Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  February 19, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

11:00 am
you re watching bbc newsroom live 7 it's11am, and these are the main stories this morning. japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — saying it needs to invest in a changing marketplace. this is a move towards electrification, we started to see it in europe, we started to see it around the world and it is in response to what our consumers are looking at and also on legislation —— back on what legislation is driving us towards. i have been getting reaction from workers in swindon who say they are devastated by the news. the shadow chancellor admits labour needs to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warned that more may yet leave. figures released this morning show record numbers of people are in work, unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1975. fast fashion, mps call for a penny charge on each new item to pay
11:01 am
for improved collection and recycling rates. and could the golden eagle be making a return to wales? plans to reintroduce the species after 200 years. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the japanese car maker honda, has this morning confirmed that it will close its plant in swindon in 2021. the factory employs 3,500 people, and it's understood all of the workforce have been sent home for the day. trade unions described the closure as a shattering body blow. the business secretary greg clarke has said it is ‘deeply disappointing' the decision has been taken now. but honda's senior vice president for europe has told the bbc that brexit is not to blame for the decision. we'll be live at the honda plant
11:02 am
in swindon in a moment, but first this report by colin campbell. fresh off the production line, new honda cars leaving the swindon plant this morning but in 2021 the factory will cease operations and close down. bowing to waiting press, a spokesperson for honda say it is because the company is strengthening its commitment to electrified cars. in response to unprecedented changes in the global automotive industry. honda say they will support their workers through a difficult time. we are very proud of what we produce in the uk, we are very proud of our associates there, but this is being driven by global forces and as i said we are, we deeply regret the impact this will have on the people
11:03 am
of swindon and will make sure we support them through this. cars have been made at the swindon site for 30 yea rs, been made at the swindon site for 30 years, three and a half thousand workers will lose theirjobs. my wife works here, my brother works here, my cousin works here, there are loads of odds, dad, stepdad, brother, my mum works in the cafe. there are about ten or 12 people just from our little family who all work here. good friends who work here but i know i've just got married and had babies and boathouses, you just feel for these people. i feel for everyone. boathouses, you just feel for these people. ifeelfor everyone. even the management who spoke to us inside, you could see it in their faces, they are just as shocked as everyone else. last month honda announced it would shut the swindon operation for six days in april, to deal with any plexus disruption. some of the workers here now blame brexit for a more permanent closure. i think unquestionably brexit has to play a part in the decision, whether
11:04 am
it is the biggest part i would question, but when you are making a long—term investment decisions as the car industry has two, investing billions over ten year product cycles, any uncertainty is damaging. arriving in the 80s and providing jobs for locals, and i helped transform swindon into a vibrant business hub. roughly for one manufacturing job there are four in the supply chain and local economy so you're talking about three and a half thousand jobs at risk, if you multiply that by four we are talking about a significant number, a major impact upon the local economy. under say the decision to close the site was not taken lightly, they say they understand the impact the closure will have on all workers, suppliers and the local community. our news correspondent, athar ahmad is outside the honda plant in swindon. good morning. we know that workers have been sent home, it must be a very strange, very curious
11:05 am
atmosphere there today indeed. that's right, at around nine o'clock this morning workers at the honda plant here started leaving en masse, driving out, cycling out, walking out, after being told by management earlier in the morning that the car plant would be closing in 2021, and that three and a half thousand jobs would be lost as a result. many of the people i have been speaking to you today see that the new that the news was coming but they were shocked and devastated to be told today that their job should be shocked and devastated to be told today that theirjob should be lost, one person i spoke to said that 12 members of his extended family had jobs here, in various capacities, and that the ramifications of today's decision would affect his family and not just the today's decision would affect his family and notjust the people who work here, but also the wider local community here and —— in swindon and have a knock—on effect. in terms of brexit, the consensus seems to be divided as to whether that was the
11:06 am
main reason for today's decision, some people i have spoken to have said that they do think that the recent decision around brexit and a lack of clarity around as to what will happen next could have contributed to the decision. 0thers have cited recently signed trade deal between japan and have cited recently signed trade deal betweenjapan and the eu, reducing tariffs on cars which are coming in as being a reason as to why this decision was made today, but there is a state of shock and despair in some families, and that is how the honda company has been describing today —— been described to me by many people today as a family and there is a real sense of despair by many people about the decision. do workers feel they are entering into a do workers feel they are entering intoa limber do workers feel they are entering into a limber —— limbo period? what will happen next? absolutely, many of the workers have gone home to spend time with their family and try and work out what is next, some
11:07 am
of them who i have spoken to said they will be here for the next two yea rs, they will be here for the next two years, seeing out their contracts until 2021, others are now in a state of limbo not knowing what to do, but many are trying to carve out a plan for themselves. some of the people i have spoken to do not see much hope for the future here in swindon and are hoping for that investment is made to try and ensure a future for them and their families. 0ur tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes told me there were many factors behind honda's decision to shut down its swindon plant. i think there are obviously, it is a complicated picture, and swindon was pa rt complicated picture, and swindon was part of a strategy by japanese auto—makers to get into the european car market in a big way in the 1980s and early 1990s and we saw honda go to swindon, toyota in derby and nissan in sunderland, and those factories were all built as
11:08 am
platforms, as launch pads for the japanese car manufacturers to build, they hoped big, large—scale production for serving the european market. that has not really happened, the only one that has really grown to skill is nissan, which makes over half a million cars a year, both swindon for honda and derby for toyota have languished around the quarter of £1 million mark —— the quarter of a million mark —— the quarter of a million mark for most, swindon was producing around hundred and 50,000 cars a year and that is really not the scale that either company was hoping for, so it has been under threat for some time but has your previous contributor said, japanese companies have a strong commitment to their workforce, they have trusted relations, they do not like to close down factories and they do not like to get rid of workers, so this is a very difficult thing for them to do. in that light, this restructuring they are going through, the fact that this has now come at a time
11:09 am
when brexit is happening, which is making these already not very viable factories even less viable, the a nalyst factories even less viable, the analyst i have spoken to here in tokyo today has said it is not the big reason why this is happening, it is not the driving force behind this restructuring, but there is no doubt that the timing, we have heard from nissan and now we have seen they will close the honda plant, the timing of this and sony and panasonic and other companies leaving the uk, there is no doubt that brexit is having an effect on japanese decision—making about whether it is going to continue investing in the uk beyond brexit. and developing that thought, what are those in the know injapan saying about possible impact on otherjapanese saying about possible impact on other japanese car manufacturers saying about possible impact on otherjapanese car manufacturers in the uk? especially in light of the new eu japan trade deal? absolutely, thatis new eu japan trade deal? absolutely, that is very important and it means that is very important and it means
11:10 am
that honda can produce cars here in japan and export them to the eu tariff free from 2027, the people i have been speaking to here say that the next one down the road clearly thatis the next one down the road clearly that is vulnerable is toyota's operation in derby, that is also producing well below capacity, it has never grown to the extent that toyota would have liked and also toyota would have liked and also toyota has other operations throughout europe, it has a plant in turkey, a plant in france, a new plant in the czech republic, so toyota has other options for staying inside the eu and so that derby plant is very vulnerable as well. but people have also said to me, if there is a hard brexit, if there is no deal to keep the uk inside the customs union, then even the nissan plant in sunderland in the long run is very much in jeopardy. thank you. the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell says labour needs a "massive listening exercise" — after seven of its mps resigned in protest at jeremy corbyn's handling of brexit and anti—semitism. the seven backbenchers left to sit as independents,
11:11 am
and the labour leader has been warned that he faces the prospect of more resignations. last night, two conservative mps told the bbc that they too were considering leaving their party to join the group. let's talk to our assistant political editor, norman smith, who's at westminster for us. whenjohn mcdonald when john mcdonald talks whenjohn mcdonald talks about a massive listening exercise, what does that mean in practice? those seven mps who left labour would say that they have been trying to get jeremy corbyn to listen to them for quite a while. that is a good question and for the moment there is no answer. i think what it tells us is that there is a desire in the leadership to try and forestall the prospect of others jumping overboard by just forestall the prospect of others jumping overboard byjust tried to turn down the rhetoric, become —— ta ke turn down the rhetoric, become —— take a more emollient and conciliatory tone, say they
11:12 am
understand, they have concerns, worries that we are prepared to address them. mr mcdonald this morning saying we will listen to issues around the leadership, we will it listen to issues around anti—semitism, around specific policies, and the hope i think is that it will forestall the danger that it will forestall the danger that other mps, and we know there are other labour mps who share the concerns of the seven notjust of a brexit bottle for changes to the nature of the labour party, a fear that intimidation, abuse, bullying culture has been allowed to take hold. there are other labour mps who share those fears and clearly mr mcdonald this morning, i think, just try to turn down the heat a bit. have a listen to him. i was at iwas ata i was at a labour party meeting last night people were very straightforward, i listened to what tom watson said and i agree with him, we need to start listening and thatis him, we need to start listening and that is what we will do. we need a massive listening exercise. we must address some of the criticisms i
11:13 am
have been made. i think we are finding a way forward but it has got to be on the basis of taking the advice of people like tom watson and the plp and others. how worried are you about this group of seven defectors ? you about this group of seven defectors? i'm really disappointed, i don't understand why they have gone and i still can't understand it, all the issues they have raised we are addressing and i would rather they stayed with us and helped us sort those problems out and walk away. i hope we will maintain some form of dialogue. mr corbett will be giving a speech around lunch time andi giving a speech around lunch time and i suspect it will be a very similar tone from him. although leaving home this morning he was back to his customary hello goodbye doorstep. here we go. good morning mr corbin are you expecting any more resignations today? good morning. are you going today? good morning. are you going to resign? good morning. good morning to you all. and goodbye to you all. the question of whether other labour mps willjump
11:14 am
the question of whether other labour mps will jump overboard, the question of whether other labour mps willjump overboard, probably not today, certainly no signs of any movement today and i suspect many may be waiting in part to see how this listening exercise actually pans out, also waiting to see what happens with brexit and that may be the next trigger in this whole process. if mr corbin does not pivot back to a fresh referendum. although intriguingly some of those who you might have thought would be sympathetic to the gang of seven we re sympathetic to the gang of seven were today very publicly saying that they would not be joining them, one of them merry credit was asked if she had any intention of quitting labour. i haven't, iam i haven't, i am staying in the labour party, it is my political home and i have served it as a representative locally and snatch —— nationally for 21 years. have you been approached? nationally for 21 years. have you been approached ?|j nationally for 21 years. have you been approached? i have and i have said no. ithink been approached? i have and i have said no. i think what is important is that we now take a long hard look at ourselves as a political party, it is clear that brexit is pushing
11:15 am
both parties to the brink, it is clear that anti—semitism has taken root in our party, and... general secretary and later say they have taken action against anti—semitism. we have had two very seery —— searing plp meetings which have failed come mps fears about the action that has been taken by the party leadership on this, and i think it is a profound moment for us to pause, to listen, to reflect and ask with —— act with humility. with -- act with humility. the bottom line is you can really not underestimate the strength of party ties, party loyalty, bonds of friendship with people you have served with for years and years. very difficult to actually walk away from that. and much, too, will hinge on whether the gang of seven can make a success of it, if they can then of course others will be much more inclined tojoin then of course others will be much more inclined to join them, then of course others will be much more inclined tojoin them, but todayis more inclined tojoin them, but today is only the two, so it is
11:16 am
still very, very early. they will need to pretty swiftly to be putting in place a coherent structure, demonstrate that they have funding, they are beginning to pick up momentum. have a leader, a clear policy platform, so they have an awful lot to do in a comparatively short space of time. thank you. 0ne one of the thoughts today is whether more labour mps will leave the party tojoin that independent more labour mps will leave the party to join that independent group, it could depend on howjeremy corbyn handles the brexit process over the next couple of weeks. meanwhile we are hearing from the european commission which is confirming that the president of the commission junkojuncker will the president of the commission junko juncker will meet theresa may in brussels tomorrow at 5:30pm, so theresa may heading back to brussels to try and further her deal with
11:17 am
brussels. the rate of employment in the uk has continued to climb, with a record 32.6 million people in work between october and december. latest figures from the office for national statistics, released this morning, show unemployment fell by 111,000 in the three—month period. that translates to a 4 percent unemployment rate. and average weekly earnings increased by 3.4 percent. our business correspondent simon gompertz is here. let's talk about those employment figures, first of all, what is the context for that? the context is the worry we have today about jobs particularly in the car industry and yet we have here very positive set of figures, considerthese yet we have here very positive set of figures, consider these numbers, 80,000 more self—employed people in that three month period, 80,000, two, full—time employed people, in fa ct a two, full—time employed people, in fact a very high proportion of the number of people getting jobs is full—time rather than pa rt—time jobs. that is good news. now you
11:18 am
have to point out that this is a period from christmas time looking back over a few months last year. when the situation did look pretty good. and it does not reflect perhaps the nervousness that has crept into the jobs market in january and friday. alongside those jobs figures of course it is important to remember —— to look at what wages are doing out there on the up according to these figures. yes you set plus 3.4% year—on—year, not is getting that, it is average but it means that the rate at which wages are rising is at a faster pace than prices are rising in the shops so we are getting a by about 1% a year and that gives people a little more spending power. what about zero—hours contracts? how many of these jobs that we are talking about are zero—hours contracts, which clearly is an area of concern for many people. again if you worry about casual labour and you think it isa about casual labour and you think it is a problem that there are more
11:19 am
zero—hours contract out there, it has actually dropped, the number of people in that situation, by 57,000. soa people in that situation, by 57,000. so a much rosierfigure on employment and wages and wages leave us employment and wages and wages leave us in employment and wages and wages leave usina employment and wages and wages leave us in a better position since 2011 and the buying power of what we are being paid, although we are still slightly behind where we were before the financial crisis. in the context of brexit, if eu citizens employed in the uk in that period? that is right, the number of people who come here to work from eu countries has dropped sharply in this period, and the number from other countries around the world has gone up, and thatis around the world has gone up, and that is perhaps as a result of the controversy that is perhaps as a result of the co ntrove rsy over that is perhaps as a result of the controversy over brexit, over these recent yea rs. controversy over brexit, over these recent years. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — citing its need to invest in a changing marketplace. the shadow chancellor admits labour needs a to conduct a "massive
11:20 am
listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warned that more may yet leave. and figures released this morning show record numbers of people are in work, and unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1975. and in sport: pressure grows on maurizio sarri after chelsea's defeat in the fa cup. former striker chris sutton believes he'll be sacked before thursday's europa league game with malmo. jurgen klopp says the league is liverpool's priority ahead of their champions league last 16 tie with bayern munich tonight — a match virgil van dyck misses through suspension. and scottish fly half finn russell's been ruled out of their six nations match with france. 0n saturday he was forced off with concussion, playing for club side racing last weekend. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past. there are calls for fashion producers to be charged a penny for every new item of clothes they make, to help improve collection and recycling rates. that's the view of mps, who say "fast fashion" —
11:21 am
where clothes are made cheaply and quickly in response to trends — is a major contributor to greenhouse gases, pollution and over—use of water. here's our environment analyst roger harrabin. sifting the residue of fast fashion, millions of clothes, many of them barely worn. some garments at this sorting centre in kent will be sent to eastern europe, some to africa, some will be offered for sale second—hand in the uk. we throw away over one million tonnes of clothing here in the uk. 300,000 of those tonnes go to landfill or incineration. what we are saying is fashion needs to take responsibility for the clothes it puts on the market and we want the government to introduce an extended producer responsibility scheme, to invest in recycling and sorting centres like this one, in every city in the uk. the impact of fast fashion stretches around the world. in east asia, many rivers are polluted with waste from the clothing industry. the fashion trade produces
11:22 am
as many greenhouse gases as all the world's aircraft. young people's habits of buying cheap clothes that don't last and throwing them away is a trend that must end, mps say. they want the government to make firms pay for the cost of disposing of old clothes. green campaigners say their recommendations are tame and say we need a whole cultural change to end what they call overconsumption of clothing. roger harrabin, bbc news. well lets talk now to sustainability expert dr sharon george who's in keele this morning. doctor george, thank you for in as this morning. if you could put it in context for our viewers, to what extent is the fast fashion we are talking about contributing to pollution and greenhouse gases etc? it is becoming even more a massive
11:23 am
problem, in 20151.2 billion tonnes of c02 was produced just from the production of textiles, and their consumption of textiles is growing, we have seen a doubling of what we are using in the last 15 years. and it is not just are using in the last 15 years. and it is notjust the impact of the materials at the end of their life, it is the production of those materials, so it is the dying process is, it is the growing of things like cotton, and it is the nutrients of those plants needs to grow. if clothes come from plastics it is the carbon and processing that goes into that, too, and when you think that we only use a lot of these clothes is a one use item, a lot of clothes are simply born and then discarded, and i think part of then discarded, and i think part of the problem is that it is part of the problem is that it is part of the disposable nature of our consumption, it is embedded in the way that we use clothes. and my hope is that this scheme might go some
11:24 am
way towards fixing that, too. we will come onto the mindset and just a moment but first of all let's look at this notion of a penny charge per item of clothing produced, which would then be ploughed back into improving recycling and so on. do you think that is ultimately going to help? of course it will help, it is predicted that we are going to get something like £35 million ploughed back into being able to develop new recycling systems but if you think about the volume of clothes going back, at the moment we are only recycling about 1% of clothes back into clothes again, the rest is just clothes back into clothes again, the rest isjust going clothes back into clothes again, the rest is just going into clothes back into clothes again, the rest isjust going into padding and stuffing for different furniture items. so 35 million sounds like a lot of money, but actually you need better reprocessing systems and to think smarter about how these things are turned into more useful clothing items at the end of use so we are
11:25 am
not using the raw materials in the first place. so i think 1p does not go far enough. 0bviously first place. so i think 1p does not go far enough. obviously you want to be clothing producers to be thinking about their processes but ultimately it is consumers who drive demand for the sort of fast fashion. how do you go about getting that message across to consumers in a way that actually changes their shopping habits? i think a lot of people don't realise the impact of the because their wedding, right now we could buy, you could buy a dress for a that does not reflect the cost of the production, the cost of the carbon and shipping and the costs to the environment and i think what we can do is educate the consumer, because like we have just seen with plastics, if people knew the impact of what they are doing, i think they would drive change just the same as we have seen with the use of straws
11:26 am
and they have welcomed the plastic bag charge, and we have seen a massive shift in behaviour. i think this is no different. i think the role of the consumer is going to be key, and they need to know what goes on behind—the—scenes of that production of clothes. thank you. each year in the uk, more than 50,000 people die from sepsis. it's a serious complication resulting from an infection, and can lead to multiple organ failure. now a team at the university of strathclyde hopes a new test they've developed could help speed up diagnosis, potentially saving thousands of lives a year. tim muffett reports. twice my heart stopped, i had two cardiac arrests in hospital, and i was in an induced coma for eight days. what started as a sore throat nearly ended ryan's life. i went to the doctor and was sent home. i was gradually feeling more unwell and i really couldn't recognise what was happening to me. my whole body ached, i felt really confused. ryan was sent home again by a different gp.
11:27 am
the next morning, i collapsed in the house. my wife phoned an ambulance. and the paramedics came out and the first thing they said was it could be sepsis. it was really scary, i couldn't believe somebody could go from having a sore throat to almost die. a quicker diagnosis could have got ryan on antibiotics faster. he has made a full recovery, but a quarter of sepsis survivors suffer permanent, life—changing after—effects. normally, when we pick up an infection, our immune system tries to fight it, attacking the germs that caused it. with sepsis, and no—one fully understands why, it overreacts, attacking notjust the infection but organs and body tissue as well. a one—hour delay in administering the correct antibiotic can lead to a 10% increased chance of death. blood tests and diagnosis can take hours or days, so, this team at the university of strathclyde in glasgow have been working on a way to make it easier and quicker. we have put an array of eight
11:28 am
sensors on to a microchip, and these sensors are about the same size as a human hair. this enables us to measure a sepsis marker in the blood at very low situations and very quickly. so, you could drop the blood on to the chip, and get a result on screen. it tells us a sepsis biomarker was present in the sample. what impact could this technology have? ultimately, save lives and reduce suffering from sepsis. getting a diagnosis early is critical. it will be at least three years before this product is available, and medical expertise will still be needed to come up with a diagnosis. but the work is receiving a cautious welcome. sepsis now kills more people than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined. the number of episodes that are recorded of sepsis is increasing. a lot of that is because we are reporting and therefore recording it more frequently. but, of course, we have a growing population, and an ageing population,
11:29 am
and sepsis preferentially affects the very young and very old, although not exclusively. if you feel very much more unwell than you have before, and if something just doesn't feel right, trust your instincts. phone 101 or go and see your gp, and just ask, could it be sepsis. sepsis is treatable and survivable but, as ryan knows, a late diagnosis can make things far worse. tim muffett, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there, good morning, we have some sunshine in this forecast particularly across central and eastern areas of england and scotla nd eastern areas of england and scotland through today, but also some showers. the western side of scotland, northern england, a scattering of showers across wales and north—west england but all the while turning increasingly wet and
11:30 am
windy across northern ireland through the day. in the best of the sunshine 11 or 12 degrees and in place as a frosty starts just eight or nine therefore scotland and northern ireland. the winch will be strengthening particularly as the train settles on so up the across northern ireland, the western isles of scotland. the rain coming down into northern england and patchy rain across wales, further south across england it should be mainly dry overnight but cloudy and mild and the like just gone. lows of around six or 7 degrees. still simmering around tomorrow, across northern ireland and scotland and northern england, becoming apache as it works its way eastward throughout the day. the best of the drier weather the further south and east you are. milder still by the end of the week. a
11:31 am
hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — saying it needs to invest in a changing marketplace. the shadow chancellor admits labour needs to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warned that more may yet leave. official figures show record numbers of people are in work. according to the office for national statistics, unemployment fell by 111,000 between october and december. a group of mps has recommended charging fashion brands and retailers a penny on every garment they sell — to fund
11:32 am
a new clothing recycling scheme. it's thought it could raise £35 million a year. and the golden eagle could be making a return to wales — there are plans to reintroduce the species for the first time since the 1800s. sport now, here'sjohn watson. hello, this is sport today, live from the bbc sport centre. speaking on five live he said his time at stamford bridge is over anticipating defeat to manchester united. last night will be his last match in charge. fans booed throughout the two nil defeat. he said his side played confused
11:33 am
football, they face malmo on thursday before taking on manchester city on saturday. the word —— sunday. with the owner fancy chelsea getting onto the top four with a manager who says he can't motivate his players, who says he will let his star man go in the summer. really? you have to question the owner. the owner will be thinking will be getting the top four, no, cani be thinking will be getting the top four, no, can i go into the game against manchester city with confidence. and is he going to chuckle his eggs in the europa basket with this manager, can't motivate the players? all liverpool fans. but now we play
11:34 am
chelsea and i think they all expected that we do our best. thank god we don't have to make that decision today. we only think we can do is to give it our all and play very passionate football, very lively football, the football people expect when they come to anfield. of course it will be a tough game, liverpool are playing well. but we know that we have also very good players. what a night in saw, only
11:35 am
the second night the two sides met in the european cup when you consider what a rich history and tradition liverpool have in this competition. we will be live in anfield in sports day later tonight. all the beale to wed build up here from 630. and life commentary on bbc five live. and scottish fly half finn russell's been ruled out of their six nations match with france. 0n saturday he was forced off with concussion, playing for club side racing last weekend. had a heavy defeat to england at
11:36 am
twickenham. four players coming to the side against the weight ahead of the side against the weight ahead of the match. and how about this for a lucky escape. now, it's a job that many people would love to have but being a tv sports commentator can't be that dangerous, can it? well have a look at this. this is nhl commentator pierre mcguire — and, yes, that's a puck inches away from his face at monday's game between columbus bluejackets and tampa bay lightning. worth seeing again — mcguire said after that "it's all part of what goes on down here". you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. more than 300 birmingham bin workers have started the first of a series of strikes in a dispute with the council. it stems from claims some staff have been "blacklisted" for taking part in industrial action in 2017, when piles of rubbish were left on the streets. the unite members have been working to rule since 29 december over a payment given to gmb members who did not take part in previous strike action. we can cross to the redfern depot in tyseley now
11:37 am
and speak to the bbc west midlands political reporter laura coffey. laura, good morning. 0bviously laura, good morning. obviously as we mentioned, this all links back to the really big strike in 2017, but it seems like some sort of dispute has been pretty much ongoing since then. tell us more about the latest action. that is right, there are about 50 members this morning, back in the summer of 2017 workers from unite walked out in a row over pay and conditions. and fast forward then to december, just after christmas, unite again walked out in industrial action, work to rule and an overtime ban. this was in a row over payments that the union said we re over payments that the union said were secret payments to the gmb union. the council utterly refutes
11:38 am
this, they say the payments were to the gmb union but for theirfailure to properly negotiate with the union during that summer of 2017 dispute. 0bviously industrial relations are ata 0bviously industrial relations are at a pretty low ebb there. what other chances of getting this resolved speedily and in the meantime what impact will it mean for people's bin collections? will rabbi start piling up again? the council would say no, they have a contingency plan in place meaning they have gone to fortnightly collections. that started yesterday. they are collecting recycling and waste at the same time on recycling days. but we know the action from the work to rule and overtime ban that started at the end of december has already because the council to miss 40% of their collections, so this new strike action, this starts
11:39 am
today, the ten days, for the next five weeks, twice a week, so that can only mean that more collections will surely be missed. and the mood here in birmingham, i have spoken to many residents and they have been telling me they are fed up with not having their collections collected on time and when they should. they have already seen some rubbish in some areas piling up and theyjust would like to see the collections start again. although this morning there has been some support along there has been some support along the road as drivers have been going past, there has been plenty of horns tooting in support of the workers who are out on strike here today. thank you, laura. the national farmers union is holding its last conference before the uk is due to leave the european union. the president, minette batters, has said that a no deal brexit is the stuff of nightmares . speaking directly to the environment secretary michael gove, she said that it was absolutely shocking that farmers had no clarity about how britain s withdrawal from the eu would work.
11:40 am
we can cross to birmingham and speak to our correspondent phil makie. hello. the nfu has been really vocal about the brexit uncertainty, about the potential impacts on britain pots farmers. tell us more about what the president was saying and how michael gove responded. we will get to michael gove in a minute. i was at the oxford farming conference last month where they were really worried about a no—deal brexit, and here we are, six weeks to go until march 29, and still they say they don't know what is happening. these are farmers, producers who send a lot of produce abroad, there are ships leaving next week which will arrive at their destinations in the far east with meat and dairy products on board and theyjust don't know what the tariff situation will be. they have to decide whether or not to bother loading those ships
11:41 am
so the nfu president had some very strong words, she looked directly at the environment secretary in the room when she said there is just a simple lack of clarity at the moment. farmers, we are just over five weeks away from leaving the european union — from leaving the common agricultural policy. and it's still not clear to our 46,000 member businesses what trade conditions we'll be operating in. it's still not clear what a future agricultural policy looks like for british farming. and it's not clear for our iconic fruit, vegetable and flower sector that we'll have access to a sizeable global seasonal workers scheme. so she said to michael gove, i want a written agreement. he had said at the oxford conference that there would be no greater tariffs for british farmers. certainly not over his dead body. she said she wasn't
11:42 am
asking for blood, just an agreement written in ink, which he has promised to give her to guarantee that the same production values we see in british produce will be guaranteed afterwards, after brexit, that they will not be undercut by cheap foreign imports. mister gove spent a lot of time praising the nfu and the president, but he also had a message for those inside and outside the conference, he said britain must absolutely leave the eu next month with a deal. if we leave without a deal then there will be significant costs to our economy and, in particular, to farming and food production. as things stand, just six weeks before we are due to leave, the eu still have not listed the uk as a full third country in the event of no deal being concluded. that means that as i speak there is no absolute guarantee that we would be able to continue to export food to the eu. i am confident that we will secure that listing, but in the event of no deal the eu have also said that they will impose strict conditions on our export trade.
11:43 am
he said there will be an announcement in the next few days or even weeks about new tariffs, potentially to be imposed on european imports should there be an ideal scenario to help protect british farmers. he also said a combination of tariffs, checks, labelling and customs delays in an ideal scenario would be disastrous. well, we know that. in fact, he has been saying the same for some time. asi been saying the same for some time. as i mentioned earlier this year, he said the same thing, he is urging farmers to get onto their mps to back theresa may's deal. i have been at the conference in birmingham for the last three years, at the same subject. we are right on the break of brexit at the moment, there will be no doubt that next year they will be no doubt that next year they will be talking about the aftermath. it is difficult to say at the moment just what that aftermath will look like. i think a lot of people would
11:44 am
give you very good money to save what the aftermath will look like now! thank you very much. a coalition of 16 us states is taking donald trump to court over over his plan to use emergency powers to spend billions of dollars on a wall along the border with mexico. led by california, the states say they re suing the president to protect their residents, natural resources and economic interests. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. another legal showdown over a policy at the heart of donald trump's agenda. the 16 states including california, new mexico and new york are arguing that the president doesn't have the authority to use funds already allocated to other projects, to build a wall. it follows congress's rejection of mr trump's demand for $5.7 billion. he got $1.3 billion — for an election promise which he initially said mexico would pay for. but on the wall they skimped. so i did, i was successful in that sense, but i want to do it faster.
11:45 am
the states are arguing that it is congress's role to allocate funding, and that the president has no right to invoke the state of emergency to get what he wants. president trump got it right when he said he didn't have to do this. mister president, you shouldn't do this. the trump administration already faces multiple lawsuits over his declaration, including one from the american civil liberties union. but they may be in for a tough fight. the president has wide discretion over what constitutes a national emergency. donald trump saw the lawsuits coming — when he announced his decision to override congress he said he expected to be sued and that the matter would probably end up being decided by the us supreme court. peter bowes, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: japanese car giant
11:46 am
honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — citing its need to invest in a changing marketplace. the shadow chancellor admits labour needs a to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warned that more may yet leave. and figures released this morning show record numbers of people are in work — and unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1975. with only 38 days to go to brexit day, the uks manufacturing industry is meeting in westminster at their annual conference. our business presenter ben bland is there. then, hello. hello. brexit very much in the minds of people gathered here. and also those jobs figures
11:47 am
you spoke about. employment up, unemployment holding at a record low since 1975. an average weight is also rising. let's talk about. —— average wages. so far, what has struck you most about what you heard from the conversations and the addresses going on inside? firstly we have rebranded ourselves, a big change for us. i think everyone is getting their heads around a dramatic change of name. the really big thing we have focused on is understanding in the period of uncertainty about brexit what that is doing for investment for our member companies. and actually the nervousness about not knowing the political climate means people are finding it hard to invest in the future. so that is potentially holding back uk manufacturing? absolutely. in all the stats you
11:48 am
talked about we have critical issues, huge skills shortage in manufacturing, about a third of vacancies are unfilled because we struggle to find the skills in the current economy, and because firms are really nervous about long—term investment they do not know the trading relationship we will have the eu, they don't know with weeks to go if we will leave for the deal or not, making long—term decisions about building new plants, making long—term investments, is very hard to do in the current environment. and what a timely week to hold this event. and to discuss the challenges and how the uk manufacturing sector studies itself immediately after we've heard that honda is to close its factory in swindon, putting 3500 jobs at risk. what are people saying? it is incredibly sad news and people are still digesting it. there are companies in there that are part of honda's supply chain, people in the automotive sector more generally, people involved in some of the other big players in that sector as well. i think at the
11:49 am
moment people feel that although there are big issues in the automotive industry there is also a real issue for overseas investors about what is a long—term market looking like in the uk, what is the long—term investment climate like in the uk, what will our relationship with europe be, and that in certainty having applications for investment is having big implications for foreign owned firms about how long they stay here and what the long—term commitment will be. we have heard from honda's boss speaking to the bbc today that exit was not a factor in their decision, it was the big changes the car industry is going through. when it comes to uk manufacturing, how adept is it at dealing with the big changes and responding to big technological changes? for example, electric vehicles, low emissions ca rs electric vehicles, low emissions cars and so on? britain is a fantastic place for car manufacturing and assembly. more ca rs are manufacturing and assembly. more cars are built in the north—east of england than in the entire italian
11:50 am
industry. britain has been home in the last ten years to major automotive innovation but absolutely that cool message from today to across the sector, from different companies, is that while brexit itself may not be a specific issue the uncertainty people are facing makes the climate for investment and if you have to make tough decisions with no certainty about trading relationship in the uk, it is very ha rd relationship in the uk, it is very hard to spend your money in the uk at the moment. let's bring in and watson from a training organisation. are you finding businesses are not willing to put the money into training people and upscaling them because of the uncertainty we are seeing so close to brexit about how things will turn out? i think the manufacturing sector has a really strong heritage of investing in training, apprenticeships, but as ben says, with the uncertainty around the future and our future trading relationship with the eu, and 38 days to go before we leave,
11:51 am
thatis and 38 days to go before we leave, that is putting a hold on some of those decisions. and it then does mean that productivity is impacted, as we just haven't got the skills. and when it comes to reskilling and retraining workers, again with the honda workers in mind, those 3500 jobs in swindon, how good is the uk manufacturing sector at doing that and what could they do that?” manufacturing sector at doing that and what could they do that? i think the uk manufacturing sector is great at upscaling and reskilling, i think what we could do better is to make sure those really good qualified manufacturing and engineering employers at places like honda are actually placed into other roles, andl actually placed into other roles, and i think there is a great opportunity for our companies with the employers we jointly share and have who are desperate for skill people to help. we also got figures today about work as a migration and there was a fall of more than 60,000 in the number of eu workers in the
11:52 am
uk who have now left. how does that impact on manufacturing? it's a huge impact. every other sector needs in the region of 60,000 new entrants into manufacturing and engineering, and if we are losing the equivalent in terms of skilled eu workers it has a huge impact. an impact in terms of productivity, the growth of economy, job creation, the impact is huge. both, thank you very much indeed. later at the conference they will be hearing inside from the business secretary as well as jeremy corbyn, leader of the opposition. we will bring you the highlights of what they have to say a little later on bbc news. users coming in of the death of the fashion designer karl lagerfeld. he was creative director
11:53 am
of chanel, had been so for a record—breaking number of years as well as having his own fashion label, and was also a renowned photographer. news coming in in the last short while from the reports on the french media of the death of 85—year—old karl lagerfeld, the creative director of chanel. and the time is now 11:53am. it's been 200 years since the golden eagle was last seen soaring in the skies over wales. but now, thanks to ambitious plans from conservationists, the majestic bird of prey may soon return. 0ur correspondent, john maguire, reports from the brecon beacons. isn't he beautiful? an 11—year—old golden eagle. he isjust getting a little bit frisky this morning, waking up, may be getting a little bit hungry.
11:54 am
we are in the brecon beacons, but the plan is to reintroduce them further up in wales, up in north wales, in snowdonia actually. just going to have a quick chat with lewis, just trying to keep my voice down a little bit because he has been getting a little bit friskyjust in the last couple of minutes. lewis, just tell us a little bit about him. rooney is 11, male golden eagle. apex predator. an icon to the british countryside. absolutely stunning birds, you know. big wings, very powerful feet. and basically they are a killing machine, really. and they play a role in the countryside by, you know, taking out animals, eating carrion. but just a magnificent animal. he really is magnificent. let's talk a little bit more about that with dr paul 0'donoghue from wilder britain. you want to reintroduce them to north wales. it seems sort of counterintuitive because we think that they would be a risk to wildlife, but you say that's not the case? absolutely. it's about balancing our unbalanced ecosystem. so the uplands of britain and wales are broken, basically. biodiversity is at its lowest level historically. we need to restore that
11:55 am
balance by bringing back animals like golden eagles. they provide boosts to not only ecosystems but also ecotourism, rural economies, by providing jobs, opportunities for diversification for farmers. so it's an ecological and an economic boost. we know the national farmers union in wales here has serious reservations — partly because of a perceived threat perhaps to newborn lambs, but also to the indigenous wildlife, the type of thing that paul was just talking about. brian, you are the owner of the farm here. rooney flies with lewis here on the farm. what you think of the proposals? well, i think it's a very good idea. lewis is a very responsible guy and looks after the birds. i don't see a problem at all, really. because you, of course, you have cattle, you also have sheep, you will be lambing this time of year — is there a risk, do you think, to the newborn lambs? well, we start lambing now through march into april. there could be a risk but it's
11:56 am
a very minimal risk. and it's not a problem. golden eagles, absolutely majestic. a set of 50p coins celebrating the 20th anniversary of the gruffalo have been released. the famous monster is the creation of londoner julia donaldson and illustrator axel scheffler. the coins are expected to become very collectable — and of course it has "terrible tusks and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws". now it's time for a look at the weather. if you're taking a stroll in the deep, dark wood today they will be some sunshine and some rain around. let's talk about them bridge temperature records, the highest temperature records, the highest temperature we have a sort was in 1998, 19.7 celsius. look how this mild if not warm air is flooding all
11:57 am
the way up from africa, so by the time we get the end of the week and into the weekend whilst we might not be seeing 19.7 celsius, somewhere could get up to 17 18. today, we are in between weather systems. this strip of cloud as yesterday's rain and this massive cloud approaching from the west will bring wet and windy weather into northern ireland and later into scotland and northern england. we also have showers ahead of it so the perfect recipe for rainbows. we will keep showers going across western scotland, through the central belt, parts of northern england, wales and southern england. the way their wet rain becoming more persistent and the winds are strengthening. best of the sunshine across central and southern england. after a frosty start temperatures recovering. and increasingly windy day as well, becoming quite gusty as the rain settles in across northern
11:58 am
ireland and the winds continue to strengthen through the western isles, through this evening this band of rain continues to work its way north and east, it could be very persistent, up to a couple of inches in places. patchy across north wales and further south and east across england it should be mainly dry is cloudy. a much milder night, temperature is not much lower than six or seven. here we are mid week tomorrow, still a frontal system in place. mainly affecting the northern half of the uk. here we will seem outbreaks of rain, particularly through tomorrow morning, across scotland, into northern england, parts of northern ireland and wales for a time. pushing eastwards, becoming increasingly patchy as it does, and very little if any rain getting too southern and eastern areas. cloudy day, but mild, 12 or 13 celsius the top. maybe 1a share in parts of aberdeenshire. thursday, increasing sunshine, perhaps still a couple of showers but elsewhere are mainly dried day with a good deal of
11:59 am
sunshine. temperatures of 13 or 1a. the milder theme continues through friday into the weekend. increasing sunshine, temperature slowly rising, somewhere by friday or saturday could well see 17 or 18 celsius. you re watching bbc newsroom live ? these are today s main stories at midday: japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs, saying it needs to invest in a changing marketplace. this is a move towards electrification, we have started to see it in europe and started to see it around the world and it is in response to what our consumers are looking at and what legislation is driving us towards. french media are reporting that the veteran fashion designer karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85. the shadow chancellor admits
12:00 pm
labour needs to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warnings that more may yet leave. figures released this morning show record numbers of people are in work, unemployment is at its lowest rate since 1975. the president of the national farmers' union says it's absolutely shocking that there is no clarity about how britain s withdrawal from the eu would work. and could the golden eagle be making a return to wales? plans to reintroduce the species after 200 years. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the japanese car maker, honda, has this morning confirmed that it will close its plant in swindon in 2021. the factory employs 3,500 people, and it's understood all of the workforce have been sent home for the day. trade unions described the closure as a shattering body blow.
12:01 pm
the business secretary greg clarke said it was ‘deeply disappointing' the decision has been taken now. but honda's senior vice president for europe has told the bbc that brexit is not to blame for the decision. we'll be live at the honda plant in swindon in a moment, but first this report by colin campbell. fresh off the production line, new honda cars leaving the swindon plant this morning but in 2021 the factory will cease operations and close down. bowing to a waiting press on the's chief officer said it is because the company is accepting its commitment to electrifying cars. in response to unprecedented changes in the global automotive industry. honda say they will support their
12:02 pm
workers through a difficult time. we are very workers through a difficult time. we are very proud of what we produce in the uk and proud of our associates there, and that this is being driven by global forces and as i said we deeply regret the impact this is going to have on the people of swindon and we will work hard to make sure that we support them through this. paris have been made at the swindon site for 30 years, three and a half thousand workers will lose theirjobs. my wife works here, my brother works here my cousin works here, loads of us. her dad, her stepdad, her brother, mum works in the canteen, her other brother is the chef here. ten or 12 people just from our little family all work here. i have friends who work here whojust all work here. i have friends who work here who just got married and had babies and bot houses, you feel for these people. ifeel for everyone. i really do. and even the management that spoke to us inside,
12:03 pm
you can see it in their faces, they are just as shocked as everybody else. last month honda announced they would shut the swindon operation for six days in april to deal with any brexit disruption, some workers here now blame brexit for a more permanent closure. unquestionably brexit must play a pa rt unquestionably brexit must play a part in the decision, whether it is the biggest part i would question but when you are making long—term investment decisions as the car industry must, it is investing billions over ten your product cycles, any uncertainty is damaging. arriving at the 80s providing jobs for locals honda helps transform swindon into a vibrant business hub. for one manufacturing job there are fourin for one manufacturing job there are four in the supply chain and local economy so you're talking about three and a half thousand jobs at risk, if you multiply that by four we are talking about a significant number. a major impact on the local economy. honda say the decision to close the site was not taken
12:04 pm
lightly, they say they understand the impact the closure will have on all workers, suppliers and the local community. our news correspondent, athar ahmad is outside the honda plant in swindon. clearly this is a huge blow for the workers there and indeed the wider community, because in all the reaction i have heard so far today people are talking about how crucial this plant is for swindon, it is pa rt this plant is for swindon, it is part of the life isn't it? that's right at around nine o'clock this morning large numbers of workers at the honda car plant he is in swindon started leaving, driving up cycling out, walking out after being told by management earlier in the morning that the car plant was due to be shotin that the car plant was due to be shot in 2021 and three and a half thousand job losses were to be expected. as you said the car plant isa expected. as you said the car plant is a huge part of the local community here in swindon, notjust for those who work here but far beyond that and that is a sentiment
12:05 pm
being expressed here today by those who i have spoken to. one man said he had been here for more than 20 yea rs, he had been here for more than 20 years, and other individual i spoke to said he had 12 members of his extended family who had all worked at honda and different capacities over various periods of time. there isa over various periods of time. there is a real sense of shock and regret at today's announcement, many of the individuals here the announcement was coming but they are still surprised by the news. just to give some sense of scale, the site here in swindon is a 370 acre site, hundred and 70,000 honda civics were introduced last year. they were exported to the eu and america. this isa exported to the eu and america. this is a big part —— big plant with a big working force, many say they feel like it is a family that has been separated and shut down. effectively they are entering a period of limbo over the next three yea rs, period of limbo over the next three years, do they have any idea of what
12:06 pm
will happen next? absolutely that's trite and that is how the people i have spoken to today feel about it, and they are in a state of limbo and they are not sure what is going to happen next. the workers have been given the rest of the day off to go home and spent time with their families and try and reassess what will happen next, what they will do and then try and move forward. knowing that within the next 2—3 yea rs knowing that within the next 2—3 years the car plant here in swindon will be shutting down and that scene have thousand jobs will be lost. thank you. we are going to go straight to westminster where the business secretary is speaking at the manufacturers conference that our business reporter ben bland was reporting from a short while ago. let's listen in. the consequences from the logistical problems caused by new customs checks to potential
12:07 pm
limitations on sending skilled workers to the uk to install, maintain and service your products. there is a lack of adequate understanding, historically, in this country as to how intrinsic manufacturing is to the success of our service. many of your products, many of your revenues i know derived from the service contracts that you have in support of the manufacturing operations that you have in this country. and i also know, and entirely understand, the importance of having this resolved much more quickly than i think has been in prospect. the reality is that yesterday the first freighter that will arrive after the 215t of march set off from felixstowe bound for
12:08 pm
japan with no clarity under the terms under which its cargo will be admitted when it meets its —— when it reaches its destination. that is u na cce pta ble it reaches its destination. that is unacceptable to you and for me and for me it shows how absolutely essential it is to conclude the arrangements with a deal in the weeks ahead, and not only the last minute on the 20th of march, but as soon as possible. no one should regard waiting until the last moment when you are making decisions now that have consequences for many weeks and months ahead as acceptable. i have always thought of my colleagues in government have that in order to —— that we must then permit the outcome of the referendum ina then permit the outcome of the referendum in a way that protects prosperity and growth and jobs and thatis prosperity and growth and jobs and that is what we should insist on. no one wants to be put at a time when the opportunities we have in
12:09 pm
manufacturing specifically are greater than ever before. we will go on making sure that the argument that manufacturers put for a deal to be concluded swiftly something that is heard loud and clear. the deal proposed is by no means perfect but it does meet in the view of many here the needs that you have expressed and in particular provides more certainty in a time of great uncertainty. but of course decisions like conduct back this morning there starkly how much is at stake. honda's may have described as not being related to brexit, but to the changes taking place in the automotive sector and there are many people in this room that are aware of that and participate in that is why this is such an important time to build on the foundations that we
12:10 pm
have in our economy, to make sure that the profits from the opportunities especially in areas in which the uk has a stunning reputation. a few months after the eu referendum! reputation. a few months after the eu referendum i had a conversation with someone known to everyone in this room, the ceo of siemens, which give birth to the idea of made smarter, making sure that smaller firms have the ability to access the cutting edge of new technologies and subtypes are ta ken cutting edge of new technologies and subtypes are taken for granted by the larger research institutions, encouraging and helping smaller firms to adopt new technologies that can help them become competitive in this time of global change. and took create more jobs. the idea struck a chord and many people in this room are involved with the made smarter
12:11 pm
commission that resulted from that. and based on juergen's commission that resulted from that. and based onjuergen's work commission that resulted from that. and based on juergen's work and supported by you we have had a huge response across the uk from the manufacturing community, from companies big and small in every nation of the united kingdom. we have made substantial progress already and in september i chaired the first meeting of the made smarter commission attended by many companies in the room today. the very next month in october we announced £120 million to make sure the diffusion of technologies that we have in this country to supply chains in every part of industry should be able to be supported. and at the heart of made smarter, will be what i know is manufacturing's numberone be what i know is manufacturing's number one priority. there are so many lingering misconceptions that i know people are frustrated about,
12:12 pm
that people have the wrong view of manufacturing. the british public we re manufacturing. the british public were asked how to guess how uk manufacturing right globally. the average guess was manufacturing right globally. the average guess was 56. actually, we are ninth in the world. and can rise more strongly. kazakhstan is 56. but the perception needs to be counted and one of the big purposes of made smarter byjudith hackett idle is here today, and they are a leader to change positions of what manufacturing and engineering is about, to show the reality of modern manufacturing as being one of the most exciting locations that exists in britain today. we should be proud of the world—class manufacturing talents that we produce in this country, and we need to produce
12:13 pm
more. and whenever i meet apprentices, whether it is at the mtcjust outside apprentices, whether it is at the mtc just outside coventry, apprentices, whether it is at the mtcjust outside coventry, the am in sheffield, or making the uk's on apprentices, i am sheffield, or making the uk's on apprentices, lam blown sheffield, or making the uk's on apprentices, i am blown away by... the business secretary greg clark at mike uk the manufacturers organisation, we are saying goodbye and out viewers on bbc two. a business secretary saying just there that it was unacceptable that anyone should be waiting until the last minute to make decisions that are going to affect life in weeks and months from now and he pointed out that the first freighter that will reach japan after the 29th of march set off from the uk yesterday with no clarity on what the rules would be when it eventually reached its destination. greg clark speaking to the manufacturers organisation, make uk. the fashion designer
12:14 pm
karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85, according to reports by french media. the german designer was best known for his association with france's chanel, he was the creative director there for more than three decades. lagerfeld was instantly recognisable due to his distinctive look of dark suits, white pony—tailed hair and tinted sunglasses. 0ur correspondent leezo mzimba's here. at the helm of chanel for three decades? quite a record. absolutely, he was one of those figures that made an indelible impression on the industry, is well known for his appearance as he was for the clothes
12:15 pm
he designed, everyone as you say remembers the white hair, the black sunglasses, the high starched collars, that distinctive appearance. and that long association with chanel starting in the early 1980s, his association to with fendi and something that started in the late 50s and early 60s when his incredible talent first became apparent on the european fashion scene. fans from all across the entertainment industry as well as of course people at home, elizabeth taylor enjoyed the things that he designed, he has designed for people ranging from madonna to kylie for some of their music tours and of course what he has done for those fashion labels in the clothes that have gone into shops, really one of the great fashion figures of the past 50 years, at london fashion week people were wondering if he would come across for fashion week. he was going to the fendi show in milan ina
12:16 pm
he was going to the fendi show in milan in a few days' time. a lot of speculation had come about because he had missed a few shows recently and this was a man who almost always turned up to the fashion shows that he was particularly involved with, so that cost a lot of speculation that has been going on right up to this week at london fashion week and then about an hour ago the sad news coming out of paris that one of the greats of fashion, karl lagerfeld, had passed away at the age of 85. the fashion world in so many others will be in mourning for one of the greats. just seeing a response from donatella versace boasting a response on instagram, we will never forget your incredible talent and its end —— my endless inspiration, we we re its end —— my endless inspiration, we were always learning from you. what do you think it was about karl lagerfeld that kept him at the top of his game for so long? especially at the helm of such an iconic
12:17 pm
fashion house. it has to be a variety of things, won an incredible work ethic that went right the way into his 80s, he put the hours in, he oversaw so much of what went on. a great businessman as well, you can't exist at that level in major fashion house without having a great deal of business acumen as well. but at the core of it and almost unique creativity in how he combines traditional with experimental and kept the designs of fresh over the yea rs kept the designs of fresh over the years so that many people wanted to work with him. i think a combination of those three things is what made him one of the great designers of the fashion world. thank you. the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell says labour needs a "massive listening exercise", after seven of its mps resigned in protest at jeremy corbyn's handling of brexit and anti—semitism. the seven backbenchers left to sit as independents — and the labour leader has been warned that he faces the prospect of more resignations. last night, two conservative mps told the bbc that they too
12:18 pm
were considering leaving their party to join the group. let's talk to our assistant political editor, norman smith, who's at westminster for us. what do you think that massive listening exercise is going to mean in practice? sometimes there has been a criticism ofjeremy corbyn that he says the right things but in terms of a practical response does not necessarily follow through, that has particularly been levelled at him when it comes to the top of anti—semitism. him when it comes to the top of anti-semitism. the initial point of it is all about tone, trying to change the mood around these defections. i would not expect to see a timetable for a listening grips with labour mps are anything like that. this is about changing the atmosphere and trying to strike a more emollient, more conciliatory tone. striking thatjohn mcdonnell even suggested this morning that he
12:19 pm
hoped they would be able to continue some form of dialogue with these seven defectors. this seems to me is clearly a n attem pt seven defectors. this seems to me is clearly an attempt to try and forestall the possibility that other labour mps who are similarly privately disparaging of mr carbon's leadership and despair over the pa rty‘s leadership and despair over the party's approach to brexit might also be toying with the idea of going, not giving them that excuse by adopting an unnecessarily aggressive approach towards them, instead saying 0k we know you have concerns, we are prepared to take them on board. even concerns about mr carbon's style of leadership. but have a listen to mr mcdonnell as he was leaving home. we were at a labour party meeting last night and people were very straightforward, i listen to what tom watson said and i agree with him, we need to start listening. we need a mammoth, massive listening exercise. we need to address some of the criticisms that have been made. we are finding
12:20 pm
a way forward but it has got to be on the basis of taking the advice of people like tom watson, the plp and others. how worried are you about this group of seven defectors?” others. how worried are you about this group of seven defectors? i am really disappointed, i don't understand why they have gone and i still can't understand it, all the issues they have raised we are addressing and i would rather they stayed with his unhelpful sort those problems out there and walk away. i am hoping we maintain some form of dialogue. . factors have been wrestling with where they should sit in the house of commons because they will no longer be at the labour bench, we now know and you can see them here, angela smith there alongside her chris leslie and next to him gavin shocker, sitting on the dup benches, which is an interesting place to sit. there was some discussion about whether they could sit at the front alongside dennis skinner but i think he may react adversely to that. they wanted to
12:21 pm
sit by the dup perhaps because there is more space there, up there you also get quite commonly, lydia sylvia and perhaps a more open environment to get a seat as it were. so far no one else has joined them, we heard from a prominent labourmp them, we heard from a prominent labour mp this morning saying she had been approached but no thank you she would not be joining them. had been approached but no thank you she would not bejoining them. one of the seven saying in effect, give us time, it is only day two, we are going to have to spend a little bit of time organising and pulling together a new party and i guess thatis together a new party and i guess that is the truth of it. building from basically zero is going to take quite a bit of effort, money and organisation and therefore i think it may be some time before we see others deciding whether they too are going tojoin. the image of those mps are sitting at that particular area of the green benches, just
12:22 pm
having a quick look ahead to tomorrow, because we have had confirmation from the eu commission that mrjuncker will be meeting theresa may early tomorrow evening, what more do you know about that and what more do you know about that and what they hope to do? there was a lot of chitchat as about whether we will now see the government begin to move more forcibly towards the idea of some legal language, text, to provide the necessary assurances on the backstop rather than the idea of alternative arrangements and different customs and technical procedures to get round the idea of a hard border. this after steve barclay was in brussels yesterday along with the attorney general, at the end of which they basically seem to have been given a no—no on the idea of using new technologies and customs procedures and instead it seems geoffrey cox will be returning to brussels tomorrow with possibly some
12:23 pm
sort of larger language that he believes could give the necessary assurances on the backstop. their amount he will be giving a speech i think tomorrow evening, also about what he feels are the necessary assurances that the uk need to be certain that we are not making trouble on the backstop so there is the sense that the government is now beginning to move more towards the idea of trying to get some sort of legal guarantees on the backstop rather than relying is brexit years have been hopping on some sort of new technology or customs procedures to avoid a hard border. thank you. the rate of employment in the uk has continued to climb, with a record 32.6 million people in work between october and december. latest figures from the office for national statistics, released this morning, show unemployment fell by 111,000 in the three—month period. that translates to a 4 percent unemployment rate. and average weekly earnings increased by 3.4 percent. earlier i asked our business correspondent, simon gompertz,
12:24 pm
to put these employment numbers into context for us. he h e co ntext he context is that the worry we have today about jobs, particularly he context is that the worry we have today aboutjobs, particularly in the car industry, and yet we have here a very positive set of figures. consider these numbers, 80,000 more self—employed people, 80 , 000, consider these numbers, 80,000 more self—employed people, 80,000, two, full—time employed people, a very high proportion of the number of people getting jobs is full—time rather than part—time jobs people getting jobs is full—time rather than pa rt—time jobs and people getting jobs is full—time rather than part—time jobs and that is good news. you must point out that this is a period from christmas looking back over a few months, last year, when the situation did look pretty good and it does reflect the nervousness creeping into the jobs market in january and february. alongside thejobs market in january and february. alongside the jobs figures of course it is important to look at what wages are doing. and according ——
12:25 pm
magnus according to the latest 0ns figures. this is plus 3.4% year—on—year, figures. this is plus 3.496 year—on—year, not everyone is getting that it is an average. but it means the rate at which it will —— wages are rising as at a faster rate at which prices are rising in the shops so we are getting ahead by about 1% per year and that gives people a little more spending power. what about zero—hours contracts? how many of these jobs are zero hours? which clearly is an area of concern for many people. again if you worry about casual labour and you think it isa about casual labour and you think it is a problem but there are more zero—hours contracts out there, it has dropped a number of people in that situation. generally speaking a much rosierfigure on employment that situation. generally speaking a much rosier figure on employment and wages and wages leave us in a better position since 2011 with the buying power of what we have been paid. we are still slightly behind where we we re are still slightly behind where we
12:26 pm
were before the financial crisis. are still slightly behind where we were before the financial crisism the context of brexit, fewer eu citizens employed in the uk in that period? that is right, the number of people who have come here to work from eu countries has dropped sharply in the number from countries around the world has gone up and thatis around the world has gone up and that is perhaps as a result of the controversy that is perhaps as a result of the co ntrove rsy over that is perhaps as a result of the controversy over brexit over these recent yea rs. mori action now to the news of the death of karl lagerfeld, creative director at chanel for more than three decades. french folk has just paid tribute to him sing the longest fashionjourney ended paid tribute to him sing the longest fashion journey ended today, karl lagerfeld has died taking with him more than half a century of visionary fashion which was both free and inclusive. a self—taught master he referred to himself as a com plete master he referred to himself as a complete improvisation, he was a liberated and creative spirit who followed only his instincts which never failed followed only his instincts which neverfailed him. he will forever be associated with chanel and it was
12:27 pm
there that he created some of the most iconic silhouettes of our time, his designs were the epitome of french elegance. a vision that he shared with the whole world. that's tribute to karl lagerfeld who has died at the age of 85, from french folk. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have some very mild temperatures to come, as we move towards the end of the week. the temperature is widely in the mid teens but a few spots could see 17 and 18 degrees. through this afternoon we have outbreaks of rain, spreading into the west, the best of the dry and brighter weather towards the east. the sunshine turning a bit hazy here with temperatures between nine and 12 degrees. as we go through this evening and overnight stay wet and
12:28 pm
windy weather continues to push its way in north and east, particularly heavy for a time for north—west scotla nd heavy for a time for north—west scotland and cumbria. further south seeing some dry weather with clear spells are not quite as cold as it was last night. overnight lows between six and 8 degrees. tomorrow a cloudy day today with rain pushing east and scotland and northern england, ireland and wales becoming increasingly patchy as it does so. drierfurther increasingly patchy as it does so. drier further south and east with the best of any brightness for south—east england, and temperatures ata south—east england, and temperatures at a maximum of 13 or 14 degrees. goodbye. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — the business secretary says the announcement is a "bitter blow". the veteran fashion designer karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85 in paris. he was the creative director of chanel for more than three decades in addition to running his own label. the shadow chancellor admits labour needs to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warned that more may yet leave. as the prime minister prepares to meet the european commission presidentjean claude juncker tomorrow, brussels says
12:29 pm
that the brexit withdrawal agreement cannot be re—opened. official figures show record numbers of people are in work. according to the office for national statistics, unemployment fell by 14,000 between october and december. let's get more reaction to the news that the chanel creative director, the german born designer karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85. more than three decades at the helm of chanel. joining me on the line helm is fashion director of the new york times, vanessa friedman. what you think it was that kept him at the helm of chanel for such a long time? it wasn'tjust chanel, he
12:30 pm
was also at the helm of another company since 1965 and had his own brand from the 80s. he was truly the most omnivorous, curious, self—propelled autodidact. he could not stop. he said that work is what kept him going. he was absolutely fascinated by the process. and you refer to his work ethic, and french vogue calling him a self master. he refer to himself as a complete improvisation. what was his background? he grew up in hamburg, either in 33,35 or 38 depending on who you talk to. we believe it was 35. he was raised by a very demanding, very easily bored mother. and really treated i think in his own version as a kind of little
12:31 pm
prince. she gave him an appreciation of luxury, of manners, of the proper way of doing things, of culture. and then he came to paris and started working. he didn't know to formal fashion school. he won an international prize when it was a mark of great distinction, he won at fur coats and shared it with a seller role at the time. he learned while doing and i think one of the marks of him was that he was always learning. whether it was about books orart or learning. whether it was about books or art or people or social media or music. he was constantly in the process of discovery. and in your estimation, what has his contribution beam to our sensibility about what makes good design? the thing about carl that really changed
12:32 pm
fashion wasn't so much a garment per se, but the actual his model for working. he was one of the first designers to take on a heritage house and transform it and update it. and that has become the model with which the entire luxury industry is built. that is how all these houses have continued and karl lagerfeld was the one who did that. and i think he is still the model to which everyone looks. he took chanel, which at the time he took it over was relatively fusty house with a very popular perfume, and he transformed it, made it one of the most influential, exciting, buzzy brands, and he managed to continue that as you say over three decades. and he did it partly through the sense del webb sets he created for the shows, which were incredible. he
12:33 pm
builtan the shows, which were incredible. he built an iceberg, a supermarket, an aeroplane hangar, a cruise ship, rocket ship. and then through his use of communication, he created short movies, he did his own ad campaigns, what with all sorts of celebrities. healy had this ability to update what was really a heritage brand. thank you. that's the news that karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85. each year in the uk, more than 50,000 people die from sepsis. it's a serious complication resulting from an infection, and can lead to multiple organ failure. now a team at the university of strathclyde hopes a new test they've developed could help speed up diagnosis, potentially saving thousands of lives a year. tim muffett reports. twice my heart stopped, i had two cardiac arrests in hospital, and i was in an induced coma for eight days. what started as a sore throat nearly ended ryan's life.
12:34 pm
i went to the doctor and was sent home. i was gradually feeling more unwell and i really couldn't recognise what was happening to me. my whole body ached, i felt really confused. ryan was sent home again by a different gp. the next morning, i collapsed in the house. my wife phoned an ambulance. and the paramedics came out and the first thing they said was it could be sepsis. it was really scary, i couldn't believe somebody could go from having a sore throat to almost die. a quicker diagnosis could have got ryan on antibiotics faster. he has made a full recovery, but a quarter of sepsis survivors suffer permanent, life—changing after—effects. normally, when we pick up an infection, our immune system tries to fight it, attacking the germs that caused it. with sepsis, and no—one fully understands why, it overreacts, attacking notjust the infection but organs and body tissue as well. a one—hour delay in administering the correct antibiotic can lead
12:35 pm
to a 10% increased chance of death. blood tests and diagnosis can take hours or days, so, this team at the university of strathclyde in glasgow have been working on a way to make it easier and quicker. we have put an array of eight sensors on to a microchip, and these sensors are about the same size as a human hair. this enables us to measure a sepsis marker in the blood at very low situations and very quickly. so, you could drop the blood on to the chip, and get a result on screen. it tells us a sepsis biomarker was present in the sample. what impact could this technology have? ultimately, save lives and reduce suffering from sepsis. getting a diagnosis early is critical. it will be at least three years before this product is available, and medical expertise will still be needed to come up with a diagnosis. but the work is receiving a cautious welcome. sepsis now kills more people than bowel, breast and prostate cancer combined.
12:36 pm
the number of episodes that are recorded of sepsis is increasing. a lot of that is because we are reporting and therefore recording it more frequently. but, of course, we have a growing population, and an ageing population, and sepsis preferentially affects the very young and very old, although not exclusively. if you feel very much more unwell than you have before, and if something just doesn't feel right, trust your instincts. phone 101 or go and see your gp, and just ask, could it be sepsis. sepsis is treatable and survivable but, as ryan knows, a late diagnosis can make things far worse. tim muffett, bbc news. earlier i spoke to campaigner melissa mead — a mum from cornwall whose son died from sepsis in 2014just after his first birthday. she explained how he was misdiagnosed. for the whole time we took him to
12:37 pm
the doctors, we were sent away with just the diagnosis of a viral cough. so there was no, like you say, they did not suspect it at all and if they are not going to suspect it i'm not going to be able to think about it because i simply did not know what it was. and how quickly did it become clear that william was gravely ill? from his first symptom of sepsis to his death was 36 hours, and we were sent home during that period, even though he was gravely ill. and i think highlighting on ryan's story just there, ill. and i think highlighting on ryan's storyjust there, he was sent home by the gp, so in many circumstances these kind of tests are fantastic but actually we need to make sure that the people in the community are thinking about sepsis. absolutely. and afterwards, when you learned what had happened, did it shock you that gps, doctors in the hospital, that they did not realise sooner that this was what was wrong? precisely. i think it was
12:38 pm
devastating. for us, we would have hoped for a conclusion that he had died of something that was so rare that no one could have spotted it. but to be told that it was quite common, the uk's third biggest killer, and that doctors and co nsulta nts killer, and that doctors and consultants and all are trained on it is heartbreaking for us. of course. and we know that if sepsis is caught early enough and treated with antibiotics and fluids, it can be treated very successfully. now, the new rapid test from the researchers at the university of strathclyde, it can potentially give a diagnosis in 2.5 minutes. currently that can take up to 72 hours. so that is an amazing step forward , hours. so that is an amazing step forward, isn't it? exactly. anything that helps to identify sepsis much more quickly will always be welcomed. but we have to remember that the doctor treating the patient has to suspect it in order to do that test, and we also need to make sure like we had in the report before that people are getting to
12:39 pm
eat their a before that people are getting to eat theira in before that people are getting to eat their a in a much more quickly because within an hour, with a 10% increase on the chance of dying, that people are getting there quickly, that gps are thinking of sepsis, in order to get the test quickly in order to get treatment quickly. and as members of the public that we are armed with the information to say to a doctor, could it be sepsis? so obviously there is the speed of the test but there is the speed of the test but the awareness is absolutely crucial. since the time of william's death, how much do you think the awareness of sepsis has improved?” how much do you think the awareness of sepsis has improved? i think it has improved dramatically. people are talking about it in the community, we see it in the doctor's surgery, we see it in dental pharmacies, the work of the sepsis trust gets into the homes and communities and that is where it needs to be. 0ver communities and that is where it needs to be. over 70% of sepsis cases come from the community. and
12:40 pm
thatis cases come from the community. and that is where the information needs to be and we need to empower the public with that information and enable them to be confident to make a decision and also be confident to raise that question, could it be sepsis. melissa needs talking to me earlier about the death of her little boy, william, and her campaign since raise awareness of sepsis. the national farmers union is holding its last conference before the uk is due to leave the european union. the president, minette batters, said a no deal brexit is the stuff of nightmares . speaking directly to the environment secretary michael gove, she said that it was absolutely shocking that farmers had no clarity about how britain s withdrawal from the eu would work. and we can cross to birmingham and talk to minette now. good afternoon. thank you for your time on this very busy day. very much a parallel message that we are hearing out of your conference today and also what greg clark the business secretary was saying to manufacturers when he mentioned a short while ago that it was
12:41 pm
absolutely unacceptable that people should be waiting for decisions so close to brexit. tell us more about the message you gave to michael gove. absolutely, and we were making the case that it is 38 days, 900 hours, and we have been promised as business across the country that we would have clarity, we would have certainty, we have no certainty on anything. and indeed michael gove is anything. and indeed michael gove is a minister who drove vote leave, a bsently a minister who drove vote leave, absently resolute in his opinion that no deal is a very bad place for the country, but in particular the british agriculture. so everything i said no deal was reinforced by him, and just to say that for us it is about an orderly departure, this is not about cancelling brexit, it is about an orderly departure so we can plan a future free trade agreement and not allow a massive shock, an
12:42 pm
unprecedented shop to our industry and business in general. do you think that moment has been missed now for the opportunity for an orderly departure? the secretary of state made the point that he still remains certain that parliament will come together, support the prime minister and her plan to leave the eu, which ultimately takes us into a transition period which would be an orderly departure, and that is what we would like to see. he was categoric and indeed to the questions that he had afterwards he could provide no certainty on anything. particularly around the tariff situation, it has been widely reported that government wants to see zero tariffs on food going forwards, that would leave our market open to food that would be illegal to produce here. we talk about lower standards, what we mean is actually standards that we are not allowed as standards there were
12:43 pm
farmers to produce too. so there are many reasons why a no deal is unacceptable, but if i could cite one in particularfor why unacceptable, but if i could cite one in particular for why long—term low no deal is so bad, it would be around the alliteration of the tariff wall. he could only give a sure if the tariff for some sectors of the short term only. tell us more about the subject of tariffs, and what impact that could have and to what impact that could have and to what extent that could impact on british farming. he had a question put to him which i think sums it up. surely, it weakens the negotiating position if you don't want equality officer reciprocated tariffs on both sides? but i think this is such a densely populated country, 66 million people, government of course long—term cheap food policy in this country, we as farmers have said we wa nt to country, we as farmers have said we want to make sure food stays affordable, we don't see any spikes
12:44 pm
in food prices because ultimately the market will work for us. so providing affordable food is absolutely key, but this being undermined by a standards that we can't have access to, it is no different to cars or anything else. you want to have safe with lowering emissions, all we are saying is we don't want a two tier market in food, we want to maintain our standards and welfare and environmental protection. but he could give no assurance on the longer term of any tariff protection at all and of course other ministers reported in the press as saying we should look to have no tariffs on anything. so it is that sort of thing that really would decimate british agriculture. for consumers who are buying the food that farmers produce, british farmers, if you we re produce, british farmers, if you were in that no deal scenario with your worse fears realised, what
12:45 pm
impact will it have for the food consumers currently buy? it's impact on every level. we produce currently 60% of the food we consume in the uk. the point i was making in my speech was we want to maintain that, we believe there is a great opportunity to actually produce more of britain boss mike food in the uk, more of what we are good at. and why would we want to see the british marketplace, farming businesses, undermined by others who produce food to different standards? it is to me absolutely obvious that the vote to brexit is about making sure effectively we are having more british food on more british plates and not less, and you look at the challenges with climate change, air miles and everything else, it makes sense that we focus on farmers' ability to care for the environment and produce whatever food we can,
12:46 pm
what we are good at, within the uk. so big one worries about standards, that they are protected. very much so, and he gave me a level of certainty. we asked for a commission to be pulled together to produce a report by the end of the year as to what uk agriculture because mac offer would be in future free trade agreements. i had to push michael gove very hard to say yes or no, will you support the commission? can i have it in writing? and he did, for the first time, commit to yes, he would put it in writing. so that for us is very reassuring. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news: japanese car giant honda confirms it plans to shut its swindon factory in 2021 with the loss of 3,500 jobs — the business secretary says the announcement is a "bitter blow". the veteran fashion designer karl lagerfeld has died at the age of 85 in paris. the shadow chancellor admits labour
12:47 pm
needs to conduct a "massive listening exercise" — after seven mps quit the party yesterday and warnings that more may yet leave. the head of scotland yard has warned if progress continues at the current rate, it'll take a hundred years for the met to be ethnically representative of london. but the commissioner cressida dick insists the met is "utterly different" to how it was twenty years ago, when it was branded institutionally racist by the mcpherson report into the aftermath of stephen lawrence's murder in eltham. let's hear more of what she had to say. we are recruiting right now. we have had some new money and we are out, recruiting. last year we we re we are out, recruiting. last year we were recruiting somewhere about 28%
12:48 pm
black and minority ethnic recruits. and that is great. and i want to see that continue and i want it to even increase in the future. but of course police officers do stay, it isa course police officers do stay, it is a job that people like doing and tend to stick with once they have arrived. and most people will stay 30 or 35 years. so it takes a long time to change. however, if you go out on the streets now, you will see the front line teams have a much higher proportion than 14% of their officers being black and minority ethnic. and clearly londoners are responding positively to that. people are saying it is great to have someone who speaks polish, it's great to see someone who looks like me, it is great to know a member of my family wants to join and they wouldn't have 15 years ago. i think things are changing fast and i would like them to change faster. your head of hr says it will take a
12:49 pm
hundred years at the current rate of progress, isn't that shocking? london has changed incredibly fast. i hope you don't think this is a cheap comment, but i walk around newsrooms, i walk around newspapers, i walk around many another organisation, and i don't see the representation that we have. and what i do see is a real desire to speed up in terms of a proportion of our recruits that are from black and minority ethnic groups, to make sure we retain them, to make sure we progress them, and the comment you refer to was on the present rate of, the last rate of trajectory, it will ta ke the last rate of trajectory, it will take a long time. that is why we are investing more in it, that is why we are campaigning more strongly on it. that is why we are trying to break down myths and stereotypes and barriers that exist in some parts of our communities about how people see the metropolitan police. so i am obviously ambitious to speed that up
12:50 pm
and we have set ourselves some quite challenging targets for five and ten yea rs challenging targets for five and ten years from now. so you hope it won't be hundred years? i really hope it won't be. of course we don't know what will happen in the rest of london in that time, so it is hard to know how our society will be then. i'm just hoping that the gap between the met‘s representation in london's representation will decrease. quite dramatically. more tributes are coming into karl lagerfeld, the chief director of chanel who has died at the age of 85. more news on the last hour or so of his death after more than three decades at the helm of chanel, arguably the role for which he was best known although of course he was also in charge at fendi and ran his
12:51 pm
own label and was a prolific photographer. victoria beckham saying on instagram, so incredibly sad to hear this, cole was a genius and always so kind and generous to me both personally and professionally. rip. and the editor in chief of british vogue saying, i am deeply saddened to hear of the passing of karl lagerfeld, he has exerted an incredible influence over the fashion industry over the past six decades. carlotta felt who has died at the age of 85. it's been 200 years since the golden eagle was last seen soaring in the skies over wales. but now, thanks to ambitious plans from conservationists, the majestic bird of prey may soon return. 0ur correspondent, john maguire reports from the brecon beacons isn't he beautiful? an 11—year—old golden eagle. he isjust getting a little bit frisky this morning, waking up, may be getting a little bit hungry. we are in the brecon beacons, but the plan is to reintroduce them further up in wales, up in north wales, up in snowdonia actually.
12:52 pm
just going to have a quick chat with lewis, just trying to keep my voice down a little bit because he has been getting a little bit friskyjust in the last couple of minutes. lewis, just tell us a little bit about him. rooney is 11, male golden eagle. apex predator. an icon to the british countryside. absolutely stunning birds, you know. big wings, very powerful feet. and basically they are a killing machine, really. and they play a role in the countryside by, you know, taking out animals, eating carrion. but just a magnificent animal. he really is magnificent. let's talk a little bit more about that with dr paul o'donoghue from wilder britain. you want to reintroduce them to north wales. it seems sort of counterintuitive because we think that they would be a risk to wildlife, but you say that's not the case? absolutely. it's about balancing our unbalanced ecosystem. so the uplands of britain and wales are broken, basically. biodiversity is at its lowest level historically. we need to restore that
12:53 pm
balance by bringing back animals like golden eagles. they provide boosts to not only ecosystems but also ecotourism, rural economies, by providing jobs, opportunities for diversification for farmers. so it's an ecological and an economic boost. we know the national farmers union in wales here has serious reservations — partly because of a perceived threat perhaps to newborn lambs, but also to the indigenous wildlife, the type of thing that paul was just talking about. brian, you are the owner of the farm here. rooney flies with lewis here on the farm. what you think of the proposals? well, i think it's a very good idea. lewis is a very responsible guy and looks after the birds. i don't see a problem at all, really. because you, of course, you have cattle, you also have sheep, you will be lambing this time of year — is there a risk, do you think, to the newborn lambs? well, we start lambing now through march into april. there could be a risk but it's
12:54 pm
a very minimal risk. and it's not a problem. a set of 50p coins, celebrating the 20th anniversary of the gruffalo have been released. the famous monster is the creation of londoner, julia donaldson and illustrator axel scheffler. the coins are expected to become very collectable — and of course it has "terrible tusks and terrible claws, and terrible teeth in his terrible jaws". i'm sure many of you are familiar with those lines from the book. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown, but first it's time for a look at the weather with lucy martin. hello. some very mild temperatures on the way this week. as we drag in some milder warm airfrom the canaries, you can see it here on the
12:55 pm
air mass, that yellow colour spreading in from the south. as we move towards the end of the week we could see temperatures widely in the mid teens but some spots could get as high as 17 or 18. a real spike in temperatures as we move through this week. today we are in between two weather fronts, you can week. today we are in between two weatherfronts, you can see week. today we are in between two weather fronts, you can see this one having cleared towards the east, thatis having cleared towards the east, that is yesterday's a that is yesterday's weather, a bright start but the next area of cloud already pushing in from the west as we move through this afternoon. temperatures largely in double figures, highs of 11 or 12, but it is turning increasingly wet and breezy as we see those outbreaks of rain working gradually north—east through tonight. particularly heavy for western parts of scotland and cumbria as we move into the early hours. further south i think if we draw a line from southern wales to the wash, south of that it looks likely dry and across the board it will be a fairly mild night. overnight lows between seven and 11.
12:56 pm
moving into tomorrow, we have two weather fronts affecting our weather. the first clears fairly quickly, the second, a cold front, working from the west bringing outbreaks of rain. tomorrow is looking fairly cloudy, outbreaks of rainfor looking fairly cloudy, outbreaks of rain for scotland, northern ireland, northern england, gradually pushing eastwards. as it works eastwards it will become increasingly light and patchy, their best chance of any dry and bright weather in the south—east and bright weather in the south—east and the temperatures up a touch, highs of around 13 or 14. thursday, a few spots of light rain or drizzle in the north and west, much of england and wales brightening up to see a good deal of sunshine. again, look at the temperatures, mild for the time of year, highs of 14 or 15. moving towards the end of the week that high pressure is going to continue to dominate the south and east. always one or two weather fronts close to the north and west, so here the greatest chance of
12:57 pm
patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle and a bit more cloud. temperatures in the mid—teens, perhaps 17 or 18 in the mid—teens, perhaps 17 or 18 in the warmer spots. "don't blame brexit," says honda, as it confirms it's closing down its factory in swindon 3,500 jobs will go in two years' time — the unions call it a shattering blow. there's about 10, 12 peoplejust from our little family, all work here. good friends that work here and i know they've just got married, had babies, just bought houses, and you feel for these people. have japanese firms lost faith in the uk? we'll have a special report from tokyo. also this lunchtime — after the resignation of seven labour mps, the shadow chancellor says the party needs a mammoth listening exercise. donald trump is sued by 16 american states for invoking emergency powers to build his wall. karl lagerfeld — a creative giant of the fashion industry —
12:58 pm
dies at the age of 85.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

43 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on