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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 4, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben bland. china and the us are reported to be close to a breakthrough on a trade deal which would see washington remove most, if not all, tariffs levied on chinese goods. live from london, that's our top story on monday 4 march. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and louise minchin. our headlines today: a £1.6 billion fund to help the uk's stuggling towns after brexit. labour says the prime minister is trying to bribe mps to back her deal to leave the eu. the reports come as the national people's congress — effectively china's parliament — after two teenagers in separate cities are stabbed to death, begins its annual meeting, the home secretary calls an urgent meeting of chief constables with the country's economy growing at its weakest pace to tackle knife crime. in almost three decades. also in the programme: fierce tornadoes strike the american states of alabama and georgia, killing at least 23 people. many more are missing. today i'm talking about personal finances. more of us are worried about what the turmoil in westminster will mean for our household budgets. i'll have more shortly.
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it was another golden night for laura muir at the european indoor athletics championships in glasgow. she won her second gold of the event, as great britain finished with 12 medals overall. and after the windy and very wintry weather of storm freya last night, thatis weather of storm freya last night, that is now out of the way. a mixture of sunshine and showers. i will have all the latest details here on breakfast. it is monday 4 march. our top story: a £1.6 billion fund is being launched to help struggling towns after brexit. the government says more than half the money will go to the north of england and the midlands, to try to bring jobs and boost the economy. the labour party has accused the prime minister of attempting to bribe mps to vote for her brexit deal. our political correspondent ben wrightjoins us from westminster. so there is more money, but there is
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criticism. yes, there is criticism about this and the suspicion that this is a very crude bribe to try and persuade some labour mps to swing behind the prime minister's brexit deal in the next week or so when she brings it back to the house of commons. and it is true that a few weeks ago the prime minister met some labour mps few weeks ago the prime minister met some labourmps in few weeks ago the prime minister met some labour mps in the voting constituencies who said they were very concerned about their communities, which are already struggling, —— leave voting constituencies. so now the prime minister has come forward with this pot of money, £i.6 minister has come forward with this pot of money, £1.6 billion, to help immunities, coastal towns, towns in the north of england, towns and the midlands, to tap this pot. so £1 billion has been allocated to various regions, including the highest recipients will be the north—west, the west midlands, yorkshire and humber. it will be bid for by other places in the uk. the prime minister says it will be part of her agenda to help working class
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families in areas of the uk which have been left behind. but as you say, the labour front have been left behind. but as you say, the labourfront bench have been left behind. but as you say, the labour front bench say this isa say, the labour front bench say this is a very crude bribe to try and persuade some of their mps to back the prime minister's deal. advocates of another referendum say this is a tiny amount of money, it is pathetic, and it will be wiped out a nyway pathetic, and it will be wiped out anyway by the effects of brexit. so i think there is quite a backlash, actually, that this announcement. —— at this announcement. an urgent meeting of police chiefs has been called after two more teenagers were killed in fatal stabbings over the weekend. the home secretary, sajid javid, who will chair the serious violence taskforce discussion on wednesday, said in a tweet that the situation can't go on. andy moore reports on the latest victims of knife crime. police officers were called to the suburban street at hale barns in greater manchester on saturday evening to find a 17—year—old boy had been stabbed. he was taken to hospital, but died there of his wounds. yousef makki has been described
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as a loveable young man with a great sense of humour. police said his death was incredibly tragic. two 17—year—old boys have been arrested. police say they are keeping an open mind as to the motive. in london, jodie chesney‘s mother came to lay flowers, as police revealed more information about the attack. they said jodie was with a group of five friends in a park, playing music. two youths were seen in the area. half an hour later, they returned, and she was stabbed in the back. she was a keen scout. her family called her a lovely and quirky girl. she was good, and kind, and she wouldn't hurt anyone. she would do do anything to make someone happy.
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she was the most beautiful person i have ever known in my life. 15 people have been stabbed to death in london alone so far this year. jodie's grandmother has called for anyone with information to come forward, saying too many young lives are being cut short by needless violence. andy moore joins us live from romford in east london, where 17—year—old jodie chesney was stabbed on friday night. andy, what are the police saying about their investigation? well, as you say, the stabbing was on friday night and so far no arrest, the family calling it a random and unprovoked attack. and certainly we have heard nothing about motive from the police. the group of youngsters were here and they saw those two men in the park, but there was no conversation between the two groups. half—an—hour later, the two men came back and jodie was stabbed once in the back. there was no conversation at that stage either. so that is the criminal investigation which is going on. then we have the wider political impact. sajid javid saying
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this violence has to stop. he is hosting this meeting wednesday with police chief constables around the country, the serious violence task force, that is a preplanned meeting. the government says it already has a strategy in place, it has made 61 commitments, it says, and it is spending £200 million on steering young people away from crime and violence. on that issue, injust over an hour, we will be talking to the crime minister, victoria atkins. at least 23 people, some of them children, have died after tornadoes swept through the south—east of america. at least two tornadoes struck in lee county in alabama, causing catastrophic damage, according to the county sheriff. the national weather service has recorded winds of up to 165 mph, and more than 20,000 homes are still without power. we're joined now by storm chaser brandon copic, who has been in the area. you have been trying to find these
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storms, what have you seen? two damaging tornadoes today, very powerful tornadoes. it was not a good scene to see. we were out there covering them for the national weather service, our weather channel, trying to keep people ahead of the storm, but sadly it was definitely a tragic day. we understand some 22 people have been killed. give us a sense of the power of these storms. well, i mean, it was just absolutely intense. with the death toll alone, 22 people confirmed killed so far. absolutely u nfortu nate, confirmed killed so far. absolutely unfortunate, but that is more deaths than we have seen in a year, without tornado season just starting, then we have seen in over six years. —— with our tornado season just starting. is there anything anybody can do, we have seen pictures of the devastation just now, to try and protect themselves? we just want
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people to get to their interior rooms and down to their basement and shield themselves, get to a safe space for when the tornado impact the area. and we know there is obviously search and rescue operations going on. have you seen evidence of that at this point? yes, we are actually part of search and rescue, earlier today. we were graced —— grazed by the south side of the tornado, and we did search and rescue with the fire department when their station had just been hit. and you have done this for sometime now, you ever hit. and you have done this for sometime now, you ever seen hit. and you have done this for sometime now, you ever seen this scale of destruction, and this level? well, that was something i was talking about with my chaise partner, i have been doing this for ten yea rs partner, i have been doing this for ten years and the damage we saw today was just in comparable to what we have seen. we have seen some pretty damaging tornadoes before, but on this level, we were talking a
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64 mile long path of destruction, just consistent damage from a violent tornado, and it was very tragic and it is definitely not something we ever want to see, or anything we have really seen before. and you say you have been doing this for ten years. is there any particular reason why these lines have been so damaging, so powerful, as far as you know? not to my knowledge. it was just kind of a setup that everything just kind of fell into place. it was a real what we call bang or bust day, where the ingredients came togetherjust right. it was going to be violent tornadoes, but if it was not, it would be mostly gusty winds and a squall line. sadly it came together ina way squall line. sadly it came together in a way which was just right for tornadoes. we really appreciate your time, thank you forjoining us. if we want to know how that has all happened, matt has been looking at
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the weather patterns. good morning, early in the tornado season in the us but fired up by weather contrast, tend to 20 degrees colder than we would normally expect, very warm air around the gulf states. when those two clash you get very active weather fronts, and as they have just said, you need those ingredients to be right at the surface to produce this band of rain, within that, some horrendous tornadoes. the deadliest tornado we have seen since 2013, and sadly more deaths in just have seen since 2013, and sadly more deaths injust one have seen since 2013, and sadly more deaths in just one day then we saw from tornadoes all of last year. and it is only just from tornadoes all of last year. and it is onlyjust the start of the tornado season in the united states as well. obviously our sympathies are very much with people who are dealing with that at the moment. it makes what is happening here in the uk seem very small indeed. there was a lot of build—up ahead of storm freya. yes, indeed, our wind speeds hardly comparable, but these are the scenes yesterday in swansea where we saw our strongest gusts touched 76
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mph, but across parts of northern england and the south—west with salt winds well above 64 mph. that has caused a bit of damage. a bit of disruption to your morning commute as well and the out onto that we saw some heavy snowfall as well especially across parts of cumbria, which will still be lying around, causing some icy and slippery conditions at the moment across some parts of northern england. the good news is, though, the worst of storm freya has now moved off into the north sea, and we will see things improve through the day, nowhere near as windy and the wind certainly nowhere near as damaging or destructive as some of the images that you are just seeing right now. we will talk to you later, find out what is happening in the rest of the country as well. thank you very much. president donald trump has blamed congress's questioning of his former lawyer for the breakdown in talks with north korean leader kim jong—un. last night, the president tweeted that michael cohen's hearing being held at the same time as the summit with north korea, was a new low in american politics, and may have contributed
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to the walk. new opt—out organ donation laws, making it easier for adults to donate organs, could be extended to children. the nhs is trying to ensure more parents are given the choice to donate their child's organs after their death. a shortage of child donors means young patients wait twice as long for urgent heart transplants than adults. we are taking steps today to ensure that, as many times as possible, if a child sadly loses their life, then those organs are available to save the lives of others. for adults we have changed the law so that, unless you actively opt out, your organs will be available. now, i'd be perfectly open to seeing that extended to children. but we've got to do everything we can in the short term, as well, to ensure that, when a child needs an organ to save their life, than those organs are available. carnival week
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is in full swing as the world's biggest party gets underway in rio de janeiro. thousands of dancers in colourful costumes from the city's elite samba schools have been taking to the streets to show off their moves, and their sequins, as part of the annual carnival celebrations. the festivities go on until lent begins on wednesday. and yesterday we saw pictures of the dog parade which pre—empts the carnival. how did it can pay a? well, these are better costumes. were the dogs that are dancers? —— how did it compare?” were the dogs that are dancers? —— how did it compare? i will always ta ke how did it compare? i will always take pancake spin of the —— pancakes over sequins. and laura muir had a
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nightmare previously in the 1500, but last night was a different story. it was another great night for great britain at the european indoor athletics championships. laura muir won her second gold medal of the competition, with victory in the 1,500 metres, with shelayna 0skan—clarke winning the 800 metres in glasgow. gone with the wind. jurgen klopp blames the weather as liverpool drop more points in the premier league title race. they are a point behind manchester city, with nine games remaining. brendan rodgers's return to the premier league got off to the worst possible start, as his leicester side suffered an injury—time defeat at watford. and tom daley has been back in the diving pool for the first time since becoming a dad, and he won two medals at the world series event injapan. he wouldn't just he wouldn'tjust go and died without
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having done a bit of practice, probably has warmed up a bit. the papers make great reading for football fans. we will see how storm freya is panning out. it will be a bit of a lively week. a bit of everything in the forecast. as i mentioned, some snow around as well. these are some images from cumbria but the good news is the worst is 110w but the good news is the worst is now over. things looking brighter today. not quite as windy with a mixture of sunshine. the strongest winds on the southern edge of this book. lively
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showers in later. the overnight cloud clearing. some rain and sleet in north—east england. winds continued to ease. it should state fine in eastern areas. cloud pushing their way in fine in eastern areas. cloud pushing theirway in and fine in eastern areas. cloud pushing their way in and some good be on the heavy side. weigh the end of the afternoon, rain in auckland and shetland. much of scotland dry. a mixture of rain and hail in northern ireland. that will affect the western half of england. when the still blustery in places at nowhere near as strong. as yesterday. temperatures into double figures. tonight, the evening rush—hour, showers hitting here. clear skies
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around but colder air mass. a bit of frost just about anywhere across central and eastern parts as we go into tomorrow morning. a low pressure system waiting in the winds. still prone to some showers, most likely on tuesday across parts of northern england, scotland and northern ireland. wintry on the higher ground. a few showers towards the south and then sunshine turning hazy later on. into wednesday, low pressure pushing in, nowhere near as potent as last night. whent and windy weather. —— wept. the
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temperature contrast north to south. a bit of top seat to the week. kind of what we expect. let's take a look at today's papers: ‘a knife to the heart of britain‘ is the headline for the daily mail. images ofjodie chesney, the teenager stabbed to death in an east london park, continue to dominate many of the papers today. the article claims the number of child knife killers has risen by 77% in the last two years. the mirror also leads on knife crime. photos there ofjodie chesney and of schoolboy yousef makki, who was stabbed to death in greater manchester on saturday. ‘anyone's street, anyone's child' the headline says. the guardian leads on its own investigation which it claims reveals an exodus of moderates from ukip and a rapid rise in anti—islamic entrants, leading the party to shift decisively to the right, it says.
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in other news, it also pictures gracejones, 70, giving younger models a run for their money on the catwalk in paris. we will show you more on that later because it is fabulous. and finally, the times leads on theresa may's announcement of a £1.6 billion fund for struggling communities and the accusations that it's a bribe to win over mps in leave—supporting areas of the uk. the story appears below a picture of huge waves hitting porthcawl pier in south wales as storm freya arrives. have you got the magazine? my favourite day of the month. they often have brilliant stories releva nt often have brilliant stories relevant to us. the price of soft drink and they are saying shoppers are paying more with coke, pepsi and
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other drinks, all the fizzy drinks have gone up in price because of higher transportation costs and a rise in the cost of aluminium. a lot has to do with plastic and the fact we do not want to have plastic waste so we do not want to have plastic waste so we're using more aluminium cans. it isa so we're using more aluminium cans. it is a very interesting article about that this morning. lots of talk about the football. liverpool derby all over the pages. very windy at goodison park. it was a draw. the back page of the guardian saying
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they have clear that manager's wrote we are not playing playstation. this is not like playing a computer game, do you think we are not try. when you say gone with the wind, does it really affect the ball? yes. that was really happening? yes. in different competitions all ways differently. for example in 2006, the ball was lighter and the goalkeepers had to train with a different role. i promised some beaches of gracejones, i am a massive fan. 70 years old and she looks like this! fantastic. an amazing model from the 70s. she
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still keeping up. massive cheers in paris on saturday for fashion week. i love that. the new chip video is available. —— i love that. the new chip video is available. — — youtube. i love that. the new chip video is available. -- youtube. it is available. -- youtube. it is available. this use me this morning. remember theresa may talking about the word simples, apparently it was actually a bet by using the word. that is a bit naughty. apparently it was a little bet and the mail on sunday reporting the prior rat secretary had a bet. we have all done that. i say no to my friends.
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have you? for a bet. i am always asked to say sausage in my sport report. if you hear something slightly... i have never done it either, we are boring. scaredy-cat, actually. thank you very much. we will see you later. the hpv vaccine is offered to girls in secondary schools across the uk, helping to protect against cervical cancer, but the bbc has found parents from some communities are reluctant to let their daughters have the jab. public health england is calling on schools to work with parents to tackle the issue, saying the work needs to be done to help save the lives of children. shanae dennis reports. it is not saying that i have been told about it from the community. that wasn't anybody around to actually talk to. people were just saying get it. schoolgirls across
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are off and offered the hpv vaccine in youreightand are off and offered the hpv vaccine in your eight and year 9. the uk has one of the most successful immunisation programmes hpv vaccine for in the world but health officials have noticed that girls from nonwhite —— white brca and is more likely to have the jab. —— white backgrounds. human papilloma virus his comment and effects men and women. 0ver virus his comment and effects men and women. over 99% of cervical cases are caused by the virus. most are exposed when they become sexually active. why would people wa nt sexually active. why would people want the jab? sexually active. why would people want thejab? a sexually active. why would people want the jab? a motherfrom north london did not want her 14—year—old daughter to want the jab. hpv vaccine with comes the conversation
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about sexual health and did not know ifi about sexual health and did not know if i was ready to have that conversation. it is one thing to give the hpv vaccine butt all the other conversation. although parents a consultant about whether their child can have the jab it is legally up child can have the jab it is legally up to the child to have it. even if i decided she cannot have this vaccination, if she goes into school and changes are mine, that is ok for her to do so, which i think is wrong. if she came to me at a later stage, after we have had that talk about sex, then i would say go for it. it doesn't require a parent but obviously we want parents to be on board because it is about saving children. it is very effective, the hpv vaccine and if we keep on height would protect the whole population. in bristol, it is above average. i
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met with some girls. i do not know what they give to you.|j met with some girls. i do not know what they give to you. i was not told everything about it so i would not have been able to make my decision. when you look at the data and student, it is because of misconception. some think it implies they are going to have sex if they ta ke they are going to have sex if they take it, almost like a precursor to lose their virginity. i guess it is all about the education. our african caribbean community might have a very different response to our somali community in terms of their reason for or against the vaccination and often we not meet communities where they are. many of the girls i spoke to would not get the girls i spoke to would not get the jab without their parents permission so what more can be done to engage parents to have
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conversations about sexual health and reduce the risk for all girls from all backgrounds getting cervical cancer. that was shanae dennis reporting. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. after the stabbings this weekend, which included a 17—year—old girl being stabbed to death in east london, figures reveal there's been more than a 90% rise in the number of children being treated for stab wounds. it's one of several figures which show a steep rise in knife—relate offences which have been analysed by channel 4's dispatches programme. the home office said it set out a range of actions to tackle violent crime in october. watford football club's troy deeney has got involved in the debate over knife crime, saying the media has a big opportunity and responsibility to balance its reporting of knife crime with stories of more positive community work.
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the striker, who was jailed for affray in 2012, told the bbc that it's also "lazy" to look at footballers or celebrities as role models. he believes role models should be in young people's homes. the lg bt helpline called switchboard, took its first call exactly 45 years ago today. it began life above a book shop in kings cross a few years after homosexuality was partly decriminalised. switchboard say one of the most common themes people call about, is feeling unable to come out to their loved ones. it currently gets over 15000 calls a year. a 41—year—old man's being held on suspicion of assault after an egg was thrown at labour leaderjeremy corbyn in north london. he was visiting the finsbury park mosque, to coincide with visit my mosque day. the man is thought to have come from behind to hit him. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads: commercial street remains closed northbound and down to one lane southbound for gas works. and in mitcham: cricket green is closed northbound for roadworks. finally, in the city: king william street is closed southbound from cornhill to cannon street. now the weather with kate. good morning. a damp start out there this morning following heavy rain overnight but for the most but it is dry, we will get some sunshine and heavy showers later. the rain from last night currently in kent and clearing. a bit of cloud but that should clear. largely sunshine this morning but cloud increasing and showers blowing in from the west. they may be quite heavy and you may hear of rumble of thunder. 0vernight chance of locally heavy showers,
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clear spells, that she cloud, chilly with a bit of a breeze, keeping it above zero. tuesday looking like quite a decent day, largely dry, sunny spells and temperatures around 12 celsius. clearing to a dry afternoon. sunshine and rain at times for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: a first view of the poignant sculpture made of bullets made to mark the 75th anniversary of d—day. we meet the winner of channel 4's child genius programme,
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who has an iq higher than einstein. and the award—winning columnist melanie reid, who was paralysed after a horse riding accident, tells us about on coming to terms with the fact that she will never walk again. an urgent meeting of police chiefs has been called after two more teenagers were killed in fatal stabbings over the weekend. the home secretary, sajid javid, said in a tweet that the situation can't go on. andy moore reports on the latest victims of knife crime. police officers were called to the suburban street at hale barns in greater manchester on saturday evening to find a 17—year—old boy had been stabbed. he was taken to hospital, but died there of his wounds. yousef makki has been described
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as a loveable young man with a great sense of humour. police said his death was incredibly tragic. two 17—year—old boys have been arrested. police say they are keeping an open mind as to the motive. in london, jodie chesney‘s mother came to lay flowers, as police revealed more information about the attack. they said jodie was with a group of five friends playing music in a park. two men were seen in the area. about half an hour later, they came back, one of them stabbed jodie in the back. she was a keen scout. her family called her a lovely and quirky girl. she was good, and kind, and she wouldn't hurt anyone. she'd do anything to make someone happy, and she was just the most beautiful person i have
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ever met in my life. 15 people have been stabbed to death in london alone so far this year. jodie's grandmother has called for anyone with information to come forward, saying too many young lives are being cut short by needless violence. a £1.6 billion fund is being launched to help struggling towns after brexit. the government says more than half the money will go to the north of england and the midlands, to try to bring jobs and boost the economy. the labour party has accused the prime minister of attempting to bribe mps to vote for her brexit deal. at least 23 people are reported to have been killed after a series of tornadoes have struck the us states of alabama and georgia, with many more injured. the national weather service has recorded winds of up to 165 mph, and more than 20,000 homes are still without power. storm freya has brought gales, snow and some travel disruption to parts of the uk.
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the met office has issued a warning of injury and danger to life from flying debris. some roads have also been closed due to flooding, and homes left without power. the highest wind speed was recorded in south wales, where there were gusts of almost 80 mph. new opt—out organ donation laws, making it easier for adults to donate organs, could be extended to children. the nhs is trying to ensure more parents are given the choice to donate their child's organs after their death. a shortage of child donors means young patients wait twice as long for urgent heart transplants than adults. president donald trump has blamed congress's questioning of his former lawyer for the breakdown in talks with north korean leader kim jong—un. last night, the president tweeted that michael cohen's hearing being held at the same time as the summit with north korea was a new low in american politics, and may have contributed to the walk.
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it is time to talk to sally and celebrates achievements. it is time to talk to sally and celebrates achievementsm it is time to talk to sally and celebrates achievements. if you are an athletics fan, you will definitely know who laura muir is, but if you are watching at home you might remember in the commonwealth games she was expected to do brilliantly and came 11th, she is that she has had the most astonishing weekend of the european championships —— vet. six medals to great britain, two of them gold, taking the british rally for the competition to the highest it has ever been. and, once again, home favourite, laura muir was the star of the show. austin halewood watched the action. the face of pure determination, laura muiron the face of pure determination, laura muir on her home track, desperate for more gold, determined to put on a show. gold in the 1,500m to put on a show. gold in the 1,500m to follow up her gold in the 3000, the first athlete ever to complete a successive double at the european indoor championships.” successive double at the european indoor championships. i never thought i'd have another championships in glasgow, but for it
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to be on my home track is just a real, it was just such a big opportunity for me, and yes, i wa nted opportunity for me, and yes, i wanted to deliver and i am so happy idid wanted to deliver and i am so happy i did that. for great britain, the night started well, holly bradshaw setting the bar with silver in the pole vault. tim duckworth was making his european debut in the heptathlon. it went pretty well, after just about making heptathlon. it went pretty well, afterjust about making it over the line in the 1000 metres, hejust about held on the silver. chemistry teacherjamie webb then won silver in the men's 800m, something to show his class back at school. in the women's event, clark lost by 100th ofa women's event, clark lost by 100th of a second two years ago. she wouldn't let it happened happen again. it is going to be gold to great britain. in the evening finished in style, scotland's doyle guiding the fourx finished in style, scotland's doyle guiding the four x 400 team to silver in gigabits's 12 medal. another great night for great britain, another golden one for
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glasgow's golden girl. laura muir was asked how she will celebrate, and this makes me love her even more, she said by going to the chippy. liverpool managerjurgen klopp said he was completely fine with chasing manchester city, who are a point clear at the top of the premier league after the merseyside derby finished goalless. mo salah had probably the best chance, and liverpool striker roberto firmino found time to pose for a picture with the baby of an everton fan. but klopp was not happy with his tactics being questioned after the match. we don't play playstation. do you think we didn't take enough risks today? is that what you want to ask? that's a really disappointing question, i have to say.
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because that means, like, it's so easy. i tell the boys we take more risks — come on, boys, we go for it. can you imagine? any draw we didn't try to win? what is that? klopp says his team are still on track, although he did seem momentarily rattled by an everton ballboy at full time. was there a touch of sarcasm in the way he clapped klopp off the pitch? brendan rodgers's return to the premier league didn't go too well. they were a goal down to watford before this equaliser from jamie vardy. that looked to have secured them a point, but it was snatched away in injury—time by andre gray, although rodgers wasn't too concerned. yes, i loved every minute of it. it has been a great week working with the players, and i said to them, whatever the result was going to be today, of course, for i want to be able to see that spur and intensity, because we have onlyjust come
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together. and i have seen that, and it isa together. and i have seen that, and it is a great opportunity now to go forward and build on some of the good points from today. chelsea won 2—1 at fulham, jorginho with the winner. fulham are still second from bottom. in the scottish cup, rangers and aberdeen will need a replay to settle their quarter—final tie after it finished 1—1. but inverness caledonian thistle are through, aaron doran with an injury—time winner at dundee united to make it 2—1. the funeral of the former england goalkeeper gordon banks will take place today. the world cup winner died at the age of 81 last month. amongst the speakers at stoke minster this afternoon will be his 1966 team—mate sir geoff hurst. supporters with tickets will be able to watch the ceremony on big screens inside stoke's stadium. newcastle falcons boosted their chances of staying in rugby union's premiership with a win over worcester warriors. man of the match toby flood went over with this effort to secure a 17—6 victory.
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and ulster are back in the pro14 play—off places, after beating dragons 28—15, captain alan 0'connor with their fourth try. tom daley won two medals on his return to diving. the former world champion hasn't been in international competition since he became a dad last summer, but he won a silver and a bronze at the world series event injapan. australia's nick kyrgios said he had prepared for his mexican 0pen final against world number three alexander zverev by going jet—skiing, and it did the trick. he won in straight sets for his fifth atp title. kyrgios has suffered with mental health issues, and he said he hoped his victory would act as an inspiration for others in a similar situation. i think it isjust more an example for anyone that is, you know, going through some struggles and some, you know, in some places where you don't think you can get out of. if i can do it, you can do it as well. i was down and out, really down and out,
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andi down and out, really down and out, and i really didn't know what i was going to do, and we collect this can change. if i can do it, you guys can do it as well. —— a week like this can change. and finally, mario balotelli is no stranger to the limelight, but have a look at this. the italian scored the first goal in marseille's 2—0 win over saint—etienne, before taking his phone to video a team selfie and then upload it to his instagram account. is that the first time a footballer has posted on social media in the middle of a match? i have so many questions, sally. i have so many questions, sallylj am not sure i can answer any of them. my first question is where the imac was he holding his phone, my second question is is it allowed to do that, but he wasn't actually on the pitch, was he? he was off the pitch. he is on the field of play. i don't know whether the laws i knew enough to even say that you can't do that. can you imagine in the middle
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of the world cup, hold on... but if there is anyone who can get away with it, it is murray at ella —— mario balotelli, he doesn't care. it's been an exciting weekend for space experts after the latest american—built capsule successfully docked with the international space station. let's take a look at the moment it happened. we are no longer sending commands, dragon doing everything on its own. applause the unmanned spacex dragon capsule will stay there until friday before dropping down to earth, and if approved by nasa, it could be carrying people into space as soon asjuly. we can speak now to dr ken kremer, research scientist
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and space journalist who joins us now from florida. good morning to you. thank you very much for talking to us. i had to ask, have you been as excited this weekend, as i can tell you so many of us were while watching that? yes, super excited. this is the most exciting launch we have had, really, since the retirement of the shuttle. iam very since the retirement of the shuttle. i am very happy you are carrying it live. i was watching it live on the roof, where we put the shuttle is an the apollo moon rockets together. so a spectacular view, it was clear, we saw it for many, many minutes, it was just a saw it for many, many minutes, it wasjust a wonderful saw it for many, many minutes, it was just a wonderful thing. fantastic, and why is so much attention being drawn to this now? well, there is so much attention because we haven't launched humans from the united date dance 2011, since the very premature and shortsighted shutdown of the shuttle. so we have been totally dependent on the russians. now we
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are on the cusp of restoring human spaceflight to the united states, and with that, we will also be able to bring our partners from europe, like a astronaut tim peake, he could fly on the shuttle instead of having to rely on the soyuz. is this only being done because of the commercialisation of this? that is pa rt commercialisation of this? that is part of it, yes, the shuttle was shut down so nasa started the commercial programme to replace the shuttle in launching humans. the cargo part the shuttle used to do is now done by the unmanned cargo vessels. so after many years of delays because of funding cutbacks, technical difficulties, we are right on the verge of launching humans. we had to do this test flight first to make sure it is safe, and so far, with the docking this morning a few hours ago, everything looks great. if it all continues to go well with the return, then hopefully we are going to launch those first
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astronauts, the first two we met them at the briefing i was out with elon muskjust them at the briefing i was out with elon musk just about 24 hours them at the briefing i was out with elon muskjust about 24 hours ago, and they are ready to go. they are fully trained, all they need to do is have a successful flight here. fully trained, all they need to do is have a successful flight harem is have a successful flight harem is interesting, you mentioned elon musk, i know you manage to get a question into him at the briefing, and with commercialisation comes characters like elon musk, who has been seen as well as pioneering as controversial as well. this i suppose is the quid pro quo of it all. yes, that is kind of the way it is. we have to have a visionary or we go nowhere. and the politicians have done a very poorjob. you know, they have strangled the space programme and they have strangled science, and the only way we can advance as a species is to invest in science and technology and innovation, and that is what we need to do. so having people like elon musk out there is a driver. we need that, and we need science, because we have got to move forward. we have got to work together as humanity, we
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have to work together for the betterment of humanity. that is what space and science is all about. what is next, what is the timeframe? if this is deemed successful, when do we see the likes of other astronauts using these? this test flight astronauts using these? this test flight will probably be atjuly timeframe. the timeline is forjuly, they have to make a few improvements and changes between now and what they find out. that flight will happen around july, august and after that will come the real operational missions and that is when tim peake and other astronauts could fly. right now the road to nasa
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astronauts but they will add to international ones, maybe from canada, europe, japan. that is what is going to happen. the crew will be large, starting early next year if all goes well and that will continue and it will be a real international programme. thank you so much. your enthusiasm is great. and what is that shirt you are wearing?m enthusiasm is great. and what is that shirt you are wearing? it is the planets and the milky way and it was made by a friend of mine who used to work on the space shuttle. she worked on thermal protection which will keep these astronauts alive as well. i have worked with the bbc also. withjonathan a mess.
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ido the bbc also. withjonathan a mess. i do everything. and he were great shirts as well! thank you for everything, brilliant. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 6:48. the headlines: an urgent meeting of police chiefs has been called after two more teenagers were killed in fatal stabbings over the weekend. fierce tornadoes strike the american states of alabama and georgia, killing at least 23 people, many more are missing. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we were talking a little bit about storm freya as well. i think i need a weather shirt. storm freya caused some problems yesterday and last night but she is clearing and things that improving.
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sunshine and cloud developing later today. this is where storm freya is at the moment. pushing off into the north sea, showers and cloud gathering in its wake. remnants clearing away from east anglia. lots of surface of water. the system continuing to pull away. things turning right and less breezy across eastern scotland. a lot of sunshine to come to eastern areas mid—morning onwards. we will continue to see showers throughout shetland. through school pickup. much of scotland drive. showers on and off through the day in northern ireland, somehow and thunder. pushing to the south—west later this morning. most
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of us will see a little bit of rain at times punctuated by sunshine and at times punctuated by sunshine and a breeze coming in from the west, not quite as strong as yesterday. evening showers through the north—east of england, parts of southern scotland. more showers pushing their way back in. clear skies around the end a slightly cooler air mass, actually start to tomorrow morning with a touch of frost in many areas. a little bit icy as well. this is set up for tomorrow, low pressure, free areas, showers on tuesday. across central and southern scotland, lots of dry weather either side of that. a bit more cloud into the afternoon in southern areas. as a gap through tuesday night into wednesday, another low pressure ringing
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outbreaks of rain in england and wales. we need the rain at the moment. for wednesday, over the higher ground more precipitation. big temperature contrasts on wednesday. seven degrees in the north and 14 towards the south. proper spring weather for us all this week. we've been spending a lot of time over the past few weeks working out how businesses are preparing for brexit, but what about the impact on household finances? steph's got more on this today. there is still so much uncertainty but insurance firms have done research to see if people are
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worried about their household budgets and what they have found is more than a third of people are worried about what impact it will have on their personal finance it and they think more than a third think it will get worse. food prices, the value of the pound. it is important to say if this is what they think might happen and we're not saying this will definitely happen but this is what the survey of people asked a worried about. there are also people who are not pessimistic and worried about it. of those people who are worried, the worry isn't growing. the number of people worrying is increasing. 8% say they have made changes, cutting back on spending, increased on their savings and 50% say they have been
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put off making a major purchase like buying a house or booking a holiday. -- 1596. buying a house or booking a holiday. “15%. although we do not buying a house or booking a holiday. —— 15%. although we do not know what the impact is going to be, there are people thinking they want to create a buffer with their money, not spend as much until they see what happens. whether you think we should leave or shouldn't it is the uncertainty that is the problem. the numbers who were worried, there is still on the other 65% not worried, not making big changes so we have to bring that caveat. there are always caveat at breakfast. thank you very much. 0n the 6th ofjune 1944 thousands of allied troops began landing on the beaches of normandy in a major offensive against the germans. now a sculpture commemorating the 75th anniversary of d—day has
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been commissioned to honour those who lost their lives. breakfast‘s john maguire has been to find out more. the dawn comes up like thunder... the dawn comes up like thunder... the adelaide invention, d—day, was a major turning point in the war. the beginning of the end of a conflict that had cost many millions of lives. 0n that had cost many millions of lives. on that day, 4414 allied servicemen were killed. the very first was the tenant dan broth reach. he was a people's person. people would say they would have followed my father everywhere. anywhere. she was born shortly after her father died. anywhere. she was born shortly after herfather died. among her photographs is one his father carried with him to battle of her mother. it is a lovely photograph. we meet margaret at the museum in portsmouth and try to imagine what
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he and his comrades would have faced on that day. they did what they had to do and therefore i am proud he did it, that he was part of the liberation of france. the museum have commissioned a sculpture to commemorate the anniversary and to honour those who died. alfie bradley has created it. he is is known for the night angel, 27 feet tall and made using weapons seized of surrendered during armistice. instead of blades, he is now using replica bullets. it is the main weapons that killed them. the sheen guns. they chucked the grenades on the machine—gun. we thought it would be nice to have been as if chucking a grenade. we wanted it to be more a
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symbol of peace so we decided instead of a grenade to have a dull. the bullets represent the thousands of allies killed that day, mostjust young men. we need to remember our heroes that fought for our country. he was my age, 2008 is sold. it is crazy to imagine myself in that situation. ——28. crazy to imagine myself in that situation. --28. this year is probably the last year we will be doing commemorations were the veterans willjoin in. the one thing they told us is it is important to keep it alive, why it happened and why it we do not want it to happen again. as a dump replaces a weapon, it isa again. as a dump replaces a weapon, it is a message of hope and peace.
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it will be onto it and it isn'tjust outside. it starts here. very moving. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. after the stabbings this weekend, which includes a 17 year—old girl being stabbed to death in east london, figures reveal there's been more than a 90 percent rise in the number of children being treated for stab wounds. a freedom of information request to police forces, by channel 4's dispatches programme, showed a steep rise in knife related offences. the home office says it's set out a range of actions to tackle violent crime. watford football club's troy deeney has got involved in the debate over knife crime, saying the media has a "big opportunity" and responsibility to balance its reporting of knife crime with stories of more positive community work.
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the striker, who was jailed for affray in 2012, told the bbc that its also "lazy" to look at footballers or celebrities as role models. he believes role models should be adults in children's homes. a 41—year—old man's being held on suspicion of assault, after an egg was thrown at labour leaderjeremy corbyn in north london. he was visiting the finsbury park mosque, to coincide with visit my mosque day. the man is thought to have come from behind to hit him. britain's first prison unit for transgender inmates, opens this week in south london. the wing, within downview women's prison in sutton, will initially cater for three offenders who were born male but have since changed gender. the prison says they won't have access to the other women on the site. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning.
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0nto the roads: commercial street remains closed northbound and down to one lane southbound for gas works. and in mitcham: cricket green is closed northbound for roadworks. finally, in the city: king william street is closed southbound from cornhill to cannon street. now the weather with kate. good morning. a damp start out there this morning following heavy rain overnight but for the most but it is dry, we will get some sunshine and heavy showers later. the rain from last night currently in kent and clearing. a bit of cloud but that should clear. largely sunshine this morning but cloud increasing and showers blowing in from the west. they may be quite heavy and you may hear of rumble of thunder. hale mixed in. 0vernight chance of locally heavy showers, clearer spells, patchy cloud,
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chilly with a bit of a breeze, keeping it above zero. tuesday looking like quite a decent day, largely dry, some sunny spells and temperatures around 12 celsius. a milder day for wednesday. clearing to a dry afternoon. sunshine and rain at times for the rest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: after two teenagers in separate cities are stabbed to death, the home secretary calls an urgent meeting of chief constables to tackle knife crime. a £1.6 billion fund to help the uk's stuggling towns after brexit.
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labour says the prime minister is trying to bribe mps to back her deal to leave the eu. fierce tornadoes strike the american states of alabama and georgia, killing at least 23 people. many more are missing. starting a business at any age can be tough. this morning i will be talking to an award—winning businesswoman who set up her catering company as a single mum of two kids at the age of 21. it was another golden night for laura muir at the european indoor athletics championships in glasgow, as great britain finished with a record 12 medals. and after some windy and wintry weather through the night thanks to storm freya, the wind nowhere near as strong through the night. i will have all the details on break. an urgent meeting of police chiefs has been called after two more teenagers were killed in fatal stabbings over the weekend. the home secretary, sajid javid, who will chair the serious violence taskforce discussion on wednesday, said in a tweet that the situation can't go on.
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andy moore reports on the latest victims of knife crime. police officers were called to this suburban street at hale barns in greater manchester on saturday evening to find a 17—year—old boy had been stabbed. he was taken to hospital, but died there of his wounds. yousef makki has been described as a loveable young man with a great sense of humour. police said his death was incredibly tragic. two 17—year—old boys have been arrested. police say they are keeping an open mind as to the motive. in london, jodie chesney‘s mother came to lay flowers, as police revealed more information about the attack. they said jodie was with a group of five friends playing music ina park. two men were seen in the area. about half an hour later, they came back, one of them stabbed jodie in the back.
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jodie was a keen scout. her family called her a lovely and quirky girl. she was beautiful, and kind, and she wouldn't hurt anyone. she'd do anything to make anyone happy, and she was just the most beautiful person i've ever met in my life. 15 people have been stabbed to death in london alone so far this year. jodie's grandmother has called for anyone with information to come forward, saying too many young lives are being cut short by needless violence. andy moore joins us live from romford in east london, where 17—year—old jodie chesney was stabbed on friday night. andy, what are the police saying about their investigation? so many thoughts, of course with jodie's friends and family, but so many people watching will be thinking, parents, children, what is going on? what the police doing now in terms of this investigation, and to make people more assured that
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they are safe? yes, well, police officers are around me even at this time in the morning, there is a presence here. as you say, there is a scary moment for the community, around in an unprovoked attack and no—one has any idea of the motive. with me is the mayor, who knewjodie and her boyfriend, eddie, who was with her that night. tell us about the couple, what were they like? firstly, i would like to only half of the town hall convey our condolences tojodie's of the town hall convey our condolences to jodie's family, and of the town hall convey our condolences tojodie's family, and i can't imagine what the family must be going through. going back to your question, i have knownjodie's boyfriend for many years, and i was just talking to them in my little is this that i have about six days ago, and they were just a happy couple,
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doing what the young people do these days. they were off to romford, and they were absolutely normal children doing normal things, and this is very shocking in our burro, that this has happened. —— burrough. very shocking in our burro, that this has happened. -- burrough. and how unusual is an incident like this? this is very unusual, i think it is totally unprovoked, and we need to get a grip on the situation, andl need to get a grip on the situation, and i think the mayor of london really needs to put some action, instead of all these words that he has been saying for many, many times. what has happened recently is that about three years ago the matter came up with this fantastic idea of tried —— tri—burrough policing, and he said to us if it didn't work within six to eight months he would go back to it, and
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ever since we know it is not working, but he is not taking much notice. and police are looking for a black man in his late teens in connection with this murder. thank you very much. shortly we will be talking to the crime minister, victoria atkins. a £1.6 billion fund is being launched to help struggling towns after brexit. the government says more than half the money will go to the north of england and the midlands to try to bring jobs and boost the economy. the labour party has accused the prime minister of attempting to bribe mps to vote for her brexit deal. 0ur political correspondent ben wrightjoins us from westminster. i suppose how meaningful is this money, and there has always been criticism, hasn't there? it is not a great deal of money in the scheme of things, less than 2% of the money allocated by councils every year. politically it could be significant, this is cash and that labour's
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heartland in the north of england and the midlands, areas which are struggling economically, have been left behind, and places that really voted overwhelmingly for leave in the 2016 election. £1 million of that has already been allocated to various areas. the top recipients are the north—west of england, yorkshire and humber, and the west midlands. and the remaining £600 million will be able to be bid for by any other part of the uk. so that is how the money is being distributed. number ten are saying this is all part of the prime minister's long—standing aim to try and share prosperity more evenly across the country, but it is also very clearly about brexit, because number ten are trying to —— trying any method they can to convince mps and this is something of an inducement to labour mps. the reaction from a number of labour mps
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has been pretty dismissive. they think the money is paltry, it doesn't go far enough, and they are quite disappointed. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has said this is an obvious bribe by the government to get its deal through. meanwhile, campaigners for another referendum have said the sort of cash we are talking about willjust be wiped out by the economic impact of brexit. but we will see if this is enough to help nudge some labour mps is enough to help nudge some labour m ps towards is enough to help nudge some labour mps towards the government's deal. indeed, thank you very much. at least 23 people, some of them children, have died after tornadoes swept through the south east of america. at least two tornadoes struck in lee county in alabama, causing catastrophic damage, according to the county sheriff. the national weather service has recorded winds of up to 165 mph. will batchelor has more. it was the deadliest day for tornadoes in the united states in nearly two years.
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storms swept through the us states of alabama and georgia, cutting a path of destruction over 400 metres wide. winds of up to 165 mph destroyed homes, downing power lines, and shut down parts of a major highway. right up there, around 38, this whole area right here is pretty muchjust gone, you know? many people are being treated at local hospitals, with officials cautioning the death toll could rise. the damage is significant. i would put it in the category of catastrophic, based on the destruction of the homes we have seen. the governor of alabama wrote in a tweet that her heart went out to the victims of the storms, adding that emergency officials were continuing to conduct rescue efforts. earlier, rescuers had been hampered after the storm's destruction made several roads impassable. the deadly tornadoes were part of a system that is expected to bring severe winter weather to the rest of the us this week. a state of emergency is now
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in place in alabama, and officials urged continued caution for residents in the region. many people have wondering what has driven storms such as this, and that has been taking a look at the weather patterns in what has built up weather patterns in what has built up to this. i have, and we are at the start of the tornado season, often driven by big temperature contrast and that is what we have seen through this weekend. cold air pushing out of canada, dropping temperatures ten to 20 degrees lower than they should be, and that has been clashing with warm air to fire up been clashing with warm air to fire upa very been clashing with warm air to fire up a very active system, working its way across the deep south to produce numerous tornadoes. but sadly this one, of course, was a particularly brutal one. it struck at the wrong time, in the wrong place. they have seen more tornado deaths from this one tornado than we did to the entirety of last year, and it is the deadliest single tornado strike since 2013. and as i havejust mentioned, unfortunately we're only
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at the start of the tornado season. it will potentially get even worse as far as tornadoes are concerned as we head into the spring. when you get statistics like that, it is very worrying, isn't it? last week we we re worrying, isn't it? last week we were building to storm freya in the uk, and thankfully nothing as severe as what you are showing us there. but still there were some concerns. we have seen some really strong winds, haven't we? indeed, it will still cause some problems nonetheless. in the mumbles we saw the strongest of the wind gusts in the strongest of the wind gusts in the uk, 76 mph —— the mumbles. destruction on going into the morning, and strong winds through the night, pretty cold air across the night, pretty cold air across the tops of hills in northern england. these are just some of the scenes from cumbria, heavy snowfall here. that has led to some problems on the roads. still a lot of snow around as well on some of the high roots in northern england, southern scotla nd roots in northern england, southern scotland and for some in northern ireland as well. icy conditions could hamper your journey this
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morning. the good news is, things are more quiet today, the weather more typicalfor this are more quiet today, the weather more typical for this stage in the spring. i will have an update for you in the next ten minutes. new opt—out organ donation laws, making it easier for adults to donate organs, could be extended to children. the nhs is trying to ensure more parents are given the choice to donate their child's organs after their death. a shortage of child donors means young patients wait twice as long for urgent heart transplants than adults. we're taking steps today to ensure that as many times as possible, if a child sadly loses their life, then those organs are available to save the lives of others. for adults, we've changed the law so that unless you actively opt out, your organs will be available. now, i'd be perfectly open to seeing that extended to children. but we've got to do everything we can in the short term, as well, to ensure that, when a child needs an organ to save their life, then those
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organs are available. president donald trump has blamed congress's questioning of his former lawyer for the breakdown in talks with north korean leader kim jong—un. last night, the president tweeted that michael cohen's hearing being held at the same time as the summit with north korea was a new low in american politics, and may have contributed to the walk. last week, the labour mp jess phillips said knife crime should be treated as a national emergency, similar to a terrorist attack. fatal stabbings are increasing in england and wales at the fastest rate since records began. today two more names, jodie chesney and yousef makki, can be added to the growing list of victims. both aged 17, they were killed in separate stabbings on friday and saturday night. the crime minister, victoria atkins, joins us from westminster. good morning to you. these are
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devastating stories, terrible things happening. what is your reaction particularly to what happened this weekend? it is absolutely heartbreaking. two more families and friends and loved ones are having to suffer the enormous grief of losing two very vibrant, very happy, very lovely people from all accounts, and iam sure lovely people from all accounts, and i am sure all of our thoughts and condolences are with the families at this time. we have just been speaking to a councillor on this programme who knewjodie chesney, actually, saying these are just normal children doing normal things. what is your government going to do about it? they are not safe to be doing that. well, i am a mum, and so i sit here is someone who we all... we can't begin to imagine the pain that their parents are going through. but we have been working
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now for the past year on tackling serious violence, and we have both short—term and long—term measures to tackle this. but what is important to realise is that this isn't simply about arresting our way out of this. we need to stop young people from carrying knives in the first place. and stop them from causing this terrible, terrible harm. and so there is a strategy that the government has, working with our partners across the country in healthcare and education, and local councils, drawing together all of our influence and our powers to build a really strong programme of intervention. but also, of course, giving the police the powers they need to tackle some of these crimes on the streets, including very recently knife crime prevention orders, which will get to the very small cohort of young people who we believe are carrying knives who haven't yet been convicted of an offence. and we are trying to get to
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them before they do so. with respect, what you are doing is not yet working. i was at a police briefing on friday were police were briefing on friday were police were briefing other police forces are cross the country and the rann small signs. i do not pretend we are there yet. —— there. that we are having some benefit and it is beginning to see some turnaround in the figures but, of course, we go back to this weekend and the mv family effect that buying knife crime, that would sound hollow indeed but the reason a programme across government to intervene early because, as i say, we reckon it nice that we cannot just arrest our way out of this. we
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do things like intervening, funding a charity to reach children at the teachable moment when they come in with wounds so we can steer them away from the path they are wrong but it is hard work. i do not pretend for a moment that it will not take time... can ijust in the right you, west midlands police commissioner, one example, it has faced cuts of £175 million leading to police officers being lost. in the west midlands they claim there are not enough police officers.” would encourage the ppc to spend some reserves and we are delighted that, with the help of police and crime commission is, we will see an increase of up to £970 million into
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policing in the next year. many pcs seized have said they want to use that money for a new officers. we absolutely welcome that because we recognise local police chief and police and crime commission is know what their local area needs better than civil servants in whitehall. as you say, the families mourning their terrible losses, where is the urgency? a labour mp saying this should be called a national emergency are keen to a terror attack. on wednesday the home secretary is meeting cheap comes to balls for the major police departments. —— chief constables. in
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terms of urgency, the met police and other forces asked at the end of last summer to introduce knife crime prevention orders and we have managed to get it through the bill going through the house of commons at the moment so police have extra power not to criminalise young people but to intervene in a structured way before they get into trouble with the law. thank you for talking to us. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. a lot of build up to storm freya and concerns about what that might do. it is living off into the north sea is so different sort of day, in fa ct, is so different sort of day, in fact, a typical spring day. heavy showers to come later. make sure you have an umbrella as you
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leave the door this morning. not as wet as overnight. this was storm freya, went in excess of 70 miles per hour, lots of shower clouds to the west now. the remnants of last night brain and so across parts of eastern scotland and north—east england. clear in the south—east corner. sunshine across fairly hazy. 0nce corner. sunshine across fairly hazy. once it clears, not a bad day for eastern areas. cloud spreading to northern ireland, and eventually by the school run, parts of south—west scotla nd the school run, parts of south—west scotland as well. a few showers. much of eastern scotland with fine temperatures. you could get that in northern england as well. towards the south—east, by three o'clock, showers could come with a rumble of
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thunder and hail mixed in. wins today, while still on the illustrious side not as strong as last night. —— blustery. because we have slightly colder air, temperatures will be close to freezing in many areas as we start tomorrow morning. some frost and ice around. looking at the big picture, three areas of low pressure following on from each other, typical spring weather. tomorrow, a bit wintry over the hills. a good pa rt bit wintry over the hills. a good part of england and wales dry and right. sunshine turning hazy later. temperatures were they should be. in two wednesday, and other area of low pressure bringing heavy rain in the
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west through the night, easing to cloudy conditions with the old bright spell during the day. some snow over the hills in northern ireland and temperatures around seven degrees. milder air to the south—east corner. we see out the week with sunshine and showers also. all typical for the week with sunshine and showers also. all typicalfor the time week with sunshine and showers also. all typical for the time of year. the northern ireland backstop is a key part of brexit negotiations and its importance has been highlighted by the nation's most senior police officer. in 1998, the signing of the good friday agreement brought a measure of peace to the british province, but chief constable, george hamilton, says politics there are now "more polarised and more entrenched" than 20 years ago. as part of the bbc‘s crossing divides season, our home editor mark easton, reports from belfast. rebecca is from a protestant area in belfast.
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naomi lives in a catholic district. but, like 93% of children in northern ireland, to this day, they go to segregated schools and they live in segregated neighbourhoods. until recently, neither girl had any friends from the other side of the wall. hi. i think she's just so funny. like, she'sjust, like, such a friendly person. you wouldn't normally think that, when you look at her. it's not often that two people from two different communities would be able to come together and have such a good friendship. i was in belfast to report on the signing of the good friday agreement, 21 years ago, a time of hope that the sectarian divide which scars this beautiful land could be healed. but there are now more walls like this than there were back then, and they're longer and they‘ re higher than ever. the work to bring true and lasting peace to northern ireland remains urgent.
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i'm going to squeeze, and then we're going to pass that squeeze on. in recent years, hundreds of millions in eu funds have been spent supporting peace projects, focusing on northern ireland's children. most of the teenagers on this course have never had a meaningful encounter with someone from across the religious divide. oh, it came back! it came back, yay! we're all the same, one way or another. it's just the way they were brought up, and the way we were brought up. i was always told that, like, catholics were, like, bad people compared to protestants. like, i never spoke to anybody from the other community, and now i do, like, i speak to them everyday. what can be done to change the narrative, to change the story, rather than instilling fear into your children? in londonderry, parents are taught how to avoid passing on unconscious prejudice to the next generation. one of my first things, obviously, being from a catholic background and community, is we shouldn't — like, protestants are different, they're from this side of the wall.
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this is our chance to try and break the mould, you know, open them up to different cultures and stuff like that. the history of the troubles is not generally taught in northern ireland schools — too provocative. but confronting events like bloody monday, the claudy bombing in county derry, is now seen as important for true reconciliation. there's glass, there's chaos, there's people with bandages. oh, my god! doctor deacon looks at my ankle and he says, that's a hospital case. half the cast of this production at the derry playhouse have close personal links to the deaths of children in the troubles, their testimonies weaved into a performance hailed as a cathartic event for them and the wider community. for the first time i was able to tell what happened, to me, and to catherine and others in claudy, 31july 1972. if you can change your mindset about the troubles, and their actions, then
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we might have a chance and their actions, then we might have a chance of having a peaceful time, a peaceful life. oh, my god... helping cross the divides of northern ireland is more than just bringing people together. no, it looks really scary! it is about seeing the world through the eyes of the other. it takes effort, it takes courage. mark easton, bbc news, northern ireland. i didn't even like that! they clearly enjoyed that. that report was part of the bbc‘s crossing divides series, which is all about bringing different communities together. you can find out more by visiting the website bbc.co.uk forward slash crossing divides. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. after the stabbings this weekend, which includes a 17 year—old girl
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being stabbed to death in east london, figures reveal there's been more than a 90% rise in the number of children being treated for stab wounds. a freedom of information request to police forces, by channel 4's dispatches programme, showed a steep rise in knife related offences. the home office says it's set out a range of actions to tackle violent crime. watford football club's troy deeney has got involved in the debate over knife crime, saying the media has a "big opportunity" and responsibility to balance its reporting of knife crime with stories of more positive community work. the striker, who was jailed for affray in 2012, told the bbc that its also "lazy" to look at footballers or celebrities as role models. he believes role models should be the adults in children's homes. the metropolitan police have said they have charged a man of assault
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afterjeremy corbyn was struck by a needin afterjeremy corbyn was struck by a need in london. he was arrested during a visit mr corbyn was making on visit moscow. a woman has spoken of feeling betrayed after falling in love with men who turned out to be spies. scotla nd men who turned out to be spies. scotland yard said officers who had long—term sexual relationships with their target had abused their position. let's take a look at the travel situation now... there's a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads: commercial street remains closed northbound and down to one lane southbound for gas works. and in mitcham: cricket green is closed northbound for roadworks. finally, in the city: king william street is closed
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southbound from cornhill to cannon street. good morning. a damp start out there this morning following heavy rain overnight but for the most but it is dry, we will get some sunshine and heavy showers later. the rain from last night currently in kent and clearing. a bit of cloud but that should clear. largely sunshine this morning but cloud increasing and showers blowing in from the west. they may be quite heavy and you may hear of rumble of thunder. hale mixed in. 0vernight chance of locally heavy showers, clearer spells, patchy cloud, chilly with a bit of a breeze, keeping it above zero. tuesday looking like quite a decent day, largely dry, some sunny spells and temperatures around 12 celsius. a milder day for wednesday. a wet start. clearing to a dry afternoon. sunshine and rain at times
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for the rest of the week. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and louise minchin. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: an urgent meeting of police chiefs has been called after two more teenagers were killed in stabbings over the weekend. home secretary sajid javid will chair the serious violence taskforce discussion on wednesday, after yousef makki died in greater manchester and jodie chesney was killed in romford, east london. councillor dilip patel knew jodie and her boyfriend, who was with her when the attack took place. they were just a happy couple, doing what the young people do these days.
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i said where are you off to, they said they were off to romford. and they were absolutely normal children doing normal things, and this is very shocking in our borough, that this has happened. i think it is totally unprovoked, and we need to get a grip on the situation. a £1.6 billion fund is being launched to help struggling towns after brexit. the government says more than half the money will go to the north of england and the midlands, to try to bring jobs and boost the economy. the labour party has accused the prime minister of attempting to bribe mps to vote for her brexit deal. at least 23 people are reported to have been killed after a series of tornadoes have struck the us states of alabama and georgia, with many more injured. the national weather service has recorded winds of up to 165 mph, and more than 20,000 homes are still without power. storm freya has brought gales, snow and some travel disruption to parts of the uk. some roads were closed due to flooding and more than 1,200 homes across wales were left without power. the highest wind speed
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was recorded in south wales, where there were gusts of almost 80 mph. new opt—out organ donation laws, making it easier for adults to donate organs, could be extended to children. the nhs is trying to ensure more parents are given the choice to donate their child's organs after their death. a shortage of child donors means young patients wait twice as long for urgent heart transplants than adults. president donald trump has blamed congress's questioning of his former lawyer for the breakdown in talks with north korean leader kim jong—un. last night, the president tweeted that michael cohen's hearing being held at the same time as the summit with north korea was a new low in american politics, and may have contributed to the walk. we will have the weather for you in about ten minutes' time, and there is so much excitement in the sport. we are very, very proud of laura
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muir. i am mostly delighted that she will be celebrating at the chippy. great britain enjoyed a brilliant finish to the european indoor athletics championships in glasgow, with six more medals, two of them gold, to take them to a record tally for the competition. and, once again, home favourite laura muir was the star of the show. austin halewood watched the action. the face of pure determination — laura muir on her home track, desperate for more gold, determined to put on a show. gold in the 1,500m to follow up her gold in the 3,000m, the first athlete ever to complete a successive double at the european indoor championships. i never thought i'd have another championships in glasgow, but for it to be on my home track is just surreal. it was just such a big opportunity for me, and yeah, i wanted to deliver, and i'm so happy i did that. for great britain, the night started well, holly bradshaw setting the bar with silver in the pole vault. tim duckworth was making his european debut in the heptathlon.
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it went pretty well — afterjust about making it over the line in the 1,000 metres, he just about held onto silver. chemistry teacherjamie webb then won silver in the men's 800m, something to show his class back at school. in the women's event, shelayna 0skan—clarke lost by 0.01 seconds two years ago. she wouldn't let it happened happen again. it's going to be gold to great britain. shelayna 0skan—clarke. and the evening finished in style, scotland's eilidh doyle guiding the 4 x 400m team to silver, and gb's 12th medal. another great night for great britain, another golden one for glasgow's golden girl. liverpool managerjurgen klopp said he was completely fine with chasing manchester city, who are a point clear at the top of the premier league after the merseyside derby finished goalless. mo salah had probably the best chance, and liverpool striker roberto firmino found time to pose for a picture with the baby of an everton fan. but klopp was not happy with his tactics being questioned after the match.
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we don't play playstation. do you think we didn't take enough risks today? is that what you want to ask? that's a really disappointing question, i have to say. because that means, like, it's so easy. i tell the boys we take more risks — come on, boys, we go for it. can you imagine? any draw we didn't try to win? what is that? klopp says his team are still on track, although he did seem momentarily rattled by an everton ballboy at full—time. was there a touch of sarcasm in the way he clapped klopp off the pitch?
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iam in i am in two minds about this, i think you should have the chutzpah to stand up to people, and there is sportsmanship and gamesmanship. and when you see a kid doing that it is because they have seen a grown up doing that. so very cheeky. he dealt with it well, though. he was greeting those teeth for a little while and then he decided to smile. —— gritting. brendan rodgers's return to the premier league didn't go too well. they were a goal down to watford before this equaliser from jamie vardy, that looked to have secured them a point, but it was snatched away in injury—time by andre gray. chelsea won 2—1 at fulham, jorginho with the winner.
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fulham are still second from bottom. in the scottish cup, rangers and aberdeen will need a replay to settle their quarter—final tie after it finished 1—1. but inverness caledonian thistle are through, aaron doran with an injury—time winner at dundee united, to make it 2—1. the funeral of the former england goalkeeper gordon banks will take place today. the world cup winner died at the age of 81 last month. amongst the speakers at stoke minster this afternoon will be his 1966 team—mate sir geoff hurst. supporters with tickets will be able to watch the ceremony on big screens inside stoke's stadium. england's woman have made a solid start to the t20 series against india. they made 160—4, with tammy beaumont top—scoring with 62. that is quite a total for india to chase. they are 35—3, with linsey smith taking two wickets for england. there is commentary on radio 5 live sports extra. australia's nick kyrgios said he had prepared for his mexican 0pen final
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against world number three alexander zverev by going jet—skiing, and it did the trick. he won in straight sets, for his fifth atp title. kyrgios has suffered with mental health issues, and he said he hoped his victory would act as an inspiration for others in a similar situation. i think it's just more an example for anyone that's, you know, going through some struggles and some, you know — in some places where you don't think you can get out of. if i can do it, you can do it as well. i was down and out, really down and out, and i really didn't know what i was going to do. a week like this can change. if i can do it, you guys can do it as well. and finally, mario balotelli is no stranger to the limelight, but have a look at this. the italian scored the first goal in marseille's 2—0 win over saint—etienne, before taking his phone to video a team selfie and then upload it to his instagram account. is that the first time a footballer has posted on social media in the middle of a match?
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definitely on instagram. in my old—fashioned definitely on instagram. in my old —fashioned and definitely on instagram. in my old—fashioned and grumpy, sally? yes. i think it is a little bit disrespectful. where does it go from bad? it is interesting, if he had taken his shirt off and waited around his head he would have gotten into trouble. it will be interesting if they change the rules in terms of social media posting during the match. you made the point earlier that it match. you made the point earlier thatitis match. you made the point earlier that it is so new they probably haven't thought about it in terms of the rules. we were seeing the most enormous trophy being marched into the studio. i did wonder what was happening. we will explain why in a few minutes. it mis not often we're joined by an actual genius on the sofa, but we're pleased that one of britain's youngest is with us today. nishi uggalle is 13—years—old and has an iq higher than einstein.
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she was crowned the winner of this years channel 4's child genius. let's take a look at how she got there. what name is given to the extinct sponges which built the first reefs during the cambrian? it is, very well done. spell your hypothesis. —— neurohypothesis. you are our child genius champion. applause imagine the relief once that is done, the tension leading up to that. nishi joins us now
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with her dad, neelanga and her mum shiromi. congratulations, first of all. you clearly have nerves of steel. talk us clearly have nerves of steel. talk us through the final. the final was really intense. it was like nothing else in the entire competition, and i think by the head—to—head everyone was tense. nobody knew from the start he was going to win. it was really exciting. how did you prepare for it? well, i have always loved reading, soi for it? well, i have always loved reading, so i think reading came into it a lot, and reading through a lot of books, and just trying to absorb as much information as possible, really. one of the questions, 0k. what is a primordial black hole? were you told to cram up on certain things before? well, i think that was from the specialist
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subject one, because mine was the physics of black holes, so that is something that i have learnt. and this is something that you read up on any private time. i love the way the parents are laughing as well, before we go on, tell everyone what the primordial black hole is, unless you already know. do you want to say it? well, it is basically a really tiny black hole that was formed properly during the big bang, so it has a tiny mass and a tiny radius. not only do you love that sort of thing, you love maths as well, don't you? you thing, you love maths as well, don't you ? you must thing, you love maths as well, don't you? you must be first of all immensely proud. he she wanted to do it, you weren't pushing her in to do this at all. no, we don't. she wanted to do it all away through. when she said she wanted to do it, what you think? we were first quite apprehensive, actually. we watched it and it was hard work, so we were quite apprehensive, but i think once it started, we realised she is
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enjoying it so much. did you know you had a really smart daughter, from a young age? because everyone says look at my child, so smart, look at her. she can put a cup to her mouth, things like that. but did you know that she had a real aptitude, at least in terms of memory? because we had only her, so again, it is subjective, so we were going at her speed, and we would realise that. it is only when we we nt realise that. it is only when we went to the nursery that they said she is at a different level. she wouldn't do the usual things that other kids were doing, she is into more growing and reading than playing with those. so that is when we started to notice that it seems like she is very different. tell us about your speech, because you made about your speech, because you made a speech afterwards when you are accepting, lots of things that were important to you, tell us. one of the things they said at my speeches that i wanted to prove the girls that i wanted to prove the girls that they can do as many things as
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possible. i think with feminism there's lots of different versions of it, but for me, my version is that no—one is better than anyone else simply because of their gender, and we all should be equal in that regard. in what i want to do is, i am not saying that i am, like a mother first am not saying that i am, like a motherfirst goal or am not saying that i am, like a mother first goal or anything to go into maths and science, because obviously there have —— i am the first girl to go into maths and science, it obviously there are others, the first women's nobel prize in physics in over 50 years was recently awarded, but what i wa nt to was recently awarded, but what i want to do is show particularly young girls that they shouldn't disregard physics or maths as a career and they should consider all their options, because it might be more interesting than it seems. 0bviously more interesting than it seems. obviously in your school and in your experience you have been given a lot of encouragement in those subjects, in the stem subjects. tell us from someone who is your age, we hear lots of ministers talk about it, education specialist, why do you think girls are being put off or not seeing this as a career for them?” think they have always been
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misconceptions about how girls shouldn't be doing those kinds of subjects, and for some girls those stereotypes might still be around them, and if they are surrounded by then they might find it hard to even consider it as an option. so it is sort of seeing somebody doing it. you have certainly done it so far, which is absolutely brilliant. tell us which is absolutely brilliant. tell us about what your kind of ambitions are, then. my ambitions are, i would love to go on and study maths and physics in the future. and i would like to study that at cambridge university. right, well, they will be in touch. will you do your gcses earlier than other people, or what is your sort of trajectory? well, i have been doing gcse and a—level maths, for example. so you might go to university at the younger age, might you? to university at the younger age, might you ? these to university at the younger age, might you? these are conversations i shall perhaps leave for you to have at home. i think we need to make clear as well that although you are brilliant at studying, and you love
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it, and you have both made very clear that you are not pushing her into this, and you do lots of other things as well. so you have a social life, iam things as well. so you have a social life, i am assuming, and you have mates, and you do chill out. what do you do when you are not on the books? i wouldn't say hitting the books? i wouldn't say hitting the books is stressful, but when you are not reading? we go cycling, i go out with my friends. i do not think that smart kids do not have a life. i do not think that is not true at all. where is this going to go because it is a very large? we are having a shelf built. the shelf is being built. have you drunk something out of it as well was back not yet. a
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milkshake. i was implying a soft drink! it has been so lovely to talk to you. good luck. thank you. child genius is available on all 4. i will give you some of my water to put in it. a quick look back at storm freya. some of the strongest gusts recorded at the mumbles, in south wales. all thatis at the mumbles, in south wales. all that is now easing away and for the weather today, much more typicalfor this time of year. a bit of sunshine, a few shower clouds, a few rainbows as well as the winds continued to ease. storm freya it is
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now pushing out into the north sea. a clear slot before more cloud work in. rain clearing from the south—east corner. some good sunny spells the many. sasha and in the south initially, once we get rid of the strong winds, sunshine was a bulk, but showers moving in. lots of sunshine in eastern parts. showers throughout the day in northern ireland, south—west scotland by three o'clock. and through parts of south—west england. some could be heavy with hail and thunder. it will head to eastern counties of england as we go towards the evening.
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nowhere near as heavy as yesterday. a few showers dotted around eastern areas tonight. rain spreading through northern ireland, west england later on. clear skies in between especially the central and eastern parts. icy conditions to ta ke eastern parts. icy conditions to take you into tomorrow morning. we have three areas of low pressure sitting next to each other, so we will have showers here and there. northern ireland, northern england could turn wintry in the higher ground. sunshine to the north. plenty of sunshine further south stop before that sunshine turns hazy with a few spots of rain. into tuesday night and wednesday morning, rain spreading across england and wales. northern england, centraland southern scotland, northern ireland
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where the day. the chance of snow on the hills. further south showers developing. notice the temperature contrast, as you would normally expect at this time of year. steph's been looking at some of the amazing stories behind people that start new businesses. i have loved this series, across the nation at people setting up their businesses. since the start of the year we've been hearing inspirational stories from people who have taken the plunge and started their own companies. our next guest was working in the care sector supporting her two children. life was tough but she found a way out by starting a street food business. that was in 2018. in january this year she turned her first profit and now she's planning to open her own restaurant and she's still only 22.
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i started this is as seven months ago and there have been times where it has been difficult. i am a young mum, with two children. the business started off very small. helped by family. it is a massive achievement and it isn't nice seeing people queueing and loving something i have created along with my family. i hope this business launches into something a lot greater and bigger in the future. adrianna baker is founder and co—owner of back—a—yard grill. thank you for coming in. i loved the story of how you set up your business. how did it come about? i started by business injuly 2018. studied in college, i had my two children, it was a real risk to start this but it was something i was passionate about. how did you come up with the idea?”
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was passionate about. how did you come up with the idea? i was... sorry... i know it is nerve—racking. you are studying kettering? i was, andi you are studying kettering? i was, and i had this real love for american street food and at home we love the caribbean food. that is where my parents grew up. i wanted to do that. what was it like, setting it up and getting everything you needed? it was hard, not having the resources and money to start a business but i went on anyway, go for it, take a risk, sometimes you have to take risks in life. you made your first profits injanuary. have to take risks in life. you made your first profits in january. how does it feel now? it is so overwhelming that it is so nice to see what you can do. itjust feels
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so nice to... what i have achieved. when i started this business are never thought it would get to where it got too and sometimes in life, you really have to just take a step back and look and see, were i add, where do i want to be in ten years' time and just use your passion and drive to get where you're going. what is next for you? i would like to open a rest and at some point, hopefully this year. that is the next step. save you are going to grow the business. before you were working in the case at, —— care sector. was working with mentally ill children. you are doing that as a teenager and studying? studied and
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bit by apprenticeship. 0nce a teenager and studying? studied and bit by apprenticeship. once i had my two children had to take that break. working as a chef you have to work long hours and it didn't go with my lifestyle and having to kids. my mother worked in the care and i joined that field. —— care sector. you are your only limits and you have to strive for what you want and be passionate and get through every day and feel motivated to really go out there and do your absolute best to your future, for your children, for yourfamily to your future, for your children, for your family and most importantly for your family and most importantly for yourself. sound advice. thank you very much. great work. 0n the 6th ofjune1944 thousands of allied troops began
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landing on the beaches of normandy in a major offensive against the germans. now a sculpture commemorating the 75th anniversary of d—day has been commissioned to honour those who lost their lives. breakfast‘s john maguire has been to find out more. it is really rather wonderful. it looks as if he may be throwing a grenade but actually think it is a dark to symbolise peace. alfie bradley has said how meaningful this project has been and has loved working to create this lasting tribute to heroes that have given their lives in the second world war. it is here for the rest of the day
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thenit it is here for the rest of the day then it will move on to liverpool tomorrow followed by a tour around the uk and normandy and it really is very beautiful. it will be touring until monday 11th of march. a stunning piece. now for the news and weather wherever you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. after the stabbings this weekend, which includes a 17—year—old girl being stabbed to death in east london, figures reveal there's been more than a 90% rise in the number of children being treated for stab wounds. a freedom of information request to police forces, by channel 4's dispatches programme, showed a steep rise in knife related offences. the home office says it's set out a range of actions to tackle violent crime. watford football club's troy deeney has got involved in the debate over knife crime, saying the media has a "big opportunity" and responsibility to balance its reporting of knife crime with stories of more positive community work.
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the striker, who was jailed for affray in 2012, told the bbc that its also "lazy" to look at footballers or celebrities as role models. he believes role models should be the adults in children's homes. within the past few minutes, the metropolitan police has said they've charged a man with assault by beating after labour leaderjeremy corbyn was struck by an egg yesterday in north london. 31 year—old, john murphy from barnet was arrested during a visit mr corbyn was making, to finsbury park mosque, for visit my m0sque day. a woman who found out her partner was a metropolitan policeman who was paid to spy on her group of activists has said she's the victim of a "conspiracy to rape". rosa and another woman have spoken of feeling "betrayed" after falling in love with men who turned out to be spies. scotland yard says officers who had long—term sexual relationships with their targets "abused their positions".
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let's take a look at the travel situation now... there's a good service on the tubes this morning 0nto the roads: it's very slow on the a406 from brent cross to ikea at wembley — a broken down car opposite ikea adding to the usual delays and in mitcham: cricket green is closed northbound for roadworks. finally, in the city: king william street is closed southbound from cornhill to cannon street. good morning. a damp start out there this morning following heavy rain overnight but for the most but it is dry, we will get some sunshine and heavy showers later. the rain from last night currently in kent and clearing. a bit of cloud but that should clear. largely sunshine this morning but cloud increasing and showers blowing in from the west. they may be quite heavy and you may hear of rumble of thunder. hale mixed in. 0vernight chance of locally heavy showers, clearer spells, patchy cloud, chilly with a bit of a breeze, keeping it above zero. tuesday looking like quite
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a decent day, largely dry, some sunny spells and temperatures around 12 celsius. a milder day for wednesday. a wet start. clearing to a dry afternoon. staying unsettled. sunshine and rain at times for the rest of the week. in the next few minutes, more on the knife attacks over the weekend on bbc london. i will be back in half—an—hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: after two teenagers in separate cities are stabbed to death, the home secretary calls an urgent meeting of chief constables to tackle knife crime. a £1.6 billion fund to help the uk's stuggling towns after brexit.
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labour says the prime minister is trying to bribe mps to back her deal to leave the eu. fierce tornadoes strike the american states of alabama and georgia, killing at least 23 people — many more are missing. stopping the influence of gagging orders. workers who receive pay—offs from their company to keep quiet will still be allowed to report wrongdoing to police. it was another golden night for laura muir at the european indoor athletics championships in glasgow, as great britain finished with a record 12 medals. and storm freya may have brought windy and wintry weather, but today more springlike, a mix of sunshine and showers, all the details here on brea kfast. good morning, thanks forjoining us. it's monday 4th march. our top story: an urgent meeting of police chiefs
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has been called after two more teenagers were killed in stabbings over the weekend. the home secretary, sajid javid, who will chair the serious violence taskforce discussion on wednesday, said in a tweet that the situation "can't go on". andy moore reports on the latest victims of knife crime. police officers were called to this suburban street at hale barns in greater manchester on saturday evening to find a 17—year—old boy had been stabbed. he was taken to hospital but died there of his wounds. yousef makki has been described as a loveable young man with a great sense of humour. police said his death was incredibly tragic. two 17—year—old boys have been arrested. police say they are keeping an open mind as to the motive. in london, jodie chesney‘s mother came to lay flowers, as police revealed more information about the attack. they said jodie was with a group of five friends playing music in a park. two men were seen in the area. about half an hour later,
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they came back, and one of them stabbed jodie in the back. jodie was a keen scout. her family called her a lovely and quirky girl. she was beautiful and kind, and she wouldn't hurt anyone. she'd do anything to make anyone happy, and she was just the most beautiful person i've ever met in my life. 15 people have been stabbed to death in london alone so far this year. jodie's grandmother has called for anyone with information to come forward, saying too many young lives are being cut short by needless violence. andy moore joins us live from romford in east london, where 17—year—old jodie chesney was stabbed on friday night. andy, what are the police saying about their investigation? andy, i know you were speaking to someone earlier who knew her, saying she was just someone earlier who knew her, saying she wasjust a someone earlier who knew her, saying she was just a normal child doing normal things. that is right, in the park behind me on friday night, with
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herfriends, just park behind me on friday night, with her friends, just playing some music, the group of friends so two men, thought nothing of it. about half an hour later, the two men came back, and without saying anything just stabbed jodie once in the back. there had been no conversation, there seems to be no relationship at all between the victim and her attacker, so a very strange case, herfamily calling attacker, so a very strange case, her family calling it a random attacker, so a very strange case, herfamily calling it a random and unprovoked attack. and this is just the latest stabbing, 15 or so in london alone, many more across the country, something like a 90% increase in the last five years in young people attending hospital with stabbing woods. sajid javid having a meeting on wednesday, the second meeting on wednesday, the second meeting of this serious violence taskforce, and the government says it is already well aware of the problem, it is on top of it, it says it has got 61 commitment so far, it
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is spending £200 million to try to stop young people getting involved in crime and violence. ok, andy, thank you. in a few minutes, we'll be speaking to the mother of a victim of knife crime and a former met police officer. a £1.6 billion fund is being launched to help struggling towns after brexit. the government says more than half the money will go to the north of england and the midlands to try to bring jobs and boost the economy. the labour party has accused the prime minister of attempting to bribe mps to vote for her brexit deal. 0ur political correspondent ben wrightjoins us from westminster. now, this was mooted in the paper is quite a while ago, wasn't it? there we re quite a while ago, wasn't it? there were almost denial is that this was a bribe, and that still continues, but it will get people talking. and it is certainly about politics as well, naga, no question of that. a number of labourmps well, naga, no question of that. a number of labour mps have been speaking to number ten over recent
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weeks about increasing funding for areas in labour heartlands in the north of england, the midlands areas that have been struggling economically, coastal towns, former industrial areas, many of which voted leave back in the 2016 referendum. now the government have come forward with this part of cash, 1.6 billion, £1 billion has already been allocated. some of the areas that will receive the most include the north west, yorkshire and humber, and 212 million for the west midlands. in total, this part represents less than 2% of total local authority spending in england, which is why the reaction from many of those labour mps hoping for the money has been pretty underwhelming. they think they is a drop in the ocean, and clearly number ten's hope is that they can persuade some of these labour mps to vote for the brexit to when it comes back to the commons later this month. but as i said, a suspicion that this is
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pretty much a bribe, really, to those labour mps, and it seems to have backfired if it is, because they do not think the sums involved are enough. this money will be spread over seven years, so stretched pretty thinly. advocates for a second referendum say that any help these communities get will be dwarfed by the hit that they get from brexit itself. number ten maintain this is an honest pledge made by the prime minister, who has long said that she wants to make prosperity more evenly spread across the country, but in political terms we will see it make any difference in wooing those labour mps to get behind her to. ok, ben, thank you very much. at least 23 people, some of them children, have died after tornadoes swept through the south east of america. at least two tornadoes struck in lee county in alabama, causing "catastrophic damage, according to the county sheriff. the national weather service has recorded winds of up to 165 mph. will batchelor has more. it was the deadliest day for tornadoes in the united states
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in nearly two years. storms swept through the us states of alabama and georgia, cutting a path of destruction over 400 metres wide. winds of up to 165 mph destroyed homes, downed power lines, and shut down parts of a major highway. right up there, around 38, this whole area right here is pretty muchjust gone, you know? many people are being treated at local hospitals, with officials cautioning the death toll could rise. the damage is significant. i would put it in the category of catastrophic, based on the destruction of the homes we have seen. the governor of alabama wrote in a tweet that her heart went out to the victims of the storms, adding that emergency officials were continuing to conduct rescue efforts. earlier, rescuers had been hampered after the storm's destruction made several roads impassable. the deadly tornadoes were part
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of a system that is expected to bring severe winter weather to the rest of the us this week. a state of emergency is now in place in alabama, and officials urged continued caution for residents in the region. let's get more on this from matt. these tornadoes, 23 people killed, what is going on? thanks, louise, this is the time of year we start to see tornado season getting into gear, because you see big temperature contrast fighting it out across the us, very cold yesterday, coming out of canada, maybe 20 degrees lower than you would expect, clashing with warm air to the south, firing up active weather systems, and all the ingredients around this as it swept across the south and south—east of the united states produced numerous tornadoes, but
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this particularly nasty one, which was just a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. it took 23 lives, more than were taken by tornadoes through the entirety of last year, the deadliest tornado we have seen since 2013. as i have said, we are onlyjust starting tornado season as well, which usually peaks tornado season as well, which usually pea ks around tornado season as well, which usually peaks around may, so it could be the start of a difficult spring. you will keep a watchful eye on that, and we have been talking about storm freya, which wasn't, well, tell us the details. of course, nothing in comparison to what we saw over in the us, but it has caused problems, rough seas across south—west wales, the mumbles, when speaking at 76 mph, strong winds across the night in northern england, and it wasn'tjust about the winds, which brought down trees, and still causing ongoing disruption, we saw snowfall across the hills of northern england, these are scenes in cumbria, even to a
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lower level is a good covering, and on some of the higher roots in southern scotland, northern england, northern ireland, slippery conditions. but that is moving out the way, typical spring conditions in the uk today, all the details on that in the next ten minutes. polemic workers who are paid to keep quiet about problems in their companies will still be able to report wrongdoing to the police. steph's here with more on these government proposals. this is about nondisclosure agreements, so essentially when your silences paid for, so something might have happened at work, the company will agree to give you money with an agreement from you that you will not go public with information. 0bviously, will not go public with information. obviously, this has been in the news a lot recently because, for example, the owner philip green, he was accused of using... he was silence in at least five members of staff over sexual harassment and racial harassment, using these ndas,
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nondisclosure agreements, so the government is now saying that they don't want to see them being misused in the way that they feel they have been, so they want people to still been, so they want people to still be able to report crimes to the police. so if you have agreed to this nda but it is something that could be classed as a crime, you can still go to the authorities about it. that is what the government is trying to push for, so that it cannot be hidden, these wrongdoings cannot be hidden, these wrongdoings cannot be hidden, these wrongdoings cannot be silenced by money. interestingly, mentioning philip green, you might remember the founder of ted baker, it hasjust been announced this morning that he has resigned as the founder, as the ceo of ted baker, an investigation continues, but he has resigned over allegations of misconduct there. he still owns a lot of shares in the company, but interesting to see people who might be seen as too powerful, too rich to get in trouble, we are now saying that
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these changes can make a big difference. ok, steph, thank you very much. let's get more and our main story. before the weekend, jodie chesney and yousef makki were two teenagers with loving families, good friends and exciting plans for the future. today their lives are over. on friday and saturday night, jodie and yousef became the latest victims of fatal knife attacks — a crime which is increasing in england and wales at its fastest rate since records began. joining us to discuss how to stop that trend is leroy logan, a former met police officer who now works with disadvantaged young people in london, and caroline shearer, whose son jay was stabbed to death in 2012. ijust want i just want to start with you, caroline, if i could — when you hear these stories, give us an idea of how it makes you particularly feel. morning. it makes me cry inside so much, they hurt, the pain. the
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unbelievable, because everybody that has been in the situational is in the situation is trying to fight the ha rd est, the situation is trying to fight the hardest, and nobody seems to be listening. people should hang their heads in shame and disgust, because what is happening on our streets, our kids are scared, and it is not just a minute amount of people, we are talking thousands. caroline, your son jay was stabbed in are talking thousands. caroline, your sonjay was stabbed in 2012, he was at a party, trying to defend one of his friends, i think, you know, and got involved in this. one of the things that so many people hear about crimes, knife crimes, they assume it is gang—related, they assume it is gang—related, they assume it is gang—related, they assume it will not happen to them. i say now that you are laughing at this, because it is changing, it feels as if it is changing. it has gone out of the gangs now, it is heading innocent children. you know, the two young people killed this
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weekend, they are both 17, the same as gerry, an a—level student. —— the same as jay. people have got to realise that these kids have got no deterrent, nothing to do, they don't care, if they see a film, they wanted, they will boot you for it, because in the end what will happen to them? —— they will cut you for it. the police are doing their ha rd est, it. the police are doing their hardest, but the outcome of this is not happening, i want to meetjavid, i want to meet this man, because all the experts that you may get, there is nothing like the experience of a mother that has been through this and spent six years of her life trying to find a way through. and we have found ways through. caroline, we will come back to you in a minute, leroy, every single life lost is devastating for their family
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and friends — we talked earlier to the prime minister about what could be done, from your experience on the front line, what would make the difference here? well, having seen how glasgow has improved things over ten years, reducing knife crime by 40%, through the work we have done with the commission, which is ongoing, exclusions were one of the biggest things that could be to help reduce, because once you are excluded from school, you are four times more likely to be involved in crime. you need inclusion units, just dispatching people to pupil referral units, they can be very good, my daughter, she is an approved teacher, they do a lot of great work. but inclusion units would stop them being left to their own devices, where they can be controlled and groomed. and another issue is the normalisation of
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violence. i wanted to ask you about that, what is striking, for example, the kids over the weekend, normal children, normal lives, sitting on a par, whatever they were doing. this whole gang narrative that was brought up after the 2011 riots hijacked a lot of these issues, saying that violence, gangs, but it is nothing like that. even now, less than half of knife crime is down to gangs, so we have now got young people being influenced by the normalisation of violence, we saw that in the youth violence commission, the anti—knife crime survey, and we said, you know, a lot of these young people are suffering from adverse childhood experiences, toxic stress, all sorts of trauma, community trauma. so it presents itself, a lot of the times, in violence, for the most petty of things, and that is why there needs to be informed policing to ensure that you have the right office is assisting these young people, not trying to scare them into
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submission, but, actually, in a lot of ways caring for them. a lot of them should be seen as patients, not prisoners. caroline, let's talk to you again — you have heard countless interviews, we spoke to the crime minister, we are hearing from a former metropolitan police superintendent, you hear what needs to be done, but when it comes to it, the fact is that there are families now in fear, mums and dads who are infearof now in fear, mums and dads who are in fear of having a story similar to yours. well, exactly, you know, everybody has got to be careful nowadays, especially our youngsters. the charity i am with works... we have trained over 40,000 young adults. the training is so different, it is quite interactive, it is engaging, and sometimes quite graphic. i think inclusion is fantastic, as long as they appear and turn up to the inclusion. this
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is the problem we have. if everybody checked their children to die before they went out the door, then i am sure that may be a few knives off the streets. caroline, thank you very much for talking to us, good luck with the work you are doing, caroline shearer. leroy logan, thank you. matt can tell us what is going on with the week ahead is looking more springlike than the last, the temperature trend is down, rain at times, and disguise across the uk will look typically springlike, may the odd rainbow thrown in for good measure. winds of 70 mph from storm freya, but that is now pushing out into the north sea. still a very low cloud and eastern scotland,
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north—east england, rain, sleet and hills now easing away. the rain towards the south—east corner create, and whilst there is lots of surface water around, sunny skies developing, a good deal of sunshine across the country during this morning, showers spreading to northern ireland, wales and the south—west, they will spread eastward through the afternoon. let's ta ke eastward through the afternoon. let's take a look around towards school pick up town and ahead of the evening rush hour, around 8—12d typically across the uk, a lot of sunshine for scotland, showers in northern ireland, easing off in wales and the south—west compared to the part of the day, but in the north—west, the midlands, heavy showers around four o'clock and into the evening rush hour. eastern parts of england, after you have lost the wind and rain, lots of sunshine around, the breeze nowhere near as strong as yesterday. still blustery, feeding on showers as we go through tonight, more prolific, the showers, across the west later on, but with
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clear skies a chilly night, temperatures dropping low enough just about anywhere for a touch of frost, and after today be wary of ice on the back roads and pavements into tuesday. the big picture for tuesday, three areas of low pressure across northern europe and the atlantic, the one waiting in the winds is the more potent, but on tuesday showers in central and southern scotland, northern ireland, some on the heavy side, a little bit of sleet and snow over the scottish mountains. much of northern scotland dry and bright, much of england and wales seeing sunshine before it turns hazy, 8—13 degrees again. more potent area of low pressure pushing through later on tuesday, but for england and wales, sunshine and showers for wednesday, heavy rain, hills now across scotland and northern ireland during the day on wednesday, not a great day, breezy compared with tomorrow, big temperature contrast on wednesday,
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4-5 temperature contrast on wednesday, 4—5 for some in scotland, 14—15 in the south—east corner. as that pulls away, things turning coolerfor the second half of the week. that is how it is looking. are we there or thereabouts for the time of month? 0n time of month? on wednesday, certainly way above, by the end of the week we will be about where we should be for this stage of march. unlike i don't like where we should be, i like this! i like the 14! you like the snow... can you imagine the arguments about the temperature in the studio?! we haven't had any, i don't know what you are talking about! you are right, i do like it super cool in here. it's been an exciting weekend for space experts after the latest american—built capsule successfully docked with
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the international space station. let's take a look at the moment it happened. please! the crew no longer sending commands, dragon doing everything on its own. soft capture confirmed. cheering the unmanned spacex dragon capsule will stay there until friday before dropping down to earth. earlier i spoke to dr ken kremer, research scientist and space journalist who's been following the whole thing. this is the most exciting launch we have had, really, since the retirement of the shuttle. i am very happy you were carrying it live. i was watching it live on the roof of the vab where we put the shuttles and the apollo moon rockets together. so a spectacular view, it was clear, we saw it for many, many minutes, it was just a wonderful thing. fantastic, and why is so much attention being drawn to this now? well, there is so much attention because we haven't launched humans from the united states since 2011,
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since the very premature and short—sighted shutdown of the shuttle. so we've been totally dependent on the russians. now we are on the cusp of restoring human space flight to the united states, and with that, we will also be able to bring our partners from europe, like esa, like your astronaut tim peake, he could fly on the shuttle, instead of having to rely on the soyuz. has this only been able to be done because of the commercialisation of this? that's part of it, yeah, because the shuttle was shut down, so about eight years ago nasa started the commercial crew programme to replace the shuttle in launching humans. the cargo part the shuttle used to do is now done by the unmanned cargo vessels. so now, after many years of delays because of funding cutbacks and technical difficulties, we are right on the verge of launching humans. we had to do this test flight first
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to make sure it is safe, and so far with the docking this morning, a few hours ago, everything looks great. and if it all continues to go well with the return, then hopefully we are going to launch those first astronauts, the first two, we met them at the briefing i was at with elon musk just about 24 hours ago, and they are ready to go. they're fully trained, all that we need to do is have a successful flight here. it is interesting you mentioned elon musk, i know you manage to get a question into him at the briefing. with commercialisation comes characters like elon musk, who has been seen as well as pioneering as very controversial as well. this, i suppose, is the quid pro quo of it all. yeah, that's kind of like the way it is, but we have to have a visionary or we go nowhere. and the politicians have done a very poorjob, you know, they have strangled the space programme and they have strangled science, and the only way we can advance as a species is to invest in science and technology
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and innovation, and that is what we need to do. so having people like elon musk out there is a driver. we need that and we need science, because we have got to move forward. we got to work together as humanity, we got to work together for the betterment of humanity. that's what space and science is all about. so what is next, what is the timeframe now? if this is successful, coming back down to earth later this week, when do we see astronauts using this capsule? this test flight will probably be july, august timeframe. i asked the vp of spacex about this, and the timeline is forjuly, they have to make a few improvements and changes between now and what they find out. so that flight will happen around july, august. after that will come the real operational missions,
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and that is when tim peake and other european astronauts could fly. right now there are two nasa astronauts, but they will add two international ones, maybe from canada, europe, japan. that's what is going to happen. so the crew will be enlarged, starting early next year if all goes well, and that will continue, and it will be a real we love his shirt that his friend made for him, he was so enthusiastic, how could you not be? inafew enthusiastic, how could you not be? in a few moments on breakfast, we are looking at these beautiful sculpture made from replica bullets isa sculpture made from replica bullets is a tribute to the servicemen who lost their lives on d—day, it is going on tour, and it starts here in
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salford just outside mediacity. not a bad day to take a look at that, spare a thought. time for the news, travel and weather where you good morning. storm freya brought us some strong winds and even some snow, that has all calmed down for now, but it will remain unsettled, and feeling quite chilly at times as well. through this morning we start off with a good deal of sunshine across many parts, but you notice these showers move their way through wales, the south of england, and even eastern parts seeing showers later this afternoon. but the
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further east you are, staying mostly dry with some sunshine, temperatures six to ten celsius. the showers fizzling away overnight, they could bea fizzling away overnight, they could be a little hill snow over the tops of the pennines and the scottish mountains. and quite a chilly night, temperatures getting down to freezing or up to three degrees. starting tomorrow on a chilly note, rain moving through parts of northern ireland, that will continue for much of the time through tuesday, going a little further north and again, hill snow over higher ground. largely dry for many parts of england and wales with sunshine before cloud increases from the south in temperatures up to 12 celsius on tuesday. through tuesday night into wednesday, this area of low pressure will start to move in from the south. that will spread its weather fronts, and the from the south. that will spread its weatherfronts, and the rain from the south. that will spread its weather fronts, and the rain that comes with it, and a breezy day through wednesday, that wind coming
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in from the south—west. but you can see some heavy rain at times, particularly over scotland and northern ireland, where again there will be some hill snow over the highest ground, showers following behind, temperatures 13 or 14 celsius. temperatures only up to about nine celsius. that's all from me. goodbye.
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