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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 3, 2019 8:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and louise minchin. e—mail us, or you can find us on twitter as well. our headlines today: do have a look at our website for previous discussions. shamima begum's dutch husband, who's an islamic state that's all from us. fighter in prison in syria, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news tells the bbc he wants coverage next week. goodbye. to return to the netherlands with her and their newborn son. it was acceptable for you to marry a 15—year—old girl? it was her own choice. she was the one who asked to look for a partnerfor her. then i was invited, and... yeah, she was — she was very young. the growing toll of knife crime — a 17 —year—old boy in greater manchester is stabbed to death less than 2a hours afterjodie chesney, also 17, was killed in romford. business leaders say company growth has stalled because of falling consumer confidence — the cbi says brexit uncertainty is partly to blame. good morning in sport. over 18 years after his first, roger federer becomes just
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the second man in history to win 100 tour titles. he says it's a dream come true. hello, good morning. we've already got some rain, but storm freya is set to arrive later today, really strengthening the winds, particularly across england and wales. i'll have all the details on that later on. it's sunday the 3rd of march. our top story. the husband of shamima begum — the teenager from east london who travelled to syria to join the so—called islamic state group — has told the bbc he wants to take her and their newborn son to live in his native netherlands. yago riedijk fought for is and is currently in prison in syria. our middle east correspondent quentin sommerville who did the interview, is in northern syria and sent this report earlier. we know that when we spoke to shemima begum that her husband had been detained by the kurdish
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authorities when they surrendered as the islamic state was in its final days. he was being held in a detention facility somewhere in north—eastern syria but we couldn't find him. we were told he was being questioned by the authorities, usually the americans and that he wasn't available for the media. late last afternoon, we got a call to come to an unspecified location where he was being detained and that he was. she memo moved over when she was 15. you met in raqqa, she was at the women's centre, you married her when she was 15 years old. how in any way is that acceptable? you were 23? you thought that was ok? to be honest, when my friend came and he said there was a girl who was
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interested in marriage, i wasn't really interested, because of her age. but, iaccepted really interested, because of her age. but, i accepted the offer a nyway age. but, i accepted the offer anyway and we sat down. she seemed like, how do you say at? she seemed ina good like, how do you say at? she seemed in a good state of mind. so it was a cce pta ble in a good state of mind. so it was acceptable for you to marry a 15—year—old girlwas her own choice, she was the one who asked to look for a partnerfor her she was the one who asked to look for a partner for her than she was the one who asked to look for a partnerfor her than i was invited and, yeah. she was very young. and it may be would have been better for her to wait a bit but she didn't. she chose to get married and i chose to marry her. this is a man who was admitted fighting for the
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islamic state in aleppo in syria. he says he has rejected the group and it was rejected because ias believed he was a dutch spy and he was tortured, held for more than seven months. he was wrong in his support of eye as he wants to return to holland to live a moderate muslim life. when speaking to these fighters, especially the ones who we re fighters, especially the ones who were captured, there is a degree of calculation, they have to send the best message so that government who are also considering that return, whether this person is fit to go back. a 17—year old—boy is the second teenager to be stabbed to death in less than 2a hours. he was killed last night in hale barns in greater manchester. two other youths have been arrested. meanwhile the family of 17—year—old jodie chesney who was fatally stabbed on friday night are appealing for witnesses. she was attacked in a park in romford, east london. our correspondent
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simon clemison is there. good morning to you. we can see a tent still that where the investigation is continuing. another morning and another stabbing. yes. good morning. this is the part where it happened. a park where young people in this neighbourhood come to hang out and as you can see also, there is a children's playground as well but as you mentioned, in the foreground is the forensic tent because this play area, this children's park over the weekend has become a scene of a full forensic investigation. we know the name of the victim. she wasjodie chesney, her grandmother told people it was her grandmother told people it was her on social media. it was an unprovoked attack and called it needless, violence. there has been a focus on tackling knife crime after a high number of homicides in london last year. please say it is an
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improving picture, but events such as this are a reminder of the work they need to carry out —— the police. she wasn't the only teenager to die over the past couple of days, a 17—year—old boy was stabbed last night in greater manchester. he was found near altrincham, few details about that case, police say it is very early stages, but two other 17—year—old boys have been arrested on suspicion of murder here in romford, police say they are doing whatever they can to bring those who killed jodie chesney or whoever killed jodie chesney or whoever killed her to justice. killed jodie chesney or whoever killed her tojustice. i'vejust seen another bouquet of flowers being laid here at the scene. this isa being laid here at the scene. this is a very sad communities scale this morning. thank you. growth in private firms has stagnated as businesses brace themselves for a possible no—deal brexit — that's according to a new report from the confederation of british industry the research
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suggests that the balance of companies reporting growth is at its weakest since 2013. the cbi's chief economist, rain newton—smith, said that uncertainty over brexit is making day—to—day business decisions "increasingly problematic". they are not expecting to expand over the course of the next year, so thatis over the course of the next year, so that is really damaging our economy, but into the future if we are investing now that support our growth into the future. rescuers hope to resume their search later today for a british climber who's been missing on one of the world's highest mountains for nearly a week tom ballard and his italian climbing partner, daniele nardi, were scaling a peak in pakistan known as "killer mountain", when they last made contact. rescue attempts have been hampered by bad weather and a no fly restriction imposed because of tension between pakistan and india.
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free tampons and other sanitary products will be offered to every female hospital patient who needs them, health leaders have announced. nhs england said women and girls will be able to ask for the products free of charge from this summer. the british medical association argued it was inconsistent for some hospitals to give out razors and shaving foam, but not offer women sanitary products. eight brexit supporting lawyers — seven of them also mps — have set out what concessions are necessary if they are to back a brexit deal. the attorney general, geoffrey cox, has been trying to reach a deal with leaders in brussels in an attempt to secure a guarantee the northern irish backstop will be temporary. according to the sunday times, the group would like to see a legally binding clause that would override the current wording on the backstop, and they want a route out if trade talks with the eu fail.
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any pictures of dogs are most welcome. these come from rio. it is not the normal carnival we are used to. this is the city's annual ‘pooch parade'. it takes place every year in the run up to the main carnival. the event attracts dogs of all shapes and sizes, dressed by their owners as everything from pink fairies to superheroes. they all have a good time. it's 8:10. equal pay, childcare and sexism in the workplace are all things that women still struggle with — but it was only a hundred years ago that women were even allowed to enter professions. a rally will take place later today marking the law that allowed females the freedom to work, and will celebrate those who continue to fight for equality. joining us now from our london studio is women's rights
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activist, helen pankhurst. thank you very much forjoining us. just tell us a little bit about what's going on today. who is going to be there? is organised by care international, on the theme of women challenging the law to change the world. it a head of international women's day and we, instead of having a march we are having a rally so having a march we are having a rally so it's in westminster central hall and we have a whole set of celebrities, super kings, beverley knight singing, david tennant speaking. i could go on. a fantastic set of celebrities who are adding their names to the issues. we pointed to harassment to the workplace, this being a global problem and wanting very much a global solution to it. 100 years since sex disqualification act removal, what laws do you still think need to be challenged?”
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think, there are so many, but essentially what we feel is right 110w essentially what we feel is right now with the need to campaign and time is up, addressing sexual violence in the workplace is the issue at the moment and that is everywhere. there is a sense that we see that emerging in some industries, and some visible places but we know it's global and its those who are most marginalised and most likely to be invisible in that story that we need to speak out for today around this issue of international women's day. what we would like is a global solution, the international labour organisation is looking to address sexual violence in the workplace and something around the world and we want that legislation to encapsulator around the world and we want that legislation to enca psulator support for those least likely to be addressed by those issues. domestic workers, farm labourers, people slightly outside the formal definition of work and of a worker.
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legislation might protect them but people feel intimidated, don't they? yes. we need the legislation to be at the best or the need for employers to address these issues, those victims, often have to speak up those victims, often have to speak up and find redress. we would like a legislative framework that actually ensures that employers have a responsibility to address these and that the state enacts that so what we are looking for is the government to her, to support strong legislation, to encourage other countries to do the same. i'm looking at one of the papers today, it says one man earning almost twice the total pay of the top 16 women at the total pay of the top 16 women at the big four banks and they've done investigation totalling the salaries of all these people. does it make you frustrated when you see endless headlines, stories like this? what you think about it? is a combination of frustration, the linkage of all these issues, economic inequality,
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social inequality, political issues, it all plays and. it's not like you tackle it in one area and he resolved all issues around gender inequality but i'm also about celebrating the successes and there are some tremendous successes. this month there was a lot that can be done, many organisations are doing a lot of things on issues to celebrate change but also to say we can do this faster, we should not have to wait another 100 years. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 8:14. the headlines: the captured islamic state fighter who married shamima begum tells the bbc he wants to return to the netherlands with the london schoolgirl and their newborn son. a 17—year—old boy in greater manchester has become the latest teenager to be stabbed to death, less than 2a hours afterjodie chesney, also 17, was killed in romford. here's darren with a look at this morning's weather.
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what is a storm of freya? lets just call it a storm. it's supposed to be easy to remember. we give it a name now and this one is going to be impacting england and wales. it arrives later on today bringing very strong winds, likely to be some damage and disruption by rush hour, things should have come down tomorrow morning. this is the clarity are developing into the storm. still a deepening area of low pressure, the winds are still to pick up, we have some rain around at the moment, yet to arrive across northern england where it has been a fairly quiet start around leeds with a bit of sunshine. it will change because we've got rain along the south coast in kent and that is moving its way northwards. at the moment the strongest winds out with these frequent heavy showers across central and northern scotland. outbreaks of rain and drizzle across
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england and wales, one band of rain moving northward and another one following on behind. that rain is heavy, pushes its way up towards southern scotland and into northern ireland later on today. turning drier and wales in the south—west where temperatures will be up to around 12 degrees but it is going to get very windy. by the state in the afternoon it's not wendy across northern scotland, the lightest of the want of a northern ireland, the strongest are for the south—west of england and south wales, all because of storm freya. that the area of low pressure is following a similar track to the class hasn't changed that much. the strongest winds on the southern flank of low pressure. through the afternoon and into the evening, much of wales and south—west england, 60—70 mph, could get 80 miles an hour in some coastal areas. overnight, the strength of the wind pushes up into the midlands and northern england together with some very wet weather, a bit of snow over the tops of the pennines and
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the southern uplands. glasgow should follow later on in the night but you can see we've got this wetter weather now further north across southern counties of england. away from here, temperatures three or 4 degrees. when the first thing in the morning for the rush hour perhaps in the north—east of england but that storm is heading out into the north sea. thanks tomorrow will start to come down, sunshine for a while, but of showers coming into the western side of the uk which takes all day to arrive, those temperatures are back down to around 8—10d. no sign of 21 returning over the week ahead. it remains on the cooler side. temperatures near average for this time of year but no sign of the weather settling down. fast to date of the week we have sunshine and showers, but around the middle part of the week, another area of low pressure means while wind and rain, should not be as bad as the windy weather but that will arrive later on today across england and wales. you might have thought the mr men books were an easy way
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of introducing your little ones to reading, but it turns out they may be more tricky than you thought. a study of more than 33,000 books for children by renaissance uk — which analyses text complexity — looked at sentence length, word length and difficulty, and says mr greedy is almost as hard to read as some of the classics, like of mice and men. to find out why, we're joined byjules daulby, a literacy expert. ijust keep reading that and think, really? yes, absolutely. you need to ta ke really? yes, absolutely. you need to take this with a pinch of salt. when you are looking at text and words, it isa you are looking at text and words, it is a technically it might be more difficult. if you are looking at sylla bles, difficult. if you are looking at syllables, how many words are in a
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sentence at the complex sentence structure. i think, sentence at the complex sentence structure. ithink, with sentence at the complex sentence structure. i think, with the mr men, it uses words like colossal and gigantic, long sentences. so on a computer programme that scans that kind of formula, you can do it on your own documents on the computer for readability, actually it would look may be quite complex. however we know reading is far more than just taking the words of the page. so with of mice and men there are so many complex issues in that book. we would not want to give that to somebody too young if they have not developed that vocabulary and subject knowledge and inference around when they are reading so there are so many issues. , it's a good starting point, probably but he would not want to just use that index to decide which books. let's start with of mice and man. for example, it's harder than some roald dahl books but if you think of some
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of the words, made up words that roald dahl put into his book,...” think i'm surprised at that. there is some sense when you are looking at, it's a formula. it will scan a number of words on a number of pages but there is also something with different languages and you look at the readability. that will change. those sorts of surreal and absurd words that roald dahl might use our other left out or have a different type of formula. or maybe children understand them better. that is true. these are read out loud. so often, the difference between a child's reading at a mr men book and their parents or carers reading the same book will have a difference as well. do you think that this might bea well. do you think that this might be a way of encouraging children, if you can read this you can read way more than perhaps children or
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pa rents more than perhaps children or parents think? i do think there is, a signpost to may be looking at books that are appropriate for certain ages but also the reading ability of children. they will develop at different times and if you've got a child with dyslexia for instance, that becomes very difficult because they might not actually be able to decode that well but their comprehension might be very good. you could use audiobooks that they might understand even if they are not able to read them in text. there's a difference there also. it's about finding the right kind of book for a child to get them even reading comic books. people might be sniffy about it but if they are reading they are learning that the plan. in the education world we are always talking about what a appropriate book for a child. i definitely think as long as they are reading that's great. but, good readers, when you look at them, they have networks. i might recommend a book to you and you may recommend it
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to someone else. that's a great way of reading culture. you get into a book and then you read the same author. i found that margaret atwood, i read all of them. we want to engender that reading culture and people that did that research have a programme they sold to schools, definitely worth having that. what they do, they look at the books and they do, they look at the books and they banned them so they test the children and their reading ability. there is supposed to choose the band in which those books are. mr men theoretically would then be in a more difficult band than mice and men. it has to have that human context as well. it's great to have a good librarian or english teachers that can recommend. those types of issues, not just the that can recommend. those types of issues, notjust the technicality of the words on the page. thank you very much. they are fantastic. mr
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tickle is my favourite. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the psychologist professor cary cooper is here to tell us what's caught his eye. let's have a quick look. the sunday mirror lead story is a letter written by the son of the salisbury novichok victim dawn sturgess, to the russian president vladimir putin, urging him to give up the men responsible for her death. the observer says it has seen internal labour party emails that reveal top officials are opposed to the suspension of several party activists who have been accused of anti—semitism. the picture is of designer vivienne westwood and her husband at paris fashion week. the times pictures 17—year—old jodie chesney, the teenager stabbed in east london on friday. it also reports that it has seen a document drawn up
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by tory brexiteers containing "three tests" for the pm to answer before they vote on her deal to leave the eu. jodie chesney also dominates the front page of the telegraph this morning. and the paper claims a change in the law to ban confidentiality agreements is to be announced in the wake of its investigation into sir philip green. this is a story about how pushy pa rents this is a story about how pushy parents flip about hiring cheaters to coach their children. 2596. are they pushy? they think other people will think they are pushy or their kids are not smart or they don't give them enough support at home so they don't want to admit about hiring tutors for their kids but a quarter of them too. 20% say it's normal. it's a part of the education process. i get worried about people
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who don't have the money to hire them. they are not cheap but it's happening increasingly. but be open about it. your kid is not silly. this is about a different kind of strike. i've not heard about this. what is this? it's a birth strike. these are a group of women who have partners or are married who form an organisation because of climate change, they feel strongly, do i wa nt to change, they feel strongly, do i want to bring my child into this world so guess what i'm going to do? i'm not going to have won until the world takes climate change seriously. this is a serious strike. one of the people that said i do have a partner, i would love to have children with him, that is not people who don't want to have children. it feels like the right
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thing to do. it's quite interesting to feel that strongly. they were influenced by the ipc stuff on climate change and the fact that the kids reacted strongly to it and went on marches and everything else. only about 60 women apparently are doing that. at the moment, a small group of women. this is a story about a blood donor, someone who had leukaemia who met the donor who gave the bone marrow. i love this story. the law is all changed now, the max and carer law. max is my nephew. what an extraordinary young man. he had a heart transplant 18 months ago and carer was the young girl who tragically died in a car accident and he received her heart. it was
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the mirror who championed that campaign and they are talking about it today in the context of bone marrow. for me as a psychologist, the two should meet. the donor in this case the donor can't because it's bone marrow it's not your heart. the dough and i can meet. psychologically for both. there a lot of caution surrounding that and various different roles but you think that is a good thing. yes. giving an organ to someone from the donorfamily, i giving an organ to someone from the donor family, i think giving an organ to someone from the donorfamily, i think are giving an organ to someone from the donor family, i think are so important for that family to fill that person is living on.” important for that family to fill that person is living on. i know my brother's family are very close to carer's family and max and her pa rents carer's family and max and her parents will share a stage talking to transplant coordinators later this week. you do have to hug each
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other for 20 seconds. it could be a corporate matter. there's an invisible line here. be careful, you are british. watch out. lingering embrace releases the bonding hormone oxytoci n embrace releases the bonding hormone oxytocin which can lower your blood pressure, improve your mental health. what i don't like at the end is where they say the greater the surface area of your body that you contact, the better. get into trouble. be careful. thank you very much. the andrew marr show is on at ten o'clock this morning, and we can speak to andrew now to see who's joining him today. morning, andrew... absolutely no hugging on my sofa this morning i can promise you. i'll be very surprised if there is. it is the month where brexit is supposed
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to happen. i'm joined the month where brexit is supposed to happen. i'mjoined by the month where brexit is supposed to happen. i'm joined by liam fox the trade secretary to talk about the trade secretary to talk about the future for industry, agriculture and food after brexit. i'm joined by the former prime minister, tony blairand in his the former prime minister, tony blair and in his first interview since mps broke away to form this new group, enjoyed by the labour frontbencher, rebecca, on another referendum and anti—semitism in the labour party, the actorjoanne froggatt and robert len mr and the great historian, simon sharma, very interesting. no hugging, no tactile involvement of any kind at all. i'm com pletely involvement of any kind at all. i'm completely with you on this. excellent. thank you very much. that's all from us for viewers on bbc one. but you can stay with us on the news channel, where we'll have the headlines coming up. all you need to do isjoin us on
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all you need to do is join us on the other side and we will have the headlines coming up shortly. and if you did that and you pressed the button and you are with us on the button and you are with us on the bbc news channel, thank you! hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main news... the husband of shamima begum — the teenager from east london who travelled to syria to join the so—called islamic state group — has told the bbc he wants to take her and their newborn son to live in his native netherlands.
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yaago reidijk, who's a dutch citizen, is being held by kurdish forces in north—eastern syria. he admits fighting for is and is facing six years in jail if he's allowed to return home. reidijk married shamima begum in raqqa in syria when it was under is's control. two teenage boys have been arrested after a 17—year—old was stabbed to death in greater manchester. the boy was rushed to hospital but died shortly after the incident, which happened on saturday evening. it comes less than 26 hours after another teenager was killed in london. 17—year—old jodie chesney was stabbed at a park in romford on friday. no arrests have been made. free tampons and other sanitary products will be offered to every female hospital patient who needs them, health leaders have announced. nhs england said women and girls will be able to ask for the products free of charge from this summer. the british medical association argued it was inconsistent for some hospitals to give out razors and shaving foam, but not offer women sanitary products. growth in private firms has stagnated as businesses brace
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themselves for a possible no—deal brexit — that's according to a new report from the confederation of british industry. the research suggests that the balance of companies reporting growth is at its weakest since 2013. the cbi's chief economist, rain newton—smith, said that uncertainty over brexit is making day—to—day business decisions "increasingly problematic". when you ask businesses about their investment plans, they are now not expecting to expand over the course of the next year. so, that is really damaging, notjust of the next year. so, that is really damaging, not just for our economy now but into the future. if we are investing now it supports our growth into the future. new research suggests that 150 young men have died after going missing on a night out over the last nine years. that's according to figures analysed by bbc 5 live investigates.
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the university of portsmouth figures suggest that 85% of those who died were found in water. campaigners are calling for more patrols around canals and for men to look after each other on nights out. britain will boost its defences against chemical attacks with £11 million of extra funding announced by the defence secretary. it's hoped the money will help prevent attacks like the one in salisbury, by deploying drones and robots into potentially hazardous areas and identifying threats faster. the announcement comes on the eve of the anniversary of the last year's novichok attack. one last look at these lovely pictures. think of carnivals in rio and you might conjure up images of sequins and feathers — but there's another carnival with an altogether furrier theme. this is the city's annual ‘pooch parade'. it takes place every year in the run up to the main carnival. the event attracts dogs of all shapes and sizes, dressed by their owners as everything from pink fairies to superheroes. they are always keen to get a selfie with the dogs. some very patient
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dogs there. very tolerant! good morning. what a legend. roger federer. watmore is there to say about him? he has now won his 100th atp world tour at.l very nice trophy! everything he does is impressive. he is an amazing player. only the second man in history to have got 100 80p world tour titles. he has done it in 19 countries, 30 cities, and he has served 4378 aces. i wish you had asked us how many he had done! i don't know where i would have gone with that, but wow! amazing, even by his standards. so yet another milestone in the amazing career of roger federer. 20 grand slam singles titles...and now he's won his 100th title on the atp tour.
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he did it by beating stefanos tsitsipas in straight sets at the dubai tennis championships. he's only the second man to reach the milestone — jimmy connors has 109, so does federer now have his sights set on passing that record? people are probably going to say, now you have to reach jimmy connors‘s record, you know. but i'm not that kind of a guy even though people might think i am. i draw inspiration from it, but i'm not here to shatter every record out there. and he's a special player, and a special legend in the sport, and if he keeps that record, it's all good. i'm just happy to have reached 100 in my career. martina navratilova is out on her own with the all—time record with 167 women's singles titles. england have given themselves a great chance of winning the shebelieves cup after a thrilling draw against the usa. phil neville's side drew 2—2 against the world champions in nashville, to set up a winner—takes—all match against japan on tuesday. the lionesses scored two excellent
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goals through manchester city pair steph houghton and nikkita parris. jo currie is there for us... what's in a name? everything and nothing, if you're part of the us women's national team, who played this game with their female idols on the back of their shirts. half an hour in, and the real megan rapinoe was writing her name on the scoresheet, leaving the england goalkeeper rooted to the spot. when you are trying to be world number one, you need a leader. step up captain steph houghton with a sublime equaliser. what an equaliser, and really well played. well worked, that! england were finding their feet, and nikita parris was finding her range. this lioness is ahead. what a very good goal, and in the lead against the world champions. but the problem with the champions is you can never write them off, and while scrappy, they were eventually able to find a way through england's defence
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to deny them the win. we had fantastic performances out there on the pitch today. we had players that played with a smile on their face, and like i say, the result is irrelevant to us on the pitch. not irrelevant to the competition, though. well, this result means that the lionesses can now fly off to sunny florida in the knowledge that a win againstjapan will seal the trophy. perhaps it really is their time to believe. jo currie, bbc news. manchester city returned to the top of the premier league after beating bournemouth 1—0. riyad mahrez scored the only goal of the game, enough to seal victory for city, who put pressure back on liverpool, with nine matches to play. liverpool play rivals everton in the merseyside derby later today... we made one of the best performances we have played. so they are incredible players, and we defend so well. all the aspects, the throw—ins, the free kicks, the corners.
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so i just can say thank you to the players, because they are absolutely incredible. at old trafford, manchester united and southampton had their own competion for goal of the month. first, yan valery thundered southampton into the lead with an absolute cracker. andreas pereira arguably went one better to equalise for united in the second half — and romelu lukaku won it with this finish two minutes from time. united winning 3—2 and moving above arsenal and into the top four. that's because arsenal could only draw with tottenham in the north london derby... but they were so close to winning it. pierre—emerick aubameyang missing a penalty in the last minute at wembley. there were wins elsewhere yesterday for west ham, crystal palace, brighton and wolves. neil lennon's winning start as celtic manager continued against his former club hibernian in the quarterfinals of the scottish cup.
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after a goal—less first half, james forrest set the game alight with this brilliant solo goal from outside the box. the draw for the semi—finals takes place tomorrow. now we've shown you some pretty decent goals already this morning. we may have one that tops the lot... step forward aston villa's jack grealish who scored this volley from a corner in his sides 4—0 win over derby county. paul scholes scored a similar goal for manchester united at the same ground 13 years ago. it is worth another look! here he is, catching it perfectly. the goalkeeper has no chance. england captain eoin morgan says his side need to be better at adapting to different conditions after a humbling defeat to west indies in the final one dayer. after reaching over 400 on wednesday, england were bowled out forjust 113 in st lucia — a wake up call in world cup year as patrick gearey reports.. byjuly, the odds say these men
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may be world champion. here was a reminder that there is nothing definite about being a favourite. this was the sound of england returning to earth. bowled him! sheldon cottrell prompted the first changing of the guard but english batsmen remained at ease, joe root among many who flew too close to the st lucia sun. the margin between being fearless and being careless is small but crucial — this is what happens when you are caught the wrong side of the line. a team that scored 418 in its last match, dismantled for 113. west indies opener chris gayle looked as though he had somewhere to be. this would be his last one—day innings on these islands — he retires after the world cup, so he released his greatest hits. banger after banger, 77 runs in 27 balls. we will never see another quite like him. when he was out, others grabbed the batting baton, west indies reaching their target in little more than an hour of power. series drawn, england have been warned.
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patrick gearey, bbc news. no more golds for great britain at the european indoor athletics in glasgow, but a silver and a bronze mean they lie second in the medal table heading into the final day. the silver came courtesy of chris o'hare in the 3000 metres. it was a tall order to beat norway's teenager sensation jakob ingebrigtsen but a storming finish was enough to claim second, just ahead of ingebrigtsen's older brother henrik asha philip was defending champion in the 60 metres. the gold was won by poland's eva svoboda with philip — in the centre here just pipping compatriot crystal awuha by one thousandth of a second. exeter stay top of the premiership after a hard—fought win over sale. but the game of the day was at welford road... as leicester managed to cling on to beat wasps. joe ford scored all 19 points for the tigers, including there only try. his fingertipsjust about grounding the ball... enough to give leicester their first win in six.
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meanwhile... in the pro 14, glasgow thrashed zebre 42—10 in parma to return to the top of group a. captain chris fusaro the man to touch down the final try. fellow—scots edinburgh didn't fare as well in italy though... their playoff hopes were dented as they went down 18—10 against benetton in treviso. david beckham has been honored with a statue outside his former club la galaxy. the ex—england footballer joined the american side in 2007, helping the team to two titles. the statue shows the right—winger taking a free kick — his trademark move that was the inspiration for the film "bend it like beckham" in 2002. looks pretty much like him. not bad! they have his stance, and his face as well. and it has the sponsor's logo! he never misses a trick that as we know, statues are not always
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that good, are they? we always come back to this! there he is. the famous ronaldo statue. the former manchester city man. this bust was mocked when it was revealed in 2017 in his home country of madeira — and was quietly replaced a year later. he kept a straight face, although underneath you can imagine, looking at that, that he was less than pleased! it was replaced one year later. thank you very much, lovely to see you. campaigners are urging young men to look out for each other on nights out, after new figures from the university of plymouth suggest that 150 men have accidentally died in the last nine years. families say more patrols around canals and waterways could help prevent accidents caused by alcohol. megan paterson reports. charlie was in his first year
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at university in manchester when, after a night out, he got separated from his friends and drowned ina canal. if one person had just asked him, are you ok, do you know how to get home, it could have been so different. and that's all it takes — literally just asking someone if they're ok. like, everyone should just look out for each other more. sadly, charlie's story isn't uncommon. new research from portsmouth university found that, between 2010 and 2018, 150 men initially reported missing died after nights out where alcohol was involved. that is an average of 17 a year, and most end up in water. the number of deaths has prompted some towns and cities to set up volunteer groups to patrol waterways at night. in manchester, plans for fencing around the stretch of the canal where charlie died have been submitted to the city council. megan patterson, bbc news. five live investigates has
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been looking into this, and presenter adrian goldberg joins us now. they are shocking, aren't they? that so many young men die and are found in waterways? it is really quite disturbing. the figures have come from geoff lewis, a visiting research fellow at the university of portsmouth and he noticed a pattern of death by accidental misadventure involving predominantly young men, mostly involving accidents or misfortune around water. he crunched the numbers and in the last nine yea rs the numbers and in the last nine years there have been 150 deaths of mostly young men in these circumstances. it's very disappointing and very disturbing, young men going for a night out and not going home, wandering off and sadly coming to grief. there have been conspiracy theories in some places about someone pushing men into the canal. police always say there is absolutely no truth in that, there is something about young men having a drink and for some
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reason they are attracted to the water? and it is partly about how young men socialise with each other. anecdotally, women will say that if a young woman goes off alone her friends are more likely to look out for her, drop her a message, ask who she is with and whether she is ok, with young men there is a matching culture, if he wonders off on his own, it is seen to be less important or worrying but as these cases prove, sadly if you are a young man ona prove, sadly if you are a young man on a night out, don't imagine that your mate is ok, imagine them being more proactive. and what efforts are being made to try and stop this?m various places where tragedies like this have occurred, in belfast there are voluntary patrols around the entertainment areas on friday and saturday nights. in shrewsbury, i went to visit the widow of sean
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walsh, young men who died after falling in the river, there are additional lifelines placed on the river bank so that if someone sees something going on, they can throw the lifeline and try and intervene. one of the things that daisy pope saysin one of the things that daisy pope says in reference to her brother's case, if someone is too drunk and they are in a nightclub, the rule is you are out and pushed out on your own but if you are too drunk to be ina nightclub, own but if you are too drunk to be in a nightclub, you are too drunk to be walking along a canal tow path. and in reference back to shrewsbury, where i did research myself, there is now going to be a recording system for people leaving nightclubs in shrewsbury, people who have not necessarily been causing trouble but deemed a little inebriated. now there will be a recording system and hopefully greater monitoring on tv so these people can be tracked, not in an intrusive way but to ensure they are ok. we have talked about it
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here on breakfast that if people into cold water, it is extremely dangerous. i've been standing by a couple of these river banks doing research on the river severn in worcester a nd research on the river severn in worcester and shrewsbury at night. it is dark. you might not even realise you are going to full into the river. you mayjust go to the side and there might be a slope and you are down there. even if you are a good swimmer, in these circumstances, perhaps slightly drunk and very cold. cold water shock. that is why campaigners say they don't expect every river to be com pletely they don't expect every river to be completely fenced off but around busy entertainment hubs and around shrewsbury and belfast, they have entertainment hubs built around the rivers, that is fine but let's ensure there is more fencing and better lighting, and that cctv is being actively monitored to help to save people in these situations. adrian, thank you very much for your time. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news.
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the headlines... the captured islamic state fighter who married shamima begum tells the bbc he wants to return to the netherlands with the london schoolgirl and their newborn son. a 17—year—old boy in greater manchester has become the latest teenager to be stabbed to death, less than 24 hours afterjodie chesney, also 17, was killed in romford. here's darren with a look at this morning's weather. news of storm freire getting ever closer? yes, she is heading our way later today. likely to impact a good part of england and wales, there could be some travel disruption and damage, thatis some travel disruption and damage, that is a developing story later today and overnight tonight, coming from this mass of cloud, this huge shield. we will see some shape in the cloud. a sure sign that the weather is going to get a lot worse. already we have seen outbreaks of rain coming from that cloud. it will
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arrive across northern england, we have had sunshine so far there today. rain and drizzle though on the south coast, the winds are yet to pick up. the strongest the other side of the country, in central and northern scotland, there are a lot of showers there. rain moving northwards in england and wales, going as far as the borders and into parts of northern ireland. uncertainty about the progress there. heavy for a while. uncertainty about the progress there. heavy fora while. it uncertainty about the progress there. heavy for a while. it will dry up in wales and the south—west later on. temperatures as high as 12 or 13 degrees. it will not be as windy in northern scotland. the lightest winds in northern ireland. the strongest of the winds in south—west england and also in south wales. we have low pressure, and storm freya named by the met office. the forecast has not changed much, or the track. the strongest core of the winds in south—west england and wales. 60 or 70 there. up to 80
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miles an houron wales. 60 or 70 there. up to 80 miles an hour on western coasts. overnight, winds will probably ease down. the wind pushes up through the midlands and into northern england, combined with heavy rain and snow over the top of the pennines. and in the southern uplands, miserable overnight. at the same time, wet weather. pushing further into southern england. temperatures there at three or 4 degrees. still windy for the early rush—hour tomorrow morning in the north—east of england. the storm pushing out into the north sea. the winds will ease. sunshine and showers, showers in the west of the uk. eastern areas dry with the best of the sunshine. those temperatures are at 8—10d. near normalfor temperatures are at 8—10d. near normal for this temperatures are at 8—10d. near normalfor this time of temperatures are at 8—10d. near normal for this time of year. don't think we will get any better than that for the week ahead. very u nsettled that for the week ahead. very unsettled weather to come. mid week,
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another area of low pressure brings wet and windy weather. not expected to be as bad as what is to come later today across england and wales, keep note if you are travelling later on. studio: we shall be watching, thank you. back in november we reported on the benefits of regular exercise for people with incurable cancer and we met gemma ellis, as she embarked on a 12 weekjourney to run herfirst ever five kilometre race. well, yesterday she completed that challenge. we'll be speaking to gemma, as well as her trainers helen and tony, in a moment. first, let's look at how far she's come. gemma was diagnosed and treated for cancer in her early 30s. at that point, i believe that i was clear. but there was always a but, there was a shadow on my spine. left leg. the cancer had spread. she was told it was treatable but not curable. the cancer had spread. she was told it was treatable but not curablem was there. i knew that i had got it
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andi was there. i knew that i had got it and i had to live with it. and march! it was then gemma decided to make a change. 12 weeks ago she started training for her first ever five k, with help from experienced runners tony collier and helen bacon. they also have stage four cancer. gemma is hoping that becoming more active will help her live a longer and happier life, despite her diagnosis.” live a longer and happier life, despite her diagnosis. i don't know my prognosis, and i never want to know, but i know that it is probably not great. but somewhere in the back of my mind, i kind of keep thinking, i will be here to see that. i give myself milestones and i'm hitting them already and i intend to do so for a long time! that was gemma talking to us a while back. we can speak to her now. helen bacon and tony collier are here in the studio, and gemma joins us from her home in manchester. let's catch up with her first of all. gemma, good morning. tell us
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what you did yesterday. morning. i completed the stratford five kilometre park run, the first i've ever done. well, i power walk. buti did jog ever done. well, i power walk. buti didjog a ever done. well, i power walk. buti did jog a little as well! you did it, that's the most important thing, isn't it? i did! and tell us about it. running, walking, howeveryou do it, five kilometres can be really challenging. how was it on the day? on the actual day, it was brilliant. i was just taken by all of the people around me. everybody was very supportive. all of the other runners. it was a really nice experience. working up to it was harder. it was easier on the day! that's what i always find. helen bacon and tony collier, you both are cancer patients. and you also help with the training. how was her training? we both have stage iv cancer and we are both passionate about the role of exercise during
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active treatment and how it helps. at the training was bullied. from the outset we wanted to find someone who would join us who had never exercised and also had advanced cancer and would follow herjourney. we met on a catwalk for the maggi's charity. she agreed to do it with us. what i would say most about it, gemma would agree, it was kept really real. there was a lot of swearing! there was a lot of, i don't want to do this! but ultimately she got out there and did it and we had a cracking day yesterday. it was awesome. we were speaking earlier, tony. if you are able to do this, it is great, and to be fit must help when you are going through treatment but if you cannot do it, that is not in anyway a bad thing, it is not for everybody. and for some people with debilitating illnesses it is very tough to go out and do basic exercise. there are
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things that i think most people can try and do, even if it is sitting down on a sofa and stretching the muscles a little bit, there are things everybody can do but literally going out and running five kilometres, or a park literally going out and running five kilometres, ora park run, that literally going out and running five kilometres, or a park run, that can be quite difficult. set an achievable and attainable, what is your target, your marathon, it might just be a walk to the end of the garden. that is key, push as far as you can go, that's the most important thing. helen, before you we re important thing. helen, before you were diagnosed with cancer you did a lot of exercise as well and you've managed to continue that. has it been tough? yes, just before i was diagnosed i did a half ironman, and post diagnosis i did a triathlon in the middle of iv chemo. probably a mistake! last year, i did the great manchester run three weeks after a total hysterectomy. i walked it,
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manchester run three weeks after a total hysterectomy. iwalked it, but thatis total hysterectomy. iwalked it, but that is the message we both share. in our situation there is a lot of dark days, we both have treatable but incurable cancers. it is what exercise does to your mental health. whether it is walking the dog or doing the triathlon, it is how it improves how you think. gemma, have you found that as well? that it helps you in different ways, not just with physical exercise? yeah, umm. yes, once i was motivated to go out, that was something i wanted to quickly say to people out there, he asked suffering with cancer and going through treatment, it isn't easy, it wasn't easy, it tuck knee weeks to get out the door but once i had done it, in small bits, ifelt better every time and after each time it got easier. and will you
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carry on now, having done one? yeah! ididn't carry on now, having done one? yeah! i didn't think i would say that ain! i didn't think i would say that again! and what are you going to aim to do, gemma? i'mjust going to start slow now, i'm going to carry on with what i've been doing but try and do the park run perhaps once a month or every five and six weeks. try and beat my time, something like that. nothing too silly, keep on top of what i've already achieved. there is no need to beat your time. there is no need to beat your time. there isa is no need to beat your time. there is a movement called five k your way. tony launched it in wilmslow la st way. tony launched it in wilmslow last weekend, and i'm launching stratford park run in may, the idea being that the last saturday of every month is that we are
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ambassadors who get people who are affected by cancer to join the park run. go and cheer people on. we want people to come along, jog, walk, cheer, volunteer. gemma, good luck with the rest of it as well. i'm so glad you did it. huge congratulations! that's all from us this morning. it will be naga and louise back with you tomorrow. join them from six o'clock. goodbye.
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this is bbc news i'm bb. the headlines at 9:00am: the dutch husband of shamima begum, the teenager who has been stripped of her british citizenship forjoining the islamic state group, has told the bbc he wants them to live in the netherlands. it was acceptable for you to marry a 15—year—old girl? it was her own choice. she was the one who asked to look for a partnerfor her. then i was invited, and... yeah, she was — she was very young. eight lawyers who back brexit — seven of them conservative or democratic unionist mps — set out the concessions they require from the eu to support the deal. rescuers hope to resume their search for british climber tom ballard who's been missing on one of the world's highest mountains
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