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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 23, 2019 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. with steph mcgovern and jon kay. the headlines at 10am: our headlines today: a warning to theresa may from three three cabinet ministers demand of her cabinet ministers — ‘get a deal approved by parliament — brexit is delayed if parliament fails to approve a deal or face delaying brexit‘. a warning to theresa may from three in the coming days. cabinet ministers who say voting gets underway in nigeria's delayed presidential elections — r&b star r kelly hands himself with reports of militant attacks in at a chicago police station — in the north east of the country. after being charged with multiple, sexual—abuse offences. here's the scene live in lagos where some of the 80 million it's a huge weekend in the six nations championship, people eligible to vote, with this afternoon's match are casting their ballot. between wales and england being billed as the tournament decider. the singer r kelly is due to appear in court in chicago and while the professionals after being charged with ten counts slug it out in cardiff, of sexual abuse, some i've been finding out what the sport involving underage girls. is doing, to get thousands more women and girls involved. and what a day we had yesterday with tony foulds first—time buyers return in greater and the thousands of people numbers to the property market — who joined us for a special despite the soaring programme in sheffield to honour cost of deposits. the airmen who lost their lives in rugby — wales aim for a record there 75 years ago — today we'll take you behind 12th win in a row when they face the scenes to show you what it was like onboard one of england in the six nations the flypast aircrafts. in cardiff this afternoon. and coming up — the travel show heads to los angeles good morning. a dry day with plenty of sunshine. it will turn miles,
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however this morning we have some dense patches of fog. that's across parts of southern england. a full forecast a little bit later. it's saturday 23rd february. our top story, three senior cabinet ministers have said openly that brexit should be delayed if theresa may fails to get a deal through parliament. writing in the daily mail, the work and pensions secretary amber rudd, business secretary greg clark, and justice secretary david gauke said, leaving without a deal would be "disastrous". we're joined from our london newsroom by our political correspondent susana mendonca. this is really unusual to have senior cabinet ministers apparently going it alone and publishing their own version of events. yes, extraordinary to have cabinet ministers going against the government line, because theresa may has been very clear that she sees
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brexit as happening on the 29th of march and she is working towards deals to make that happen. we know privately these cabinet ministers have had reservations about the direction the brexit issue has been going, but you have them come out and say that they think the whole process should be delayed rather than ending with no deal is quite extraordinary. brexiteer is have reacted with hostility to this. we have had andrew bridge in, a backbench brexiteer, who has said that these mps should resign if they are not going to stick to collective responsibility. also suggesting this is an orchestrated attempt by the director of communications to try and get them to get back theresa may ‘s deal, to bully them into it. we don't know if that is the case, but downing street have said the prime minister is working towards getting a deal with the eu, that all backbenchers could support. we have votes this week, we understand there will be amendments again. one of
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those amendments from yvette cooper and oliver luck when it is around trying to delay brexit if no deal is achieved. looking at what these cabinet ministers have said today, it suggests that if no deal is done, they might be looking to back that amendment. a very difficult week ahead for the prime minister again. another busy week ahead for you lot. thank you. labour is to announce new plans for flexible working which — it says — will provide more support to women. in a speech today, the shadow women and equalities secretary, dawn butler, will say that a change in the law is necessary to close the gender pay gap, and to dismantle barriers that hold women back from promotion and progression. a man and woman in their 70s have died, after a car they were in was hit by a van, being pursued by police in south—east london. officers say a van was being "driven erratically at speed" in eltham and failed to stop — before colliding with a carjust after midnight.
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the driver of the van was arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. the incident has been referred to the independent office for police conduct. voting has opened for presidential elections in nigeria, where there have been reports of a series of explosions in the northeast of my—da—guri. in the northeast of maiduguri. poor weather conditions, security concerns and allegations every time we come to you, the crowds are building. what is the atmosphere like? yes, people streaming in slowly, coming to cast their votes. at first they were still quite calm, people were quite eager once polls opened. others have been joining eager once polls opened. others have beenjoining them eager once polls opened. others have been joining them through the morning. they have a card reader here which is a machine they used to
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identify voter cards, to check they are authentic. they also check your biometric details. one of them stopped working so there was a bit of commotion earlier. generally things are pretty calm. there has been a lot of unrest. the fact that this selection is happening is really important for the country. yes, definitely. this is africa's most populous nation as well as its largest economy. anything that happens here is watched closely by the rest of africa as a reflection of the state of democracy in the region. it is incredibly important, security has been an issue for many voters here. the islamist group boko haram has been waging war, particularly about six hours from where we are now. they have been fighting government forces there for the last ten years. this morning we are hearing that in the capital there were some blasts hard, some gunshots. the police say they were just security exercises. we are not clear what that means. plenty of
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witnesses telling us they heard gunshots and found it quite alarming. particularly on voting morning. whites thank you. fascinating hearing how elections work in different countries. we take it for granted that we can vote so eagerly. —— easily. the american musician r kelly has surrendered himself to police and been charged with a series of abuse and assault allegations. the singer, whose real name is robert sylvester kelly, denies all of the charges and is due to appear in court in chicago today. monika plaha reports. at one point he was the biggest name in r&b, but here r kelly is being is escorted by security as he handed himself into chicago police. # i believe i can fly... he has had massive crossover hits globally, through it all allegations and rumours of sexual abuse against underage girls were never far away. and in 2008 he went to trial on charges of child pornography, after a tape surfaced allegedly
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showed him having sex with a 13—year—old. but he was acquitted when the jury decided the tape wasn't clear enough. some women were paid not to talk and others started to come forward to say what had gone on. i did realise that he had a problem and i couldn't fix it. now prosecutors feel they have enough evidence to press charges relating to four victims. earlier today, robert kelly was indicted before a cook county grand jury on ten counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. it appears a recent tv series speaking to alleged victims gave others the confidence to come forward, too, to try and getjustice against one of the biggest selling us stars — for abuse allegations going back more than two decades. monika plaha, bbc news. one of britain's most wanted men has been extradited from switzerland to the uk— after spending years on the run.
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mark acklom, who disappeared in 2012, allegedly posed as an mi6 agent to con a gloucestershire woman out of £850,000 life savings. he's currently in police custody and will appear at bristol magistrates court today. venezuela has shut part of the border with colombia, after the government complained of serious threats against its sovereignty and security. tensions have been rising over a row about the delivery of humanitarian aid. two people have been killed by venezuelan security forces near the border with brazil. the luxury apartment block, that belonged to colombia's infamous drug lord, pablo escobar, at the height of his power and fame, has been demolished in the city of medellin. it had become a popular tourist attraction, which many local residents found offensive and disrespectful. a ceremony was held outside the building, to honour the victims of the criminal organisation
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led by escobar. white smack that tourist attraction is no more. wow, buildings like that coming down. some breaking chocolate dress news. 15 minutes ago we were talking about a fashion show where all of the outfits were made from chocolates. we then had a chocolate here get in touch as saying that she has made chocolate dresses for a london chocolate dresses for a london chocolate show. i asked how you make sure they don't melt. she said we melted some of the chocolate onto the dress to stick them on, so the dresses made of fabric and they melt the chocolate to stick them on. some we re the chocolate to stick them on. some were also sewn the chocolate to stick them on. some were also sewn on. the chocolate to stick them on. some were also sewn on. the catwalk was kept cool but our model did end up with melted chocolate on her. air conditioning on full blast. you just eat them as you are going round. thank you very much, julia, for
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letting us know how to make a chocolate dress. it is ten past nine. he was desperate to know. i was, i still have many more questions. thank you forjoining us here. a high courtjudge in glasgow has ta ken the unusual step of allowing the identification of the teenage boy, who raped and murdered six—year—old alesha macphail, on the isle of bute. media outlets argued it was in the public interest to identify 16—year—old aaron campbell, who is facing a life sentence after being found guilty of abducting and killing alesha lastjuly. we'rejoined now from glasgow by media lawyer david mckie. can you just explain to us why the decision was made to remove this restriction? in short it is because of the severity of the offence. in scotland, and in england, we have an
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automatic ban on identifying any accused person, or a complainer, who is under 18 involved in a criminal just as process. but there is an exemption available to ask the courts where it is in the public interest to do so to have that span lifted. that is what we, a number of media outlets, apply to the court to do yesterday. how significant do you think this is? it's very unusual that these bands are lifted. i can't think of many, i have been doing this for over 20 years. from the sense that it is very unusual, that is significant. in terms of moving forwards, i'm not sure we will have many more applications. this one was very well considered, carefully considered and responsibly considered and responsibly considered by the media before going to the court. to ask for permission
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to the court. to ask for permission to have the automatic ban lifted. one of the concerns about this is the rehabilitation side of it. how can the murderer be rehabilitated if eve ryo ne can the murderer be rehabilitated if everyone knows who he is? do you think that's a concern?” everyone knows who he is? do you think that's a concern? i don't think that's a concern? i don't think so here. this is a case where the likely sentence is going to be one of life imprisonment. he will be imprisoned for an awful long time. he is already serving his sentence. i don't know if he has been formally sentenced yet but he is in custody. he will be in custody for a long time. one of the arguments we had was that on his 18th birthday, we would have been able to name him in any would have been able to name him in a ny eve nts. would have been able to name him in any events. he would have been in custody then. he's not going back into the community, back to school. we wouldn't have made the application had he been cleared. it was only on the basis that he was convicted. i don't see the rehabilitation being affected at all
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here. another concern is the fact that butte is a small place, by being named this could have an impact on his family. yes, whether you look at it as fortunate or not, the law does not really protect his family. they do sometimes effectively by extension, but the family is not protected. the protection only lasts for the child until that child turns 18. this was regarded as an exceptional case and there were reasons why the application was made to have that ban lifted. do you think there are any wider implications from this? not particularly. this was a particular case, i'm not going to say unique. it was different from other cases, unusual. we may see some more challenges. i know in england, the most famous case is the bulger case. it was many years ago. you don't see many cases where somebody under 18 is identified.
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either as a victim or more significantly here as a —— as an accused person. is it difficult these days to keep a name hidden because we have social media and so many people out there are often naming people before it's got to court? that's a very good points, one that we in the media sometimes can be frustrated at. the mainstream media behave very responsibly. we know the name is in the social media, it is out there. this name was relatively well hidden. i'm not sure how extensive it was. you are right, it is one of the problems of the modern age, trying to control social media. it's extremely difficult to police. thank you very much for your time. a media lawyer there. it is 9:15am on a saturday morning. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. the lovely weather will continue. a
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fine weekend coming up. a beautiful start to the day for a number of places. already the sun out in force. think sky there in western scotla nd force. think sky there in western scotland because we have a weather front section within here. a bit of rain later on. further south fog is causing problems. particularly across, a swathe of southern england, the home counties, parts of the midlands, east anglia. some dense patches around. worst visibility below 100 metres in places. that's leading to poor driving conditions. take extra time on the roads. a number of flight cancellations at london city airport due to the fog. murky weather, slowly lifting. it could take a time across parts of eastern england. is that weather front moving its way into, bringing splashes of rain. in northern ireland, some damp weather. for much of england and wales, dry with some sunshine. temperatures could reach 18 celsius. to put that
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into context, at this time of year we would normally see highs of eight or9 we would normally see highs of eight or 9 degrees. it is 10 degrees above normal. there of the temperatures we would expect in late may. six nations rugby matches taking place this afternoon. front against scotla nd this afternoon. front against scotland in paris and wales taking on england in cardiff. both matches have similar weather. sunshine and temperatures around 1a degrees at the time of kick—off. overnight, clear skies for a time but low cloud will reform through the night. perhaps mist and fog patches drifting further north with time. temperatures, a cold night, two to five celsius in towns and cities. in the countryside, patches of rust into sunday. sunday starts on a cold notes. the wind is coming from a long way south across our shores. another very mild late february day. the low cloud, mist and fog, patchy frost will tend to lift for most areas. staying rather cloudy in
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northern ireland. clear blue skies elsewhere. a lovely day. still very mild, temperatures 11 to 15 or 16 degrees. temperatures a shade down on what we will have this afternoon but still a long way above average. this high—pressure keeping the weather dry. a weather front brushing the far north of scotland. that will bring rain to the hebrides, highlands and orkney and shetland through monday. otherwise dry with sunshine. the trend through the week ahead is for those temperatures to gradually come down a little bit. but staying above average. average in london this time of year is about nine. 1a is still for about normalfor of year is about nine. 1a is still for about normal for the time of year. that is the latest weather. we were very grateful for that good weather yesterday in sheffield for the fly—past. yesterday in sheffield for the fly-past. it was amazing. if you we re fly-past. it was amazing. if you were watching yesterday, you will have seen it yourself. in sheffield, to remember 10 us servicemen, who lost their lives
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when their plane crashed there 75 years ago. breakfast‘s john maguire took to the skies in one of the 10 planes which performed a special fly—past, organised in their honour. let's take a look back at the view from the cockpit. today we thought we would follow it up today we thought we would follow it up by today we thought we would follow it up by seeing what was happening in the air. our reporter was in one of the air. our reporter was in one of the plains performing the special fly—past. now we can take a look at the view from the cockpit. as dawn broke, the earlier warnings of fog evaporated and the crews from various bases prepared to come together as one, to honour those
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who had flown before them. the men of the mi amigo were about to take to the skies once more. in name, at least, on the sides of the f—15 strike eagle jets. and we were hitching a ride on a tanker. the weather looks set fair. this is the aircraft we will be flying on. it is a mid—air refuelling aircraft. the crews are just doing their pre—flight checks before take—off. our plane, the kc—135, flew from raf mildenhall in suffolk to sheffield in around 25 minutes. once there we formed up with the other aircraft in the memorial flight. especially being stationed here in england, with their rich history of the 100th, and all the aircraft that have gone before us, being able to honour this crew on the 75th anniversary is a very special honour and a privilege. we are right at the back, underneath the aircraft.
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this is the position where the boom operator lies when they're lining up the boom for mid—air refuelling. a perfect place to get a bird's eye view of the crowds down below us in endcliffe park. as the numbers swelled below, they were clearly visible from the air. 2,000 feet above them. one of the f—15s lifted out from the formation. this is the missing man, to remember those lost in conflict. the thousands in the park came to pay tribute to the ten crew men who died here at 75 years ago. and to thank the one man who is here everyday, and for whom this means so much. three cheers for tony! three of the mi amigos crew, at the request of their families, have remained in england and are buried here at
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american cemetery near cambridge. we filled the inscription with sand from normandy beach. it is very poignant because everything was leading up to d—day, 6th june 19114. this is the 75th anniversary this year. it is poignant that we use that sand to fill in the names, the inscriptions, so that they stand out for the families. overhead, the f—15s flew past in tribute once more. as the crews arrived safe and sound back at base, there was time to reflect on a significant day. it was absolutely phenomenal, it really was. everything was like absolute clockwork today. we hit our timing within a second which is amazing — as an air crew, you like to be on time. to be able to honour tony, sheffield and the community, to be able to give back in just
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a very small way, we're very grateful, very honoured and very humbled to be able to do this. in the air and on the ground, inspired by tony's selfless dedication, thousands chose to play a part to commemorate ten young men whose lives were cut short but whose service will always be remembered. i've got goose bumps again, every time. when i see tony's face as well. spending the morning with him yesterday, he was just so modest about it. he was overwhelmed by everything but equally he was just, kept talking about how it was for the men, his family, as he called them. just didn't accept that it was actually him as well that was such a big part of the story. he is in all of the papers today. some brilliant pictures of him. that's great. watching the fly—past with his hands up watching the fly—past with his hands up in the air. just before it, he
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said to me, is it all right if i stand up and wave at them? i said, tony, you can do whatever you like, of course you can! this is for you just as much as for them. as soon as the fuss and the crowds and the display was over, he just quietly went away and went back to the memorial, where he goes everyday.- various points he said to us, i'm just going to go and see my family. i thought he was going to see his lovely fa m ily i thought he was going to see his lovely family who were there, but he meant he was going to the memorial to to his lads. and tell them what was happening. every so often he would go and chat to them and tell them what had been going on. it was just magical. all everyone from sheffield who came and who travelled from far to be there, thank you very much because that really made it for him. i know everyone was very touched to be able to have watched it. i was going to say he will enjoy looking at those pictures but he
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doesn't watch telly. he didn't know who any of us wear! he was walking along and someone waved in my direction and i thought they were waving at me, so i wait and then realise they were waving at tony! wind your neck in, staffs!|j realise they were waving at tony! wind your neck in, staffs! i think he will get a lot more of that. if you'd like to see more highlights and reaction to our coverage of the flypast, have a look on our facebook, twitter and instagram pages. details are on your screen now. mathematician and computer scientist, anne—marie imafidon is here to tell us what's caught her eye in the papers. whites mag pagers, a pager on an emergency. and surprisingly we still have them in our hospitals. matt hancock, health secretary, has suggested we need to upgrade a little bit. use some of the new technology that we are using in everyday life, and allow medical
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professionals to be able to use that, rather than still painting each other. maybe a whatsapp equivalence. i noticed we had a message saying there are some occasions where it wouldn't be helpful to have a phone go off, if you are in surgery, adding that vibration of the pager but it not interfering. i don't know how true that is. it's amazing that a p pa re ntly that is. it's amazing that apparently 10% of the page is in the world a re apparently 10% of the page is in the world are being used in the nhs. are you surprised? world are being used in the nhs. are you surprised ? who world are being used in the nhs. are you surprised? who else has had a pagerin you surprised? who else has had a pager ina you surprised? who else has had a pager in a long time? i wonder who else is paging each other? even having it in surgery, you could set it to vibrate. i think they checked it to vibrate. i think they checked it doesn't interfere with the machinery. the idea is it, you probably wouldn't use your pager in surgery probably wouldn't use your pager in surgery anyway. it is fascinating to think that it is still here. it really is. let's look at this one, this is the story we mentioned from the labour party and their flexible
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working pledge. done but is announcing this today, that labour, when the next general election, or next time they are in power, they will suggest that all people are given the opportunity to have flexible working from day one. to make this a big norm which, i know we have had across the technology industry for a while, allowing people to work flexibly. different hours. for labour they are talking about the fact that this will help the 46% of women who fit in caring for others around work. it is a nice, a nice way to be able to use technology and other things to lighten the load for all kinds of different people. but also there have been other stories about present he is, where we don't have to do this 95, it doesn't fit with the way we live at the moment. to be able to legislate for that and mean that everyone is able to take advantage would be fantastic. the danger is, we end up working all the time because we can always be
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contacted. your pager always going off! i do think that if more people we re pa rt of off! i do think that if more people were part of it, we would be able to figure those kinds of things out together. if there are some people are 95 and others doing flexible, you get that kind of murkiness. in workplaces where they are used to it, everyone knows that is a line that has been drawn, that person is not online and we will not poke or prod them and expect them to read e—mails. it is definitely a move in the right direction. we were reporting a few weeks ago that amy winehouse was going on tour, years after she died a hologram of her would be going around the world. it looks like, according to this report, that might be off. it has been delayed, put on the back burner for now. interestingly not because of technical capabilities but because with the things you tend to need the person's permission. of course with amy there is a bit of a question as to how we would get her consents for her hologram. family or
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the estates. apparently the family have been supportive but there are still questions about the ethics. just because you can build it, doesn't mean you should. we have to be careful with that whatever it is we are creating. interesting. thank very much. my stomach is rumbling. mine has been rumbling all the time. that must mean it is time to talk to michelle ruth. in the saturday kitchen. good morning! our special guest is comedian rob. thank you for having me! we will talk later properly. about food and whatnot. and of course comic relief. what is your idea food heaven? i'm a big fan of cockle and whelks. i have never had them cooked, only out of a bag of
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vinegar. i'm interested to see what you can do with them. and how? leather, orange and dark. to be honest, i know you are good but i don't think you can pull this out of the bag. —— liver, orange and duck. two great chefs on here as well. what will you be cooking?” two great chefs on here as well. what will you be cooking? i am cooking candy striped beetroots.. little bit of orange in there but i will let you away with it. a little bit of orange in mine as well. have you got any orange for us? know, but something super classic. a little bit more off—piste with this dish.
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you have the wines and look forward to. he at home are in charge of what rob eats at the end of the show. those of the website for booking details. see you at 10am. headlines coming up shortly. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and jon kay. coming up before 10am, chris will have all the weekend weather, but first a summary of this morning's main news. three senior cabinet ministers have said openly that brexit should be delayed if theresa may fails to get a deal through parliament.
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writing in the daily mail, the work and pensions secretary amber rudd, business secretary greg clark, and justice secretary david gauke said, leaving without a deal would be "disastrous". downing street insists theresa may is working hard to secure a deal ahead of crucial votes expected next week. the government has awarded contracts worth more than £100 million to external consultants for work on brexit. according to analysis for the bbc, companies have been hired in areas such as recruitment, research and it. the government said it was standard practice to draw on the advice of specialists, but the civil servants' union described the money spent as "eye—watering". a teenager has died after being shot and stabbed in north london. police were called to a group of people fighting in wood green yesterday evening. two men were taken to hospital, and a 19—year—old man died in the early hours of this morning.
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no arrests have been made, but police are appealing for witnesses. voting has opened for presidential elections in nigeria, where there have been reports of a series of explosions in the northeast of maiduguri. poor weather conditions, security concerns and allegations of corruption have delayed the process by a week. 84 million people are expected to vote over the next few hours, with some having travelled through war zones to place their ballot at temporary polling stations. the american musician r kelly has surrendered himself to police and been charged with a series of abuse and assault allegations. he is due to appear in court in chicago later today. the r&b star is best known for his hit song "i believe i can fly". in january, several women publicly accused him of abusing them in a documentary series broadcast on us television. the singer, whose real name is robert sylvester kelly, denies all of the charges. one of britain's most wanted
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men has been extradited from switzerland to the uk, after spending years on the run. mark acklom, who disappeared in 2012, allegedly posed as an mi6 agent to con a gloucestershire woman out of her £850,000 life savings. he's currently in police custody and will appear at bristol magistrates court today. venezuela has shut part of the border with colombia after the government complained of serious threats against its sovereignty and security. tensions have been rising over a row about the delivery of humanitarian aid. two people have been killed by venezuelan security forces near the border with brazil. the luxury apartment block that belonged to colombia's infamous drug lord pablo escobar at the height of his power and fame has been demolished in the city of medellin. it had become a popular tourist attraction, which many local residents found offensive and disrespectful. a ceremony was held outside the building to honour the victims of the criminal organisation
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led by escobar. a tourist attraction no more. quite an attraction watching it come down! those are this morning ‘s main news stories. it is a huge weekend of sport, isn't it? yes, six nations paris and cardiff, where the states are starting to fill up. choirs are warming up their vocal chords, the goat is being fed before it leaves the team is out onto the pitch. it is a huge game. wales and england are unbeaten in the tournament so far. england are ranked third in the world. wales are ona ranked third in the world. wales are on a record match—winning streak.
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you are with the man who helped england demolish their team on the pitch in 2013. yes, it is requiring every bit of self restraint not to marauder out onto this fabulous stadium pitch. i have been told in no uncertain terms, keep off the grass. i have been warned. two people who know only too well what it is like to grace this wonderful turf, lewis moody, former england captain, andjamie turf, lewis moody, former england captain, and jamie roberts, welsh international. 36 nations titles each, but lewis does have that winners medal in his back pocket, but we don't need to discuss that just yet. plenty of action to come in what is a big world cup year. the focus on this match at wales against england. you must have been impressed by the way england have played so far. hugely impressed. the first game against ireland, an away win, and in such style. not only the
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way they handled the ball, but defensively, the number of dominant connections they put in was remarkable. because of that, in itself winning away against ireland put england ahead in this match, but this is a big occasion, it is a difficult game ahead. is it fair to say that wales have not yet hit their stride, jamie, but i am sure that warren gatland will have prepared his team sensibly this week, and you need no bigger occasion than this, playing england. exactly, if there is any day to improve your stride and kick off your championship hopes, it is today. wales have not fazed yet, and i hope they do today. they have the potential today. — — i hope they do today. they have the potential today. —— fizzed.
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i hope they do today. they have the potentialtoday. —— fizzed. last week would have given wales a chance to iron out those mistakes and get the right game on the park today. all week we have talked about what it is like to play in this stadium. with the seat so close to the pitch, asa with the seat so close to the pitch, as a visiting player it is quite a unique atmosphere, isn't it? as a visiting player it is quite a unique atmosphere, isn't mm as a visiting player it is quite a unique atmosphere, isn't it? it is, it is unique. jamie reminded me that he bumped before his try in a quarterfinal in leicester against cardiff, we went on to win so it didn't matter, but it isjust a remarkable place. the atmosphere, and when you are inside, the build—up to it. as an englishman coming in, the atmosphere outside the stadium is as impressive as it is inside. just the noise, as soon as you walk onto the pitch, the fireworks, the music, the fans, the singing. obviously the wells are synonymous with singing. it is a beautiful place to come. —— the
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welsh. england can expect a fervent atmosphere on their way into the stadium later. it is the second match of the weekend. scotland get under against france in paris, but they also have not hit their stride as yet, have a question mark they have not won in paris in 20 years. will that be playing on their minds? i think so. history is nojudge of the present, you treat each game as they come. scotland have a lot of injuries, but for them to have the squad they have in paris is a testament to gregor townsend, it is still a strong side. scotland host wales in the next round. if scotland can pick up a victory in paris, that game against wales becomes paramount. scotland won their first game with a bonus point, and this makes them great. i bet you guys wish you were playing. hundred percent. thank you for your company
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this morning. what a day it is going to be. a great occasion, a wonderful match, and with the roof open, the sun is out, it is a beautiful day for rugby. let's hope the game later will live up to it. john, throw a little one to lewis orjamie. but don't get it on the grass! all right, is it. oh, very good! look at that, an england player passing to a wales player. it is all very friendly. great stuff. next to another england batting collapse, in the west indies. england had elected to bowl, but it was hard going, as a century from shimron hetmyer helped the hosts set england a target of 290. england looked set to reach that total until they lost their last six wickets forjust 35 runs and west indies levelled the series at 1—1.
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fulham's hopes of staying in the premier league have been dealt another blow, they lost 3—1 at west ham. fulham had made the perfect start, ryan babel scoring his first goal since joining the club last month. there was controversy over west ham's equaliser with replays appearing to show the ball coming off the hand ofjavier hernandez. issa diop and michail antonio then got the goals that leaves fulham eight points from safety. watford are up to seventh after they thrashed struggling cardiff 5—1. gerard delofayo scored his first senior hat—trick and watford's first in the top flight since 1986. captain troy deeney got the other two. in the scottish premiership a contenderfor goal of the month. it's hibernian's stevie mallan as they won 11—2 at dundee. that's two wins out of two,
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for new boss paul heckingbottom. chris eubank says he's petrified of his son losing his big fight tonight against james degale. it's a crucial career fight for 33—year—old degale, who is a two—time world champion and olympic gold medallist at super middleweight, while chris eubankjunior has yet to break into the sport's elite. de gale, says the loser, will have to retire. for me, i don't let the occasion, i don't let the trash talk, the hype. i don't let affect it my mindset. i thinkjames does. i think as we get closer and closer, he is going to get more and more edgy and rattled. for me, stay focused, stay professional. stay dangerous. what a moment for teenager emma parker, who was trying to become, the first woman to win a match in a men's world ranking snooker event. she was on a break of 16, and must have thought this could be her chance
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against india's laxman rawat at the snooker shoot out in watford. but this red just missed the middle pocket and it cost her as she went onto lose 61 points to 17. stoke city will pay a special tribute to their former goalkeeper gordon banks when they play aston villa later. the england world cup winner died this month, aged 81. current goalkeeperjack butland will wear this plain jersey. it recreates the one banks wore as stoke beat chelsea in the 1972 league cup final, their only major trophy. a lot of focus will be onjack backlund today. imagine if aston villa ‘s player comes in with a header and he pulled off one of those saves! it is 20 years this weekend since the public enquiry into the murder of stephen lawrence,
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the teenager who was stabbed and killed racist attack in london. the report found the metropolitan police to be "institutionally racist" and made 70 recommendations to change the culture of police forces in england and wales. so, what has changed in the last two decades? we're joined now by duwayne brooks, a friend of stephen lawrence, who was with him on the day he died. thank you so much forjoining us this morning. 20 years after we first heard that phrase "institutional racism". how much progress do you think has been made? good morning. i believe the met have made huge progress in moving forward some of the recommendations that we re some of the recommendations that were put forward by macpherson. but i think the question today has got to be, is the met institutionally racist? my answer to that would be this. macpherson held an independent enquiry where he listened to
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evidence from both the police, members of the public, and external organisations, and he concluded with his panel that the met was institutionally racist. today, if they met once to relieve itself from that label, we need to hold a similar exercise. the met say that back then only 3% or 4% of officers we re back then only 3% or 4% of officers were from another background, they say progress has been made and things have been changed. when you see those statistics, does that convince you that things have changed enough? society has changed, and you would hope that the met would reflect society. in saying that, if you were to dial 999 today because you need assistance, the skin colour of whoever turned up would not be the first thing on your mind. even so, we do want a police force that is inclusive, and a
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police force that represent the community it serves. the reason we wa nt community it serves. the reason we want that is because it builds trust and confidence. it makes you feel safer. if the consensus is that visible policing makes us feel safer, then we have to same and follow the trend that meeting and engaging with police officers that look like, follow the same religion as you, or follow the same sexuality as you, or follow the same sexuality as you, or follow the same sexuality as you, will make you feel more confident. how much confidence do you think there is? how much trust is there in the community now, 20 yea rs is there in the community now, 20 years after that report? that is a difficult question, and that is why i think burnett should hold an independent enquiry into policing today. —— the met. we are still having the same problems that i believe took place 20 years ago. but you have a discussion about it, we need an enquiry by the public organisations that work with the police, and police officers themselves can come along in a safe
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environment and talk about what their experiences are today. an interesting idea, so to compare where we were two decades ago, and see how far we have come, like a direct comparison? yes, i wholeheartedly believe that the commissioner was going to produce a report to show where they met were, what they have done with the recommendations, and where they are today, but it hasn't happened. all we have heard are hollow words. the met have moved on. where is the evidence? i suppose they might say that the evidence is in the statistics, that the number of officers from different backers has increased significantly in that time, that the tension has improved in that time, that it is a different force with a different outlet, reflecting london and the community ina reflecting london and the community in a different way now. macpherson mentioned two things that are still an issue today. one is stop and search, and the others progression
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and retention and recruitment. we need to know more about what has happened inside the met because we know what is happening outside, we have seen about stop and search, and we know there is an issue holding onto bme offices in the net. we need to know what is causing this, and i believe the only way we can get to the bones of this is by having another independent enquiry. not as large as what we had before, but a similar exercise. how safe do you feel? how confident are you personally these days?|j feel? how confident are you personally these days? i feel safe, i feel the majority of londoners feel safe. from my personal experience, 80% of the police officers that i worked with, and have worked with, have been professional, inspirational, great professional, inspirational, great professional officers, and they are doing a greatjob every single day. they make me and my family feel
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safe. duwayne brooks, thank you. can ijust safe. duwayne brooks, thank you. can i just say safe. duwayne brooks, thank you. can ijust say a safe. duwayne brooks, thank you. can i just say a couple of other things? i made a statement yesterday on the radio four about racist police officers, and i wanted to clarify that those officers who i asked worked with, 80% are doing a fantasticjob, none worked with, 80% are doing a fantastic job, none of worked with, 80% are doing a fantasticjob, none of those are racist, but i would like to say that i. racist, but i would like to say that i, as somebody who has experienced racism internet, could never sit down and say there are no racist offices in the metropolitan police. we still have some of the issues we had 20 years ago. duwayne brooks, thank you forjoining us this morning. here's chris with a look at this morning's weather. it is unusual at this time of the year, to have such mild, warm weather. yes, it is like we have skipped a whole season. these haemorrhages are more like late may. this morning ——
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temperatures. this morning, the sun illuminating this cloud. this weather front has brought a bit of damp weather into northern ireland already, and there is the low cloud and fog that has been affecting southern and eastern areas of england. here, visibility is still down to 100 metres in places, so some poor travelling conditions. some problems with london city airport due to foggy weather. the fog will tend to lift and clear, becoming slaves to clear across eastern areas where it could loiter. —— becoming slow to clear. it will cloud over in scotland later on with the rain moving in, also affecting the rain moving in, also affecting the far west of england and wales. wherever you are, a very mild today, temperatures touching 18 celsius, unusual weather for this late stage of february. there is temperatures running around 10 degrees above normalfor running around 10 degrees above normal for the running around 10 degrees above
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normalfor the time of running around 10 degrees above normal for the time of year in some places. two rugby matches taking places. two rugby matches taking place in the six nations later on. both of them will be covered live on bbc one. france against scotland and wales taking on england in cardiff. the weather will be similar in both areas. sunny spells, temperatures around 11! celsius at the time of kick—off. tonight, clear spells at first, low cloud will form overnight, but further north than last night. a colder night with temperatures in towns and cities to — five celsius, but colder in the countryside, cold enough for some frost first thing sunday morning. sunday, another mild day of a starting chili. the wind coming from more or less where the canary islands are. the low cloud, mist and fog will clear, some sunshine coming through across england, wales and scotland, and in northern ireland it will probably stay cloudy into the afternoon. still very mild for the
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time of year. the fine weather is set to continue. we do have a weather front bringing a little bit of rain on monday across the hebrides, north of the highlands of scotland, and into parts of orkney and shetland. otherwise, the high pressure stays with us on monday. more very mild weather, 18 celsius in london. but there is a trend for the week ahead for things to cool offa the week ahead for things to cool off a little bit, but still above normalfor off a little bit, but still above normal for the off a little bit, but still above normalfor the time of off a little bit, but still above normal for the time of year. that's the latest weather. a quick question, chris, what did you want to be when you were growing 7 a bank manager, a dustbin man, because i liked the button they had on the back of the bin lorries, and believe it, a weatherman. i really did want to be a weather man! you have achieved your dreams, i love it. we have a guest on the sofa with his
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mum who has already achieved so much at the grand age of 13. josh is here with his motherjoanna, already an established fashion designer. tell us established fashion designer. tell us all about it. what have you achieved so far? we saw a film of you earlier, but it is fantastic, and we have got one of your fabulous dresses here as well. yes, i did london fashion week in february and in september last year. last weekend, i showcased there, ijust had a stand there. in 2017, i did my first ever show in portland. so where you 11? i wasjust 12. first ever show in portland. so where you 11? i wasjust12. that is amazing. how do you make this a dream come true? a lot of people have ambitions at your age, but to be on the cat walk, showcasing your
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work, that is remarkable. it is amazing to see your sketch, the process , amazing to see your sketch, the process, and to see it going down the runway at the end, it is amazing to see the whole process. mum joanna, where did this all start? ever since he was a child, a baby boy at the age of four, he would sit in front of my wardrobe, pull out some of my dresses, draw them again, at his own spin to them. it is to get a little bit frustrating, "can i sit in front of your wardrobe, mummy?". sit in front of your wardrobe, mummy? and you sit in front of your wardrobe, mummy?". and you would think he began again, sticky fingers on dresses, but he would roll with it because you could see the talent building as the years went by. these are some of your creations in this film. how big do you want to be? yes, iaim film. how big do you want to be? yes, i aim to be as big as alexander mcqueen, chanel, all those top designers. tell us about this dress next year. how did you create this?
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i literally sat down with my sketchbook, this took me ages to sketch. it started out completely different. then i just sketch. it started out completely different. then ijust rub it out, we different. then ijust rub it out, we drew, and came up with that. how did you get to the catwalk? how did people find out about you? through the house of icons, they get all the publicity and magazines, editors.“ there someone who is a family friend? no, we were introduced to the ceo of house of icons. they put oi'i the ceo of house of icons. they put on shows during london fashion week, and josh did his first shakers in 2018 with the capsule collection, some of the pictures you see on the boards behind, and in september last year it went on to the evening wear. now the next show coming up in september will be another big
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evening. what do your mates at school say, when you turn up in school say, when you turn up in school on a monday morning and they have been doing other stuff, and you say you have been to fashion week, displaying my latest creations in milan, or whatever you have been doing? a lot of people are like wow, that's amazing. some people asked me to make them something. but a few people i like, why is he doing that? it is something i enjoy, sol people i like, why is he doing that? it is something i enjoy, so i keep doing it. it must be hard work. to create something like that, as you say, must take a lot of time. do you fit in your schoolwork? yes, it is easy, any spare time i get it is all focused on my fashion.|j easy, any spare time i get it is all focused on my fashion. i am so tempted to wear that, it is beautiful. well done, josh, thank you, man. we will keep this recording so we can say, remember the day when he came in? good luck with your career, we have no doubt he will be a great success. thank
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you. that's all from us at breakfast this morning. sally and rachel will be here tomorrow from 6am. we'll leave you with a final look back at our special programme from sheffield yesterday, when we remembered 10 us airmen who crashed their plane there 75 years ago. it was such a memorable day. i was there with around 10,000 people. thank you to 82—year—old tony foulds, who told us about their story, and to the thousands of you who came to see a special military fly—past. we saw this plain circle, just over the rooftops. he tried to go over the rooftops. he tried to go over the trees, and the next thing we knew, boom.
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i always kiss them. if people pass, they must think i am daft. but i will never stop. 22nd of february this year, you would love some sort of fly— past this year, you would love some sort of fly—past over this memorial to mark the occasion. it gives me great pleasure to say look to the skies on 22nd of february for a very special flyby. you got your flyby, tony! every day we are those who have gone before us, but when we have an opportunity to do something on a commemorative day like this, it is an absolutely amazing opportunity. this is a story i have known my entire life. to know that, 6000 miles away from my home, there is a man who has dedicated his life to remembering them, means so much.
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these people have come because you have told the story of these ten men, and you have told it so well. three cheers for tony! it started off as more or less nothing, to see how many people have actually taken note, it is fabulous. that was worth waiting 66 years for.
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