or the east of england where rural areas where they depend on these machines. we have got to ask where is the cost greater for people using cash machines? is it on the banks are is the cost greater for the elderly person who the cash machine disappears and they have to spend their money on a bus fare to the nearest town, holding more money in
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their house and that there is a safety issue there as well. explain that. who are the people hardest hit? the majority of us are using cash on a regular basis. there is about 2 million people who rely almost exclusively on cash. they are likely to be older people, people on low incomes. they were really concerned about the effect on these vulnerable groups and if cash disappears completely. but we are seeing if these machines which are supposed to be protected by the regulator and isolated and rural areas. those are closing using hold communion —— leaving whole communities without access to money. is it inevitable that cats will be a thing of the past? cash is not going down without a fight. we really support which?‘s campaign to support the uses of cash. we are working with business groups and other campaigners, fighting to protect cash banks. we have seen a massive
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closure of bank branches over the last two years in spite of the fact that banks are still receiving billions in subsidies from the taxpayer. we deserve to gift tax payers access to these vital services. thank you very much. good to talk to you. the nhs has admitted that wrong metal plates may have been inserted into patients who have broken bones. it‘s thought 5,500 patients could be affected. the regulator nhs improvement has set out an urgent alert asking all hospitals across england to review the x—rays of patients who have been treated with metal plates for the fracture of long bones. our health reporter, john owen has been following the story. a total of seven cases have been found after one patient fell after a surgery and required further surgery when the mistake was discovered. so these plates that medics refer to as a ‘fraction fixation plates‘
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coming several different varieties. and the different kinds have different properties, including different rigidity think different strengths. some patients choose at once just have a more flexible plate inserted into them that was meant for reconstruction surgery instead of a more rigid plate that is meant for fractures. so the wrong type of plate, one that should be ready for those patients who had experienced fractures. how has that happened? the confusion is partly being blamed on recent changes in the design of some of those reconstruction plates. they used to be more visually distinct from the other kinds of plates, but they‘ve had a recent design change which means they now simply look more alike which has resulted in confusion. over the course of the sterilizing and selection process, there is room for the confusion in simplyjust selecting the wrong implement for the type of surgery that a surgeon is undergoing. this sounds pretty grim. if you are one of the 5,500 people affected, what if the advice? the regulator of nhs has sent out an urgent alert asking all hospitals to review the x—rays of patients who have been treated with metal plates for fractures of long bones
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such as arms and legs, self principally affecting those with fractures in the body. the advice is that hospitals will get in touch with anyone who is affected. as you say, is thought to be as many as 5500 people going back to february 2018. but we are being told that the risk of harm is very low. as a result patients should not be too alarmed. the greatest advice there. —— the latest advice there. convicted criminals in england could be banned from driving taxis or minicabs, under new government proposals to protect passengers. those convicted of serious crimes — including sexual offences — would be refused a licence. the government will also consider putting cctv into taxis. the plans would affect drivers in england and, for the timebeing, wales as well. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. sian o‘callaghan caught a taxi in swindon eight years ago. sian was on a night out with friends and left a local nightclub to walk home. unfortunately she left on her own.
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as she was walking home, probably about 150 yards from the nightclub, a car pulled up which she got into, which later turned out to be the taxi driver christopher halliwell. taxi driver halliwell abducted and murdered sian. he was given a life sentence. sian‘s mother says the government‘s proposalfor a national code for issuing taxi licences is overdue. clearly something needs to be done to make this, you know, a national standard and to have national regulations, which i don‘t think, a lot of the time, the public are aware that they are not already in place. can i have an inspection on the outside, and can i check your badge, please, sir? in newcastle, spot checks and tighter rules on licensing have been the norm for months after private hire cabs were used by a gang over a number of years to groom and abuse girls and young women. one measure newcastle took was to join forces with 11 other councils in the north—east of england to create a single licensing body, so the same standards and checks are applied when issuing licences.
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i think the local authorities are all cognisant of the fact that vehicles and drivers will work across authority areas, and therefore it‘s vital that we share information between ourselves to ensure that any public safety issues that we identify with drivers are made available to all. now the government wants a common rulebook for all councils in england and wales, so if someone is denied a taxi licence in one area, they can‘t one from another council which is more lenient. that is still possible today. under the plans, criminal background checks would also be compulsory. mandatory cctv in all taxis is being considered, but privacy is an issue. well, maybe we should raise people‘s safety above people‘s privacy. maybe we should be saying to ourselves, if you get into a taxi or a private hire vehicle, and that vehicle will have cctv, it will be stickered up, you will be aware, therefore you should watch what you‘re talking about, you should keep your own privacy to yourself.
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a government consultation on the proposals will now run for several weeks. tom burridge, bbc news. rebecca is here — in a moment will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. gordon banks —— one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time and a legend of english football — has died at the age of 81. theresa may tells mps she believes a brexit deal can be reached which will win the support of parliament. it‘s emerged a nurse who died last week, was told six times by the nhs she worked for, she didn‘t have cancer. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the struggling department store chain debenhams has been given a cash injection of £a0 million. it will buy it extra time while it tries to strike a longer—term deal with lenders. the firm is in such bad shape it made three profit
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warnings last year. the bank of england governor has urged mps to solve the brexit impasse in a speech warning of growing threats to the global economy. mark carney said that failure to agree a brexit deal would create an economic shock for the uk. it would also send the wrong message at a time when protectionism was on the rise globally. the car giant nissan said profits for the last three months of last year fell 76%. it said a large part of that was to account for previous salaries and other charges that hadn‘t been taken off in previous years. these are the first results since the arrest of former chief executive carlos ghosn over an accounting scandal. we‘ve heard from mark carney before but this language sounds stark? he couldn‘t be clear about what he thinks will happen in the event of a note to brexit. he did also make
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reference to other economic currents in the rest of the world because it is not all entirely about us, although it can feel like that. one of the things he pointed to was the rise in trade barriers and particularly if you think about the trade fight between the us and china, seeing terrorists slept on other country‘ goods which is clearly a barrier to trade. let‘s hear what mark carney said from the man himself. we shouldn't be under any illusions, i'm not going to put a point estimate on it. but a no—deal and no—transition breaks it would be an economic shock for this economy. and it would have, and i will loop it back to the speech, it would also send a signal globally about the prospects of refounding globalisation. and that would be very unfortunate given the intentions of both parties and this is to come to a very different place. and we‘ll have a look at how
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the markets responded in a few minutes‘ time. meanwhile: the royal mail has been looking at a fast—growing business of subscription boxes — what are these? not something you do yourself i take it from your tone of voice? now. did they deliver alcohol?” it from your tone of voice? now. did they deliver alcohol? i don't know. funny enough, they do. that is one of the more unusual things you get through your letterbox. let‘s make sure we asked guest about that one. seu sure we asked guest about that one. self gets —— self gifting is part of the boxes, one of the expressions we use. self gifting? look after yourself if no one else is going to do it. it is called shopping. you're right. it is an expression that is eased by the modern!, obviously not all of us in the studio. let‘s talk to the royal mail‘s mark street in our newsroom. you heard us talking about the types of things you can
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get for your post, why don‘t you tell us what is available out there? you are right. i think one of the interesting things about the sector is how people are using innovation and packaging. i know your colleague mentioned wind. it is one of the things that are now being sent by subscription. a company has designed a rectangular wine box all made of plastic so it can be posted through the letterbox and land on your door, if you have taken out a subscription for wine. and if you can tolerate having your light and plastic bottles, which some of the more traditional folk around here cannot do. plainly you are hoping to make money out of this. one of the things you being the royal mail that will facilitate this, as you say, the development of letterbox shaped parcels. however there are of course many competitors you can also compete with posting things to your letterbox. how do you make sure at the royal mail that you can grab a slice of this growing pie? you are obviously right. i think one of the great strengths is the fact that we
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have 90,000 postmen and post women up have 90,000 postmen and post women up and down the uk, the largest street network in the uk and they are the at the heart of their local community. doing these walks on a daily basis, and this stuff as i said is designed to drop straight through the letterbox. we are specialising in making sure he tells first time to the people who have ordered it. this is going to be pretty important for you. continually we hear from you that the fall off and your traditional business, the letters that we get through our letterbox, the postage rate for that is declining faster than expected. i think it is no secret that letters are in structural decline. we are seeing an increase in the amount of parcels that we are delivering. of course this is driven by ecommerce, you and iat this is driven by ecommerce, you and i at home at night putting in our
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orders. we are making sure we specialise in the next day delivery. we are delivering the first time, every time. a making sure the subscription economy is being dealt with in the same way as we are dealing with the rest of the internet economy and getting the parcels that people order to their homes. thank you very much. mark street from royal mail. thank you. so you wont be signing up for that wine service then? theyjust need to put a tube through it. anyway, let‘s look at the markets. no real reaction to mark carney and what he has had to say. i think the investors in the uk really don‘t know quite which direction to turn in. the 100 share index. show me someone in. the 100 share index. show me someone who does. 70%, not in. the 100 share index. show me someone who does. 7096, not a question for me, 70% of the components of the 100 share index is made up from profit services. perhaps that is the effect we have seen perhaps that is the effect we have seen there, but very little change. as we can see, the pound, dollar or thereabouts. we cannot really see
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any percentage change. i saw the chart earlier and there was a big blip is morning and be pound and dollar an pound —year—old in relative terms, but we cannot really see what a test on the day now. i think the movement marker is not showing up on our board, sadly. there has been the news that the european commissioner said that even if there is a no—deal brexit, he can still use the chain for three months through the tunnel which will change things a bit. we‘ll talk more about this later. thank you very much. a regulator should be appointed to oversee tech giants like google and facebook and prevent the spread of fake news, according to a government—backed report published today. it‘s one of several recommendations by dame frances cairncross, aimed at protecting local newspapers — 2a5 of which have closed since 2005 in the face of digital competition. based in leeds, the yorkshire post is yorkshire‘s national paper. as editor you become acutely aware
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that you are merely a custodian. 100 years ago, people got their news from the local paper. today, many of us get our news online, while the internet has destroyed the market in classified advertising. according to the press gazette, 2a5 local newspapers have shut since 2005 alone. what we have is, essentially, a business model that‘s acutely challenged by declining revenues. but the dichotomy of more people demanding our content than never before. local papers have been asking government for help, particularly from what they see as the predatory behaviour of technology firms like google and facebook. the government response was to ask dame frances cairncross to publish a review on the future of high quality news. it suggests... ..and its impact on the commercial sector. i asked dame frances why she resisted lobbying from the industry to classify tech platforms as publishers and make
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them pay for news content. there‘s no way that the platforms are going to pay for content. i think they would rather stop carrying news directly, and that would do no good to any newspaper. there is, as dame frances says, no silver bullet. but while the presses are rolling, there is cause for hope, so long as people are willing to pay for news. amol rajan, bbc news. time for a look at the weather... here‘s ben rich. good afternoon. we may still be in the depths of february, but dare i say it, it‘s going to feel a bit like spring at times this week. and it looks like spring for this weather watcher in east sussex. further north and west we‘re not quite as springlike. that was out to the hebrides. a lot of cloud here earlier today. you can see from the satellite picture the way in which that cloud has been pushing in from the atlantic, particularly towards northwestern parts of the uk. but what we are developing
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as a south—westerly wind. quite a brisk wind at times, but as we had to the next few days that will drag ever milder air in ourdirection. some relatively high temperatures for the time of year over the next few days. with that, it will be mostly dry. not completely dry through the rest of today. we have got this weak frontal system bringing some outbreaks of rain across parts of northern wind down into north wales. for many other places it is dry, quite a lot of cloud around, some sunshine across parts of the northwest and temperatures between 12 and 1a degrees. as we go through this evening and tonight, this weak front moves a little bit further south and they starts to retreat northwards again, taking clouds and outbreaks of plenty rain across northern island in scotland. from the south, some clear breaks generally quite cloudy. temperatures notjumping too far. most places will be frost free and there could be the odd fog patches around to start tomorrow morning. as we do for tomorrow there will be a lot of cloud, particularly at first. some outbreaks of patchy
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rain drifting northwards across got a the day wears on. in the south we may well see the cloud starting to break up a little bit into the afternoon. some spells of sunshine and thus temperatures still pretty much across the board up into double digits. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, those weak frontal systems that have been bringing a bit of rain in northwestern areas will move away to the north and increasingly he picked up a southerly feed of wins, bringing some dryer air from the continent. watch the cloud, it melts away. more and more of us will see some sunshine. i think thursday is likely to be quite a sunny day, particularly in the south. further northwest we are likely to start off with more cloud, but even here it should brighten up. quite breezy especially across northwestern areas but very mild indeed. 11, 12, 13 degrees quite rightly. a few spots could get a degree higher than that and by the time we get into friday one or two places could get to 15 degrees. the weekend stays dry for many. but there will be a bit of rain at times in the west. this hello, you‘re watching
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afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at a. the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. commentator: what a save! that save against pele in 1970 — is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock, hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear her father sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. an extreme body artist from wolverhampton,
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who removed parts of an ear, tongue and nipple from his customers has admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent. coming up on afternoon live all the sport... a close look at some of the wonderful tributes to gordon banks. clearly a lovely one from the great pele. and in the cricket, england should win the final test match, they could win that with a day to spare. we can stay with optimism and get the weather forecast. good afternoon. temperatures climbing this week, well above where they should be, you might be tempted to head to the beach, at least for a walk. we will be talking about the uk weather and also about ghost apples. also coming up... we‘ll be in stoke, where tributes are being paid to the city‘s world cup—winning goalkeeper, gordon banks.
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this hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. gordon banks — one of the greatest goalkeepers of all time and a legend of english football — has died at the age of 81. he was part of the england team that won the world cup in 1966 — and his save from pele in 1970 is seen as among the finest ever. banks was named fifa goalkeeper of the year no fewer than 6 times. his former club, stoke city, said his family were "devastated to lose him" but could not have been more proud. our sports correspondent andy swiss looks back at his life. it remains a footballing miracle, 1970, england against brazil and that save. pele! what a save!
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gordon banks! the greatest ever from one of the greatest ever. four years earlier, gordon banks had been a cornerstone of england‘s world cup triumph and those who played alongside him today were united in tribute. sir bobby charlton said gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper and "i was proud to call him a team—mate." sir geoff hurst described him as one of the very greatest, a sentiment echoed throughout the game. he was my hero, obviously, growing up, and being able to train with him, the big thing i would say about him, in an era which is totally different to today, he had this great positional sense and that was his dedication. banks first made his name with leicester city. banks was safe in the leicester goal. it was not long before he attracted england‘s attention. his reliability was pivotal
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to their 1966 triumph. winning the world cup, he later said, changed his life. tremendous! when we came back, you wouldn‘t believe the people in the streets, just incredible. we felt so proud. although england fell short at the next world cup in 1970, banks was at his peak, most famously against brazil and what has been described as the save of the century. quite how he denied pele has dumbfounded everyone, not least the striker himself, pele. i alreadyjumped to say goal and then i did this! banks‘s brilliance helped stoke city to the league cup in 1972, the club‘s first major trophy, but later that year a car crash cost him
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his sight in one eye. amid emotional scenes, he was forced to retire from the game, although remarkably he made a brief comeback in the us. but his fame and popularity proved enduring. honoured for his achievements for stoke and england, in 2012 he carried the olympic torch at wembley stadium where, decades earlier, he‘d conjured such wizardry as a player. in a statement today, his family said, they could not have been more proud of him. for many, the greatest keeper english football has ever seen. gordon banks played 19a games for stoke city between 1967 and 1973, and was the club‘s president. stoke‘s current number one jack butland has been giving his thoughts of the england legend. he‘s been speaking to the bbc‘s sports editor, dan roan. over the last few years i‘ve got to know gordon really well, invited to
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his home to meet his family, to talk about everything from the world cup to defending corners and god knows what else, so this has extra... extra bit to it, knowing him fairly well, which is a honourfor me to have met him, first of all. he was a hero of yours? i was not around for 1966 and the pele save but he just had a way of making everyone feel brilliant, he had a way of rubbing off on people and bringing happiness. he always made me feel extremely happy and that is testa m e nt to extremely happy and that is testament to him as a person. if you ask anyone about gordon, they will tell you first and foremost what a great person he was. and just what a gentleman he was. he had a way of cheering people up and making people happy. he was able to win the world
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cup but also that save four years later, do you think that is the greatest ever save? yes, the man he was in the goalkeeper he was, from being our only world cup winning goalkeeper, everything that goes with it, and the fact it was an incredible save. i‘ve heard him play it through to me in his words, and from pele, as well, every equation of the save was special, so it has got to be up there as one of the best. personally for me is the best ever. that was jack butland. our news correspondent navjetjohal is outside stoke‘s stadium. several more tributes have been paid? the tributes by the statue of gordon banks has been growing throughout the course of the day. the statue was erected over ten yea rs
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the statue was erected over ten years ago and i doubt it has had as much attention and as many visitors and is —— as it has had today and you can understand why. gordon banks won the 1972 league cup with stoke city and later became the club president. i was speaking to fans earlier, they said gordon banks was almost embarrassed by the adulation he would receive. he was known of course for the 1966 world cup victory where he became the first english goalkeeper and only english goalkeeper to win a world cup winners medal and of course the remarkable save in the 1970 world cup in mexico where he managed to claw out the header from pele away from the goal. regarded probably as the greatest save in the history of the greatest save in the history of the game. the tributes are also remarkable. they have come from some of the greatest names. harry kane says he was very sad to hear the news, describing gordon banks as an
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england legend. bobby charlton said he was proud to call him a team—mate, and he said gordon will be deeply missed. the german national football team have posted a message saying that gordon banks was a fierce opponent and a good man. in terms of stoke, the club will be organising their own tribute to gordon banks at their next home game against aston villa, and i will leave the final word to pele, his one—time adversary, he has said, goalkeeping has changed a lot since gordon and i played but if he were playing today he would still be one of the very best. rest in peace, my friend, he said. thanks forjoining us. theresa may has told mps they need to hold their "nerve" over brexit — saying the on—going talks with the eu are at a ‘crucial stage‘. in a commons statement a short time ago, the prime minister said she still believes it‘s possible to find a deal that
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parliament can support. she is still trying to persuade the eu to make changes to the most controversial element of the withdrawal agreement — the backstop — to prevent a return to a hard irish border. our political correspondent ben wright reports. she has a deal mps don‘t want, the eu says it will not be renegotiated and we are just weeks away from brexit. but the prime minister appealed for patience in the commons this lunchtime. the talks are at a crucial stage and we now all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. by getting the changes we need to be back stop, by protecting and enhancing workers‘ rights and environmental protections, and by enhancing the role of parliament in the next phase of negotiations, i believe we can reach a deal that this house can support. there was nothing unexpected in the prime minister‘s summary and the labour leader accused her of deliberate delay. in truth, it appears that the prime minister has just one real tactic, to run down the clock hoping members of this house
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are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. and the eu side does not seem to be budging over the irish backstop — after talks with the brexit secretary in brussels last night, their chief negotiator said the deal was done. it is clear from our side that we are not going to reopen the withdrawal agreement. we will continue our discussion in the coming days. it is hard to see where this crisis is heading. parliament and the government remain deadlocked. mps will again have the chance to try to shape the prime minister‘s strategy in votes on thursday but there is still no clarity about when the government will try to get its brexit deals throught the commons again, and that is why many mps think no 10 is running down the clock. piling pressure on tory brexiteers as well as some labour mps to back an agreement, or let britain fallout of the eu without a deal at the of march. supporters of another referendum have not given up
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and sprayed their frustration withjeremy corbyn over a poster in his constituency this morning. some labour mps want their leader to get on board. if there is not to be a brexit deal that we know is going to damage our constituents, that is totally at odds with our internationalist values, if we know that is the alternative then surely we have to grasp with both hands the only way in which we can stop that happening to the country and stop our values being destroyed by brexit, and that is to put it back to the people. but there is no sign of a majority for another referendum here. instead, there is drift, division and uncertainty as the struggle over brexit goes to the wire. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminsterfor us. the chat is about whether this is kicking the can down the road and is this the strategy theresa may was
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a lwa ys this the strategy theresa may was always intending to pursue, to move things towards that exit date in the hope that mps look at the options and decide her deal is the best option. and that would be the only way to get that. to turn the huge defeat into a win. do you think this is part of a plan, defeat into a win. do you think this is part ofa plan, grant defeat into a win. do you think this is part of a plan, grant shapps? she clearly would have preferred to have a deal signed off, no doubt. the prime minister would like to have that done in december, and as the delay play into her hands? in some ways. when mps are faced with a no—deal brexit in which many mps are convinced will be a disaster and her deal, then her deal does seem even if it is only marginally, to those people more attractive, so she may end up finding that running down the clock is the best thing to do.“ you can‘t get the support of those
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in her own party, could she turn to labour mps? she's definitely trying to do that, we saw that in the letter to jeremy corbyn and also individual meetings with labour mps, but she knows the party very well, because we have both been 40 party chairman, the party could react badly to her winning this vote off the back of labour mps —— we have both been party chairman. it could have vast ramifications, like when tony blair got the vote through for the iraq war not with the support of his own side, but some of the opposition. a dangerous strategy for her. it could spark alarm bells. we wa nt her. it could spark alarm bells. we want to help the most vulnerable people in society and you do that by making sure everyone hasjobs, we have the most number of people in
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this country employed as a proportion of the country, unemployment is half the level of france, we have done this by having a labour market which we have made more flexible during the coalition government years. she is suggesting we will tighten that up and pass different labour laws and she can therefore appeal to 20 labour mps but then end up losing mps from her own side who say, no, we want to make sure unemployment remains low and we don't want to go down that route, so she has a tricky path to follow. do you think she would be willing to go down the no deal route? that is the thing everyone is also talking about. many people feel this would be detrimental to the country. i doubt she would be prepared to do that, and yet, every indication is that she has ruled out so indication is that she has ruled out so many of the things that for example, customs union free movement
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of people, that if parliament were trying to push her against her own red lines, that in the end she might say, ok, actually, we would be better without a deal, but the thing about a no—deal brexit, the more you prepare for it, the less frightening the prospect, and have we spent three years preparing for it, it could even be edging ahead of any other option —— and had. one little secret is that a lot of mps like me have been spending virtually every day inside delegated secondary legislation and i have never sat on more secondary legislation, and we passin more secondary legislation, and we pass in every case a piece of legislation for what happens if we have no deal and these are going on in theirdozens, their have no deal and these are going on in their dozens, their hundreds, so actually the country in terms of the legal level is a bit more prepared than most of the public realise.
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thanks forjoining us. everyone looking to thursday and wondering if they will be any attempts by mps to bring forward their moments and bring forward their moments and bring forward the brexit they want. at the moment it is not looking likely. i have news from france. jeremy hunt has been meeting his colleague, the foreign french minister. this is a statement, the state of talks on the uk‘s withdraw from the eu, france supports the planned withdrawal agreement that was agreed and it is now up to the british authorities to clarify their intentions. what they are trying to do, is to say it is up to the british government to say what it wa nts british government to say what it wants because although we have had that defeat, there are some in the eu who feel there is no workable
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solution so it is all very well saying we don‘t like the backstop and it needs to change, but they are saying very clearly they won‘t reopen the withdrawal agreement so most people feel the best theresa may can get is a kind of legal document alongside the withdrawal agreement and it is not entirely clear that that will be enough to get through this place. a feeling of deja vu. vicki young, thanks for joining us. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear her father sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. and coming up — an extreme body artist from wolverhampton, who removed parts of an ear, tongue and nipple from his customers, has admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent. and in sport, more
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tributes have been paid to gordon banks. the great pele says he was a goalkeeper with magic and a fine human being. england are closing in on victory in the final test in st lucia. chasing a85 for victory, the windies have slumped to 35 for a at lunch, jimmy anderson has taken three wickets. england prop mako vunipola will miss the rest of the six nations after suffering ankle ligament damage during the win over france on sunday. i'll i‘ll be back with more on those stories in the next 15 minutes. jurors in the trial of a teenager accused of killing a six—year—old schoolgirl have heard that her father sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. alesha macphail was found dead near her grandparents‘ house on the isle of bute last summer. the 16—year—old boy on trial who cannot be named for legal reasons denies raping and murdering her. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon was at the high court in glasgow and sent us this update.
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the court heard today from robert, alesha macphail‘s father. six—year—old alesha stayed with her father every second weekend and for a large part of each school holiday. alesha, he said, loved her holidays on the isle of bute. she was always doing something, going swimming, going to the park. her father went on to tell the court of the last time he saw his daughter alive. he said on the evening of sunday the 1st ofjuly, alesha got out of her bed, going into the living room. this, he said, was at 1030 or 11 o‘clock at night. he said he took her back to her room, settled her and left her watching a peppa pig dvd. he said his last words to her were that he would see her in the morning.
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the next thing he knew, he was being woken up by her grandparents seven or eight hours later who told him that alesha was missing. he said there was pandemonium when it emerged that the child was not in the flat. there was a frantic search for her, the father and his partner visited the park and other places trying to find his daughter. her grandmother put out an appeal on facebook asking locals on the island to join in the search but that morning, six—year—old alesha‘s body was found in woodland. the court heard robert sold cannabis to the 16—year—old who is accused of killing his daughter. but that had stopped by the time of the murder in july. the 16—year—old denies abducting, raping and murdering her. he cannot be named because of his
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age. the 16 year old blames someone else for the murder, and the trial at the high court here in glasgow continues. a refugee footballer at the centre of am extradition battle has landed back in australia, after two months in thai detention. hakeem al—araibi was jailed during his honeymoon in thailand — and threatened with extradition to his native bahrain. but an international campaign caused bahrain to drop its request — and the 25 year—old enjoyed a triumphant return to melbourne. it‘s just been announced that the uk will provide an emergency aid package, including £6.5 million of crisis funding, for venezuela — which has suffered economic collapse. the money will be used to treat malnourished children, provide vaccinations and supply clean water to the most vulnerable communities, the international development secretary penny mordaunt has announced. veneuzuela‘s dire economic state has seen many people unable to afford food or other basic necessities. millions have already fled to neighbouring countries. an extreme body artist
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from wolverhampton, who removed parts of an ear, tongue and nipple, from his customers has admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent. 50 year old brendan mccarthy, dubbed dr evil, ran a body modification emporium in wolverhampton. but even though his customers consented to the procedures, criminal charges were brought. he ll be sentenced next month. ben godfry‘s report contains images of extreme body modification. he calls himself dr evil, brendan mccarthy is a9 and from bush break a man who has grown a worldwide following for extreme body modification. his work is celebrated online. but he was knocked licensed to do procedures like tongue splitting and removal of nipples. to do procedures like tongue splitting and removal of nippleslj splitting and removal of nipples.” do not feel i‘ve done anything wrong. so this is crushing, it has
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crushed me completely, i‘m a who are used to be. mccarthy's customers as —— asked him to perform these procedures but the fact they consented under law is not part of the defence, so he pleaded guilty to grievous bodily harm. he explained in more detail about what was going to happen. nick asked dr evilto remove scar tissue around his nipple. he wanted to know why i wa nted nipple. he wanted to know why i wanted the procedure done, he wanted to make sure that i knew what i was doing, so he took a real duty of care. i‘m happy with what i have had done. the city of wolverhampton council said they had consulted a surgeon council said they had consulted a surgeon who said mccarthy‘s lack of qualifications but customers at risk of serious infection. the council received a complaint regarding the cosmetic practices that were being carried out and these practices are barbaric practices, tattoo parlours
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are registered but these practices which are becoming popular require proper legislation and we will be asking national government to progress that. they were giving consent. body art, formerly known as matthew whelan, is said to be the most tattooed man. he was a customer of mccarthy and gave consent to procedures, implants under his skin. has it bothered you that someone doing this to your skin might not have any medical qualifications to do it? no, because i personally do all the research on the modifications, i‘ve got a great doctor that i talk to. the practitioners refused to work on people, they have got ethics. body modification is becoming a subculture in the united states, and in the uk it‘s a growing practice as people seek out more extreme forms of body art. the councils cannot properly regulate until we know
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where we stand and what forms of body modification are actually lawful and once they do that the council can then establish a proper regime for regulation. it is the town to tabuk about how far should they go? —— it is the tower to to boot. this case could now redefine the industry. —— it is the tattoo to boo. a pregnant teenager and her husband are understood to be the burglary suspects who died after their car smashed into a coach as they were chased by police in london yesterday. newlyweds patrick and shawna were killed on a road near east acton, at around nine o‘clock, actually, it was sunday evening, sorry, and the couple were said to be expecting a baby girl in april. the unborn child is not believed to
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have survived the collision. many tributes have been paid to the couple on social media. a second man who was in the car was taken to hospital and has been arrested on suspicion of aggravated burglary. 20 minutes before the fatal collision police were called to reports of a burglary in harrow and what followed was a high—speed road chase and a police helicopter was also involved, and in the pursuit the car veered onto the wrong side of the a a0 and crashed into a coach. the independent office for police conduct have been informed. grim news just reaching us from scotland yard. horseracing across the uk will resume tomorrow after the outbreak of highly infectious equine flu which caused a complete shutdown of the sport. there‘ve been no meetings since last thursday,
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and tomorrow‘s races will only take place under strict controls. our sports correspondent richard conway reports. racing returns, and the sport can look to the cheltenham festival once more, which begins in exactly four weeks‘ time and there is increased confidence it will go ahead. authorities say the outbreak of equine flu had the potential to significantly disrupt racing, but after a six—day stoppage horses will be under starters orders once again from tomorrow. this, however, is being billed as a managed return with a number of measures in place to help contain equine flu and stop it spreading. individual trainers will be categorised by the level of risk their horses have been exposed to. no race entries will be accepted from horses that have not been vaccinated in the previous six months. and trainers will be required to provide a health declaration upon arrival at a racecourse. we believe that we‘ve controlled and contained the disease as best we can,
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based on the level of risk we have assessed through the data collection, and we have worked tirelessly, not only our staff at the bha, but also staff at the animal health trust, tirelessly over the last six days to get us back to this position where we can resume racing in the safest possible way we believe we can. thousands of tests taken from swabbed horses have taken place in recent days at this laboratory in newmarket. given the volume, not all of the testing has been concluded, but there is cautious optimism about the level of risk equine flu now poses. the suspension of racing divided opinion, but with millions lost in revenues, and jump racing‘s biggest fixtures on the horizon, there is relief that it can return and that a bigger crisis has potentially been averted. richard conway, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. remarkable photograph. these
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pictures came from the usa, from michigan, what does it look like? apple made of glass? a frozen apple. that is exactly that. so we can do the weather now. some people might not have been watching a couple of hours ago, simon. it seems a long time ago. explain how that has happened. so andrew in michigan, he says he has found these, and what we think has happened is that this has been as a result of freezing rain. it is water which falls out of the sky and it is very cold and it freezes solidly on impact and it gives a glaze like that on the
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surface. the glaze has formed over these apples and the apples start to rot below —5, and so the apple inside has rotted away, and apples have a freezing point of about —2, we have heard, which is a bit lower than water, so as the temperature comes up the apple is defrosted and the marsh has dropped out of the bottom —— the mush. this is exactly what we think has happened. they have more freezing rain to come in the united states, as well. on the southern flank of the weather system where the air is milder, that is where the air is milder, that is where the air is milder, that is where the risk of freezing rain is coming so we might have more ghost apples to come. great. what about us? it is warming up? you mentioned
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buckets and spades earlier. only because you were standing on the beach. i was. here is because you were standing on the beach. iwas. here is a harbour instead. not everywhere was so blue today in terms of the sky, this was how it looked for cumbria. not quite beach weather but mild weather over the next few days. you can see the cloud on the satellite picture, but with the winds coming in from the south—west, we will have ever milder air heading ourway south—west, we will have ever milder air heading our way so the temperatures will be a bit higher than they should be at this point. in the next few days it will be mild, mostly dry. we have a bit of drizzle around at the moment. patchy rainfor drizzle around at the moment. patchy rain for north wales and northern england, the weak frontal system sitting about here, and to the south we have cloud developing and in the north clearer skies. temperatures as
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we head into the first part of the evening, may be heading home from work a 10—11, that is pretty mild for this time of year. the band of patchy rain will be sinking slowly south, that starts to edge north again, taking patchy rain out of northern ireland and northern england and maybe across scotland. further south, a few breaks in the cloud. temperatures generally holding up between five and ten, most people will be frustrated tomorrow morning, dry but relatively cloudy weather to come, and rain through the first part of the day across scotland although most of that will go north through the morning. further south, spells of sunshine, and temperatures, 11—12, we should be somewhere between 6—9 really at this time of year. subtle changes into thursday, the frontal system to the north—west starting to retreat away and bringing the winds
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from the south, not only will we bring in milderair from the south, not only will we bring in milder air but also fairly dry airfrom the bring in milder air but also fairly dry air from the continent and it melts away. for thursday, dry air from the continent and it melts away. forthursday, many dry air from the continent and it melts away. for thursday, many of us will see a lot of sunshine, even where we start a bit cloudier, i‘m hoping it will break to reveal blue skies and sunshine. this chart even looks like spring, with temperatures like that you might even think about heading for the beach at least for a walk. 15 on friday, potentially. like devon and wales. into the weekend, dry weather but the chance of rain in the west. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. pele! what a save! that save against pele in 1970, is often described as the greatest piece of goal keeping in world cup history. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. the talks are at a crucial stage and we all need to hold our nerve to get the changes this house requires and deliver brexit on time. it appears the prime minister has just one real tactic. to run down the clock hoping members of this house are blackmailed into supporting a deeply flawed deal. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear herfather sold cannabis to the alleged murderer.
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an extreme body artist from wolverhampton, who removed parts of an ear, tongue and nipple, from his customers has admitted causing grievous bodily harm with intent. and — nearly two million complaints were made last year, about bins not being collected — but why is the problem particularly bad in leeds? we‘ll be finding out, in just a few minutes — in nationwide. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. there is only one story in town. tributes are still coming in for the legendary england goalkeeper gordon banks. some wonderful attributes. really taken aback by some of them. the current generation of england like harry kane and raheem sterling paying tributes on their social media channels. going back to his team—mates from that world cup winning side in 1966. sir bobby charlton, one of the first to pay tribute. "gordon was a fantastic goalkeeper, without doubt one of the best "england has ever had.
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"i was proud to call him a team—mate." england posted this... "an all—time great for england, moments from his remarkable "world cup—winning career will continue to linger "long in the memory." and this from the german fa, posting a picture of banks and their beaten players in 1966... that is a picture of banks with the beaten german players in 1966. that is from the german football federation. 1966 his finest hour but this save in the group stage against brazil at the 1970 tournament was perhaps the defining momnent of his career, keeping out that pele header and the brazilian great has paid his own very moving tribute, he described banks as a... "blue phantom in making that save in mexico, "i am glad he saved my header —
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because that act was the start "of a friendship between us that i will always treasure. "whenever we met, it was always like we had never been apart. "rest in peace, my friend. "yes, you were a goalkeeper with magic. "but you were also so much more. "you were a fine human being." there are so many more attributes that continue to come in for gordon banks, obviously his death was announced this morning during overnight at the age of 81. that really is what twitter does best, with those tributes coming through. great to see. let‘s move on. let‘s talk about cricket. england are on the up. they've lost in the series but they are going out on the app. in this series. it could all be over by the close of play. joe root was out for 122 when play resumed on day four, england then declared leaving the windies an improbable a85 for them to win cuejimmy anderson who took three wickets in the space of five overs.
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he can thank moeen alli for taking a terrific catch to get rid of openerjohn campbell. anderson also dismissed the other opener craig brathwaite and then darren bravo, joe root taking that catch. mark wood took five wickets in the first innings, he chipped in with a wicket before lunch, shai hope, the fourth man down. the windies 35—a at lunch. still need another a50 rounds, that is not going to happen. six wickets required for england. they have got a line of one base to follow and also in the t20 series two in the caribbean. england prop mako vunipola has been ruled out of the rest of the six nations with an ankle injury. vunipola suffered ankle ligament damage during the aa—8 win over france on sunday. he is expected to be out for ten
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weeks exeter‘s ben moon and leicester‘s ellis genge are in the frame to replace him. there‘s a boost for wales though with full—back leigh halfpenny returning to full training tomorrow ahead of the england clash. he hasn‘t played since suffering concussion against australia in november. the champions league first knockout stage begins tonight with a mouth—watering game between manchester united and paris st—germain. the first leg is at old trafford. ole gunnar solskjaer belives his side can handle the occasion given their excellent form — ten wins from 11 matches — since he took over. we have given us the best possible opportunity from the way we have gone into this game now, because we‘re confident. i‘ve found out what team we have. we‘re looking like a team, we‘re agreeing on how we should approach games. so, if there was ever a chance or any time to go into big games like this, it is now, for us.
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we are looking forward to this. it is both the supporters and the players that have been looking forward to. they are special. the trial has been made for the world group to the playoffs. they have to kaza khsta n group to the playoffs. they have to kazakhstan in april. at home as well. they have gone every chance of making it into the world group for the first time in 20 odd years. great britain against kazakhstan in april. that is on the sport for now. ——that‘s all the sport for now. kat downes will have more for you in the next hour. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. first we have harry gration in leeds talking about a story we‘ve been covering today
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regarding bin collection. and mary rhodes is in birmingham paying tribute to the footballer gordon banks. but first lets go to harry in leeds. 1.8 million complaints about bins in the uk, what makes leeds particularly bad? it's it‘s an interesting one because those complaints have gone up by one third in the past four or five yea rs. third in the past four or five years. why is this? well, the local government association would say that winter. and it is much easier to complain. but there‘s also reality check here. because 17% less money is actually spent on bin collection or has been since 2010. that equates to over £100 million. in leeds for example there is one area in the hyde park area which is essentially a student area. there is a suggestion from some people living there, because they are students than they are less likely to complain. that apparently has not
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been the case. it can be an area where you prioritise which areas you decide to collect rubbish from bins. you‘ve been writing their scripts on the back of an envelope, literally, which is great. this is something that gets people really wound up everywhere. particularly where you are and some of you are looking in on the programme tonight?“ are and some of you are looking in on the programme tonight? it is indeed. i suppose that the answer goes down to austerity. one of the points that you get is that every single counsel in the country will be pleading poverty in some shape or form at the moment. and of course the government is now turning around and saying well, we are going to get councils an extra billion pounds to try and help with certain situations. the reality may be that rubbish collection might not be one of the priorities. that is why people get so angry. because one of the basic things you get when you pay your council tax, you expect your bins to be collected and indeed
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every one week or two weeks. in whatever shape or form that materialises in. so i think it is a issue which gets people very hot under the collar to say the least. before i leave you. gordon thanks will pay tribute today. have you met him? i met him in about 2004 2005 in chatfield. i left that he gave so much time to the young children. the young children probably didn‘t even know who he less. they were obviously told by dad and granddad to go and get his autograph. hejust spent so much time with them and all of them came back and were so impressed by him. and ijust love the wonderful way the tributes have been on your news bulletins throughout the afternoon. the favourite points for me was when he made that sent did you notice the way that bobby moore number six just went tapped him on the head, it was just a remarkable jester to a truly fantastic goalkeeper. a beat. thank
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you very much. we will stay with that theme. mary, across stoke synonymous with gordon banks and many tributes there today. there has been an enormous outpouring of love for him. gordon thanks was so popular and highly respected and regarded as one of the greatest if not the greatest ever goalkeeper. he was part of the england world cup winning team in 1966. but for many in this part of the world he will also be remembered for his time at stoke city from 1960 72 when he retired in 73, his career cut short bya car retired in 73, his career cut short by a car accident. he helped stop killing the meek cup in 1972. he returned to a heroes welcome from wimbley after they beat chelsea. when they unveiled a statute to him outside the stoke city stadium in 2008, mcafee left the guest of honour. you will have seen that great state that gordy made against pele in the 1970 world cup. the statue at the stoke city stadium, well, that has been the focus of tributes for many stoke city fans
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today. come to lay flowers and share memories of seeing him as a player are see him walking around, he was a very approachable and friendly man in the countries where he make his home even though he was born in sheffield. this is what some of the fa ns sheffield. this is what some of the fans had to say today. it was brilliant. he was a nice man not just a goalkeeper. really kind, genuine, friendly. getting a hell of a lot for charity. he should be a star gordon banks. he will be in our hearts and stoke—on—trent always, sir gordon. there is one where it that people use to describe gordon banks, is gentlemen. absolutely. like harry i was fortunate enough to meet and interview him a number of times in my for guys as a bbc sports correspondent and joining the team here at midlands today. he was a lwa ys here at midlands today. he was always very humble, always very kind. he did not make a fortune from football because it was before the big money base in the game, but he
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did raise thousands for charities. you had one of the. saying that a little earlier. he raised money for charity here in the midlands and beyond. hejoined charity here in the midlands and beyond. he joined france charity here in the midlands and beyond. hejoined france on a walking group around trenton gardens and stoke most weeks where he spoke to us here at midlands todayjust a couple of years ago. i find myself very fortunate that, you know, the life that i had playing professional foot ball life that i had playing professional football and playing for england and winning the world cup. ijust felt really proud of that. we will have full tributes to gordon banks on that list today at 6:30pm including from his former stoke city team—mate terry comley. terry was one of the friends who walked around trenton gardens each week on a tuesday morning. they did it again this morning, family without gordon. thank you much. it was good to talk to you. harry, had he gone off on monitor there? no, i don't, unfortunately. i think you know which photograph i am about to shell because he treated earlier. what on
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earth are you thinking? i'm not thinking very much other than you are stalking me at the moment, simon, and i'm slightly concerned about that. what tends to happen on this programme is i get asked to do strange things. this was one this morning that is called a bungee exercise class. you need to dress appropriately. he might argue that i was not dressed appropriately. but i can assure you that i was because you need a bit of strength in the nether regions for this particular thing. and itjust hurls you all over the place. you can do things like superman and things like that. so thank you for showing that. i'm glad that my career ends on your programme. that's both of us. i can‘t think of anywhere where that sort of clothing is ever appropriate. but i will watch tonight. we may talk about it another time. you have to and stitches as well. she still is. i'm going to have to watch that. nothing that cannot be sorted with a bit of counselling. thank you both very
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much. that is nationwide tonight. it's a pleasure. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them on the bbc iplayer. the nhs has admitted that wrong metal plates may have been inserted into patients who have broken bones. it‘s thought 5,500 patients could be affected. the regulator nhs improvement has set out an urgent alert asking all hospitals across england to review the x—rays of patients who have been treated with metal plates for the fracture of long bones. our health reporter, john owen has been following the story. a total of seven cases have been found, after one patient fell after a surgery and required further surgery when the mistake was discovered. so these plates that medics refer to as a ‘fraction fixation plates‘ come in several different varieties. but the different kinds have
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different properties, including different rigidities and different strengths. some patients treated at one trust have a more flexible plate inserted into them that was meant for reconstruction surgery instead of a more rigid plate that is meant for fractures. so the wrong type of plate, one that wasn‘t sufficiently rigid for those patients who had experienced fractures. how has that happened? the confusion is partly being blamed on recent changes in the design of some of those reconstruction plates. they used to be more visually distinct from the other kinds of plates, but they‘ve had a recent design change which means they now simply look more alike which has resulted in confusion. over the course of the sterilizing and selection process, there is room for the confusion in simplyjust selecting the wrong implement for the type of surgery that a surgeon is undergoing. this sounds pretty grim. if you are one of the 5500 people affected, what is the advice? the regulator of nhs improvement has sent out an urgent alert asking all hospitals
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in england to review the x—rays of patients who have been treated with metal plates for fractures of long bones such as arms and legs, so principally affecting those with fractures in larger bones in the body. the advice is that hospitals will get in touch with anyone who is affected. as you say, that is thought to be as many as 5500 people going back to february 2018. but we are being told that the risk of harm is very low. as a result patients should not be too alarmed. that is our health reporter. rebecca is here with all the business news in just rebecca is here with all the business news injust a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the 1966 england world cup winning goalkeeper, gordon banks, has died at the age of 81. theresa may updates the commons on brexit — and denies claims that she‘s running down the clock. jurors in the trial of a teenager, accused of killing six—year—old alesha macphail, hear herfather sold cannabis to the alleged murderer. here‘s your business
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headlines on afternoon live. the struggling department store chain debenhams has been given a cash injection of £a0m. it will buy it extra time while it tries to strike a longer—term deal with lenders. the firm is in such bad shape it made three profit warnings last year. the bank of england governor has urged mps to solve the brexit impasse in a speech warning of growing threats to the global economy. mark carney said that failure to agree a brexit deal would create an economic shock for the uk. it would also send the wrong message at a time when protectionism was on the rise globally. the car giant nissan said profits for the last three months of last year fell 76%. it said a large part of that was to account for previous salaries and other charges that hadn‘t been taken off in previous years. these are the first results since the arrest of former chief executive carlos ghosn over an accounting scandal. strong words — even stronger perhaps
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than we‘re used to — from mark carney bank of england guvnor. they do feel slightly stronger and more direct in town even though he has not done the issue in previous speeches. let‘s hear what our markets guest has to say about this. monique wong is senior portfolio manager at coutts. how did mark carney‘s made his pronouncements on brexit go down today? good afternoon. the first thing i have to say is that mark carney has essentially had two m essa g es of carney has essentially had two messages of fate. one that breaks it clouds the forecast horizon for the uk. i believe he has called it the brexit fog, and secondly if the you keightley syrup without a deal that it will cost economic disruption. i don‘t think these messages are so surprising for the markets nor is it surprising for the markets nor is it surprising for the business community. in fact,
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surprising for the business community. infact, last surprising for the business community. in fact, last week and the inflation report that the bank of england revised down the growth forecast. yesterday in the gdp report we saw not only that growth slowed until the end of the year, but we also notably saw that brexit has meant that business investment has meant that business investment has declined for four consecutive courses. given that we have six weeks away from the end of march, i think mr carney was bringing home his message clearly and loudly. he's been selling it sometime in the markets and have been hearing it for some time and there was very little reaction from the ftse100 index although a lot of the companies in that index make most of their money overseas. debenhams today, news of a £ao overseas. debenhams today, news of a £a0 million lifeline. what is your ta ke £a0 million lifeline. what is your take on that and the share price reaction to it? as you said debenhams has had a £a0 million cash lifeline from its lenders which will give it time and space to do their restructuring. a stock price reacted
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quite well to it. hejumped a0% today. bear in mind that the stock price is coming from a very low base, it is that for pins right now. does it take away the challenges that debenhams have had with regards toa that debenhams have had with regards to a disruption changing and our shopping habits to online rents, business rates and more recently we have seen the economic numbers showing that consumers are not shopping nearly as much. what sort ofan shopping nearly as much. what sort of an investor will want to invest in debenhams? the shares are almost flat on their knees, aren‘t they? if ita flat on their knees, aren‘t they? if it a brave investor. mike ashley who seems to be the saviour of the high—speed recently. seems to be the saviour of the high-speed recently. well, ok, apart from him you have got to wonder who else is having a point on debenhams. we‘ll also take a look at the travel firm which owns what used to called thompson holidays more from them today. they missed a bit on their profit. it is a tough
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message for the investors because backin message for the investors because back in december the company announced that had a record for year results for 2018 and then a month later what happened is we had a really hot british centre down summer, lower bookings on holidays and those that we saw had lower price. we had less update mistake on the outcome for 2019 and now that has been borne out in the results we saw today. i think that the market has overreacted saw today. i think that the market has overrea cted to saw today. i think that the market has overreacted to what is essentially very conservative guidance from the moment sentiment is very negative. thank you very much. we will see if there any rebounds in the shares tomorrow and the rest of the week. indeed. in the meantime markets. flatfoot c. pound dollar 128 and pound year old just short of 1a0. flatfoot c. thank you very much. see
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you tomorrow. that‘s all the business news. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with huw edwards. time for a look at the weather... here‘s ben. dare i say it will feel a bit like spring. temperatures will be mostly dry. there is a bit of rain around at the moment, a weak frontal system pushing its way across northern england vanity northwest. fairly blustery across the northwest of the uk as well but temperatures this afternoon between 11—1a. into this evening and overnight this area of cloud and pa nty evening and overnight this area of cloud and panty rain which has been moving southwards will start to move northwards again. some wet weather moving across parts of scotland, northern ireland and weather in england. generally cloudy and temperatures pulling well above freezing. there could be a few fog patches around as well. tomorrow some panty rain across the north at the uk first thing. that should tend to clear. looking at a lot of dry but cloudy weather, something brighter into the south later on.
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those temperatures in double digits. on thursday and friday some of us could get close to 15 degrees. a lot of dry with her around and some spells of sunshine. that is all for me for now. today at 5: tributes to one of the greats of english football, gordon banks, who‘s died at the age of 81. he helped england to world cup victory in 1966, and is perhaps best known for this wonder save from the great pele. commentator: what a save! some of the biggest names in football have been paying tribute to the legendary goalkeeper. he was capable of making saves look easy by good positional play. that‘s one thing that i always thought was his strength. and we‘ll have reaction from players and fans around the world. we will be talking to the former england goalkeeper ray clemence, so
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stay with us. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... theresa may updates the commons on brexit,
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