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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  March 1, 2019 7:45pm-8:01pm GMT

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structure of the planet. now, a special type of drill, has another role, to burrow underground, the deepest ever attempted on another world, five metres down, to measure the heat flowing up from the interior. it's all part of trying this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. to understand what has happened the government agrees to pay to mars, how it formed 33 million pounds to eurotunnel, at the same time as earth, to settle a lawsuit over extra ferry but ended up so very different. services in the event of a ‘no—deal‘ brexit. one of the key instruments, a seismonitor, was designed labour says the transport secretary, and built in britain, at imperial college london, chris grayling, must go. and oxford university. he stumbles from catastrophe to disaster, and it is just gross incompetence on an industrial scale. enough is enough and that this man must be out of his post by monday. the highly sensitive device, that can pick up the slightest pakistan frees an indian tremor to help create a snapshot, fighter pilot, captured of the interior of mars. after his plane was shot down — every time an earthquake goes off, it is like a flashlight, and you can use the same, amid rising tensions over kashmir. imagine the same thing on mars. if there is a big enough mars quake that we can see a man who gave his girlfriend ringing around the planet, drugs at a festival, that would be very exciting, and filmed her as she died, because it can give us that quick has been jailed for
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eight and a half years. flash of what the planet looks like. making landlords check tena nts' immigration status, is ruled to be a breach this is what the wind really sounds like on mars, the first time anyone has heard it, of human rights. picked up by the spacecraft soon after it landed. they hope now, is that with all the instruments ready, there will be a lot more discoveries to follow. now it's time for newswatch. this week samira ahmed asks why the bbc has been getting the public involved in its brexit coverage. hello, and welcome to newswatch, with may 01. the bbc invites members of the public to help shape its brexit coverage, is that wise? and olivia colman won an oscar on sunday, but did bbc news go on too much about her as the idea of her as a national treasure? one of the few things we can say with certainty about brexit, is it has divided the
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nation, confusing and in infuriating many. driven by members of the public, and called brexit. and what about politicians we see on the media, do you think we get clarity from them? media, do you think we get clarity from them ? what media, do you think we get clarity from them? what is the feeling? not at all. we don't get a balanced or measured view, in terms of what the actual pros and cons of either moving out or staying in, airs, and hopefully the pieces that we get involved in gives people a chance to get a different view from the normal view. a panel of 12 people with different political views featured ona different political views featured on a range of output, giving their views and asking questions of journalists. harris wondered, this just confirms that people were com pletely just confirms that people were completely ill informed at the time
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of the referendum in 2016. i will start with where the old dear ——idea i will start with where the old dear —— idea of where this day came from. the bbc has done a huge amount,|j know the bbc has done a huge amount,” know we have had our critics, but we have done a huge amount, before the referendum, and since the referendum, and since the referendum, to try and explain some of the key themes, to try and unravel some of the complexities that many people found it irritating, and we want to keep pushing ourselves, and this idea came from, how can we let the audience into the process, and let them into the process of what we do, so we very them into the process of what we do, so we very deliberately chose a panel of 12 people from across the
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political spectrum, geographically social or economic background, and asked them what they wanted us to do. we had a special news conference last week, so that we could prepare some pieces, and then they have been involved in our decision—making or they were involved in our decision—making all day on friday. and so it is just a decision—making all day on friday. and so it isjust a question decision—making all day on friday. and so it is just a question of, what does the audience want to know, and how can we help them understand this completely to dish you? given how divided britain is, going back referendum, still very divided, how could a day like that with a panel like that provide any clarity? what has been really interesting, is that people want to know what the effects could be of britain using the european union, whether that is on food imports, health insurance when travelling, what is likely to be the relationship for european citizens in britain, and eu citizens in britain, and british citizens in the rest of the eu. but you are right, there are lots of things we still don't know, so some of it, we have got to say, we are not sure, here
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are some likely outcomes, but what it has revealed, and helped us think about, as they want some practical a nswe i’s. about, as they want some practical answers. of course, there is a lot of political heat, as you say, a lot of political heat, as you say, a lot of people who are disagreeing with each other, but what the audience is telling us, is tell us the practical fa cts . telling us, is tell us the practical facts. that is always a dispute, with people saying you are scaremongering, it is going to be fine, a lot of it depends on people's belief, we don't know the a nswe i’s people's belief, we don't know the a nswers to people's belief, we don't know the answers to these questions. people's belief, we don't know the answers to these questionsm people's belief, we don't know the answers to these questions. it is not about whether you believe it is going to be fine, we at the bbc are about what is the evidence about whether it will be fine, or not, and what our expert saying, and what is the public saying itself? i think it is to our credit that we are saying, we wa nt is to our credit that we are saying, we want to talk to the audience in a different type of way, involve them in our decision—making. a lot of the audience say they feel too distant. in the media in general, all the media feels too distanced. so we say, let's break down those
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barriers, and do our best answer the questions. it is not perfect, we know it is not perfect, but it is an attempt to try and unravel some of these complexities. people still say that the bbc defines itself as a professional journalist with duty to inform and educate, then what are you doing handing over to the public for a day? we are still professional journalist, we are here for the audience, yes, we are professionals, and of course we stick to the absolute professional standards of the bbc, in all cases, it was not that we were simply, this was about the collaboration with audiences, a different way of thinking about how we do news. in the nine o'clock meeting, which is our main editorial meeting, which is our main editorial meeting, to start for the day, it was great to have the audience members, members of the public in that meeting saying, do you know what you should do today? something about food, something about health insurance in europe, if we leave without a deal. someone saying, you
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are too negative about leaving the european union, some other people saying you are two negative about remaining in the european union. it makes us think differently. we have learnt a huge amount, because we are listening directly to what the audience want. some viewers also saying this is all too little too late, and an admission, going back to that original referendum campaign that the bbc failed to challenge enough, to inform enough and to explain adequately when it really mattered. sire i was the economics editor before the referendum. we did a huge amount trying to explain what could be the economic ramifications of different types, if we left or didn't leave. of course, we did a huge amount since then, specials on television, specials on the radio, a huge amount online, but of course, the public are keen to hear more, and that is what there is audience day was all about. thank you very much. sunday night so the annual
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razzmatazz of the oscars, and the annual howls from some news watch viewers that bbc news wastes too much airtime and money on what was called lovey—dovey backslapping. dan johnson took on the task of trying to... and the following day, newsround compiled this video paying tributes to his efforts. lady gaga! olivia! bbc news, can we talk to you? oh, no, she not even looking round. congratulations!
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he did have some success, securing a word with director spike lee, and his efforts were appreciated by scott reid, i am rooting for the poor bbc reporter at the oscars, who is remaining cheerful, despite being they need by many of the stars. but others were less than impressed. are shambolic and pointless coverage from the oscars, what a waste of public money, to presumably pay a reporter to stand in the corridor, shouting after so—called celebrities, as they walked on, oblivious to, and having no interest in him whatsoever. come on, bbc, if you must show this tripe, then
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please do not broadcast it simultaneously on the bbc news channel. there has to be some escape. also in los angeles, was bbc a rts escape. also in los angeles, was bbc arts editor, who summed up how oscars night had gone. there were none of the mistakes that we have seenin none of the mistakes that we have seen in previous years, no envelopes going into the wrong hands, and if there is the odd controversy about there is the odd controversy about the choice, that's great, and that gets people to watch. more people did what this year than last year. it was more diverse in terms of those people who won awards, and olivia colman was great. olivia colman's best actress award was certainly the story of the night, as far as bbc news was concerned, but some thought its arts editor had abandoned all journalistic impartiality in his enthusiasm. genesis evens had already detected an excessive fondness several hours earlier.
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surely a programme about politics would be an olivia colman freezone, but politics live also showed her a cce pta nce but politics live also showed her acceptance speech, prompting this reaction. what an acceptance speech. what did you think of olivia colman there? she is wonderful, we are huge fans of her. there followed a discussion about gender equality in the world of theatre and film.” discussion about gender equality in the world of theatre and film. i am watching politics live which is to bea watching politics live which is to be a politics programme, and we have
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a spectacle of olivia colman on the oscars. can we just stick to politics on politics programmes, news or news programmes, and entertainment, celebrities, whatever you want to call them in a bucket somewhere... well, we put those points to bbc news, and they told us, the oscars is one of the biggest entertainment stories of the year, and we know that entertainment news is of interest to our audience. thank you for all your comments this week. if you would like to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs, or even... e—mail news watch at you can find us on twitter, as well.
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hello, after a quiet start of the week, things are to turn very u nsettled. week, things are to turn very unsettled. a band of rain spreading across the country tonight. tend to die down as it reaches the eastern pa rt die down as it reaches the eastern part of the uk, but quite a bit of cloud cover, should be another wild night. a fairly mild night to saturday into the weekend, spells of wind and rain, both saturday and sunday, we have got a named storm likely to bring some potential disruption. on saturday, this first storm will arrive across the north—west corner of the country as the day wears on. we start off on a dry net, the went will increase, the
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cloud will increase, from the west, and then some heavy rain in northern ireland, then into western scotland and western england, and into wales. it won't arrive across the east until after dark. gusts of 60—70 00:14:13,889 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 mass power are likely.
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