Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at 9  BBC News  February 18, 2019 9:00am-10:00am GMT

9:00 am
you're watching bbc news at 9 with me, carrie the headlines this morning: mps investigating ‘fake news‘ on social media call for stricter regulation and tougher action against facebook to end the spread of disinformation. and it's not a question of us going to california and asking them to behave in a nicer way. it's saying, "as a country, we can set our laws, we can require them to act against this content." and if they fail to act, they have basically failed in their duty of care. a group of labour mps look set to announce their resignations from the party overjeremy corbyn‘s handling of brexit and the anti—semitism row. peak and off—peak rail fares could disappear under sweeping changes being proposed for the uk's train ticketing system. the south african runner caster semenya launches a legal challenge over plans to limit testosterone levels in female athletes. # nine to five, for service and devotion # you would think that i would deserve a fair promotion # wanna move ahead but the boss won't seem to let me
9:01 am
# i swear sometimes that man is out to get me. # and we hear from country and music legend dolly parton about her hit film 9 to 5 into a musical, and the chances of another film with jane fonda. lily, jane are going to be doing that sequel that we've talked about for years. i used to joke and say, "we better get after it, or we'll have to call it 95" — because we're getting there! good morning, and welcome to the bbc news at 9. facebook "intentionally and knowingly" violated data privacy laws, and needs much stricter regulation — that's according to a damning report by mps this morning.
9:02 am
the commons culture committee said the firm's founder mark zuckerberg failed to show "leadership and personal responsibility" over the rise of so—called fake news. the report is calling for a compulsory code of ethics for social media companies — which will be overseen by an independent regulator. an overhaul of current electoral laws in the uk, and rules on overseas involvement in british elections. and the removal of known sources of harmful content — which was brought to light by the death of 14—year—old molly russell, who killed herself after viewing images of self—harm and suicide. facebook said it welcomed the digital‘s committee's report, and would open to any form of "meaningful regulation". our media editor amol rajan reports. it's totally fake news. just fake. the term fake news has entered the mainstream in recent years. in america, there has been grave concern that the election of donald trump may have owed something to the interference by russia in the presidential election. an investigation by former fbi director robert mueller is looking into the allegations. the nearest thing to that in britain
9:03 am
is the culture select committee's report on fake news and disinformation. its findings, published this morning, are scathing about technology companies and the legal and regulatory framework in which they operate. the committee says facebook intentionally violated both data privacy laws and anti—competition laws. it says a new code of conduct, overseen by an independent regulator, should be set up. rather than carrying on and on and repeating the same mistakes we should have a proper regulatory system that imposes standards on the tech companies and can impose if they fail to meet those standards. this exists in system broadcasting and is common in other industries and is common in other industries and we need it in the tech industry as well. facebook say they have taken extensive steps to weed out illegal or harmful content on its platform, including fake news. but coming so soon after the outcry over molly russell, the 14—year—old who committed suicide after seeing
9:04 am
pictures of self—harm on facebook—owned instagram, it shows that technology companies and those who legislate against them are entering a new era. amol rajan, bbc news. let's talk a little more about this now to social media consultant, matt navarra, whojoins me from cardiff. good morning, matt. what do you think of this report from the culture committee? good morning. i think it is long overdue, we have seen it coming for some time, and i think it is one of the dominoes of regularly statements coming from companies. we have seen this in the us, we know companies in europe are already making steps towards regulation, so in some way it is no surprise, the statements made. i think it is interesting, the idea, and there are a lot of good ideas in there, but it actually comes down to there, but it actually comes down to the detail of how to achieve it and how to solve this. obviously sometimes with these things it is about getting the key priorities in place. what do you think are the priorities from this report? the
9:05 am
things they most need to do?” priorities from this report? the things they most need to do? i think the important part is having the right regulatory body. at the moment there is not an overseeing powerful regulatory arm in the government that knows the details, and how to treat these companies. i think that is one of the first things. and then having the power to act. at the moment the regulatory bodies we have had very limited scope to find or report the action. that would be the first thing to stop secondly, more technical experts who understand the industry, rather than relying on government figures and civil serva nts government figures and civil servants who may not. i think that is the main thing that needs to start moving across the board. are those things mutually incompatible? those people who understand the industry, will they end up being sick from the industry and therefore kind of poacher turned gamekeeper is? well, -- end up being kind of poacher turned gamekeeper is? well, —— end up being squandered
9:06 am
from the industry. —— seconded. this can be quite fast, but also technical experts, it is not an easy job. my personal preference would be to see how these companies can help support government initiatives. and more work with the companies they are trying to regulate but also people who can help the system and guide the legislation because as soon as guide the legislation because as soon as you guide the legislation because as soon as you start creating regulatory legislation and powers that are very narrow and specific, the change in the industry goes so fast they become quickly outdated so i think it needs to be a much more broad and overarching regulation to start with. and using those experts, asi start with. and using those experts, as i say, to feed into the process. obviously the noises coming from facebook have been quite positive to the report, they are sounding cooperative and open to regulation. do you think that is cosmetic or for
9:07 am
real? i hold myjudgment. ithink it is the only thing they can say, in fairness. i think they knew this was coming and had probably planned for some time how to respond to it and prepare themselves, and i think they don't seem to be saying anything else to show —— my if they were saying anything else to show they we re saying anything else to show they were resisting it it would look bad well they need to say the will commit. these ideas have been put forward , commit. these ideas have been put forward, fitting their meaningful criteria. i think at the end of the day they will do all they can to make this better for them. day they will do all they can to make this betterfor them. we day they will do all they can to make this better for them. we see huge numbers of people in washington lobbying for facebook and i think we will see that by the end of the year. matt navarra, thanks for joining us. and for help and advice on what is fake news, website at www. bbc.co.uk/
9:08 am
beyondfakenews. the bbc has learned that a small number of labour mps are expected to announce their departure from the party this morning. there's been concern about jeremy corbyn's stance on brexit and anti—semitism and it's thought that several of his backbenchers believe its better to pursue a future outside the party. we can speak to our political correspondent chris mason. this has been a rumour mill grinding around for weeks. will it happen? yes, we don't know quite from who or how many mps, numerically, but a group of labourmps how many mps, numerically, but a group of labour mps setting out what we expect to be an announcement where they will no longer be labour mps. we don't expect them today to be setting up some shiny new party with an emblem, slogan and all of that stuff, but they are
9:09 am
solidifying, as you say, that centre anguish, that has been articulated for some time from a small but for syphilis number of labour mps who don't share idea logicallyjeremy corbyn's vision for the labour party —— fora corbyn's vision for the labour party —— for a small number of labour mps. they have been deeply disheartened by what they see as mr corbyn plus my failure to grapple with this problem of anti—semitism. as i say, a solidifying of these rumours and this discontent with the expectation that a few, four, five, half a dozen, maybe, labour mps would resign the whip, to use the westminster language, and sit as independents. we are already seeing the action from the within the labour party, real fury, the action from the within the labour party, realfury, that the action from the within the labour party, real fury, that this kind of thing to chip away at the potential in for there might be unelectable at the next general election. the fear no doubt being articulated from within the labour party after a ny
9:10 am
articulated from within the labour party after any announcement this morning is that these kind of brea kaways make it morning is that these kind of breakaways make it easierfor the conservatives to win general elections, because those on the left will be definitively split. you say fury but who are they furious with? are they furious with the leader for failing to glue these people on, effectively? or furious with the split —— splitters? effectively? or furious with the split -- splitters? summer furious with the leader for leading the party to a situation where some to leave, and some are furious at those who in the next hour might do something significant and resign the whip. i suppose those desperate to limit desperate to see a labour government furious with any contributory factors that might undermine the potential for that kind of thing and what is likely to be the obvious sort of criticism for those, if it goes ahead and they do it, breakaway in the next hour or so, will be that they are creating a division within their own party when the governing party, the
9:11 am
conservatives, are plenty divided themselves, and a general election at some stage is not entirely impossible and neither is it impossible and neither is it impossible labour could win that, but it would be harder, so would go the argument, if there were factions within the party who are at outside of it suggesting it isn't fit to govern. in the midst of all this, is anyone pausing for thought to remember paul flynn, who of course died yesterday? yeah, people are, and from across the house of commons. he was the labour mp for newport west, had been in parliament since 1987 after a 30 year career in the steel industry. a hugely popular and big character, very independent minded. a prolific writer and author and tweeter and blogger, proud to be and tweeter and blogger, proud to be a backbencher for the vast majority of his career. a well developed sense of humour. had a brief stint on the front bench for labour when
9:12 am
there were loads of resignations in there were loads of resignations in the immediate aftermath of the eu referendum, and he tweeted that it was a nod to a desire for diversity in this era, because it was the promotion of an octogenarian. he had suffered from arthritis for years and years and that left him bedbound for his last few months. he said a few months ago he would resign at an opportune moment. and it was difficult for him to continue the practical work of being an mp but, yes, reflections from the labour leadership, jeremy corbyn, marking his passing, from the welsh secretary on the conservative side as well. it is one of those moments when a figure who has been here for so when a figure who has been here for so long dies that it does tend, in the reflections on a career, bring parties albeit briefly together. well, nice to know they have a human element as well to them. i will let you go, butjust remind us exactly when we are expecting this announcement on these splits?” think within the next hour we can
9:13 am
expect to hear something pretty significant. there will be a news conference, getting together of a collection of these labour mps, and asi collection of these labour mps, and as i say we don't know who they are or definitively how many they are, but i suspect we will be looking for names like chuck ramona, the former shadow cabinet minister, and chris leslie, also a former backbencher —— frontbencher —— like chuck una —— if neither of them either there will be questions about why they have not decided to turn up —— chuka umunna. don't expect many there but a really significant moment, and in this gathering period on brexit there has been frankly a lot of knowledge and not a lot of light. today will be a genuine new story. brexit is part of the consequence of what is about to happen, but only part of it, and it isa happen, but only part of it, and it is a big significant moment for the
9:14 am
labour party. fight back talk to you later. thanks, chris. —— labour party. fight back talk to you later. thanks, chris. -- talk to you later. thanks, chris. -- talk to you later. thanks, chris. -- talk to you later. thanks, chris. train companies have proposed major changes to ticketing on britain's railways. the rail delivery group says the current system is outdated and overcomplicated. it wants to see more flexible fares and a roll—out of electronic systems, like london's oyster card, across the country. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. tap—in, tap—out travel has been the norm in london for years. now, rail companies say there should be a similar style system for passengers across the country. swipe, and you would automatically be charged the cheapest fare for your journey. and if you travel the same route often, your weekly rate would be automatically capped. it's a far cry from the system we have today, which train companies say is overcomplicated and full of anomalies. for example, a single can sometimes be almost as expensive as a return.
9:15 am
the industry wants more flexible fares for long—distance journeys, to avoid people rushing for the first off—peak service after the rush hour. passenger groups say change is needed, but worry there will be winners and losers. the issues go beyond the railways. this is about ticketing across rail, bus, tram, metro, and other forms of transport. we have got a ticketing system and a fare system that doesn't work for seamless door—to—door journeys. it doesn't work for people day in, day out, travelling to work, going to education or going to the shops. we need a simpler system that works across all forms of public transport. the train companies say the average price of a ticket wouldn't change under today's proposals. they consulted nearly 20,000 passengers. but real change to the way we buy tickets could take years. and, ultimately, it will be down to the government. tom burridge, bbc news. i'm nowjoined by the regional director of the rail delivery group, robert nisbet. robert nisbet, thanks forjoining us. robert nisbet, thanks forjoining us. is there a trust deficit here? do people trust you on this issue?
9:16 am
we acknowledge there is a trust issue. we started this process before the main timetable problem so this is something we have been working on for some time, but we acknowledge the fact we have to work ha rd to acknowledge the fact we have to work hard to regain the trust of their customers and this is one of the ways we believe we could do it, by building afair ways we believe we could do it, by building a fair system that actually better reflects how people live their lives now as opposed to 25 yea rs their lives now as opposed to 25 years ago when these regulations we re years ago when these regulations were put in place. but we need to work with government to achieve that, as tom was saying in that report. obviously the government has its review, so why notjust leave it to them because at least they are not the person dipping into the traveller's pocket? this is the industry's first major contribution to that rail review that is carrying on at the moment. there has been a lot of discussion about putting the customer at the heart of a new reformed railway, but we think you need to look at the fare system as well as the other elements, including investment, rolling stock,
9:17 am
etc, and this is in effect looking at it and saying you need to strip back the fare system and rebuild it using that single leg as the basic building block, because if you do that you can make the national fare system talk to the local fare system, linking into the london pay—as—you—go tap in, tap out systems around the country as well, and that we think would be a real benefit for passengers. but passenger groups support these as well, including transport focus, the independent watchdog, which is important for us as an industry. what do they see as the priority? you have to split up the group of customers. looking at commuters, at the moment it is so inflexible and not all of us work the 9—5, monday — friday anymore, well then i think you are paying forjourneys you are not actually taking, so you have to look at that, but for long distance as well, you can get seriously
9:18 am
overcrowded trains in the shoulder peaked after the rush hour, so we can think about smoothing out fares across the day. we are looking at various areas of travel but we need real world trials and that is why we need to work with the government now. if they say yes, we are ready to go and we could have a national roll—out in place, finished, between 3-5 roll—out in place, finished, between 3—5 years. that is obviously a fast piece of work but we believe it is so piece of work but we believe it is so important and crucial that it needs to start now. obviously a lot of passengers will be sitting watching and thinking, at the end of the day what i would like to hear him say, my fare is going to go down. we are saying that under this modelling for the majority of people that would be the case. for example, off—peak walk up fares, we say 80% off—peak walk up fares, we say 80% of trains could be offering cheaper fa res. of trains could be offering cheaper fares. some commuters could see reductions because they are only paying for the journeys they take, so paying for the journeys they take, so there are real advantages here we
9:19 am
wa nt to so there are real advantages here we want to grasp. but it is really now up want to grasp. but it is really now up to government, with us working with government to deliver that, and with government to deliver that, and with that rail review happening at the moment we believe the time is right to be able to change the system so it is much easier for people to use, to understand, and so they can use new technology is built to travel around the country and really bring the rail industry into the 21st—century because at the moment we have ticket types that we re moment we have ticket types that were preserved in aspect a quarter ofa were preserved in aspect a quarter of a century ago thatjust do not reflect the way we live our lives now. obviously some people will be thinking, oh, he said the majority will get a cheaper fare. thinking, oh, he said the majority will get a cheaperfare. who thinking, oh, he said the majority will get a cheaper fare. who are the minority who will not come and am i1 of them? element we are being quite open about this. most people will pay less but some may paye open about this. most people will pay less but some may pay a little more and we are looking specifically at the shoulder peak —— we have been quite open about this. we are looking at, you know, you get those scenes of people running down the platform with their suitcases trying
9:20 am
to get a seat because suddenly the train has become so much cheaper, and we are talking about flattening out those fares across the day so you fill up the seats more, and the public consultation with 20,000 people tom was talking about, it showed the majority of people, the vast majority of people, think there should be dynamic pricing to fill up those seats to make a smoother journey for everybody. robert nisbet, thanks for joining journey for everybody. robert nisbet, thanks forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news... mps investigating ‘fake news‘ on social media call for stricter regulation and tougher action against facebook to end the spread of disinformation. a group of labour mps look set to announce their resignations from the party overjeremy corbyn's handling of brexit and the anti—semitism row. peak and off—peak rail fares could disappear under sweeping changes being proposed for the uk's train ticketing system. as we were just hearing. in sport olympic champion caster
9:21 am
semenya has arrived in court in switzerland to challenge plans to limit testosterone levels in female athletes. they want athletes with a higher than normal level of male hormones to take medication before competing. there were no shocks in the fa cup yesterday. wolves, swa nsea the fa cup yesterday. wolves, swansea and crystal palace all made it through. the final 15 matches tonight with chelsea hosting manchester united. and in australia neil robertson —— the australian neil robertson —— the australian neil robertson —— the australian neil robertson has won the welsh open for the second time. he now climbs to eight in the world rankings, having beaten stuart bingham in the final. i will have more on those stories later. cyber security chiefs have said that any risks posed by allowing the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, to work on british infrastructure projects "can be managed". the uk's national cyber security centre's decision undermines us efforts to persuade its allies to ban the firm from 5g
9:22 am
communications networks. australia, new zealand, and the us have already banned huawei from supplying equipment for their future fifth generation mobile broadband networks. the chinese government is accused of using huawei as a proxy so it can spy on rival nations. but huawei has said it gives nothing to beijing, aside from taxes. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is here. rory, a very interesting story. the interface between technology and security. yes, and a lot of pressure from the usa on its allies to shut this company huawei out of this vital next generation of mobile phone networks, called 5g. the uk government has been running this review, the supply chain review, a dull sounding review, and absolutely key decision at the heart of it, do we keep the chinese company out? it looks as though the advice from the national cyber security centre into this review, which will not be final, it's just this review, which will not be final, it'sjust advice, is that this review, which will not be
9:23 am
final, it's just advice, is that you can manage the risk. i have been talking to a lot of the mobile telephone operators who are right now ordering equipment or preparing to order equipment because these networks will arrive later this year. they have been consulting and say they have received similar advice. be cautious, don't have it in sensitive places, this huawei equipment, but you can probably manage the risk. don't have everything on huawei. have their competitors, nokia and ericsson, in the mix as well, but you can get away with having their equipment, and that has come as a great relief it has to be said to the operators who are saying they would be left behind if they couldn't have the option of using this equipment. that is interesting, isn't it, the source of relief? why would they be left behind? is it that only huawei can provide it, only they can provide it ata provide it, only they can provide it at a certain price? element two things. huawei is widely regarded as having led the field in this particular form of equipment -- matt
9:24 am
well, two things. the operators also say that to build a 5g network you actually build on your existing 4g network. they have huawei equipment all over their 4g networks and they would have to start stripping that back as well and that is the message. there could be an 18 month delay if they were not allowed to do that. on the other side, you have this great suspicion of this company, which has embedded itself really in our infrastructure, with people pointing to the fact that all companies in china finally owe their allegiance to the chinese government. so interesting, because the critics, including the us security department, they will be saying you guys in the uk arejust deciding it is too expensive to see this elephant in the room?|j deciding it is too expensive to see this elephant in the room? i think the uk would come back and say the national cyber security centre has unique insight into huawei. they have been in charge of running an annual review already of huawei equipment to look out for any risks, and they published quite a critical
9:25 am
report not about security back doors but about sloppy standards last year and they are about to publish another. so the uk feels they have a sensible middle way, but there will bea sensible middle way, but there will be a lot of pressure from the united states to not do this. at the end of the day, rory, one of the things that strikes me, it is really big tower ideological at the end of the day, and the us has obviously had a few issues —— make big power. they have had a few issues with telecoms companies themselves. what kettle. yes, there was discussion of what the us had done with angela merkel plus mac phone, so there is a bit of big politics —— angler miracle's phone. but nothing much has changed but the politics really has changed and there is a lot more concern about the threat generally posed by china to our security —— angela merkel‘s phone. we could talk about
9:26 am
this morning, rory, but we are not going to. thank you. a related story. the australian prime minister scott morrison says the country's major political parties have been the subject of a cyber attack. australia's security agencies believe a "sophisticated state actor" was responsible for the hack earlier this month, which also breached pa rliament‘s computer systems. here is mr morrison speaking in parliament. 0h, oh, no, we're not going to hear that, i apologise. oh, no, we're not going to hear that, iapologise. we oh, no, we're not going to hear that, i apologise. we will come back to that later. now, the london teenager who ran away to join is four years ago, says people should sympathise with her. in an interview yesterday, 19—year—old shamima
9:27 am
begum said she had no regrets, but appealed for help to return to the uk with her newborn baby. ms begum's family say they're "very concerned" about the child's welfare. tasneem akunjee is the begum family's lawyer, and earlier he spoke to bbc breakfast and explained what the family had done to try and get shamima back. efforts have been made throughout the four yearsm to encourage her back. when contact was established, previously, that contact then disappeared, for some many, many months and we assumed the worst, and now she reappears in need of help. but it will be understandable that the family, regardless of what her comments are, in the context of a camp where she is surrounded by other isis supporters, the family will always want to bring their child home and bring them to safely, and particularly the innocent grandchild that now is in existence. can i ask you, from your dealings with the family, what are they expecting to happen? in terms of their best—case scenario, is it for the pair of them to return to the uk, for them maybe to be able to look after their grandchild, and for shamima to face whatever she has to face in terms of the law courts in this country? it would be along that line, but one step being missing. in that the family fully
9:28 am
expect her to be "quite damaged", so they would want an assessment around shamima and as much help around her mental health and recalibration, effectively, into normal thinking as possible. in terms of any criminal proceedings, that's something she invariably will face, depending on what evidence is against her. that was the lawyer for the shamima begum family. in a moment the weather, but first let's join samira hussain for details of what's coming up on this morning's victoria derbyshire programme at 10. could you live sustainably for a month? what is sustainability? make sure you are responding to events from the future. there is a recycling bin around. if not, just rubbish... error major resources... i have no clue. i thought it was just recycling. meet the student how
9:29 am
is taking on our month long sustainability challenge. we look at the small things we can do to help save the planet. join —— join us on bbc the news channel. thanks. we will definitely have a microphone working by then. now it's time for a look at the weather — we can cross the newsroom to carol. blustery hail and thunder at times and patchy rain in the south—east but in between all of that and especially in eastern areas it should remain mostly dry was some sunshine. temperatures down on the weekend, 9—12. this evening and overnight, a ridge of high pressure builds, killing off a lot of the showers, and with clear skies it means it will be called with a touch of frost and we are also looking at some patchy mist and fog. none of
9:30 am
that problem in the morning, bright start with sunshine particularly the further east you travel. cloud building in from the west to the day with the rain in northern ireland through the morning and with that it will be much you —— with you for much of the day. temperatures tomorrow between eight and 12. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: mps investigating fake news on social media call for stricter regulation and tougher action against facebook to end the spread of disinformation. it's not a question of us going to california and asking them to sort of behave in a nicer way, it's saying, as a country, we can set our laws, we can require them to act against this content, and if they fail to act, they, basically, have failed in their duty of care. a group of labour mps look set to announce their resignations from the party overjeremy corbyn's handling of brexit and the anti—semitism row. peak and off—peak rail fares
9:31 am
could disappear under sweeping changes being proposed for the uk's train ticketing system. uk intelligence chiefs say any risk posed by involving the chinese technology giant huawei in uk telecoms projects can be managed. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. democracy is at risk from the unregulated activities of facebook, twitter and the other social media giants, that's the conclusion of a new report by a cross party committee of mps. one of the key witnesses they heard from was carole cadwalldr, the observerjournalist who exposed widespread manipulation of data during the eu referendum. nick robinson from the today programme has been speaking to her. so, this report isn't... it's... it's completely damning, about facebook. it comes out of this report so badly. but it's also very damning
9:32 am
about what it sees as foreign interference in our elections. and it's calling for an independent investigation into all british elections, since 2014. and we've just had silence from the government on this. and that is also in report. it notes the government has responded very robustly to russia's actions over the poisoning of sergei skripal and then it compares them to its actions over what it's acknowledged are attacks upon our democracy, but yet has done nothing. the difference, it seems to me, often, between you and the people you criticise seems to be this: they often point to it and say, "look, we can find online evidence that the russians, for want of a better phrase, are sturring it. that after the scottish referendum, let alone the eu referendum, scottish bots are causing trouble, are trying to find and ferment divisions in society". you go much further, don't you? you seem to be saying that the brexit referendum may well,
9:33 am
if you like, have been won by russia ? i don't say that. no, i don't say that. what i say is that we now have absolutely mounting evidence of criminal activity during the referendum. but that was by our own domestic campaigns. but what we also know is that the russian government targeted us. we know that in the week that leave eu launched its campaign, it invited arron banks into the russian embassy and it offered him this very lucrative gold and diamond deal. the government has refused to make any comment on that, despite very robust calls from damian collins, the chair of this committee. and that silence is troubling. the family of shamima begum, the teenager from london who fled to syria to join the islamic state group, say they're "very concerned" about her newborn baby. the 19—year—old is now living in a refugee camp and is appealing for the government to help her get back to britain.
9:34 am
nicola benyahear knows what it's like to lose a child to is. her son, rasheed, was radicalised in birmingham and then killed in fighting in syria. she's been speaking to john humphreys. there were tiny changes, pockets of changes, within... for about a year, year and a half in 2014—2015. but nothing that said to me that he was being radicalised, in any way. i just thought it was the usual teenage phase that anybody... that, you know, kids were going through. and knowing what you know, now, the dreadful tragic thing that happened, could you have done anything different? i certainly do. obviously, i've had a long time to reflect back and i've learnt a lot. i've obviously sought knowledge about how this happened to us as a family. when i do look back, there are pockets of intervention that i could have steered things very differently. he kind of felt...
9:35 am
he began to become very bored in his job and he sought out anotherjob. at that point, he applied for one, but then he didn't get it. he got incredibly low and disappointed. but, unfortunately, that's when the recruiters came in, to kind of give them... give the solution. that was to go to syria. and when you say the recruiters, what do you mean, who were they? the people who actually brought in this ideology and kind of groomed him, really. because he, you know, this wasn't something that... that he... he talked about. we didn't... we weren't. .. you know, he prayed every day and fasted, but it wasn't... we weren't very religious. but it wasjust, like i said, unfortunately, somebody who knew him within the community that, kind of, introduced him to these ideologies. how did they get at him? was it in the mosque or what? no, i don't believe it was in the mosque, at all. i believe it wasjust
9:36 am
somebody that knew rasheed was going through a difficult period and just befriended him. because that's what they do, they look for the vulnerable people, where there is a kind of pocket where they can, you know, intervene. but i certainly don't believe it was the mosque, at all, or any sort of community centre. i think it was just somebody that knew that rasheed was going through a particularly difficult stage. so, what's your advice now, to mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, who may be worried? i think don't do what i did. i kept it to myself. ithink... not that i knew he was being radicalised, but there were changes within him or something. but it was just a gut instinct and i couldn't pinpoint what it was or articulate what it was. i think any parents that may be feel something... because, quite often, parents feel that their son or daughter is depressed or has anxiety, and that may be one of the first signs, actually. because that's a vulnerability.
9:37 am
i think i would encourage families to really talk about this to somebody who can actually guide them to say, "well, actually, yes, there could be a concern here that they are going down that path", or they get the right intervention the right intervention for some mental health service. plans to overhaul the way we recycle plastic are due to be unveiled by the government later. it's expected a deposit return scheme will be introduced for bottles. environmental campaigners are calling for all bottles to be included. but big retailers have been accused of trying to water down the proposals — arguing that large bottles shouldn't be subject to a deposit. do you consider the impact on the environment when you buy clothes and would it surprise you to know that fashion is one of the world's most polluting industries? sustainability has been one of the key talking points around this year's london fashion week. nature and science presenter liz bonnin has been working to raise awareness — she spoke to bbc breakfast. i... have to admit i didn't know the extent of the impact of the fashion industry on our natural world. like
9:38 am
every other consumer, i'm beginning to learn more and more aboutjust how much of an impact it has and how damaging it can be. everything from the fact that just to make one pair of jeans the fact that just to make one pair of jea ns ta kes the fact that just to make one pair of jeans takes 15,000 the fact that just to make one pair of jeans takes 15, 000 litres the fact that just to make one pair ofjeans takes 15,000 litres of water. 1% of the materials that are used for clothing are recycled, just 196. used for clothing are recycled, just 1%. now that the fashion industry has, literally, 52 seasons, sometimes more, and encourages us to buy something new every week, all of those things sort of happen without you really having a long hard think about what that means, the price of that garment. it goes far beyond, you know, the price on the tag. let's ta ke let's take a look at the stories you've been looking on at our app. labour mps set to quit the party. we will cover that this morning. we have covered train firms. while may, down towards the bottom, an
9:39 am
interesting story we haven't covered this morning, the bank customer told that vegans should be punched. this isa that vegans should be punched. this is a natwest customer and she went to apply for a loan for a nutrition diploma from natwest and was told that all vegans should be punched in the face. the bristol woman then actually got compensation, natwest offered her compensation and an apology. because the response was wholly inappropriate, it agreed. apparently, the person who told her this said he was... outraged because beacon activists had drawn pictures of animals and messages such as "friends not food" in chalk on the pavement near where he lived. he felt vegans were forcing their beliefs on him. but being told that you need to be punched in the face is not what you expect when you go to the bank to apply for a loan. let's look at the most watched
9:40 am
video. down the bottom. there is a really nice... i've lost it, now... yeah, where are we? laughter i can't find it! i was looking for that lovely... that lovely video of... of that lovely... that lovely video of...0fa that lovely... that lovely video of... 0fa man that lovely... that lovely video of... of a man playing a piano that lovely... that lovely video of... 0fa man playing a piano in a station. i apologise, of... 0fa man playing a piano in a station. iapologise, i'll of... 0fa man playing a piano in a station. i apologise, i'll have to sort this out. there it is! got it at last. self—taught pianist, let me play that. i'm not sure we can get the sound up but this man's piano skills came to everyone's attention ina skills came to everyone's attention in a station, i'm not sure which station it is, it doesn't tell us. but i think it might be... king's cross st pancras. he was on his way home from football. he attracted a crowd and this led to a piece being made about him and how he took up the piano on a rather decrepit old keyboard and taught himself on you tube. a lovely story and he is a
9:41 am
beautiful pianist, take a look. listen to it, most importantly of oil. those are our most watched stories and most read —— most importantly of all. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. (0930 nc bulletin) you have some football? yes we do. but before that... one of the world's most successful track athletes, caster semenya, has arrived at court in switzerland to challenge controversial plans to limit testosterone levels in female athletes. the sport's governing body wants athletes with a higher—than—normal level of male hormones to take medication before they compete, to ensure races are fair. our sports news correspondent, richard conway is in lausanne. richard, it's been a long running — and quite emotive — debate, will we finally get an outcome now? are we finally going to get an answer, now? well, the answer should be coming, yes. but it will be at the end of march before the panel as the end of march before the panel as the court of arbitration for sport.
9:42 am
this is a five—day hearing. we saw this morning caster semenya arrived with her legal team. she is challenging those eligibility rules from the iaaf, which say that athletes with naturally occurring high levels of testosterone must ta ke high levels of testosterone must take medication for six months, prior to competing in a beat middle distance events. —— in elite middle distance events. —— in elite middle distance events. —— in elite middle distance events. she says those rules are discriminatory against her because she was born with hypo androgynous from a condition which is characterised with excessive levels of male hormones. that is the position from her and she wants to challenge this bill. the iaaf say they must take action against this. i spoke to lord coe, the president of the world athletics body on arrival this morning and this is what he has to say about why these rules are required. this is a very,
9:43 am
very important day. the core value for the iaaf is the empowerment of girls and women through athletics. the regulations we are introducing are there to protect the sanctity of fairand open are there to protect the sanctity of fair and open competition. that's what we're here to defend. both sides have made their position is quite clear, now. but it is for this panel, this 3—person panel at the court of arbitration for sport to determine where they stand. the science behind this will be critical. it has been challenged by experts. the iaaf backing their judgment and backing their research into this area. but the five—day hearing will conclude on friday night and by the end of march, we will get what could be a very pivotal decision for both caster semenya and the sport she competes in. a huge case. thank you.
9:44 am
there were no shocks from the three fifth round ties yesterday. premier league club crystal palace were playing at third tier side doncaster rovers but scored twice in the first half for a 2—0 win. there were wins too for wolves and swansea. in the scottish premiership, celtic captain scott brown was sent off for celebrating his last—minute winner against kilmarnock. it had looked like the match had been heading for a goalless draw, but brown's deflected strike gave brendan rodgers' side all three points. the celebration then led to celtic fans running on the pitch and brown recieved a second yellow card. australian neil robertson survived an evening session wobble to win the welsh open for the first time in 12 years. he led stuart bingham 7—3 before the englishman levelled. robertson recovered to take the two frames he needed. he's now climbed to eighth in the world rankings. now let's show you some incredible pictures from overnight.
9:45 am
they're from the famous daytona race in florida. one of the cars slammed into the wall and that started a chain—reaction which involved more than two dozen vehicles. really scary stuff. not surprisingly, a red flag stopped the race for a lengthy cleanup. luckily, no—one was hurt — those cars can really take a lot. now, when your dad is a grand slam tennis winner and your sister is the 12th best golfer in the world, the pressure to win could be pretty great. but now, nelly korda has joined her successful family by winning the women's australian open golf. dad petr won the aussie open tennis in 1998, brother sebastian won the boys' tennis title last year and sisterjessica won the australia open golf seven years ago. and in what has now become tradition, the children have all copied dad's celebration, too. good sporting genes! let's have a look at some of this
9:46 am
morning's back pages. the telegraph are saying it's time to deliver for alexis sanchez. it's after the chilean admitted he's worried about his form at manchester united. and on the daily mail, they're talking about what's becoming a bit of a row between cardiff city and french club nantes, over the payment of the £15 million transfer fee for emiliano sala, the striker who died in a plane crash last month. they say cardiff are preparing to sue the agent who inflated sala's price. just before i go, just a reminder that sportsday is coming up at 6:30pm this evening with a full round—up of all the day's sport, plus we'll also have the draw for the women's fa cup quarter—final draw, with the likes of chelsea, manchester city and liverpool in the hat. and don't forget, the last match in the men's fifth round — chelsea against manchester united, you can watch that live on bbc one, kick off is at 7:30pm, with coverage starting from 7pm.
9:47 am
that's all the sport for now. i'll have more from the bbc sport centre at 11.15am. thanks. the headlines on bbc news: mps investigating "fake news" on social media call for stricter regulation and tougher action against facebook to end the spread of disinformation. a group of labour mps look set to announce their resignations from the party overjeremy corbyn's handling of brexit and the anti—semitism row. peak and off—peak rail fares could disappear, under sweeping changes being proposed for the uk's train ticketing system. more now on the critical report into fake news by mps — which is calling for a compulsory code of ethics for tech companies to tackle harmful or illegal content. the commons digital and culture committee says facebook needs far stricter regulation to stop the spread of misinformation on the social networking site.
9:48 am
with me is our media editor, amol rajan. it's quite a tough report. it's really tough. there's been something ofa really tough. there's been something of a vacuum in this country, compared to america. in america there is the mueller investigation looking into russian interference of the election of donald trump. this committee report was about fake news, misinformation, disinformation and has spread in spoke about the power of technology companies, electoral law and about the social contract between technology companies and voters. it's brutal and scathing. on facebook it is aggressive, saying facebook intentionally and knowingly broke two different types of law, around data privacy and competition for stop electoral law, what citizens are told about who is targeting them and how come it says electoral law is not fit for purpose and it repeats the now familiar claim that we need a new form of regulation. that the era of self—regulation is
9:49 am
about to end. first, they knowingly and intentionally broke the law claim, prosecutions? damian collins, the very influential chair of this committee has not gone so far took all four prosecutions but it seems to be the logical implication of a breaking of the law that you would have prosecutions. we await facebook‘s response, they said they don't break the law. this is really about the often little acknowledged exchange that goes on between facebook and users. facebook say they don't sell data, but they do painta kind they don't sell data, but they do paint a kind of digital target on the back of your head, based on your digital activity and they give advertisers information about that activity. is that selling data? i am not sure. the issue about competition is interesting, damian collins says that facebook is too powerful, that it has such enormous weight in this world, it can bully small app developers. prosecution could come, but it's not quite there yet. this question of the regulation, it's hard to regulate
9:50 am
these people, poachers, gamekeepers, who is actually in charge? is it going to work? as an intimate, there isa going to work? as an intimate, there is a lot of money on lobbyists spent to try to fight against this regulation. i think regulation on the internet in some form is coming. we will only know once it's been in practice whether or not it works. but it is worth saying if regulation on the inter—network easy it would have happened a long time ago. regulation is slow, consensual, it means buy ins from other countries. technology innovation is fast and unpredictable. would this be a new regulator or would it sit under existing regulation? snapchat say they are a communications and camera company, not a social media, what you regulate, how you do it and what constitutes online harm is still something they need to figure out. lots more to digests. thank you for that. some breaking news coming in from syria. on the case of shamima begum, she has just from syria. on the case of shamima begum, she hasjust been interviewed by the bbc, some lines are emerging
9:51 am
from our reporter that she was a poster girl, by her own admission, for islamic state recruitment. she apologises to britain forjoining is and says she is ready to face britain and prison if she is allowed to attend. she still has sympathy for the group, to attend. she still has sympathy forthe group, and to attend. she still has sympathy for the group, and equated its crimes to coalition air strikes against is. she said despite being only 15 years old when she left the uk, she knew what she was doing and was capable of making her own decisions. throughout that a bbc interview, she was holding her new baby, obviously born just a couple of days ago. he is named after her first son, who died whilst she was in this so—called caliphate. we will be broadcasting that interview later. pakistan has recalled its high commissioner for india following a sharp rise in the diplomatic tension between the two regional rivals. after a suicide attack on indian troops in
9:52 am
indian—administered kashmir. india has accused pakistan of being behind the bombing by islamist militants. in a further escalation, at least four indian soldiers were killed in a gunfight with rebels. let's look at some culture news. 9 to 5 was one of the defining films of the 1980s. it tells the story of three female office workers who take their sexist boss hostage. almost a0 years on, who better to adapt it for the stage than dolly parton herself? breakfast‘s louise minchin spoke to her. dolly parton, what an absolute honour to meet you. thank you very much for talking to us on bbc breakfast. the look, it's so clever, it's so specific. what was it inspired by? there is a town tramp, trollop, in our town, and i thought she was beautiful, and everybody said, "she's just trash", and i said, "then i want to grow up to be trash", because i thought that was a look. and so i grew up to be trash! she chuckles and i like to think i'm a little more than trash, but ijust always loved that look — itjust seemed to fit my personality
9:53 am
more than just plain stuff. i mean, i like to be flashy and gaudy, and be seen, i guess. # nine to five, for service and devotion # you would think that i would deserve a fair promotion. ..# you're here because 9 to 5 the musical is out now. looking back, and i've seen it, the themes, you know, the film came out so many decades ago, and the themes are still the same, about equality, about fairness. what you think about that? well, i think it's wonderful. we're getting another chance to revamp this, during this metoo movement, to shed more light on a subject that needs addressing. i think when the movie came out, a0 years ago, it did a lot of good. i think it really helped a lot of things and opened a lot of doors for a lot of people. but, as always, you know, there's still work to always be done, and improvements to be made with anything, so i think this gives us another opportunity to kind of bring the subject up again for, like you say, the equal pay, and harassment in the workplace and all that.
9:54 am
i'm not your wife or your mother — or even your mistress. what?! mm hmm. i am your employee, and as such, i expect to be treated equally, with a little dignity and a little respect. it's interesting watching it, because many of the lines are the same from the film as they are in the musical, and they still get a laugh. they do, and i wrote a couple of new pieces for it so, you know, i think we took out the fantasy scene in the song of "hey, boss", kind of tried to address the issues, talking about it's not all the men — it'sjust some bad men, because i've worked for a lot of good men. but i really think this is a wonderful time for women, and i think we're making great progress. so, 9 to 5 — there are rumours of a follow—up. will you be involved ? of course i'll be involved! lily, jane and i are going to be doing that sequel that we've talked about for years. i used to joke and say, "we better get after it, or we'll have to call it 95" —
9:55 am
because we're getting there! but we actually are going to be part of it, big—time, with three new young girls that are still working at the old company we used to. and the story is that they wonder what happened to those three women who made those changes all those many years ago, so they find us in different parts of the country, running successful businesses. and we all kind of incorporate and have some more fun and make some more good points, and it should be fun. really, really lovely to meet you. nice to see you, yeah. thank you very much indeed. the inimitable dolly parton. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. it was quite a mild weekend with some sunshine. still fairly mild for the time of year but not quite as warm as it was over the past few days. for the rest of today, fairly cloudy skies across england and wales. this is the sea in kent, drizzly outbreaks of rain, a bit
9:56 am
more sunshine across the north—west the uk. mild and breezy. there are some showers but also a bit of brightness, particularly in the north and west. the recent satellite picture shows and is a line of cloud across england and wales, that is a cold front which is fairly slow moving, bringing cloud and patchy rain south—east. it will be soggy in the southeast this afternoon. cleary skies two clearer skies in the west. sunny spells and scattered showers. some are quite heavy. thunderstorms likely as we head through to the afternoon with some hail around. driest towards the east of scotland and north—east england. plenty of showers in the north and temperatures are reasonably mild, 12 degrees in the warmer spots. tonight, most showers fade away, things will become drier and clearer and a colder night than recently. temperature is around 2—3 even in towns and cities. a touch of frost in the countryside first thing on tuesday. it starts on a quiet note
9:57 am
but the low pressure is bringing in france from the west later on. many places start off dry and bright —— but bringing in weather fronts. eastern parts of scotland and eastern england will keep the sunshine all day and skies will cloud over in the west ahead of this area working in across northern ireland and western parts of scotla nd ireland and western parts of scotland and wales by the afternoon. top temperatures similar today, eight, perhaps 12 degrees. the middle of the week, some rain to start your day on wednesday in the north, which should clear away. drier conditions. it should brighten up drier conditions. it should brighten up and it will be warming up. gradually from mid week onwards. 12-13 gradually from mid week onwards. 12—13 degrees on wednesday. then we got much milder air working in from the south—west and by the end of the week, we could see highs of around about 17 or 18 degrees. hello, it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm samira ahmed. this is the scene in westminster, as a group of mps are set to announce their split from the labour party, we'll be live there for that announcement as soon as it happens.
9:58 am
iam i am chris mason in the room here. in the next few minutes these labour mps are expected to walk in and announced they are walking away from the party that for years they have been a part of. tough and urgent action is needed to stop facebook allowing the spread of fake news — according to a group of mps. rather than having a system where the tech companies just apologise when things go wrong and carry on repeating the same mistakes, we should have a proper, statutory, regulatory system, which imposes standards on the tech companies, with a regulator that can act against them if they fail
9:59 am
10:00 am

8 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on