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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 28, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm: a woman convicted of killing her husband with a hammer wins an appeal against the murder conviction. sally challen now faces a retrial after defence lawyers argued she'd suffered decades of psychological abuse. her son gave his reaction to the news. it's an amazing moment, you know? the courts have acknowledged this case needs to be looked at again, as we've always said as a family. the abuse our mother suffered we felt was never recognised properly and her mental condition was not ta ken into account. the summit between president trump and kimjong—un ends in failure after north korea demands relief from economic sanctions in return for denuclearisation. north korea's foreign minister says their position will not change even if the us seeks further talks. a man is found guilty of manslaughter after he supplied his girlfriend with drugs
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at the bestival music event in 2017. ceon broughton did little to help 24—year—old louella fletcher—michie as she suffered a reaction to a class—a drug. the man who booked emiliano sala's fateful flight to cardiff city alleges the player was abandoned by the club, but doesn't blame anyone for his death. i don't know hold anyone responsible because it was just a tragic accident. we did nothing wrong. we just tried to help. the house of commons has been debating climate change for the first time in two years. only a handful of mps actually attended the debate, which was led by layla moran, a liberal democrat, who secured the discussion after being inspired by schoolchildren who went on strike over climate change last month. lam i am playing all the right notes,
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but not necessarily in the right order. andre previn, the oscar—winning film composer, conductor, and star of this famed morecambe and wise sketch, dies at the age of 89. good evening. a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack after what she said were decades of abuse will face a retrial after her murder conviction was quashed. 65—year—old sally challen admitted killing her husband richard in august 2010, but denied murder. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports from the court of appeal. for sally challen‘s son david and her lawyer, this was partial victory.
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they had hoped to have the conviction reduced to manslaughter, but the appealjudges ruled that instead sally challen must face a fresh murder trial. it's an amazing moment. the courts have acknowledged this case needs to be looked at again, as we've always said as a family. we felt the abuse our mother suffered was never recognised properly and her mental condition was not ta ken into account. there was an emotional atmosphere in court and supporters were disappointed this was not an end to the legal process. sally and richard challen were married for 30 years, and her lawyers had argued that throughout this time, she was a victim of her husband's emotional abuse, known as coercive control. in 2010 at the family home in surrey, she killed him, hitting richard challen more than 20 times with a hammer. during the appeal, the court heard from experts about sally challen‘s mental state.
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in giving the ruling, thejudge said that in the opinion of a consultant forensic psychiatrist, sally challen had been suffering from two mental disorders at the time of the killing and this evidence hadn't been put before the jury at the original trial. sally challen wasn't in court. she had followed the proceedings by video link from prison. she must now prepare for a new trial. at a news conference this evening with her family and supporters, her lawyers said they would now be attempting to have herfreed on bail as they wait for a trial date. a summit between donald trump and the north korean leader kim jong—un has ended early without agreement. a signing ceremony was cancelled at short notice because president trump said the us refused north korean demands for all sanctions against them to be lifted. in the past few minutes, the north koreans have denied this. despite the abrupt end of talks, mr trump claimed the relationship between the two men remained strong. 0ur north america editor jon sopel reports from hanoi.
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it all seemed to be going so well. president trump and chairman kim wandering through the gardens of a smart hanoi hotel, the pair apparently relaxed and getting on. and then a small piece of history — a reporter shouted a question at the north korean dictator, something that doesn't happen in pyongyang, and he answered. translation: if i'm not willing to do that, i won't be here right now. polite laughter. but then the rumours started to circulate that things were going awry. there'd be programme changes, the white house told us. the talks had been due to go on all morning, and then, according to the white house schedule, there was going to be lunch and a signing ceremony, but it all fell apart. it's hard to overstate what a failure it is that, after eight and a half months of talks, a draft agreement,
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the principals flying in, and then everything turning to dust. as the delegations went their separate ways, it looked as though kim jong—un had overplayed his hand in demanding full sanctions relief and donald trump had overestimated his persuasive skills in getting the koreans to denuclearise. so, it was a rueful donald trump who appeared at his news conference. they were willing to denuke a large portion of the areas that we wanted, but we couldn't give up all of the sanctions for that. i suggested there might be another explanation. mr president, do you think it was premature to have held the summit when all these things had not been tied down? in the white house schedule last night, it said signing an agreement today, and i wonder as a follow—up question, whether you could just sketch out what the next few months look like. you always have to be prepared to walk. i could have signed an agreement today, and then you people
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would have said, "oh, what a terrible deal, what a terrible thing he did." you have to be prepared to walk and, you know, there was a potential we could have signed something. i could 100% have signed something today. we actually had papers ready to be signed. the one thing that wasn't fast was kim jong—un‘s 60 hours on a train getting here from pyongyang, regular cigarette breaks on the way. surely he'd been hoping for more. and donald trump hadn't travelled halfway around the world to return back to the us empty—handed, but he is. jon sopel, bbc news, hanoi. a man who supplied his girlfriend with a class—a drug at a festival has been convicted of manslaughter. 30—year—old ceon broughton is due to be sentenced on friday morning. he had denied he was responsible for the death of 24—year—old louella fletcher—michie, the daughter of the holby city actorjohn michie. she died at bestival in dorset after taking the drug 2—cp. yes, this has been
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a really painful trial. described by louella's family as really harrowing. her parents and brother and sister had to sit in court and watch the final moments of her life filmed on a mobile phone by her boyfriend ceon broughton. after giving her what he described as a "bumped—up dose" of the hallucinogenic drug 2—cp, he filmed and photographed her as the drug took hold over a number of hours. and in woodland on the outskirts of the bestival site, she became increasingly agitated, screaming, distress, screeching and repeatedly hitting herself. broughton called her parents and they said in court that she had sounded like a wild animal in the background of that call. they'd immediately got in their car, driven from london to dorset and pleaded with him to seek medical help.
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but he didn't. despite a hospital tent being just a few hundred metres away. after the unanimous verdict, john michie, herfather and a well—known as an actor in the tv drama hobly city, spoke of the pain that this has caused his family. regardless of the outcome of this harrowing trial, they were never going to be any winners. we began our life sentence on what would have been on what would have been her 25th birthday. his life sentence is knowing that he did not help her to live. ceon said he had tried to help her. yes, his defence barrister maintained that he did not know that she was at risk of dying, but even so, he had tried to alert a friend who was at the festival as to their location. but we also heard in court that he was fearful of involving officials because he was subject to a suspended prison sentence and he was worried about going to jail.
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now, instead, he remained with her until the final moments as her condition deteriorated. louella's death was tragic and needless and despite his close relationship with her, he chose to ignore the advice of others had given to him and not seek medical help. even when she lay motionless struggling for breath and dying, he continued to take photos and videos and message friends. all he needed to do was walk a few hundred metres to an on—site hospital. he supplied her with the drug and had a duty of care. his actions were selfish and shameful. our thoughts remain with all of her family and friends at this very difficult time. thank you. well, ceon broughton was an aspiring rapper and a grime artist. this video is actually found by louella's brother sam. now he has supplied sam and her with drugs in the past,
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but he denied supplying her with 2—cp on that night. when he was arrested, police found a bag of the drug in his mobile phone case. the prosecution and medical experts say it is highly likely that she would have survived if help had been gotten that night. and they say that his calloused failure to take reasonable care of her contributed significantly to her death. broughton will be sentenced here in winchester tomorrow morning. james reporting from winchester crown court. the conservative mp george eustice has resigned as agriculture minister and warned of humiliation for the uk if brexit is delayed. in a letter to the prime minister, the leave—supporting mp said he was worried that the eu could now dictate the terms of any extension to the withdrawal process. 0ur deputy political editor john pienaar sent this update from westminster. george eustice is a brexiteer, but he has resigned not because he opposes theresa may's plan for brexit, the deal
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she is trying to thrash out in brussels and get to the commons. he supports that plan. he has resigned because he believes she has mishandled the whole process and believes that she has put the future of brexit itself at risk. the breaking point was theresa may promising mps a chance to vote against a no—deal brexit, a last resort under pressure from the threat of the ministerial resignations, but he saw the threat of no—deal is putting useful pressure on brussels. he was also upset the mps given a chance to vote to delay brexit bill on the leaving date of march 29. his worry that a short delay could become a longer life and the longer delay and eventually perhaps an indefinite delay. now as it is, the chance for mps to give their verdict on or before march or 12. there is no knowing whether mrs may will finally beat the odds
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and messages will finally roll in behind her because they see her plan as the only brexit available. george eustice has shown just how frustrated and angry brexiteers are at the way this is been handled and have been placed in such a painfully uncomfortable position. well, in another development on the brexit front today, the democratic unionist party hinted that a time—limit to the irish backstop, the mechanism to prevent a hard border of the island of ireland, might be enough to get theresa may's brexit deal the support it needs to be approved by mps in the commons. here's the dup's sammy wilson. the nature of the time limit would be very important. it can't be a long time in the distance, in the distant future. the period that we have made quite clear is that we have 21 months before the implementation period must be finished anyhow. and we believe that there are possibilities to have the monitoring of trade across the border solved and resolved in that time, and that's the kind of time limit we would be looking for. secondly, it's got to be very clear that the legal impediments
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of the withdrawal agreement have been removed and have been replaced with this. and tomorrow, with less than a month to go before the uk leaves the eu, we will have a special day of brexit coverage, beginning with brexit: your call with ask this, a joint programme on the bbc news channel and bbc radio 5live where we hear your views, comments and questions. you can tweet using the #bbcaskthis, text on 85058 or call on 08085 909 693. that's from 9am tomorrow morning. the headlines on bbc news: a woman convicted of killing her husband with a hammer wins an appeal against the murder conviction. sally challen now faces a retrial after defence lawyers argued she'd suffered decades of psychological abuse. the summit between president trump and kimjong—un ends in failure after north korea demands relief from economic sanctions
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in return for denuclearisation. north korea's foreign minister says their position will not change even if the us seeks further talks. a man is found guilty of manslaughter after he supplied his girlfriend with drugs at the bestival music event in 2017. ceon broughton did little to help 24—year—old louella fletcher—michie as she suffered a reaction to a class—a drug. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good evening. fulham have sacked manager claudio ranieri. the london club are struggling in the premier league, 19th in the table and ten points from safety. ranieri only took over in november, but last night's 2—0 defeat to southampton looks to have been the decisive blow for the italian.
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he was in charge for 16 league games, but won only three. chairman shahid khan says, "following our discussion this afternoon, claudio agreed to my decision that a change was in the best interest of everyone." former fulham midfielder scott parker will take over as caretaker manager. ranieri has not been the right apartment. at the time, i exited it. iam apartment. at the time, i exited it. i am always disappointed when he left the job because i am always disappointed when he left thejob because i i am always disappointed when he left the job because i was a i am always disappointed when he left thejob because i was a big i am always disappointed when he left the job because i was a big fan of his and i thought he deserved a little bit more time. considering the amazing work that he did to get fulham in the premier league. his mission was to keep fulham in the division and i think after last night's the figment we are now ten points address and i think even the most optimistic fans will except that fulham are almost certainly relegated. five weeks on from the plane crash that killed emiliano sala and pilot david ibbotson, the men who facilitated the transfer of the footballer from nantes to cardiff have told the bbc
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that they have been made scapegoats for the tragedy. willie mckay and son mark say that they made sala's travel arrangements after cardiff city left him abandoned to make his own plans and that the premier league team could have done more. in a statement, cardiff city strongly rejected their claims, insisting sala was making his own separate arrangements. willie and mark mckay were speaking exclusively to our sports editor dan roan. he was abandoned in a hotel more or less to do his travel arrangements himself. nobody encouraged them to be doing anything. it was a bit embarrassing because if i had paid 17 million euros and then leave him in a hotel until going on the computer and looking for a flight. and there'll be more on that story after the sport. plans to create a new international rugby union league have been criticised by some of the game's leading players over
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concerns their welfare is not at the heart of the proposals. world rugby want to create a new 12—nation tournament involving the likes of england, wales and new zealand. they'd travel acrosss the globe to play 12 matches throughout the year, with a final staged in decmeber. in an already packed international and domestic calendar, the international players body the irp fear the proposals are out of touch with the demands of the modern game. the idea of playing for the northern hemisphere teams, playing three games in consecutive week across the southern hemisphere, which is a huge geographical challenge, and back into the competition which involves five matches in five weeks for the teams who make it to the final. it's just an ask too much for most players. well, world rugby said in a statement the opposition was "surprising" as the two parties were still in talks and that
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important matters such as playing load are at the heart of the overall concept. britain's two—time world champion james degale has retired from boxing in the wake of his defeat by chris eubank, jr. he also won olympic gold in 2008 and is ten years to the day that he made his professional debut and said boxing had given him the best years of his life. he won 25 and lost three of his 29 professionalfights. and three—time olympic champion ed clancy led great britain to silver in the team pursuit as australia smashed the world record to claim gold. australia's quartet of leigh howard, sam welsford, kelland 0'brien and alex porter finished in a time of 3:48.012 seconds in pruszkow. that lowered their own world record set at the commonwealth games in 2018 and laid down a marker before the tokyo olympics in 2020. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at 10:30pm.
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thank you, if you have no one to beat but yourself. holly hamilton, thank you very much. the football agents who booked the plane to fly emiliano sala from france to his new club cardiff city injanuary have told the bbc that they've been made scapegoats for the tragedy after the plane crashed in the channel. willie mckay and his son mark claim the club had abandoned their new multi—million pound signing to make his own travel plans and they should have done more. cardiff city has declined to comment on their claims. 0ur sports editor dan roan has this exclusive report. it should have been the start of an exciting new chapter in the life of a talented young footballer. emiliano sala was cardiff city's record signing, butjust days after he was unveiled last month, the argentinian striker died alongside pilot david ibbotson when the plane they were travelling in came down in the english channel. this man, football agent willie mckay, helped broker the £15 million deal from nantes and arranged the flight that ended in tragedy. he told me he only did so to help
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the player to say goodbye to friends in france and that cardiff could have done more to help. he was abandoned in the hotel more or less to do his travel arrengements himself. nobody in cardiff seemed to be doing anything, and it was a bit embarrassing, because they buy a player for 17 million euros and then leave him in a hotel himself, trying to go on the computer and look for a flight. i think cardiff let themselves down badly. cardiff strongly dispute that, declining to comment today, but have previously said their offer of organising a commercial flight for sala was declined and the relevant authorities must be allowed to determine the full facts. this week, as the search for his body continued, air accident investigators said mr ibbotson did not have a license for commercialflights and could only fly passengers in the eu on a cost—sharing basis. people will look for a scapegoat, me initially, and in the end,
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they will probably say it was pilot error. i assume it wasn't a cost—sharing arrangement? it wasn't, because emiliano was not paying anything. you were going to pay the full amount? yes. mckay did not own the plane and says he arranged the flight through his regular provider and had not been aware mr ibbotson had been asked to fly it. did you ever think "i should know who that pilot is"? when you phone a taxi and the taxi comes, you don't ask them, "do you have your driving licence?" you don't even think about these things. "is the car mot‘d?" these things you don't think about. i wasjust thinking about getting the boy back home and we were happy with what we did. for people to try and villify the pilot, when the man is dead, it's a disgrace, i think. i don't hold anybody responsible, because it was a tragic accident. mckay recently attended sala's funeral in argentina.
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he and his son mark, the agent acting for nantes in the deal, say they are willing to forego the £1.5 million they were due to receive. is there anything about it you regret or feel responsible for or would do differently? i don't see how i would have done anything any differently. i don't want to sit here and be a victim and say, because i'm not, and that's a fact, but it's been tough, but it's been tough for people around me, and they've took the brunt of it. cardiff were due to start paying nantes the money for the transfer yesterday, but have withheld payment until investigations are complete. i don't care if cardiff pay, i don't care if nantes pay us, because what we went through is total hell. with fifa now investigating and cardiff considering legal action,
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the fallout from this tragedy continues. israel's attorney general says he will bring corruption charges against the prime minister benjamin netanyahu for bribery and breach of trust. it's just six weeks until the country's general election when mr netanyahu will attempt to win a fifth term of office. his likud party had tried to block the announcement, describing it as political persecution. in a tv address, mr netanyahu said the case would "collapse like a house of cards". the american actor luke perry is in hospital after apparently suffering a stroke. he is best—known for starring in the ‘90s drama beverley hills 90210 and stars as fred andrews in the netflix series riverdale. reports from american media say parmedics were called to his home before he was taken to hospital. mr perry's spokesman said he is "is currently under observation at the hospital". the conductor, composer and pianist andre previn has died at the age of 89. his agents in new york confirmed that he died this morning. he was born in berlin in 1929
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and became one of the best—known figures of his generation in classical music. let's give you a flavour of how his passing has been marked.. among those writing on social media was the third of his five wives, mia farrow. on twitter, she wrote... the london symphony orchestra, which andre previn conducted between 1968 and 1979, was he would be hugely missed and remembered with great affection. they added... and from the world of tv and film, the actor david schneider referenced that same legendary sketch. he wrote of previn that he was one of the best comic straight man performances ever in one of the most beautiful sketches ever. daniela relph looks back at his life.
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he was one of the 20th century's most remarkable and versatile musicians. not just an orchestral conductor, but an arranger, an award—winning film composer and a brilliantjazz pianist. he'd started in 1940s hollywood, performing and arranging music for mgm when still a schoolboy. he was just 19 when he wrote the music for one of the lassie films, his first complete film score. he went on to win four 0scars. then in the 1960s, he decided to reinvent himself as a classical conductor. at the london symphony orchestra, he became a star. good evening, ladies and gentlemen... he had his own television series, a glamorous third wife, the actress mia farrow, and an enviable lifestyle, but he was fiercely ambitious, a workaholic. it was his family who suffered. a career is a career.
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i was being asked to do things that i thought were important, that i wanted to do, that people wanted me to do, that i thought were musically fascinating. and if you're a professional in any given performing art, you have to go and perform. eric, say hello to mr preview. ah! mr preview, hi! in 1971 he was invited, unforgettably, on to the morecambe and wise show. you're playing all the wrong notes. i'm playing all the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order. laughter. i'll give you that, i'll give you that, sunshine.
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his willingness to do new things lead to no good boy deserves favour. and a streetcar named desire was an opera based on the tennessee williams play. when soon—yi, the daughter he adopted with mia farrow, married her mother's boyfriend, woody allen, previn was furious. soon—yi, he told a reporter, does not exist. a bitter note in a life dedicated to music and music making. i am just very happy that i'm a musician. which branch of the music is actually immaterial, i'm just very pleased to be a musician, a wonderful thing to be. let's talk now to presenter of the bbc radio 3 breakfast show, petroc trelawny.
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thank you for coming in about andre previn. for someone like me who knows little about classical music andi knows little about classical music and i did not so that probably but it is true, he is the bloke who was in that sketch with morecambe and wise who was married to mia farrow and he used to advertise the virtues of compact discs. clearly, so much more to him as a musician. that sketch sums up his personality that he was prepared to do that. there is no doubt he was one of the great conductors of the 20th century but what made him special was his passion for spreading the word about classical music. he believed the classical music. he believed the classical music. he believed the classical music should have no barriers and be available to eve ryo ne barriers and be available to everyone to enjoy the great symphonies and concertos and if that means it —— he went on morecambe and wise, watched by over half the population of the uk at that point, he would do it without thinking about it. and that sketch, i do not think it was rehearsed. i seem to recall it was done in it one take and it is tb gold. this meeting of classical music and mass popular
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culture that andre previn will epitomize what has not really happened since. and he had what a lot of great conductors have which is that bit of show business about him. he could perform to make it right and conduct in person. him. he could perform to make it right and conduct in personlj him. he could perform to make it right and conduct in person. i saw him the lesson he conducted in 2011, the conduct 0rchestra which he had a long relationship with her was musical director. he was a bit slow on the state once he picked up the baton, he could have been a 20—year—old. he was born in berlin in1929, 20—year—old. he was born in berlin in 1929, jewish family, his father very since we saw what was coming on the family out to paris and into los angeles and that was where it really took off her hand. as a teenager, he was on the staff at mgm, scoring and arranging the big movies musicals. he won four 0scars arranging the big movies musicals. he won four oscars and people forget about that, for gg for porgy and bass and did the arrangements in 1951 he was up for three 0scars in a single award ceremony. and if he had stayed in hollywood, he would be
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talked about now frankly, still such a star but that was not enough or him. he became a greatjazz performer and worked with ella fitzgerald. he went with dinah shore became a composer and wrote to his seminal 20th—century american operas, chamber music as well. and he became a conductor in pittsburgh in the us and most famously with the london symphony orchestra and he was a conductor whistling to say. he was not just this cool a conductor whistling to say. he was notjust this cool dude in a turtleneck sweater who had this sort of show biz life which you mentioned mia fera. she was one of five wives and it was quite a show biz existence. mia farrow had been out with frank sinatra before. she set up with frank sinatra before. she set up with him. musicaltaste with frank sinatra before. she set up with him. musical taste was big for her. we did not have to conductors is publicly glamourous is that before. leonard bernstein the closest parallel and like bernstein, he shared his passion for sharing his art. more visible to us and you can because of that long association with the london symphony orchestra.
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how important was that popularizing classical music? i think very much so classical music? i think very much so and it also established the reputation of the lso as an international orchestra and they toured america and this great mix of these brits in this glamourous america at the head on tour. andre previn's music let's not forget, this was a show where he conducted and talked about classical music. this was a show where he conducted and talked about classical musicm was on bbc one in the slot that strictly is in now. that says something. saturday evening came at peak time. millions watching and that was because of him. there was no brief that we had to have a classical music show with a conductor in the gave it to him because he was a brilliant communicator, because he could talk about music and because he was this cool figure. wearing about music and because he was this coolfigure. wearing her about music and because he was this cool figure. wearing her hat as a radio three broadcast, i am sure you have played much of his music over many years. is there a recording or anything you would say to somebody to pick that out. we talked about it because my programme tomorrow
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morning we will play lots of his work in the certainly some of his jazz. i keep coming back to his recordings of williams. the idea of this glitzy american connecting this very english manna music who came from gloucestershire, who hated big cities, who was kind of a real pest 01’ cities, who was kind of a real pest or english music router him at one of our great composers. but interpreted by andre previn is very special. what about the interpretation makes it work?|j think interpretation makes it work?” think it's an honesty. he was somehow able to bring the glitz and glamour and that american brass he and his him that american showbiz style to english music and lift it somehow without in any way abandoning what this music was about. his recordings of moser, his operas, his recording of carmen is one of the finest recordings of that work. people were talking to someone
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earlier on who said i did not really know because you to be over 50 to remember him on television as a star but just remember him on television as a star butjust go on youtube or spot if i listen to those recordings because they aren't really very special because he is a key figure. people who look after the bbc iplayer, they have a good archive and can dig up some andre previn for us. i pleasure and look forward to breakfast tomorrow morning. you were there from when? 6:30 a:m.. and a lovely story with the edvard greek piano concerto and he played it in public after him and val arrived on eric and ernie and he had to stop and wait for the audience to stop laughing because they brought the sketch back to them. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. well the recent warm spell feels like a distant memory now, as we've switched our weather to something much cooler and more unsettled. more typical of this time of year. tonight's going to remain quite
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cloudy, further outbreaks of rain. the weather front responsible for it will push off into the near continents, so i think the rain eases down, but we hold onto a lot of cloud across the country. some low clouds, some mist and fog too. that will help blanket in the temperature, so actually a milder night to come tonight than what we've seen the last few nights. so friday morning starts off pretty grey, and damp, could still see a few spots of rain across eastern areas, but with the ridge of high—pressure building in, it should be largely settled. lighter winds. we will see increasing amounts of sunshine in places, particularly northern ireland, wales, the southwest of england, ahead of this next band of rain which will arrive across western parts of northern ireland later on. temperature wise, 10—13d, still a little above the season average. as we head on into the weekend, it turns very unsettled, deep air of low pressure will bring a spell of wet and windy weather to our shores. hello this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines. a woman convicted
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of killing her husband with a hammer wins an appeal against the murder conviction. sally challen now faces a retrial after defence lawyers argued she'd suffered decades of psychological abuse. the summit between president trump and kimjong—un ends in failure — after north korea demands relief from economic sanctions, in return for denuclearisation. north korea's foreign minister says their position will not change, even if the us seeks further talks. a man is found guilty of manslaughter after he supplied his girlfriend with drugs at the bestival music event in 2017. ceon broughton did little to help 24—year—old louella fletcher—michie as she suffered a reaction to a class—a drug. the man who booked emiliano sala's fateful flight to cardiff city , alleges the player was abandoned by the club, but doesn't blame anyone for his death. a disappointing turnout at the first climate change debate in two years which was led by lib dem mp layla moran who secured the discussion after being inspired by schoolchildren who went on strike
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over climate change. you are playing all the wrong notes. and star of this famed morecambe and wise sketch, dies at the age of 89. fresh allegations of abuse have been made against michaeljackson who died ten years ago. in a documentary being broadcast next week, two men claim that the singer abused them when they were children 30 years ago. wade robson and james safechuck say they were 7 and 10 years old when the abuse began at michaeljackson's neverland ranch in california. the jackson family have denied the claims. lizo mzimba reports.
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# thriller— michaeljackson # he was the most famous pop star on the planet, millions bought his records, but in his later career, he more than once faced accusations of abuse, something he consistently denied. a criminal trial in 2005 cleared him of molesting the 13—year—old boy. everybody wanted to meet michael, or be with michael. now, a new documentary has detailed further allegations by two man. michael asked do you and the family went to come to neverland? both make similar claims that the pop star abused then at his neverland ranch after befriending them. the days were filled with magical childhood adventure and experiences. they told cbs news it went on for years. for me, while the abuse was going on, so the abuse for me went from age seven to 1a years old.
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i rememberfeeling around 12, starting to be a little more uncomfortable about that, and sometimes may be trying to change the subject or, you know, distract, but then, but then having a fear that if i don't do this, i'm already feeling like i'm not a favourite of michael's any more. if i don't do this, what's going to happen? exactly. his family and says these new allegations are completely untrue. i want them to know and understand and know that this documentary is not telling the truth, there has not been one piece of evidence that corroborates their story. and they are not interested in doing that. some would say though guys, that it's hard for you to sit here and say that the documentary isn't telling the truth when you haven't seen a documentary. shouldn't you see the documentary jackie? no, because i know my brother. i don't have to see the documentary. i know michael. almost ten years after his death, michaeljackson's reputation
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continues to be questioned by some who believe that he was an abuser, who was never brought to justice. lizo mizimba, bbc news. the mini site and that you saw one of the survivors, wade robson, speaking to cbs news in that report. in an interview to be broadcast in full on the victoria derbyshire programme here on the bbc news channel from 10 o'clock tomorrow morning, mr robson said michaeljackson encouraged him to lie about what had happened: so from day one of michael sexually abusing me, he immediately started to tell me and train me on how to lie about what was happening between us. first he would tell me that what this is, this sexual activity is because he and i love each other, and this is how we show our love. then he would immediately follow that up with,
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but if anybody else in the world ever found out what we were doing, people are ignorant, they wouldn't understand. and what would happen is that you and i would go to jail for the rest of our lives, and our lives would fall apart. he and i would be pulled apart, all of this was terrifying to me, and so one, of course the idea of going to jail, two, the idea of being pulled away from michael now, this man, this otherworldly figure, this god to me who had now become my best friend. no way was i ever going to do anything that would pull me away from him. you can hear from you can hearfrom then and you can hear from then and the other man who said they are victims of michaeljackson in the programme tomorrow from ten. the uk needs to "decarbonise capitalism" if we are to truly tackle climate change, according to former energy secretary sir ed davey. the ex—minister put forward a raft of radical policy ideas to shift
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the focus onto green energy during a debate in the house of commons on moving to net zero carbon emissions. for the first time in two years, the house of commons has this afternoon been debating climate change. the lib dem mp layla morgan — led the discussions describing the situation as a climate emergency. we just haven't had the element of progress that we should have at this point. the government's effectively banned on shore wind, the cheapest form of renewable energy, all while pursuing an ideological obsession with fracking, overriding the vias of local communities who have rejected it. these policies make it crystal clear that this government isn't serious enough about cutting emissions, we must demand better for our environment and our planet. caroline lucas, the green mp for brighton pavilion, who secured the debate with moran, said long—term climate targets had to be amended to net zero.
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we need to look at our energy systems, 31 million homes in this country run on gas. how are we going to get them to a clean gas source? is it's going to be hydrogen? is it going to be air source heat pumps, and what and how are we going to lag those buildings? it's not that hard, but we need to choose our policy sectors. when we choose our sectors, and when we choose our actions, we can have a just transition. we can have that new green deal. that report some contributions there from the house of commons, not sure if that was caroline jones. i from the house of commons, not sure if that was carolinejones. i think it might‘ve been mary cried, but a nyway it might‘ve been mary cried, but anywayjoining me to debate these issues in more detail i know we have the names right on this, because we checked. are dr christopherjones, researcher at the tyndall centre for climate change research in manchester and also i'm joined by howard frumkin, head of our planet, our health. thank you both for being with us on bbc news this evening. let me ask you, let me start with you chris jones, first of all, a question a
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lot of people ask is there has been a big claim to process agreed at a governmental level, the work is being done, i don't need to think about it, not a lot going on in my life right now, never mind all of my relatives and friends to worry about, and that is what i paid a government for, that is theirjob, ie lexan, and they go and sort it out. it's all in hand. certainly the government is a major pa rt certainly the government is a major part of the process of dealing with this, it's a colossal challenge as you have heard in those sound bites before, which really requires not just government, but also an electorate, because we are a democracy, and getting our politicians to do what we want them to do, so communicating with them, how important it is to us. also between industry and as as consumers, we all have a really important role in dealing with us. it's a massive global issue that is not just for it's a massive global issue that is notjust for governments. but government is a huge role in that,
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but we can't just leave government is a huge role in that, but we can'tjust leave it government is a huge role in that, but we can't just leave it to government. we have to pressure them and take action ourselves. what sort of action at a microlevel? there are actions we can take up a household level and at the present behaviour level, as well as the kind of policy actions that we just heard mentioned. we can make choices to reduce the energy impact of the way we live, that means shifting from automobiles to walking, cycling, transact. we can change our dietary habits, a little bit less meat, more heavy on the fruits and vegetables, nuts and beans. we can insulate our buildings better. so all of these are choices that can reduce our carbon footprint, and help us move towards decarbonization of the economy, but i do have to emphasise that they go hand—in—hand with the syste m that they go hand—in—hand with the system changes, the policy level changes that we also need. they talked of this and some of the extracts they are crass in the house of commons this afternoon about kind
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of commons this afternoon about kind of tea carbon icing capitalism, do you get a sense that commercially now, we are reaching a tipping point in terms of industries like the automobile industry for example, the building industry, maybe in the way we sell and process food as well. something has shifted. i think the point i made before really emphasised that there is a shift going on, and a lot of people, there is a lot of appetite for making these changes from consumers and from industry. that has to go hand in hand with these clear policy signals, this clear, the tools we need to get the industry to know that this is something that is going to be supported by government, to have the right policies in place, and we have seen in the past where policies have been in place, in the interest of the public, and really followed to make a great change. the uk has made progress. indeed carbon icing electricity supply, and that has come from that combination. so
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we need to take that formula and apply it to household heating and transports, which have not seen those and mission reduction so far, it shows really to have those two things need to be going together. how would you be working in this field for 20 years now, particularly looking at the health concerns, is that one area where you think you could actually kind of create a sense of real interest among people who perhaps are otherwise, dare i say, not that interested in this subject, when they start to realise the health impacts of climate change has. i think so, the health impacts of climate change has. ithink so, and it's the health impacts of climate change has. i think so, and it's notjust a tough story, it's also a good news story. it's a tough story, in that climate change is an enormous threat to health. heat waves, whereas air quality, where his allergies. infectious diseases. natural disasters. so on. the good news is, that the steps we have to take to tackle climate change are almost invariably good for health. so if we
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shift our transport systems to walking, cycling, and transit, away from using automobiles, well we get more physical activity, which combats the obesity epidemic, more social capital, because we meet and greet people instead of honking at out greet people instead of honking at our neighbours. fewer deaths from car crashes. if we change our diets away from meat, shifting a little bit more towards fruits and vegetables, we reduce our chances of heart disease and cancer. 0n vegetables, we reduce our chances of heart disease and cancer. on and on, if we plant trees in our cities, which we need to do as working towards urban heat waves which become more frequent, the trees give us become more frequent, the trees give us cleanerairand better become more frequent, the trees give us cleaner air and better mental health, believe it or not. there is a very good news story, this is not a very good news story, this is not a story of sacrifice and deprivation, this is a story of opportunity, of better lives, healthier lives. chris jones, there will have to be some sacrifice some deprivation, some adaptation, some learning to do without things we have taken for granted for quite a
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long time. i think clearly these what we're up against, what we know are the detriments that are on the line in the next sort of 20 — a0 years where we might see the impact of climate change if we don't mitigate and track and avoid it. i think it's fairto track and avoid it. i think it's fair to say that you can do mitigation in a lot of ways, you do medication to reduce admissions in ways that have low cost benefits for reducing fuel poverty and for improving air quality, and standards of living. so that is certainly something that, with clear policy, and the right instruments in place, you can certainly achieve. where the real sacrifice and a lost opportunity is is if we don't act fast enough, and we have to act immediately, and on a large—scale, as that if we don't do that, then we risk sacrificing a lot of
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opportunity in the future there our ability to cultivate certain crops, that we rely on, and to be able to enjoy the natural environment as it is today. we rely on unstable climate for, you know, many centuries, and we want to be able to continue to work with that climate. so we want to avoid making those really difficult sacrifices in the future by acting now and in a way that we manage ourselves, rather than in response to what happens to us than in response to what happens to us through climate change.” mentioned at the start of this that the mp, one of the mps initiated today's debate said she had been inspired by the kind of action taken by schoolchildren in this country, and internationally as well, to demonstrate their concern. do you think there is a lesson for us in terms of the focus, that young people seem to have on the subject, that has perhaps slept over as dare i say it those of us of advancing
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yea rs ? i say it those of us of advancing years? i think there are at least two lessons, when his shame on us. 0ur generation hasn't done the job that we need to deal. we have known for several decades what a big challenge climate change is, and we haven't risen to that challenge. so it's no wonder the young people are alarmed. the second issue is that we need to think long—term. today's a young people will be hitting their old age at the end of this century. that's a long time from now, they are thinking in a long time frame, as well as they shed, because they will live a long time, but all of us and thinking about policy and energy systems and transport systems, agricultural systems, need to be thinking on the timeframe of many decades. long past the next election, long past the next quarterly return on our stocks. long—term thinking is key to solving this problem. from our planet our health, and doctor christopher jones with the research for climate change
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in manchester, thank you so much for joining us this evening. thank you. around 1a5 thousand people in the uk have parkinson's disease — a degenerative brain condition with no cure. but scientists have been trialling a new technique — that patients say alleviated their symptoms. here's hugh pym. there's more ending up on the floor than in the pot, isn't there? yeah. my legs would be too weak to stand as i got out of bed. rolling over in bed was just impossible. life with parkinson's at times was a real struggle for lesley. that one's come out. she and her husband carefully plan her regular medication, but four years ago she volunteered for the trial of a new drug, gdnf, involving pioneering brain surgery. this involved four small tubes implanted inside the skull to deliver the drug directly to parts of the brain affected by parkinson's. it was pumped in through a metal port on the head. patients went in for monthly infusions of the drug. throughout the trial,
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they did a series of physical tests. there were signs of improvement, though not enough to scientifically prove that the drug had made a significant difference. but scans showed there had been positive effects on damaged brain cells. the surgeon who devised the radical new technique says the big breakthrough was proving that drugs could be delivered right into the brain. the critical thing about this trial was the demonstration that you could actually do this every month to patients over months or years, and this opens up huge prospects for treating neurological diseases, be it brain cancer or neurodegenerative diseases like parkinson's. lesley hopes the trial she took part in will eventually pave the way for a long—term solution. i think it's too easy to sit back and worry about the future and just think, "well, that's my lot, i'm going to end up in a wheelchair or in a nursing home." ijust wanted to do something, if not for me then forfuture generations.
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lesley is convinced the drug has made her feel better, and with other participants is now fundraising so another trial can take place. hugh pym, bbc news. here is a case of teaching a dog new tricks. a dog belonging to the former american president, george h.w. bush, has started a new role with the us navy. sully, a yellow labrador, won the affection of americans last year when he faithfully laid down beside his late master's coffin. his new role will see him helping wounded war veterans and their families, as neda tawfik reports. it's a proud day for sully the service dog as he embarks on his next assignment. he was a constant companion for former president george hw bush in the last few months of his life. starting today, his new home will be with veterans at walter reed military medical center. sully hw bush, do you affirm as a hospital foreman in the united states navy, that
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you will support, comfort and cheer up veterans and their families, active duty and retired? sully first touched the hearts of americans when he loyally accompanied the a1st president's casket to the nation's capital. theirfriendship began when the two—year—old lab moved into the family estate following the death of first lady barbara bush. sully was always by his side for long walks and presidential meetings. bush senior loved him so much that he even got socks to honour sully. hi, valerie. nice to meet you. is this sully? this is sully. say hello to nada. we were lucky enough to meet sully at this training facility in long island before his new mission began. sully‘s trainer valerie says he is an old soul, which made him a perfect match for bush senior. his team wanted a loyal dog, a dog that was easily adaptable, great with children, and sully fit the bill perfectly.
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sully, phone! he's also talented. service dogs like sully are trained to help in emergency situations or with daily tasks. yes, good boy, sully! it was president george hw bush's wish that sully would go on to walter reed to continue serving his country. there, his job will mainly be to comfort veterans and their families. army veteran tyler began therapy with service dogs at walter reed before he was matched with his very own trooper. yes! good boy. walk. he had to relearn everything after sustaining severe brain injuries and a fractured spine while on deployment. when he needs assistance, trooper is there. it has meant the world to me. i feel like i can move on with my life. it's just a bond that cannot be broken. i'm always there for him and he's always there for me. we got each other's backs.
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sully will be making new relationships but he'll forever carry the presidential seal on his vest and he'll always be sully hw bush. nada tawfik, new york. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos hello there, what a difference a day makes, a much cooler, fresherfield to the weather outcome outbreaks of rain, cloud, wind, and into tonight, it will stay cloudy with further spells of rain. signs of it turning dryer by the end of the night, thanks to a rates of high—pressure building and, this is the weather front that brought the patchy reins to parts of england and wales earlier on. slowly clearing away and this of high pressure will nudge into, things down. a cloudy night to calm our breaks of rain, slowly easing down, there will be further spells of drizzle and mist and mist and fog two, with all the cloud cover around, it should be a milder night and what it was last night. so we start friday then off and i
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rather dull note, quite a bit of cloud around, the oblate shower across eastern areas, apart from that, it should be a dry day, increasing amounts of sunshine appearing across northern ireland into wales and the southwest of england, i had its next weather front which will bring wet weather to the west part of northern ireland later on. does temperatures above the seasonal average, but feeling cooler than what we have been used to. now through friday night, that band of rain it pushes across northern ireland and across much of britain, some heavy as well, the winds picking up too. i went start to saturday morning across central and eastern areas, dry but windy across northern ireland. the wind is certainly going to be a feature this weekend, pretty vigorous area of low pressure, which will bring spells of wet rain both saturday and sunday. that's it to my friday night rain it clearing away, this is the area of low pressure i was talking but as we headed to saturday. so we'd start off quite damp across eastern areas, that rain clears away, the sunshine emerges for a while, but the winds
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will be picking up ahead of this air of low pressure, gales developing across many western areas, severe gals across western scotland, 60—70 mall per hour gusts, and heavy rain here too. it may not reach the far southeast until after dark. it will sweep its way eastwards, and then on sunday, it remains windy, low pressure to the north, this next feature could bring some wet and windy weather to the southern presence of the country, bit of uncertainty as to how far north this rain will come, but it will be a wet day across sunday. strong winds across the south because, by stray showers across much of scotland, some of these wintry hills with a bed of sunshine as well, but it will feel much cooler than as of late.
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hello, i'm karin giannone, this is 0utside source. after the handshake, the fallout. donald trump and kim jong—un disagree over why their summit failed. basically they wanted the sanctions lifted in their entirety, and we couldn't do that. but as the us president made the long journey home, north korea said he's wrong and they only wanted sanctions partially lifted. we'll discuss whether the two sides can get the process back on track. benjamin netanyahu becomes the first prime minister of israel to be prosecuted in office. he's facing charges of bribery and fraud. india has welcomed pakistan's decision to release a fighter pilot captured after his plane was shot down. pakistan says it is a gesture of peace. and we'll be looking at the case of two sisters from saudi arabia

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