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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 17, 2019 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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ok, this is our stop. check this out! this museum includes a remake of the tokyo street where ramen was first popularised. ramen is an essentialjapanese food, with a vast array of broth and toppings to choose from. 0k... stop! one hour and 31 minutes. we're one minute over, but this definitely looks worth the wait. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and rachel burden. our headlines today... president trump has threatened to release hundreds of is fighters — if britain and other nations refuse to put them on trial. come together now in the national interest — theresa may writes to all 317 tory mps urging them to put aside their personal
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differences over brexit. hundreds of passengers are left with worthless plane tickets after flybmi cancels all of its flights and files for administration. almost 400 jobs are at risk. winning by a country mile... laura muir smashes a 31—year—old british record to win the women's indoor mile in birmingham. it's go go go for brea kfast‘s mike bushell as he goes toe to toe with britain's fastest sprinters. we'll see how he gets on. the mild weather continues, some rain in western areas but do not lose hope. sunshine and the details right here. president trump has said britain and other european allies should "take back" more than 800 islamic state fighters captured in syria and put them on trial. mr trump said the us would be forced to release the alleged jihadists unless they were taken into custody.
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peter bowes reports. in a series of tweets, president trump said the caliphate was ready to fall and that american forces were pulling back after a 100% victory. but he warned that the united states will be forced to release islamic state fighters and that he didn't want to watch as they permeated europe. he said britain, france, germany and other european allies should take back over 800 is fighters and put them on trial. it is time, the president said, for others to step up and do the job that they are so capable of doing. captured is fighters are currently being held by us—backed kurdish—led forces. responding to the case of shamima begum, the british teenager who went to join is but now wants to go home, the uk government had said it will evaluate each case individually. peter bowes, bbc news. stranded passengers are trying
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to find alternative travel arrangements, after the airline, flybmi, collapsed. the company has announced that it is filing for administration, leaving 376 employees at risk of redundancy. in a statement, the company blamed rising fuel and carbon costs, as well as uncertainty caused by brexit. the east midlands based airline operated i7 planes flying to 25 european cities. theresa may has written to all conservative mps urging them to put aside "personal preferences" and support a brexit deal in the commons. the prime minister was defeated in a symbolic vote last week. we're joined by our political correspondent pete saull. have you seen this letter? yeah, the prime minister hasn't really changed her approach or message really but clearly she felt she needed to do something to keep the peace within the conservative party. in recent days we have seen some conservatives, including ministers, actually, seemingly at their wits end with pro brexit party with any
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party, you could call it, of the european research group, who caused that government defeat on thursday by abstaining. in the letter, theresa may urges colleagues to look beyond what divides them and deliver on the brexit people voted for. she isn't going to change tactics either. despite losing the vote, she plans to go to brussels, hold talks with the ec president, junkojunker, and also hold talks with every leader of the remaining 27 eu leaders. still no sign that the european union is in any mood to reopen the withdrawal agreement, with 40 reopen the withdrawal agreement, with a0 days to go now until we leave. counting down... thank you. videos and photographs promoting animal cruelty and illegal blood sports are being shared on social media, according to a bbc countryfile investigation. footage of hare coursing and cockfighting was discovered on social media platforms. in response, facebook and youtube have taken down some of the content,
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but some material is still accessible. two thirds of fathers of premature babies are being forced to return to work while their child is in intensive care, and are not being given enough time off, according to new research. a survey of mothers and fathers by the charity bliss found serious concerns over paternity and maternity arrangements. the government says it's reviewing the available help. nine gold miners have been pulled alive from flooded mines in zimbabwe but officials fear dozens more are still trapped. the men were rescued after becoming trapped on tuesday when heavy rains flooded mine shafts. more than 20 bodies have been recovered so far. the government has declared it a national disaster. millions of workers could see their take—home pay fall from april when the amount they have to put into their pension pot increases. a bbc analysis of earnings suggests higher contribution rates for those in auto—enrolment pensions will hit pay packets, despite an imminent tax cut. rob young reports. from april, many employees will have
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to pay a bigger proportion of their pay into their auto enrolment pension pot. according to an analysis of earnings carried out by the bbc, the annual take—home pay of someone earning the bbc, the annual take—home pay of someone earning £15,000 a year will be £a9 lower, someone on £30,000 will take home £253 less. in a few weeks, many workers currently contributing 3% of their pay will have to put a 5% in. contributing 3% of their pay will have to put a 596 in. this is a significant increase relative to what they have been paying to date and this will affect up to 10 million people auto enrolled in the
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last few years. the potential impact of this change is substantial. the hit to net pay could be bigger, the tax cut for most earners due in april will soften the blow. some of the industry one of the hit to pay could lead people to opt out of saving for a pension. speaking on a recent visit to this factory, the minister in charge said she hoped that would not happen. we need to encourage people to save more and employers to take more of a role. i think that's exactly what we are seeing and we are going to increase it is likely this year. the government has regarded auto enrolment as a huge success and will monitor what happens in a few weeks' time. some of the industry say worker contributions may have to rise further if they want a decent retirement income. rob young, bbc news. we were talking earlier about how guinea pigs are apparently good for easing anxiety. you've been sending us pictures of the pets that have helped you through tough times.
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mark says "a dog was recommended to help with my son 5 anxiety and in the end we got two!" sally says "my horse is my counsellor, therapist and forever friend" peter says "meet ted — my wife brought him into our lives as little puppy and sadly died from cancer nine months later." thank you so much to everyone who sent those in. lovely to see those. it is eight minutes past eight. you have been hearing young frey, he was with us this morning. with dad, james. good morning to you! we have josie anderson here as well, senior policy officer of bliss. we are talking about premature babies this morning and the paternity care that is not afforded to them. 100,000 babies are born prematurely and in
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need of care every year. now a charity's found that two thirds of fathers are being forced to return to work while their child is in intensive care and are not being given enough time off. can you tell us the story of frey? he was born in december, 2016, ten weeks premature. he weighed £3 and eight, so healthy for his size and gestation but there is no explanation as to why he came early, probably a chance occurrence. he has no outstanding health issues, so we're really fortunate. he was in hospital for a 34 days. he spent 20 daysin hospital for a 34 days. he spent 20 days in the neonatal unit and an extra 20 days in transitional care. what did you do during that time? in terms of work, paternity leave?
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because it happened so quickly, the labour, it was literally a couple of hours. we didn't really have much to think about, so over the following days after he was born...” think about, so over the following days after he was born... i think a mummy may need to take frey... he seems happy and is enjoying it... my decision was to take time off after he was born and hope he would be well enough to come round within a reasonable amount of time. the two weeks of paternity leave after he was discharged from hospital, he had a feeding tube through his nose, so... a feeding tube through his nose, so... josie, what is bliss campaigning for, when you hear situations like this? so what bliss would ideally like to see if that one extra paid week for neonatal care, for both parents. this story
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is not unique, we hearfrom parents all the time and the stress of being ina all the time and the stress of being in a neonatal unit and the amount of leave it eats up is a great challenge and our findings that have come out today show that 66% of fathers go back to work. there is the question of how employers can afford this. how can you justify that? i would say that it is already very costly for employers, 36% of fathers responding to our survey had to ta ke fathers responding to our survey had to take sick leave and none of that can be reclaimed from the government whereas a statutory paternity pay can be. most employers can reclaim 9296 can be. most employers can reclaim 92% or even 103% for some. if an extension is made following this model, then we would expect it to work the same as statutory paid out at the moment. and also, that prolonged period of parental leave
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is easierfor employers prolonged period of parental leave is easier for employers to manage, prolonged period of parental leave is easierfor employers to manage, a defined amount of time, when a sick leave can be intermittent and much harder to deal with. i had a 31 week baby and had to spend many weeks in hospital afterwards and if support mechanisms are in place, you are likely to get a more effective member of staff who comes back and commits long term. it's notjust about the fathers, it's about the mothers too and returning to work after what can be a pretty physically and mentally traumatic period. fully agree with that. how has it been adjusting to life? first we have the whole issue of adjusting to life in hospital. when you go through a pregnancy... here he is, absolutely tiny, this is not what most people expect when they give birth. yeah, you have to adjust to
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the full hospital place, an alien environment, nothing i had heard of, once you come to terms with that and just, you then have to go home and again, it's something totally different that you're not really prepared for so you do need the extra time to find your feet and get settled and make sure everyone is happy. you have done an amazing job. frey has gone off with his mother now, he wanted to run around. but it must seem like a distant memory now that you have a two—year—old on your hands? it does but we were looking la st hands? it does but we were looking last night at the old pictures and it brings it flooding back and it never leaves you , it brings it flooding back and it never leaves you, the sheer scale of what you went through and how close you are to a possibly bad outcome and it is frightening. chains, thank you for talking to us, josie thank you. and there's more on this story at 11 o clock this morning on five live investigates. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather.
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thank you. good morning, a lovely start in the east, this shot from the east coast of england and the best of the sunshine is in the east. some rain in the west but the sunshine will return. cloud at the moment, this extends from portugal through to the west of scotland, across northern ireland. heavier bursts of rain. working north resigned eastwards into wales and cornwall. it will start to weaken and fragments, the main ring chance is this morning. sunshine returns to northern ireland to the morning and into the afternoon. showers moving northwards. can see this thin strip of cloud, the channel islands through two parts of the midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia, once the
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fog has cleared, it will cloud over. some light showers. western parts, a lovely sunny afternoon for them, leaving much of the mainland dry by the afternoon. temperatures in double figures. 0utbreaks the afternoon. temperatures in double figures. outbreaks of rain across lewis and harris and parts of shetland. gale force winds for scotland. showers for northern ireland, later into parts of north—west england and western wales. england should be dry but we will see remnants of that weather front. temperatures are frost—free. the weather front will invigorate across the south—east on monday. showers developing in the west, but a lot of dry and bright weather. showers most frequent in scotland
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and northern ireland, a gusty day, with gusts reaching gale—force across the far cooler on monday, leading to a cooler tuesday night. some showers in the west, cloud increasing, hazy sunshine and rain later. temperatures 10—12 celsius. iam i am pleased about all of that. thank you very much. it is 8:16am. more on our main story now. president trump has called on britain and other european allies to "take back" more than 800 islamic state fighters, who've been captured in syria, so they can be prosecuted. he warned that, otherwise, the militants would have to be released — and could return home by themselves. let's speak to counter—terrorism consultant douglas weeks who's in our london newsroom. this figure of 800 fighters, what is
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he referring to? i'm not entirely sure, this is something that a p pa re ntly sure, this is something that apparently came out in a tweet last night. i don't know if this is based on numbers from the various refugee camps that a lot of these people are in at the moment or if he is referring to, for instance, the widely reported 850 that left britain to ultimately go to syria to fight. we are not entirely sure at this point where the numbers are coming from. that figure seems plucked out of the air a little bit. do we have any idea of the number of british writers who went out to join iis who are still out there somewhere? —— mike british fighters. it was reported in the uk that many
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went to syria to fight but so many have been killed that the number remaining is a big question, other reports suggest as many as a00 who have already come back. so i think realistically the number of foreign fighters existing interior is rather few. he is suggesting about captivity and this is a topic at the moment, with the story of shamima begum and how the authorities ought to deal with her, what is uk government policy on people returning to this country who have been with is? there is a directive to say you are not allowed to make people homeless but that said, the
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policy of the uk government is for the most part to not allow these people to return. however, if they are british citizens and have nowhere else to go, i think legally they will likely have the prerogative of coming back. that creates a number of issues for the british governments in terms of how they will be dealt with, whether they will be dealt with, whether they will be dealt with, whether they will try to prosecute them or put them into de—radicalisation or mentoring programmes or whether they will assess that they are simply not a threat and that is the challenge they face. a lot of the talk around shamima begum is around her being possibly prosecuted but these prosecutions are very small? currently the number is somewhere around a0 cases where there have
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been prosecutions out of the 850 or the a00 that may have returned, so quite honestly, a lot of it, in terms of the decision, comes down to what the british authorities are able to find primarily from their social media accounts. people put to various things up they are outwardly supporting is or show they are doing training or calling for attacks in the uk and that is what is actually driving a lot of the decision to prosecute or not. thank you for your time. it shows you the challenges faced by the british authorities in dealing with these individuals. a 20 am is the time. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. music producer steve levine is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to steve in a minute.
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first, let's look at the front pages. the times leads with the story that the uk's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, is leaving the country to save billions in tax. the observer has it's own investigation which it says reveals how the home office hires out staff to hunt migrants. the duchess of sussex has said she is surprised and supporting a campaign to de—colonise the curriculum and confront the lack of diversity in universities. the observer has it's own investigation which it says reveals how the home office hires out staff to hunt migrants. a picture of the tomb of karl marx in highgate having been desecrated by anti—communists. the sunday express says the eu is planning to send food aid to britain in the event of a no—deal brexit. it also features a story about how the government plans to outlaw monthly bin collections. there is a picture ofjennifer
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aniston and courteney cox, who were ina near aniston and courteney cox, who were in a near miss in some kind of private jet journey, in a near miss in some kind of private jetjourney, from in a near miss in some kind of private jet journey, from upper they are safe. and the sunday telegraph says 800 jihadis are ready to unleash isil on the west — this is a warning from the us to britain and it's allies to take back their jihadists captured in syria to prevent a surge in terror attacks. let's talk to steve, sticking with the telegraph. you picked this story. this is interesting. we were talking about a country file investigation that the rspca is part of showing animal fighting and hare coursing and that being shared on social media. they are starting a campaign to change the law to try to hold all of the platform is responsible for the immediate they show because hare coursing is outrageous and should not be shown. we need a law change to make them
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responsible because they are always using excuses as to why they cannot ta ke using excuses as to why they cannot take things down. this relates to videos which you have described and all sorts of illegal contents, film and music, recently, the european government looked at new laws and article 13, 1a and 15, to allow creators to have much more of a return for their investments because these companies have spent tens of millions of pounds lobbying against it because they prefer the status quo, they are making so much money. the more videos you upload, the more bandwidth you need, the more money you make, but these even most horrific videos have adverts. the children's commissioner has also been talking to social media companies but the resistance is immense. money is driving at. it is great they are starting this campaigning we really should support this. in the sunday telegraph, part
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of the fun of the oscars is looking out for those tiny awards, the person who gets to stand beside all those hollywood stars and get their moment of glory and there was some plan to limit awards shown on tv, they were going to show those during they were going to show those during the ad breaks but that has been cancelled. i have just the ad breaks but that has been cancelled. i havejust had my make—up done, how would a film be without make—up? this is about people winning oscars and the second when they tried to cut was editing, how many film directors acknowledge the importance of editing? even the other week at the baftas, the editing is so... the main accolade they give at the end, editing is so incredibly powerful. i think what has happened is they have all protested. there was a petition. exactly protested. there was a petition. exa ctly a nd protested. there was a petition. exactly and eventually they said they would change their mind. the
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power of the oscar award makes a difference to your career. we have the brits next week, an artist winning a brit, it will make an enormous difference to their career, the longevity, and the whole industry. if somebody is going to getan industry. if somebody is going to get an oscar, the very least they can do is televise it so everyone will know. to write! i think there will know. to write! i think there will be more coverage of those four than when they were going to be missed off. what is this one about? so, how often do you get a piece of equipment, and it goes wrong, often for a simple thing? this started in america, where retired citizens put together an afternoon club and often the skills you learned a number of yea rs the skills you learned a number of years ago are actually skills required. when i was at school i learned to do basic electronics. during the 1980s, whilst i am
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computer literate, i couldn't probably repair one of those boards because they were made with lasers and really tiny, however, a lot of the technology, the things that go wrong with it, are not the computer parts but the power supply or the plug. these are basic elements. so you don't throw the equipment away, go to one of these places and for a couple of pounds, someone can help you. a brilliant idea. we have covered this. i don't know if it is this particular one in colchester, but we did visit a repair cafe. and there is a great community, because very often it is retired people, with community spirits, having tea and coffee... you could try to buy a new machine. the element i bought a toy cassette machine and i knew what was wrong with it because when things are old, the belts inside fatigue, and i repair that. when you
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solder something and make it work, it is so satisfying. you could go to any supermarket and buy... this is fantastic. essentially, this young chap, if you have a passion, i have a passion for people making records, this chap with down syndrome has a passion and we mentioned in one of the first piece is about looking through the eyes of a different culture, creating different music. here, his lens, the way he photographs, you notice they are all closely cropped. that beautiful one of the swans and that fantastic one of the swans and that fantastic one of the swans and that fantastic one of the vulture. he is cropping the picture is different perhaps to how another photographer would do. his pa rents a re another photographer would do. his parents are saying, he has downs and ididn't parents are saying, he has downs and i didn't appreciate how many babies we re i didn't appreciate how many babies were born with down syndrome, literally to every day. but this is
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incredible because his passion is giving him a career. but the way he looks at the wildlife he takes pictures of is really different. and i think that is amazing. it is about making sure people have a chance. i think that is amazing. it is about making sure people have a chancel think what the article is saying is that not only does he have a passion for photography but he takes pictures in a way that perhaps a different photographer might not. i have worked with autistic children and some of the things they have are extended to an incredible level. i had a student with a particular autism and he could hear pitch and tuning of literally anything. i said, we must get him involved with softwa re said, we must get him involved with software because in the studio we use certain types of tuning software to fix vocals and he could fix it in a minute. so nice to see you today, thank you so much for coming in. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. a lot of talk about the economy this week as brexit approaches. i am joined the economy this week as brexit approaches. iamjoined by the economy this week as brexit approaches. i am joined by the british boss of airbus, catherine bennett and the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell and i will be talking about social media and what the government is going to do about damaging images online, with the new culture secretary, jeremy wright, i have the actor, brendan coyle, you will know from downton abbey and david suchet, so it busy era to 10am, as usual. i'd like to thank you, andrew. the headlights coming up. —— you, andrew. the headlights coming up. -- headlines. hello, this is breakfast with
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rachel burden and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main news. president trump has said britain and other european allies should "take back" more than 800 so—called islamic state fighters captured in syria and put them on trial. in a tweet mr trump told the uk, france and germany that the us would be forced to release the alleged jihadists unless they were taken into custody. he warned the is fighters could "permeate europe." stranded passengers are trying to find alternative travel arrangements, after the airline flybmi collapsed. the company has announced that it is filing for administration, leaving 376 employees at risk of redundancy. in a statement, the company blamed rising fuel and carbon costs, as well as uncertainty caused by brexit. the east midlands—based airline operated 17 planes flying
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to 25 european cities. theresa may has written to all conservative mps urging them to put aside "personal preferences" and support a brexit deal in the commons. the prime minister was defeated in a symbolic vote last week. her letter calls on members to unite, for the sake of the nation. she also confirms talks will take place next week with the european commission president. videos and photographs promoting animal cruelty and illegal blood sports are being shared on social media, according to a bbc countryfile investigation. footage of hare coursing and cockfighting was discovered on social media platforms. in response, facebook and youtube have taken down some of the content, but some material is still accessible. two thirds of fathers of premature babies are being forced to return to work while their child is in intensive care, and are not being given enough time off, according to new research. a survey of mothers and fathers by the charity bliss found serious concerns over paternity and maternity arrangements. the government says it's
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reviewing the available help, nine miners working for an illegal company have been pulled alive from flooded mines in zimbabwe, but officials fear dozens more are still trapped. the men were rescued after becoming trapped on tuesday when heavy rains flooded mine shafts. more than 20 bodies have been recovered so far. the government has declared it a national disaster. millions of workers could see their take—home pay fall from april when the amount they have to put into their pensions pot increases. a bbc analysis of earnings suggests higher contribution rates for those in auto—enrolement pensions will hit pay packets, despite an imminent tax cut. the government says it will closely monitor what happens. and here is a story about smith's for a sunday morning. you'll love this, don't you? and today's good news story is that a new world record has been set in germany for the most human smurfs
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gathered in one place. in total 2,762 people dressed up in blue and white costumes as the gnome—like characters, who were created in the 19505 by a belgian cartoonist. the record comes three years after the town's first attempt failed to beat the record, which was previously held by welsh students who managed to unite just over 2,500 smurfs in swansea back in 2009. the next time we read about this we will probably be reading about the swa nsea will probably be reading about the swansea group trying to beat this great. maybe we should take part and post numbers. you are to talk to be smart. —— a smurf. laura muir is in the form of her life at the moment and it is exciting with the european athletics championship coming up. she has been so impressive in the past and broken so many records, we
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have seen her do it time and time again. this time it was smashing the record by five seconds which when you talk in terms of a mile this is a huge amount so getting very excited looking ahead to the european championships. such a phenomenon. also the fa cup continues. we are in the fifth round. newport county's fa cup dream came to an end as they were beaten a—1 by premier league champions manchester city. newport managed to hold them off until the 51st minute though, when leroy sane gave city the lead. then phil foden doubled their advantage with this effort. padraig amond managed to pull one back in the last few minutes, but city hadn't quite finished. anotherfrom foden — the goal of the game — before riyad mahrez made it four. we start thinking what could have been but they are exceptional. they are exceptional. i can't speak highly enough of them. the class they have shown since they have been here. pep guardiola, all the players.
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you know, i think that is such a classy manager and football club. brighton are also in the last eight after beating derby county 2—1. anthony knockaert scored their opener with this excellent finish. they were two up by the break when yves bissouma's shot was followed up byjurgen locadia. former england defender ashley cole pulled one back. it was the 38—year—old's first fa cup goal. it's a year when of course a lot of the premier league teams are out of the competition and probably the likes of ourselves and others that are still in there, you know, had that opportunity to progress one step further and i think ultimately it's generally a premier league top six team that wins it but it opens the door little bit more this season.
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this goal from murray wallace was enough for millwall to beat fellow south london club wimbledon 1—0 and secure a spot in the last eight. it means the 200a finalists are now one win away from a semifinal spot at wembley. rangers have missed out on the chance to narrow the gap on rivals celtic at the top of the scottish premiership. steven gerrard's team had to settle for a goalless draw at home to stjohnstone and are now five points behind in second. that means celtic could go eight points clear at the top with a win at kilmarnock today. third—placed aberdeen were also held at home by bottom side st mirren. there were wins for hibs and dundee. other major clubs are being encouraged to follow the example of non—league side altrincham, who donned a rainbow—coloured kit yesterday in support of football's fight against homophobia. the national league north side's usual red and white stripes were replaced with the colours of the lgbt pride flag for their one—all draw against bradford park avenue. they're now auctioning them off for charity as well.
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we are just trying to raise awareness for homophobia in football. hopefully we can cause a ripple effect where people take note of what we are doing and it has been a success today. hopefully a bit like the kick it out campaign, it can have a positive outcome. away from football, and britain's laura muir set a new national record over the mile at the birmingham indoor athletics. she won in a time of a.18.75, taking five seconds off kirsty wade's mark, which had stood since 1988. the time was also the fastest in the world this year and the third quickest in history. it proves she's in great form ahead of next month 5 european indoor championships in glasgow, where she'll defend both her 1500 and 3000 metre titles. i knew i was in great shape
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and for me it was about winning the race but i wanted to run fast and to get an opportunity to try and go for another record. i couldn't miss it. i get so chuffed to be able to do it. i bet she is chuffed. in rugby union's premiership, saracens are top after a convincing bonus—point win over leicester tigers. they scored four tries on their way to a 33—10 win, which keeps their hopes of winning an unprecedented treble still alive. saracens and exeter are now level at the top on points after 13 games of the season — sarries having the better points difference. neil robertson will face stuart bingham in the welsh open final this afternoon. bingham broughtjoe o'connor‘s dramatic run in the competition to an end. the world number 103 had beaten ding junhui and john higgins on route to the semifinal, but it was a step too far as he fell to a 6—2 defeat. the final begins at 1pm this
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afternoon and you can watch via the bbc sport website and the red button. looking forward to that this afternoon. it is a shame forjoe o'connor, he had an incredible run compared to some of those finalists, down to the last four. he has a huge career ahead of him. he is a name that people will remember. we will seejoe o'connor again. that people will remember. we will see joe o'connor again. did that people will remember. we will seejoe o'connor again. did you used to call the rag and bone man the rag and bone man? now, just you. someone else said they used to do it as well. did you know the use to collect bones? i knew very let about him,i collect bones? i knew very let about him, i thought the musician was coming on. laughter why are we talking about it? it is a sight and sound that we don't see
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very often on our streets. the rag and bone man with his horse and cart calling out for your unwanted items. george norris from hull was well known in his home town for decades, collecting all the stuff that people didn't need. now photos from the family album have been put together for a new exhibition. here's his story. rag and bone! any rag and bone! i am george. the exhibition is george senior. josh, 22. basic read the story of my dad, 78 years on the planet with his horses and passion. my dad has been doing it since he was 15. our grand dad used to sell horses to the free trade and to the dockers back in the
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50s. so what is the best thing you have ever got when you have been at: ? have ever got when you have been at:? all sorts. have ever got when you have been at: ? all sorts. these guys were the first recyclers. when i was 17, i had been out of school, i tried other things, my dad brought me a horse and cart. i enjoyed it. it was a lot of freedom. i have a few cousins still work it but without these guys recycling there would be a lot more fly—tipping turnabout everywhere. it might be worth about 15 quid. it is hardly worth collecting at all now. my dad is making sure they are all all right, cleaned out and there are no problems. vet bills over the years. everybody in the city knows my dad
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andi everybody in the city knows my dad and i think once he goes it will be the end of the generation of horse traders like that and that happens, it will be a sad day. it is a lovely story. the exhibition is at hull's street life museum. until april. brea kfast‘s mike bushell has faced some daunting challenges in his time — and yesterday he faced perhaps his biggest yet. a 60 metre sprint against some of the fastest men in the country at the indoor grand prix in birmingham. not racing, taking part! ithink not racing, taking part! i think it puts it into perspective. these were allup to 23 puts it into perspective. these were all up to 23 is as well and mike doesn't quite fit into that category. he's been putting in the hard miles at his high—altitude tenerife training camp — so let's see if it did him any good. on your marks! with the crowd in their seats, the atmosphere building, down in the basement i was getting my name and
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number, a place on the wall alongside the sport's elite. then i found space on the wallop track going through my stretching routines, —— warm up. so important, the risk of injury while exploding out of the blocks was very much on my mind. if i am not properly warmed out i will pull something and don't even get to 30 metres, hence the rather strange routines. sore thumb with all these young athletes ready to go. me in my 50s. alongside me also getting into the zone, olympic and european greats from around the world and some of britain's biggest stars. what is your top tip for getting into the song to seem so relaxed. i just getting into the song to seem so relaxed. ijust enjoy it. i love competing and being in this environment so it is just fun for me andi environment so it is just fun for me and i am not really nervous, just excited. i also managed to break the ice those who have been trying to leave me behind. the us territory? psyche you out? just focus on the
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finish line, try and zone out. it has to be an instinctive response. it should almost make you jump. the gun will make mejump he says, never liked loud bangs. soon it was time. inside the atmosphere and noise could be even more intense than the athletics bit. my name and age were called out. the truck suddenly looked much longer than 60 metres. slowest to react to the gun, the roar of the crowd gave me the energy of the masses. the biggest cheerfor mike bushell as he crosses the line. congratulations, you won i didn't even see you , congratulations, you won i didn't
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even see you, i congratulations, you won i didn't even see you, i was congratulations, you won i didn't even see you, i was 2.5 seconds behind. congratulations. what is it about this event? it is over so quickly. i prefer the 62 via 100. it is more exciting to watch because it is more exciting to watch because it is over in a flash. all about the start. i was a bit slow out of the blocks, the contact me by surprise. it takes getting used to it. good luck for the season. surprising, over such a short distance, how hot and sweaty and out of breath, time to go and warm down as they say. what a feeling and what an honour. we can all get involved with the sport even if we are always going to come last. and i have never been happier coming last in a race. mike bushell, from bbc news in birmingham. he did so well and he is recovering. you are brave and brilliant. well done and you have still got your vest on. you love
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that, don't you? i haven't taken it off. a quick shower and came straight back on. i have been out in the garden practising my stance because i got the start of wrong so lam now because i got the start of wrong so i am now obsessed with this printing starts so it is all about that. i was listening for the gun and having been told in that one up it would be really loud it will make me jump, i was listening so intently i was too conscious of it that when it went off i thought is that it? it is time to go. so that cost me and then i looked up straightaway to see where the others were. i have been trying to fix that in the garden this morning. that is what i love about it, the whole experience, it has shown me it is not about coming last ina race shown me it is not about coming last in a race and going against the others, it is your own personal challenge we can all be in our garden in the garden or lounge to see if we can get to 10 metres, a viewer sent me a picture, video of the little sun doing the start and bring across the lounge. hopefully it might inspire some others. i have
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been trying to improve the start because it can make all the difference when it comes to 60 metres as we saw. to be fair, it might not be evident to people watching the race, you were quick genuinely, were you pleased with your9.27, genuinely, were you pleased with your 9.27, because you should be? for one day, richard who won the world title in 2014, he said if you put the work in and train and take it seriously you could do it under 10 seconds and he thought i would be 2.5 seconds behind the winner at the end. he was almost spot on. i was 2.59. however when i watched the cove rage 2.59. however when i watched the coverage back, my technique was understandably ta ken apart coverage back, my technique was understandably taken apart by the pundits, listen to this. column, let'sjust examine pundits, listen to this. column, let's just examine the technique pundits, listen to this. column, let'sjust examine the technique of
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mike bushell there. you get destroyed out of the blocks. this is when all the real sprinters show their real class. out of the blocks, those first 10 or 15 metres, and look at the margin there. these guys are all under 20 look at the margin there. these guys are allunder20 in look at the margin there. these guys are all under 20 in that sense, it gives everybody at home watching a little bit of an insight much work and effort and how quick these athletes are motoring. mike himself is trying to stay relaxed because the whole field continually moves away from him, but he really struggles and look at the tension in his face. has been rewarded with a nine point to will of course be his personal best. that will stand for a while. i personal best. that will stand for a while. lam not personal best. that will stand for a while. i am not sure personal best. that will stand for a while. lam not sure he personal best. that will stand for a while. i am not sure he will ever do this again but that is not bad. while. i am not sure he will ever do this again but that is not badl love the bbc sport coverage, i don't know if you saw before the race, personal bests, it had for me pb full english, a bit cheeky but
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funny. my personal best was in training in manchester on thursday, 9.1. iwas training in manchester on thursday, 9.1. i was pleased with 9.27, at i think that buying at the beginning and the crowd and i looked up too soon and it cost me to split second. that is what the sport is all about and that is why i find it fascinating. it is an art and science and you realise what all these athletes go through just to get to the start line and for those 60 metres, that short burst, those 60 metres, that short burst, those 60 seconds for most of them, and all of that training and hard work, the warm—ups and that is far longer than the actual race. mike, you must stop beating yourself up about your start. you know how many people you have inspired just by doing it? it is what you do. you are an everyday quy is what you do. you are an everyday guy who has a go. we all are in all of you and you deserve a rest this sunday morning. even though it is your day off. off you go. sunday morning. even though it is your day off. off you gol sunday morning. even though it is your day off. off you go. i am going to go to the park. i am getting a
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few strange looks from the neighbours. i will explain to them what i have been doing and then up the park to try and practice to start again. the great thing about sprinting is it is not like i did the marathon and my toenails are falling off, i can walk down the stairs, after sprinting i feel fresh and ready to go again. see if you wa ke and ready to go again. see if you wake upa and ready to go again. see if you wake up a bit lighter on, shall we? take care and seagate. wake up a bit lighter on, shall we? take care and seagatel wake up a bit lighter on, shall we? take care and seagate. i expect mike's neighbours are used to seeing strange things going on in his garden. i think it is going to warm up, matt knows everything. breezy today. a cracking start for some sunday. this is a view across the thames in central london. all of you will see some point through the day. there will be some rain around particularly in the west this morning. the satellite imagery, this
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cloud stretching all the way from the atlantic through portugal towards us. a weather front producing some outbreaks of rain. heavy burst at the moment to parts of northern ireland and west of scotla nd of northern ireland and west of scotland and edging in across this far south—west of wales and can also step that holds and pushes north and east. it will fragment a bit. some will miss it as it works through wales into western angle. writing up in northern ireland. showers spreading across scotland. not much in the north and east but that means the afternoon, western areas will be much sunnier. breezy and the breeze will pick up across eastern areas of the light winds and a bit of fog. milder in the sunshine. around 15. a lot more cloud through the channel islands. central,, lot more cloud through the channel islands. central, , southern lot more cloud through the channel islands. central,, southern and eastern england to the east midlands as well. that is what is left of the and by that afternoon. a bit of cloud. the best since i know this money. sunshine will come out. some printers into double figures widely. and across into orkney outbreaks of
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rain will spread into shetland through the evening. the united states quite breezy wherever you are. the strongest winds in the west of scotla nd are. the strongest winds in the west of scotland with frequent showers. gale force. showers in northern ireland and later into wales and western parts of england. further south and east many will stay dry but the remnants of the weather front lingering across the south—east corner and channel islands and that will still be there tomorrow. it might reinvigorate during the day to produce more cloud and rain. a few showers in western england and wales dripping is. lots of dry and sunny weather in between. for northern ireland and western scotland. frequent showers. strong and gusty winds. gale force across the four north of scotland in the afternoon. east of scotland staying dry. temperatures in the mid teens for some only around nine or 10 on monday. still above the time of year average. a chilly start to tuesday. a few showers in the west to begin with but lots of sunshine for many.
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clouding over from the west. start to see at pics of rain develop. similar temperatures to monday. 10-12. the similar temperatures to monday. 10—12. the rain heads north through tuesday night and then we draw in those southerly winds. much milder air heading back. while this week but by the end of the week we could see temperatures into the high teens. enjoy the rest of your sunday. thank you. you enjoy yours. it was the worst nuclear accident in history. the chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded in 1986 in soviet ukraine, but the cause, and who was to blame, is still being debated. since then, an area of more than 4,000 square kilometres has been abandoned. our science correspondent victoria gill spent a week there with scientists who are studying the radiation—contaminated environment, and met one of the very small number of people who still live within the exclusion zone. after the 1986 explosion at the chernobyl nuclear power plant, more than 4,000 square kilometres spanning ukraine
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and belarus was evacuated. where people moved out of towns and villages, wildlife moved in. but not every village was left for nature to reclaim. we are deep in the chernobyl exclusion zone, and some people still live here. victoria. nice to meet you. today is maria's 78th birthday, and she has made us breakfast. oh, wow. thank you. up until the day of the accident, this had been the only home she knew. her family simply walked back across the then—patchily—enforced boundary. they refused to abandon the place.
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maria and her neighbours make up a remote community ofjust15, a tiny village reclaimed after the disaster. unbelievable story.
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we can now speak to mike wood, who's an ecologist at the university of salford. good to have been with us. you were on that trip. what did you come away feeling from that trip?l on that trip. what did you come away feeling from that trip? i have been to the exclusion zone many times but this was the first time i had met one of these settlors properly and had the opportunity to share a birthday breakfast with them. it was an amazing experience because i view chernobyl through the eyes of an ecologist, scientists studying the wildlife there but actually you really get an opportunity to talk to somebody whose life has been so directly impacted by it and learning about how they live in that kind of system, how they have to workjust to survive day to day is quite humbling. we have known for a while that what happens is you take humans out of the picture and ecosystems
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and wildlife thrives as it has in this area, astonishing, is there any evidence there has been a long term health impact on species there because of the radiation that happened? conflicting reports on this. a lot of the scientific evidence suggests that overall wildlife is thriving in this area, there are certainly evidence of some genetic damage and things that appear in some of the species that have been attacked but this is at a relatively low level in comparison —— have been looked at. in chernobyl we see although there was a nuclear accident that caused a large degree of contamination in this area, when you take humans out of the equation subtly to wildlife is able to return. did you get a sense of why people are still there because i think that is why, what many people will be asking. if you have had
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generations of your family living in a particular location you have a really strong pull to that location, it is very hard to separate yourself from it. when i speak to people who have lived in pripyat, the men town there, and also the villages and have moved away, you can see how me ntally have moved away, you can see how mentally challenging it has been for them. many of them, talk to them and there are tears running down their cheeks. that is a genuine response. it is not like they are playing it up it is not like they are playing it up for the it is not like they are playing it up forthe camera, it is not like they are playing it up for the camera, people are really emotionally impacted by this. but they are getting more visitors there now i think, people who are curious about chernobyl and delaware that there is a small community stops i am there has been an amazing transition over the last five years and it is about working there. transition over the last five years and it is about working therel transition over the last five years and it is about working there. i was the only person, myself and my colleague nick, ready to get to work on the zone and now there are tourist buses all over the place, a
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tourist buses all over the place, a tourist kiosk selling chernobyl souvenirs, it has changed unbelievably over a very short space of time. thank you very much for letting us know about it. thank you for your time. you can see victoria gill's full report from the chernobyl exclusion zone on bbc iplayer now or tonight at 9.30pm on the bbc news channel. this is the time we say goodbye to those of you who are watching on the news channel. we are saying on bbc until 10 past nine. this is bbc news. the headlines at 9am. president trump has threatened to release hundreds of is fighters —
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if britain and other nations refuse to put them on trial president trump demands that europe takes back more than eight hundred islamic state fighters captured in syria to put them on trial. hundreds of passengers are left with worthless plane tickets after flybmi cancels all of its flights and files for administration. almost 400 jobs are at risk. a bbc investigation exposes films and photographs promoting animal cruelty and illegal blood—sports on social media websites. some content has been taken down, but why not all? theresa may writes to all 317 tory mps urging them to put aside their personal differences over brexit — and come together in the national interest. workers on auto—enrolment pensions will have to contribute 5% of their salary in april. the increase means take—home pay may fall for millions of people.

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