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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 7, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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this is business live from bbc news, with victoria fritz and sally bundock. huawei launches a fightback against western claims its equipment could be used for spying by china. live from london, that's our top good morning. welcome to breakfast story on thursday 7 march. with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the world's biggest telecoms equipment maker is suing the us government for banning federal public satisfaction in the nhs falls agencies from using its products. to its lowest level in over a decade also on the programme, — a new survey highlights waiting times and a lack of funding we care about your privacy — that's the message from as the main causes for concern. mark zuckerberg who says facebook a manchester miracle in paris. will now be focused around privacy. against all the odds, united, knock paris saint germain out of the champions league, thanks to an injury time penalty, and we'll be getting the inside awarded by var. track on what oils the wheels was to get their first goal, be in the game with five minutes ago, or ten to go, and we were —— the plan was. why is tech still dominated by men? amazon says encouraging more
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women to work in tech could significantly boost earnings. i'll speak to one of amazon's uk bosses, just before seven. iam going i am going to be explaining why the type of market values to take the temperature pc 100 years years ago is affecting what we think about climate change is a ——no bug is required to day to tell you it is feeling substantially colder than it was for some yesterday and with windchill as well. some of you a jacket will be required. i will have the full details for your breakfast. it's thursday, 7th march. our top story: a man in his 20s has become the latest victim of knife crime in the uk, after being stabbed to death in east london, as the prime minister faces growing pressure to find extra money for the police. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, hasjoined a dozen police and crime commissioners, urging theresa may to put 10,000 officers back on the streets, as alexandra mackenzie reports.
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another death, another bereaved family. victims of this current spike in knife crime. here in east london, a man in his 20s was found yesterday by police officers and paramedics. he died at the scene. the 21st person to be stabbed to death in london this year. theresa may was home secretary when police numbers were reduced. labour say those cuts are part of this current problem. the problem is that violent crime has doubled. the rise, mr speaker, has been driven by austerity, something the prime minister told us a few months ago was over. you cannot keep communities are safe on the cheap. there's no good members on the opposition benches standing up and saying no, you are not, it is a fact that more money is being put into the police this year, that more
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money is being put into the police next year. london's mayor sadiq khan has described this as a national crisis. he is urging the prime minister to put 10,000 police officers back on the streets. is this idea of a crime summit may throw up good soundbites, but it won't solve the problem. the home 0ffice won't solve the problem. the home office says it is listening to police officers, as law enforcement is vital. but it says it is also about early intervention and preventing people turning to crime in the first place. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news. we'll ask the chancellor philip hammond whether he has the money to put more police officers on the streets, that interview is at 7:10. sadiq khan is also talking to us this morning. that is coming up later on breakfast. european union officials have urged the government to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of tomorrow, in order to break the deadlock in talks. both sides have described yesterday's negotiations as "difficult", but eu leaders said they would work non—stop over
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the weekend if "acceptable" ideas are put forward. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley is in westminster. good morning to you. it is interesting, isn't it, when they say a acceptable. i am doing that in inverted commas, because who knows what is acceptable to them now and, actually, what westminster or theresa may can offer that everyone agrees with. yeah, exactly. that is the big alagiah, naga. firstly to get something of the next few days with europe. the signsjust get something of the next few days with europe. the signs just now are not good. the top law officer for the government was in brussels in the government was in brussels in the last few days. those talks did not end well. they are no further forward. we still don't have something for him to bring back to put to the government. that means the big vote on tuesday is looking really difficult for the prime minister. two reasons, firstly
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because she does not have the concessions on the irish border that she needs to get her roadside to vote for her deal, and secondly her big deal to win over labour mps with more money for left behind areas and better workers' rights doesn't seem to be changing minds in any great numbers. all the signs are just now that she has still got that massive mountain to climb. i suspect the government will be in overdrive as the next few days, desperately trying to come up with something on the irish border, but it will not be easy. certainly not. nick kommer thank you very much. we will talk to you later. —— nick, thank you very much. public satisfaction with the nhs is at its lowest point in more than a decade, according to a new survey. research found that waiting times, staffing levels and funding were the main causes for concern. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. satisfaction levels with the nhs have varied over the years, but the latest survey of public attitudes in england, scotland, and wales shows growing concern over the state of
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the health service. in 2010, the annual survey revealed, overall, record levels of satisfaction. a high of 70%. at last you that figure fell to its lowest point since 2007, just 53%. with waiting times, the number of staff, and a lack of funding being the main factors behind dissatisfaction. people who have recently used the service are much more satisfied, so i think a big issue here is access to care, getting those appointments, getting in to see a gp, for example, and they think a lot of us have struggled with getting a gp appointments and that is really having an effect on satisfaction. being free at the point of use, the quality of care, and the range of services were the main reasons people were happy with the nhs, but patients recognise the difficulties the health service faces. unsatisfied with the service they provide, i'm not satisfied that they have got enough funding to have enough people to do the job
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properly. a few years ago, actually, i changed my gp because they rang up and the first appointment they could offer me was in 21 days because time. people like to take the nhs for granted, and they criticise it relentlessly, it seems, but i think we need to put into perspective the work behind the scenes. there will be particular concern that almost a quarter of respondents were unsatisfied with gp services. but it seems that direct, personal experience of the nhs, for example asa experience of the nhs, for example as a hospital inpatient, gay people as a hospital inpatient, gay people a more positive view of the service. dominic hughes, bbc news. —— gave people. nearly a third of the uk's electricity is set to be generated by wind power by 2030, under a new deal announced by the government. the plan will see the offshore wind sector invest £250 million over the next 11 years, in exchange for state subsidies. the government says the sector will create thousands ofjobs. last year, on and offshore wind turbines provided 17% of the uk's energy needs.
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the singer r kelly is back behind bars after a court hearing in chicago over unpaid child support. the sheriff's office says he will be detained until he pays the full amount he owes — more than $160,000. it came just hours after a tv interview in which he angrily denied allegations of sexual abuse. the singer was charged last month with ten counts of aggravated sexual abuse. one of the world's largest telecoms companies, huawei, has announced it is suing the us government. it comes after the us passed legislation banning the chinese compa ny‘s products, citing a security risk. 0ur correspondentjohn sudworth is at the company's headquarters in shenzhen. john, this is the latest twist in an international row? john, this story is pretty complex as it is. they're happy many rows already. this is taking it to a new level in the courts —— there have been. it is. what we heard in the press c0 nfe re nce been. it is. what we heard in the press conference today, from this
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giant chinese telecommunications company, is that it is beginning the fight back. you could argue that it's not just huawei's fight back. you could argue that it's notjust huawei's reputation at sta ke it's notjust huawei's reputation at stake here, but be very future of the global internet. basically, a line of executives took to be staged today to tell reporters that they are going to challenge, in the us courts, a us government ban on the purchasing of its equipment. basically, the us government argues that the nature of the chinese political system means that all companies based here are beholden to the chinese communist party and china could use huawei to disrupt or to spy on critical communications networks. the executives he today say there is no evidence that it has ever done that, that the ban is unconstitutional and discriminatory, and it harms us consumers. it could, of course, as it goes with us courts, take many to resolve. for the moment, thank you.
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garden gnomes, have you got ade gardner? you never had a garden gnome? your parents never had a garden in? no. why are we talking about them ? garden in? no. why are we talking about them? i don't know. explain. it could soon be the end of "off to work we go" for one of europe's last traditional manufacturers of garden gnomes. based in germany, the 145—year old firm may be forced to close its doors when the owner retires, unless someone comes forward to take the business on. the company employed more than 60 people at its peak but now has just three staff. i don't have one. garden gnomes became popular in germany in the late 19th century, with current estimates putting the country's gnome population at 25 million. just in germany? that is just in germany, i think. just in germany? that is just in germany, ithink. there just in germany? that is just in germany, i think. there are a lot of them. i do have four. do you? there
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isa drunken them. i do have four. do you? there is a drunken one in the garden and one in the house that looks to you. look in the mirror? laughter. 0ne talks to you. look in the mirror? laughter. one talks to you. it is movement and talk activated. it will start talking to you, he shouts all these foot ball talking to you, he shouts all these football terms that you. it is a footballing gnome. was it a gift? yes. somebody like me very much. i do like them. do you hide the other two in the garden? bills are quite boring. theyjust sit there in the garden and stare at you. commentators last night were kept busy, were they not? where do you start? a miracle. so many things you could say. in the history of the champions league and european cup, 106 times before, the tea m european cup, 106 times before, the team that had lost 2—0 in the first
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leg had gone out. note he never came back from losing at home 2—0 in the first leg until night. absolutely extraordinary —— until last night no tea m extraordinary —— until last night no team had ever. it was changing throughout the game as well. it was one of the most unlikely turnarounds in the history of the champions league. a night they will never forget, as marcus rashford scored a nerveless penalty in injury time to complete united's incredible comeback and knock out paris saint—germain to qualify for the quarterfinals. andy murray says the chances of his competing in the men's singles at wimbledon this year are less than 50%. murray says he's pain free after having surgery on his hip, but still doesn't know if he'll be able to continue playing. johanna konta is through to the second round in indian wells after beating france's pauline parmentier. the british number one konta won in straight sets in 90 minutes. and it really was a two horse race —
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a strange meeting at lingfield yesterday. only 15 horses competed and there were several races with just two horses taking part. it's all because of a row over prize money. a bit ofa a bit of a protest. a protest over prizemoney. not enough? there was thought that they were taking too much prized many, so the trainers and owners were protesting that they we re and owners were protesting that they were getting enough of the spoils. there you go. it rather spoils the occasion. absolutely. i don't want to labour a point, occasion. absolutely. i don't want to laboura point, do occasion. absolutely. i don't want to labour a point, do you name your gnomes? i have not done. i do call the one that speaks to you in the bedroom quite a few names... you had your known in the bedroom? the one that speaks to you. it is on the windowsill. i think that is where we stop. i think it is enough. it is 30
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minutes past six. i do not know if it is good weather for gnomes ——30 minutes past. how will be gnomes to be feeling this morning? they will be pretty chilly, to be honest. at least they have a waterproof layer, some of you will need it through the morning. standing out here in central london, lovely start, blue skies overhead. best of the sunshine will be across southern counties of england. it won't be the same everywhere. if we ta ke won't be the same everywhere. if we take a look at the forecast, and at a chill to the weather today by some strengthening winds that will develop across the country, bringing cold airfrom develop across the country, bringing cold air from the north. there develop across the country, bringing cold airfrom the north. there is some rain around, a mix of rain, sleet, and here also linked to the area of low pressure. it is starting to pull away into the north sea through the day. as that starts to work its way is to as we join our winds from the north or north—westerly direction across many parts of the country. that is dragging in increasingly cold air. drab the warm jacket to day. you
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will probably need it. let us look at the details. has to be brightness to the south—east. 0utbreaks at the details. has to be brightness to the south—east. outbreaks of rain, sleet, and hill snow in the north. that will head into northern england, north wales and the north midlands through the day. showers to the south—west. it will brighten up across scotland and northern ireland through winds will be picking up, fairly strong and gusty winds, touching gale force if not more across southern and western parts of the uk, in particular as we go into the uk, in particular as we go into the afternoon. while on the thermometer steve riches may read 7-8, 11 thermometer steve riches may read 7—8, 11 degrees, add on the effect of the wind, there will be windchill and it will feel was freezing —— the temperature is may read. as we finish the day, the rain, sleet, and so will head to the south—east corner. that will gradually shift its way out to the north sea. clear skies developing across the country. you will notice from the colours of the market will turn much colder.
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widespread frost to take us into tomorrow morning. most of you, if not below freezing, will be low enough or the frost on the cars and grass. chilly start to tomorrow morning. much of the country bake in sunshine to begin with. the exception being northern ireland. cloud around has been. clouded thick enough to bring outbreaks of rain which will move into western scotland, wales, and england as well. better than we finish the day. it may not feel quite as cold. into the weekends, after some showers through the night there will be sunshine around that time in parts of the north—east of scotland, north—east england to begin with, but there will be plenty of showers elsewhere. some of those will turn quite readily to rain, hail, sleet, so. it should brighten up later on. it is going to feel cold again on saturday thanks to the wind. bachelor of bill will continue into sunday, with more wintry showers around. —— that chilly winter.
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sunday, with more wintry showers around. -- that chilly winter. you are very wrapped up. temperature do you think it is on the roof? probably around five degrees. but it is cold in the wind. i think he has one of those in our gauges. i can do that. laughter. let's take a look at today's front pages: the home secretary is set for a further clashes with the prime minister over police numbers, according to the guardian. sajid javid is backing demands by police chiefs for an emergency grant to fund more officers to fight knife crime. the daily telegraph reports that the cabinet expects theresa may's brexit deal to be defeated by up to 100 votes next week, after the attorney general and the brexit secretary returned from talks in brussels empty—handed. the times leads on its own investigation into tax havens.
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there are a080 hours for a deal to be made in the brexit. ——a8. the times leads on its own investigation into tax havens. the paper says a third of british billionaires have moved to use them over the last decade, denying the uk treasury billions every year. a diet of soups and shakes can reverse type 2 diabetes in the long—term, according to a study reported in the daily mail. the paper says more than a third of patients put on the daily regime of just 850 calories were free of the illness after two years. that is a long time. 150 calories a day... i would want some solid food in those two years. soup and shakes. you need to get your teeth into it. nothing wrong with serve. not every
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meal. you'd not a bread... i meant in this diet. 0n meal. you'd not a bread... i meant in this diet. on that tangent. let me talk to you about facebook. mark zuckerberg, there has been this row and controversy about what we post publicly. he now wants to focus on a private messages rather than posting things publicly and share information. more at of us are sending things privately. facebook also owns instagram and whatsapp. sending things privately. facebook also owns instagram and whatsappm is not necessarily private. more of us are is not necessarily private. more of us are using direct messaging. maybe those photos that you can only watch once and then they disappear. it is
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a bit ofa once and then they disappear. it is a bit of a response from the backlash about the data facebook has on all of us. isn't it whatsapp that is encrypted. it is our move away from public to private and encryption as well. manchester united would not want to go private but share with the world their triumph. you have experienced players like spaulding and rashford, coming off the bench a 17—year—old and scoring. he is back in class tomorrow? yes, he did well. they all did in only and played with such enthusiasm and the skill and confidence. united party like 1999, a reference to the famous
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championship comeback. last night, it was very much the manager. a very badly behaved fans getting onto the pitch. there is another contract? that has run out. everyone is expecting a full—time job. but there is an underwritten history that if you give a manager a new contract when they are going well, it goes pear shaped. a lot of superstition. yes. i do not know that we will get an announcement that he gets a full—time job. had it not been for video assistance technology, they
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may not have gone through. 0r referees consulted va and a penalty was awarded. it did hit the defenders hand. —— var. was awarded. it did hit the defenders hand. -- var. are you going to be able to show that this on him? i thought you meant it now. . . on him? i thought you meant it now... oh, he turned his back. it comes up now... oh, he turned his back. it comes up like that. imagine the ball. it is almost like we were there. laughter. there is a lovely story in the paper that goldman sachsis story in the paper that goldman sachs is ditching its dress coat because it is too stuffy and
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corporate. so quite helpfully it says that it wants to create a welcoming environment for all but this is the advice and this is where it starts getting vague and open to interpretation. they want people to wear clothing consistent with your client expectations. it says, shorts not allowed. trainers are allowed but you have to change into your shoes when you arrive. i would be all at the ditching suits and ties. i have seen you in shorts though. i think stick to the suits and ties! viewers will never know. you would see some lovely knees. let's return to the issue of knife crime.
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as politicians continue to look at the reasons behind a rise in violent attacks, one of the issues highlighted is the impact of school exclusions on vulnerable young people. a letter sent to the prime minister from the mayor of london, sadiq khan, and a number of police and crime commissioners, calls for reform of the system. 0ur education and family correspondent, frankie mccamley, has more. dance class for pupils in this dance college. all have struggled with main stream school. today, the prime minister is being warned a broken system of support the trouble and excluded youngsters is at the heart ofa excluded youngsters is at the heart of a rise in violent crime. something zandra disapproves with. there are people who do it for the sake of doing it, and then the row people who do it for protection. you can actually never label a person.
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despite losing a friend to knife crime, she was to become a performer. you did not have to be an education to make it in life. in a way that is what the media is perceiving. that you will not make it. but there are so many different ways the people to create and make new things in life. just last week, someone was stabbed in this young man's area. i thought, someone was stabbed in this young man's area. ithought, it is someone was stabbed in this young man's area. i thought, it is crazy. you just do not know who it is said to be next. i do not think there is a link between exclusion and gangs. in my experience, at school i felt restricted and that is why did not go to school for a while. they used to skip some years because i could not enjoy it. with the recent spike in knife crime, the spotlight is now
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being put on schools. exclusions by not be helping the situation but in reality the reason young people are turning to violent are much more complex. in a joint letter to the prime minister the london mayor has joined a handful of police commissioners claiming poverty and budget cuts at adding to the rise in violent crime and calling for the end of people being informally managed out of school as well as new powers for local council to intervene on exclusions by the many who have lost friends, families and their children, this mayjust be more words. to them more action is needed to stop headlines like this. we will be talking to sadiq khan, the mayor of london a little later on. and the chancellor phillip adams in about a0 minutes. —— and philip
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hammond. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a charity's calling for legal aid for the families of those who die in state custody. tanya el kyria was helped by the charity called inquest after initially being refused legal aid in the wake of her daughter amy's death. the 1a year—old was found hanged in a mental health clinic in roehampton. the government says for the vast majority of inquests, legal representation isn't necessary but the charity says it's essential. there is absolutely no doubt that without legal representation of the truth about how and why amy died would never have come to the forefront. no charges are likely to be brought in the criminal investigation into the grenfell tower fire for at least the next two years. the met police says it would be wrong not to wait for the final report of the grenfell tower inquiry,
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the second phase of which is unlikely to begin before the end of this year. in response, the grenfell united action group said they felt they were living in a limbo with no individuals or organisations being held accountable. in celebration of world book day today special postboxes will be unveiled across london in honour of some of the capital's most famous authors. david walliams is one of them his work will be celebrated with a bright yellow post box outside the natural history museum. there is another for the tiger who came to tea writer, judith kerr in barnes. let's take a look at the travel situation now: 0n the tubes we've got part—suspensions on both the bakerloo and 0verground, along with minor delays on the picadilly line. the m25 is closed clockwise atjunction 5 that's the m26 interchange, with the m26 closed eastbound from the m25 to j2a due to damage to the m26 overbridge following a collision overnight. 0n the m1, there are lane closures northbound towards j11a, following a collision ,with delays back to to j11 for dunstable and luton.
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now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning, a very windy day of whether head of brisk south—westerly wind. it strengthens as we headed to the afternoon. up to 50 miles per hour perhaps in the london area. a few showers but we're starting plenty of sunshine. increased amount of cloud, western counties in particular. many eastern areas staying dry. gusts of around 50 miles per hour as we said. temperatures between nine and 11 celsius. further outbreaks of rain through the evening rush—hour. 0n and off for through the evening rush—hour. 0n and offfora through the evening rush—hour. 0n and off for a while. the winds will lighten overnight. for the evening the cloud breaking up and a rather
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chilly night and a cold start to the day tomorrow maybe with a touch of frost with those lighter winds. we start the day tomorrow with plenty of sunshine then outbreaks of rain. it is staying windy over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: middle distance runner laura muir has set her sights on olympic gold in 2020. she onlyjust finished the competition at the weekend. she'll be here on the sofa to tell us about training for tokyo and life as a newly qualified vet. dad doesn't want me to end up like him. he wants me to get a good job,
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good grades. i think it is too difficult. new documentary film h is for harry tells the story of an 11—year—old boy who goes to secondary school in suburban london unable to read or write. we'll hear from harry, his teacher, and the film's director. the first part of the much anticipated documentary leaving neverland aired last night. it details allegations of two men who spent time with singer michaeljackson when they were children. we'll have reaction from a tv critic and also what to expect from part two. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may continues to face a mounting backlash for denying a link between the number of police officers and an increase in violent crime. the mayor of london sadiq khan has joined a dozen police and crime commissioners urging the prime minister to put 10,000 officers back on the streets.
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a murder investigation was launched yesterday evening after a man, believed to be in his mid—20s, was stabbed to death in leyton, east london. european union officials have urged the government to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of tomorrow, in order to break the deadlock in talks. both sides have described yesterday's negotiations as "difficult", but eu leaders said they would work non—stop over the weekend if "acceptable" ideas are put forward. attorney general, geoffrey cox, is leading the uk team and wants to finalise legally binding assurances on the so called backstop for the irish border. public satisfaction with the nhs is at its lowest point in more than a decade, according to a new survey by the health think tanks, the king's fund and the nuffield trust. the research found that waiting times, staffing levels and concerns over funding were the main causes for concern. the department of health says "the long—term plan sets out an effective blueprint for making the nhs fit for the future". police investigating a suspicious package sent to glasgow university yesterday believe it is linked to three small explosive devices found at london's
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main transport hubs. a bomb disposal unit destroyed the latest package which was discovered a day after letter bombs were found at heathrow, waterloo, and london city airport. some of the parcels had irish post marks which have prompted fears of a campaign by irish republican dissidents. the chinese telecoms firm huawei has announced its suing the united states government over a ban on its products. the us passed legislation that prohibits use of huawei equipment after suggesting china could use it to spy on, or disrupt, critical next generation mobile communications. a senior huawei executive said officials had failed to produce any evidence to support the allegation. take a look at these spectacular images from a storm in the us. this thunderstorm was spotted over southern california and these images were captured by the santa barbara fire department and the sheriff's office. according to the la times,
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the national weather service recorded nearly 1500 flashes of lightning off the coast of santa barbara injust one hour. that doesn't look real, does it? that doesn't look real, does mm is extraordinary. it looks like some apocalyptic film. it reminds me of, good morning, mike, it reminds me of ghostbusters. the special effects. it doesn't look real. the original ghostbusters. a long time ago. and assuming everyone was ok. no reports of injuries, just a spectacular night of storms. paint the picture for us last night, who is playing in what happened? parys st germain expecting to cruise through in the finals of the ken hinkley. they won in manchester, 2—0. no team had ever lost a champions league tied at home 2-0 lost a champions league tied at home 2—0 and gone through. this match,
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this comeback makes history. not just because of that because of the way it was one. for long periods of the game manchester united had to write their luck and withstand the pressure. it was a scratch team. the manager kept changing his tactics. everything were stacked against them, but it made history. at injury time, ba are picked up on a penalty that many had not thought was going to be given. even appealed for. they decided it was a penalty. had it converted, and that is why it is so historic and so remarkable in its comeback. what is it about 0le gunnar solskjaer and late wins in the champions league? he famously won it for united 20 years ago, and last night he saw his side beat paris saint—germain in the most dramatic of circumstances. patrick gearey reports. the match that hinged on an elbow, one minute into stoppage time the referee was still studying the replays. was this handball a
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penalty? manchester united's champions league hopes depended on his decision. the trial by television ruled in theirfavour, now marcus rashford, a 21—year—old mancunian could complete the most incredible comeback. how on earth had we got here? after all, paris saint—germain held a two away goal lead going into this. they presented romelu lu ka ku with lead going into this. they presented romelu lukaku with the chance to grab one back. surely that would be less of a joke than a hiccup, just ten minutes later wonder that had them level on the night. be breezy is could not settle. john leech 11 is could not settle. john leech 11 is one of the most express goalkeepers in the world, but he presented this to romilly lukaku. two. not enough until the referee went to check on the arm. the debate about video technology rages on, but in russia's might there was peace. with ole in russia's might there was peace. with 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s manchester united it is never too late. we always believed. that is the thing. we said that is the plan.
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it wasn't about having the ball and not playing. if you give this intimate space and time, you cite a few times in the first half when we missed our defensive shape, it withdrew it straightaway. the plan was to get the first goal, and in the game with five minutes ago, ten minutes to go, we were. solksjaer had a couple of other united legends, to celebrate with after the win in paris. former boss sir alex ferguson, and eric cantona, were watching from the stands, in paris. and there was an altogether more animated reaction, from united playerjesse lingard who's injured and was watching from home. that is what we do! that is what we do. that is what we did. united mentality. come on, boys! get in there!
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that sums it all up. quite common of some of the reaction is all from former and current united players. your face says it all. i not going to say anything. but he is pleased. ——iam to say anything. but he is pleased. —— i am not. to say anything. but he is pleased. -- i am not. did he say get there? that might get in there. i think he did. away from the champions league a police investigation in under way after the home of the new leicester city manager, brendan rodgers, was burgled. this was at rodger‘s home in scotland, and it's believed that his wife and stepdaughter, were in the house at the time of the break in. the burglars took family possessions, and medals that rodgers won during his time as the manager of celtic. andy murray says he's now pain free after having hip surgery for a second time, but he still has no idea if he'll be able to play competitive tennis again. he's been speaking to our sports editor, dan roan. to play singles at wimbledon, i would say it would be less than 50% chance of playing, you know,
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doubles, maybe possibly. but beyond wimbledon, there is a realistic chance, that you could get back into serious senior men's tennis as a singles player? well... i think it is possible. but i don't want to say it is highly likely, because it has not been done before. so i can't look at another tennis player and say, yeah, that i did it, so why not? i have been told by the surgeons and stuff that you can try that there are certainly no guarantees. johanna konta, meanwhile, is through to the second round at indian wells. the british number one beat france's pauline parmentier in straight sets and will play sheh su—wei in the second round in california. the olympic champion, adam peaty, is going to lead the london—based team in a new swimming competition. the team will be one of eight competing in the international swimming league — which will stage an event in the capital later this year. competion bosses say it'll transform the way swimming is viewed around the world, but it doesn't have the backing of the sport's governing body.
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it was a strange old day in the race meet at linfield. the 2:30 was quite literally, a two horse race — as were several others. only 15 runners were entered for the six scheduled races with trainers and owners calling boycotting the meet because of an ongoing row over prize money. after the levy it gets from betting takings falls from april. this is because the government has lowered fixed odd stakes on betting. 0perators expect a shortfall when the rule change comes in in april, hence this row. and finally, we are going to head to the second division in guatemala. and how about this for taking matters into your own hands.
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deportivo carcha against deportivo jocotan. luis acuna took a penalty and then decided he'd change the scoreboard himself. having scored the penalty. and that is the one at state. it finished 1-0. i is the one at state. it finished 1—0. i don't think we would see that in the champions league. don't try that if you are playing this weekend. a nice touch. a little hard for the scoreboard. the health and safety officials must be having kittens. we spoke on monday, who was the footballer who did an instagram video once he scored? on the pitch? somebody did it on monday. balotelli. are there any rules about going off the pitch? you get booked for taking your shirt off, for starters. i am assuming he did not get booked for going up and changing the number. did not get booked for going up and changing the numberlj did not get booked for going up and changing the number. i think the rules in guatemala division are specifically that you are allowed to go specifically that you are allowed to 9° up specifically that you are allowed to goupa specifically that you are allowed to
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go up a ladder... stepchange the scoreboard. i'm not sure he got booked. --uk to scoreboard. we will see you later. then he very much. concerns over funding, waiting times, and staff shortages, have put satisfaction with the nhs at its lowest point for more than a decade, according to an annual survey. let's speak now to dan wellins from the king's fund — one of the think tanks behind the research. good morning. thank you for talking to us this morning on breakfast. what do you make of this survey, 53% of the people survey said they are satisfied with the nhs. we are comparing it to 2010 and it was 70% then. so it is falling. it is falling. it is the lowest level that has been recorded since 2007. and it is also worth bearing in mind that it was rising all the way through the years. this decade were starting to see the figures falling. they seem to be freaky reasons people are
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telling us that they are more dissatisfied with the nhs, those are around waiting times, the time it ta kes to around waiting times, the time it takes to get an appointment. it is staff shortages, there is a real concern that. and perceived lack of funding for the concern that. and perceived lack of funding forthe nhs, concern that. and perceived lack of funding for the nhs, as well. we should say that, actually, when people are talking about the quality of care they are receiving, that is still very common entry. yes. that is an important point to make. it is a big difference between asking people about their experiences with services, which are often very good, and it is worth remembering that the vast majority of its reasons people have the nhs are good. this is about how the images runs and it is about broader concerns. i think particularly around staff shortages, we actually have 100,000 vacancies in the nhs right now. one in 11 posts. the public are picking up on that. i want to quit the department of health, the nhs in england was recently ranked as the safest and best health service in the world.
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its dedicated staff are delivering high—quality care to more patients than ever before. i'm not surprised it seemed that statement. 0bviously the nhs is going to be defended and many would say rightly so, what does this say, though, for the nhs moving forward ? this say, though, for the nhs moving forward? i think one of the key thing is, as we said, is around the work was questioned. and, also, i suppose in some respects these findings were surprising that they came last year, in the 70th birthday people remember all the celebrations, these services at westminster abbey, the running this from the prime minister, but it will ta ke from the prime minister, but it will take time to see if that money will have an effect, will it change services, will it improve the things that people care about? and that will take time to see both of that money will make those changes and is it going to be enough? talking about your experience with the nhs, what areas do you think are struggling? gp services, for example, this area
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has been highlighted, twice as many people saying they are dissatisfied compared to 2009. i am very conscious that we can compare years all over the place and have a big disparity. the fact is the dissatisfaction levels with gp services is falling. that is right to pick up on that. it is a significant concern. if you think about gps that is how most people interact with the nhs. and i think four, broadly, again, when people do see their gp they are happy with the level of service. it is about getting in and people watching would have had experiences where it is difficult to get a gp appointment. dan wellins. they you very much for talking to us. thank you for going through that. so, its world book day, parents everywhere have been up all night finishing off outfits for their little ones, and, matt, your daughter has had some help with her outfit hasn't she?
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iam smiling i am smiling because, take a look at this picture... that is a map in central london but match is one of the most creative people i know. he can make the weather sound amazing but his child, on world book day should be pretty fantastic. the mind boggles. i did see the picture and i did laugh. you need to explain this picture. it was mrs t who did all the hard work this time. laughter. i had to daughters and one had to go as cha rlottes had to daughters and one had to go as charlottes web. this is her spider costume. and my eldest is going as a spy bat, as much fun as it is, to get the kids reading, i think it is a form of torture for
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working parents. some brilliant outfits on social media. but no—one wa nted outfits on social media. but no—one wanted to go as the weatherman? and no, no. they are the two old. they got over that one years ago. i hope you have a warm jacket to stick over the top. it is chillier this morning. added windshield increasing this afternoon as winds continue to strengthen. a waterproof costume could also come in handy or some of you. a mixture of rain and sleet and hill snow for the hills. increasing cold aircoming hill snow for the hills. increasing cold air coming down from the north, north—west right across the country. rain in northern and central scotland. snow in the tops and
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hills. it will push its way southwards across the rest of northern england, into the midlands. scotla nd northern england, into the midlands. scotland will brighten a little bit. still a few showers. much of southern england will stay dry with sunshine but achieving and threatening wind. when you factor in the temperatures, add on the wind, it will field much, much colder, close to freezing for some of you as we go through the afternoon. a big change from what we saw only a week ago. through the evening rush—hour, edging through the north sea, allowing skies to clear and temperatures to plummet. widespread frost to take us into tomorrow morning. the temperature will below enough for frost on the clouds and grass. —— clouds. cloud thickening
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to bring rain through the morning. spreading to western parts of scotla nd spreading to western parts of scotland and western areas of england, turning the snow over higher ground. dry and right for parts of england. the wind not as strong so perhaps not quite as cold as of this afternoon. the strong winds back on saturday, rain, sleet. after a wet start in the south, things brightening up and one to make not have any showers altogether. the windshield will be back with us again on sunday with further wintry showers across the country. after the feel of early summer, it is starting to feel like late winter once again. you have one of the most beautiful
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vistas in london. that is stunning. thank you, mror vistas in london. that is stunning. thank you, mroers vistas in london. that is stunning. thank you, mr or mrs cameraman. but you aching for a cup of coffee, a cup of tea. if you could bring me one, that would be nice. you have nine minutes before you have to be ready for the headlines. coffee, barton, all sorts. iwill try ready for the headlines. coffee, barton, all sorts. i will try my best. if anyone is watching, police give matt a cup of tea. —— police. the online retailer amazon wants better opportunities for women in tech and it's got a plan to do it. ben's got more on this. good morning. that's right. the online giant says there aren't enough women working in technology so its going to introduce a number of new schemes to try and redress the gender balance. fiona mcdonnell, the head of amazon's consumer retail division in the uk, joins me now.
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good morning. good morning. amazon, not enough women in tech or amazon. what is the proportion working with you? in some industries women make up you? in some industries women make up onlya you? in some industries women make up only a quarter. but if we look back at what we have done is look at independent and in—depth research because it is still too few. we are launching a set of initiatives to improve diversity across our business in the uk. i started as an engineer 25 years ago and i was one of the only women in the class but things have changed. independent research has shown there is a tangible success to increasing. by getting more women into workplace.
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why is it such problem and why are not women more not applying for these roles? we found that the language it used around innovation is just not resonating with women. even those with spoke to who might hold a patent did not consider themselves to be innovators but associate with people making a difference or solving problems. when we talk about investment, to get more women into work, or more minorities into work, it comes at every level. training and a pet —— apprenticeship as well. it is in the —— this industry was not available when i started. it is important to give best reason to women in engineering —— bursary, or
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apprenticeships to be more flexible. of course, amazon is always in the headlines. let's look about high street. the decline in the high street. do you feel responsible when you look at how we shop, and business rates. traditional business failures paying a lot of money. let me put this into context. in the uk, a retail, we only make 2% of the uk retail revenue but one in two of the products sold in amazon come from smaller businesses. for example sherritt candle, they have been able to reach a vast amount of customers and now they are able to open their fifth high street store. we will talk to the chancellor a little
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later on. in front they are proposing a 3% levy stop the boss of tesco said you should pay an on line tax. that would not mean your costs are up substantially. would you welcome it? all the taxes we pay in every country, perhaps what you are asking is that does and is on the backin asking is that does and is on the back in as much as we put out? —— amazon. the figures are pretty stark. £a.6 million incorporation ta kes stark. £a.6 million incorporation takes if you are paying a 3% tax, that would be £250 million. it is a huge difference. i do know we have paid all the taxes... huge difference. i do know we have paid all the taxes. .. but 4.6 million in 2017, more than 250 million in 2017, more than 250 million and that is a significant
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difference if these changes in france win. we operate in many different regions and we are used to change and if this happens we will adapt and we're investing 9.3 billion in the economy since the thousand ten and we will come back to look at the research and the uk needs a thriving economy and we are finding tangible ways we can do that for the country. what are you most worried about? consumer spending? we have been putting our hands in our pockets less since brexit? we will wait to see what happens on brexit. we spend our time focusing on being able to satisfy our customers and maintain supply and offer great selection at competitive prices. good to talk to you and good luck with that initiative to get women into tech. more from me after seven
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o'clock. we could have spent an hour talking to fiona. such an important issue try to get the gender balance. it is book day. kids are getting ready for school. send in your pictures. was that the hungry caterpillar? harry potter and brush —— bruffalo. scale is always important. send in your pictures and your outfits. matt's daughter has an interesting one, charlottes web.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. survivors of the grenfell tower fire say they feel they're living in limbo with no individuals or organisations being held accountable for the tragedy. it's after it's emerged no charges are likely to be brought in the criminal investigation for at least the next two years. the met police says it would be wrong not to wait for the final report of the grenfell tower inquiry, the second phase of which is unlikely to begin before the end of this year. a charity's calling for legal aid for the families of those who die in state custody. tanya el kyria was helped by the charity called inquest after initially being refused legal aid in the wake of her daughter amy's death. the 1a year—old was found hanged in a mental health clinic in roehampton. the government says for the vast majority of inquests, legal representation isn't necessary but the charity says it's essential.
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a fire with uppal of scrap metal is aligned. the incident is being dealt with. in celebration of world book day today special postboxes will be unveiled across london in honour of some of the capital's most famous authors. david walliams is one of them, his work will be celebrated with a bright yellow post box outside the natural history museum. there is another for the tiger who came to tea writer, judith kerr in barnes. let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0n the tubes we've got part—suspensions on both the bakerloo and 0verground, along with minor delays on the picadilly line. the m25 is closed clockwise atjunction 5 that's the m26 interchange, with the m26 closed eastbound from the m25 to j2a due to damage to the m26 overbridge following a collision overnight.
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now the weather with elixabeth rizzini. good morning, a very windy day of weather ahead of brisk south—westerly wind. it strengthens as we headed to the afternoon. up to 50 miles per hour perhaps in the london area. a few showers but we're starting plenty of sunshine. increased amount of cloud, western counties in particular. many eastern areas staying dry. gusts of around 50 miles per hour as we said. temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. further outbreaks of rain through the evening rush—hour. on and off for a while. the winds will lighten overnight. through the evening the cloud breaking up and a rather chilly night and a cold start
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to the day tomorrow maybe with a touch of frost with those lighter winds. we start the day tomorrow with plenty of sunshine then outbreaks of rain. it is staying windy over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: another knife death as pressure mounts on the prime minister to put 10,000 police officers back on the streets. public satisfaction in the nhs falls to its lowest level in over a decade. a manchester miracle in paris. against all the odds, united, knock paris saint germain out of the champions league, thanks to an injury time penalty, awarded by var.
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the plan was to get the first goal, be in the game with five minutes to go, or ten to go, and we were. a baker's billion. greggs reports its results for last year in the next few minutes — sales expected to pass the billion pounds mark for the first time. i'll have more on that and i'll be speaking to the boss. another gold medal, another title. this is the woman everyone is talking about when it comes to british athletics. double european champion laura muir willjoin us on the sofa, as she continues to rack up the gold medals. and you will need a quick sprints today to stay warm. it is cold thanks to a strengthening wind. quite a bit of rain around for some of you through the day. i will have all the details here on breakfast. it's thursday, 7th march. our top story: a man in his 20s has become the latest victim of knife crime in the uk, after being stabbed to death in east london,
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as the prime minister faces growing pressure to find extra money for the police. the mayor of london sadiq khan has joined a dozen police and crime commissioners, urging theresa may to put 10,000 officers back on the streets, as alexandra mackenzie reports. another death, another bereaved family. victims of this current spike in knife crime. here in east london, a man in his 20s was found yesterday by police officers and paramedics. he died at the scene. the 21st person to be stabbed to death in london this year. theresa may was home secretary when police numbers were reduced. labour say those cuts are part of this current problem. the problem is that violent crime has doubled. the rise, mr speaker, has been driven by austerity, something the prime minister told us
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a few months ago was over. you cannot keep communities safe on the cheap. it's no good members on the opposition benches standing up and saying, no, you're not, it is a fact that more money is being put into the police this year, that more money is being put into the police next year. london's mayor sadiq khan has described this as a national crisis. he is urging the prime minister to put 10,000 police officers back on the streets. he says her idea of a crime summit may throw up good sound bites, but it won't solve the problem. the home office says it's listening to police officers, as law enforcement is vital. but say it's also about early intervention and preventing people turning to crime in the first place. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news. will be speaking to two people this morning. speaking to the chancellor philip hammond as to whether he will
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be allocating more money to police officers. also speaking to the mayor officers. also speaking to the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who is asking for more officers on the street. those interviews coming up shortly. european union officials have urged the government to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of tomorrow, in order to break the deadlock in talks. both sides have described yesterday's negotiations as "difficult", but eu leaders said they would work non—stop over the weekend if "acceptable" ideas are put forward. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley is in westminster. you know what, nick, iwas you know what, nick, i was reading dad, another deadline, and i can only imagine what people think when they watch our coverage of this and we say a8—hour was until this, 20 days until that, it seems all these deadlines are most inconsequential at the moment because they are not getting anywhere. yeah. and there are an awful lot of deadlines and they keep being moved that they are not being met. some of these
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deadlines are not completely set in stone. the one that matters right now is the big vote on tuesday. the prime minister has promised you will bring back a new deal for mps to consider. she needs to get changes to that. let us not beat about the bush. a loss of conservatives went back a deal if there is not significant change on the irish border issue. that is what the irish, destro to get in brussels. —— thatis irish, destro to get in brussels. —— that is what the government. so far they keep coming back empty—handed. difficult was the word used to describe the talks. that basically means in brussels language they have not gone well. a word that has not been used is progress. what the government is going to do now is try to get something it takes to brussels over the next couple of days that can then be negotiated and brought back to parliament for next week. but as i say, at the moment, as things stand, it does not look like the immediate deadline of coming back with something concrete to put to mps on tuesday is in a
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particularly good place. ok, thank you very much. we will speak to you later. public satisfaction with the nhs is at its lowest point in more than a decade, according to a new survey. research found that waiting times, staffing levels and funding were the main causes for concern. the department of health says its long—term plan is making the nhs "fit for the future". here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. satisfaction levels with the nhs have varied over the years, but the latest survey of public attitudes in england, scotland, and wales shows growing concern over the state of the health service. in 2010, the annual survey revealed, overall, record levels of satisfaction. a high of 70%. but last year that figure fell to its lowest point since 2007, just 53%. with waiting times, the number of staff, and a lack of funding being the main factors behind dissatisfaction. people who have recently used the service are much more satisfied, so i think a big issue
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here is access to care, getting those appointments, getting in to see a gp, for example, and i think a lot of us have struggled with getting a gp appointments and that's really having an effect on satisfaction. being free at the point of use, the quality of care, and the range of services were the main reasons people were happy with the nhs, but patients recognise the difficulties the health service faces. i'm satisfied with the service they provide. i'm not satisfied that they have got enough funding to have enough people to do thejob properly. a few years ago, actually, i changed my gp because i rang up and the first appointment they could offer me was in 21 days' time. people like to take the nhs for granted, and they criticise it relentlessly, it seems, but i think we need to put into perspective the work behind the scenes. there will be particular concern that almost a quarter of respondents were unsatisfied with gp services. but it seems that direct,
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personal experience of the nhs, for example as a hospital inpatient, gave people a more positive view of the service. dominic hughes, bbc news. nearly a third of the uk's electricity is set to be generated by wind power by 2030, under a new deal announced by the government. the plan will see the offshore wind sector invest £250 million over the next 11 years in exchange for state subsidies. the government says the sector will create thousands ofjobs. last year, on and offshore wind turbines provided 17% of the uk's energy needs. they're the biggest bakers on the high street — greggs' results are out. ben has all the details. how much money do you think you can make from sausage rolls or iced buns? deagan or meet? altogether. we talk about it as a company that is doing something slightly at odds as
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to what you are seeing elsewhere on the high street. we are talking millions, aren't we? billions. they hit £1 billion for the first time. results out this morning. the sales we re results out this morning. the sales were up to 7.2%, hitting £1 billion for the first time, just over. that they made £82.6 in profit. it is an astonishing story. it is that thing we see on the high street and do not pay much attention to. you may be go in and grab your lunch. they have been spending money to expand the chain and into places you might not expect, there are putting in tube stations, railway stations, all that sort of thing, rather than on the traditional high—street. sort of thing, rather than on the traditional high-street. give us an idea of scale, those levels of sales, what are they like in terms of other high—street outlets? sales, what are they like in terms of other high-street outlets? you might think mcdonald's is pretty synonymous, up and down the country, a loss of stores, they have 1250 mcdonald's stores, greggs has 1950,
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weigh more. they're expecting to open more this year. they have 21,000 staff working in them. tesco express , 21,000 staff working in them. tesco express, again, maistri corners, they have 1750. absolutely huge. ——0n they have 1750. absolutely huge. ——on most corners. they are hitting out billion pounds for the first time. it is interesting, it is such a different business model to what we would expect in terms of success on the high street. they have been spending on what they call grab and go. the idea that you can go in, get your lunch, and go. the idea that you can go in, get yourlunch, and go go. the idea that you can go in, get your lunch, and go again. maybe before you make a thumping to take home may be a cake or something, what they have said is they want to concentrate on at lunchtime at market —— you maybe buy something to ta ke market —— you maybe buy something to take on. i'm going to speak with the chief executive of the greggs in about a0 minutes. i was beat him about a0 minutes. i was beat him about all about. clearly about what the strategy is. also that idea of the strategy is. also that idea of the high street, the high street is
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in decline but they are sort of reversing that and by adding muscle zanni high—street. reversing that and by adding muscle zanni high-street. interesting to see what kind of high—street it contributes to —— opening more stores on the high street. also things about what they are paying. you're talking to the chancellor soon about business rates. that is important. that is absolutely right. there is less than a week to go antil the chancellor makes print statement. we have been talking a lot about knife crime and the demand for some form or police forces in england and wales. philip hammond will update mps on wednesday, due to be the day after another meaningful vote on theresa may's brexit deal, if you are keeping up with e—voting. he is ina if you are keeping up with e—voting. he is in a westminster student for us. they give your time this morning. —— with the voting. front and centre are the issues around the knife crime. can you enlighten us? are you going to come up with more money for policing? we have come up with more money for policing. the police will have almost £1 billion
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of additional funding available to them in the financial year that starts next month. many police forces around the country are recruiting more officers with that money. but this isn'tjust recruiting more officers with that money. but this isn't just about more police officers or more police resources. it is about a whole of government response. we need to look across the actions of all departments, how we deal with young people who are going off the rails, how we deal with the drugs grazes in order to get this rise in knife crime early and stop it dead in its tracks. kenny baker that figure for me? you have talked about £1 billion of additionalfunding, me? you have talked about £1 billion of additional funding, how much of thatis of additional funding, how much of that is direct government funding and how much is the extra revenue raised from the council tax kuzma —— can you breakdown. the majority will come from local funding. can you breakdown. the majority will come from localfunding. the police has always been a locally funded service. and most of the additional funding comes from additional capacity that police and crime commissioner tapping given to preset
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on the council tax, up to £2a per year of additional precept on the council tax. that is the traditional way that much of our policing has been funding. there is also central government grant funding in that mix. as i understand it, 6896 of police funding comes from the central government, is that wrong? well, i can't give it is a percentage figure...|j well, i can't give it is a percentage figure... i believe it is, nearly 70% comes from the central government. can i ask you this, when sadiq khan or many other people come to the chancellor in your offer people come to the chancellor in youroffer ——in your people come to the chancellor in your offer ——in your office, and you say we are already building a of extra funding and, when they say we need more than that because we have a problem we are facing right now, what are you going to say? well, in relation to the mayor of london, we make funding available to the mayor of london, it is for him to decide what the priorities are. and, of course, talk to my colleagues across
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about funding issues and we have got about funding issues and we have got a spending review coming up later this year. as you would expect, there are lots of conversations going on about where we should focus additionalfunding. and going on about where we should focus additional funding. and you going on about where we should focus additionalfunding. and you won't going on about where we should focus additional funding. and you won't be surprised that there are many, many demands for the funding that is available. today we are focused on knife crime, and rightly so, but there are many other demands on available public spending. myjob is to make sure that, dealing with an issue like this, we use public resources in the most effective way. that means making sure that we prioritise, within police funding, in order to ensure that the public‘s rarities are being dealt with. and right now i am sure that the public‘s priority is dealing with knife crime. is it true... crosstalk. 0fficers crosstalk. officers from other areas of activity deal with this particular problem we are facing today. it also means making sure that the police
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are operating efficiently. if all police forces operated at the level of the most efficient in terms of eliminating paperwork and the most modern ways of mobile working, we would save enough police time to be the equivalent of about 11,000 additional officers a year. so getting the police more efficient, making sure that the police's prioritisation of resources reflects the public‘s a session is at the heart of this. chancellor, you seem to be saying very clearly that the police for stoke need more money, they need to get their act together. everybody can use more money and i have no doubt that given more funding, they would use it... are they going to be given more funding? i feel like we are going around in circles. are you going to give them more money or not? has the home
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secretary, or example, come to you and said! secretary, or example, come to you and said i need more money for policing and you said no, has that happened? no, that has not happened. we had a discussion for police funding in 2020 and we reached an agreement. additional capacity for police and crime commission is to raise local precepts and that means the police will have nearly £1 billion of additional funding the police will have nearly £1 billion of additionalfunding in the police will have nearly £1 billion of additional funding in the financial year 2019... billion of additional funding in the financial year 2019. .. but they are making very clear, the additional funding already in place, but you must see like everyone else, it has been come clear that you, central government, needs to come up with more money to deal with what some people are saying is something genuinely out of the ordinary to do with policing. you seem to clearly be saying that additional funding is
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already in place and the implication is you are not in a position to say you will be handing out more money to police for more officers or whatever they need it for?” to police for more officers or whatever they need it for? i am saying that the funding for 2020 has been found. nearly a billion pounds and will be having a review starting inafew and will be having a review starting in a few months which will look at the additional spending capacity over the coming three years and what our priorities are for that. but there are many demands on the available public funding and we have to look at how to prioritise that. i am also saying that within that envelope police funding, the police need to ensure that they prioritise the things that matter most ordinary and right now, we know from polling, that people consider tackling knife crime should be the number one
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priority police are focusing on. i wa nt to priority police are focusing on. i want to see police force is surging officers from other duties and dipping this problem in the bad, making sure we turn this spike around. to be absolutely clear up because we will speak to the mayor of london later on, your message is that for at least three months, we will stay as we out what you have a think about whether spending some more money is worthwhile? no, that is not what is said at all... yu said there was a spending review and thenit said there was a spending review and then it will make a decision... in a months' time, in april, police forces up and down this country will have an additional billion pounds to spend. that money is available to them. that is fixed and agree. if there are other initiatives that
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need to be taken we will look at those, i will work with the home secretary and we have a spending review coming up but it is notjust about money, it is about prioritise in the resources the police have the deal with the most important issues and knife crime is on top of the lease. it is about a joint approach across all government, dealing with young people caught up in this knife crime surge, dealing with the drug issues that underlie it, a whole government approach to deal with these challenges and make sure we have an effect responds that avoids young people going off the rails and taking too violent crime in the first place. chancellor, thank you for your time. i am taking a nose because we will be talking to sadiq khan, the mera london —— mayor of london and we will be talking about
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knife crime. matt has a great view over london for the weather this morning. it looks great, it looks stunning but tell me it is going to get better. i wish i could. we had the best of the day already. a bit of cloud and a lot of cloud across the country. you will notice it feels substantially cooler. it is linked into an area of low pressure. it brought rain across the country yesterday. it is still with us. as the pressure continues to move out into the north sea, the wind coming from the north adding to more of a windshield and wind strength will pick up as well. a wet start across parts of central scotland, north
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wales and north—west england. persistent rain, sleet and snow across the rest of northern england, north wales and into the midlands. scotla nd north wales and into the midlands. scotland and northern ireland writing up. the best of the weather towards the south—east corner. the weeds strengthening across the board this afternoon. temperatures could read around 7— 11 degrees but out on the windshield it will fill substantially colder, closer to feeling across parts of eastern scotland, north—east england, this afternoon. rain across the midlands, east anglia, all the way towards the south—east in the evening rush hour. skies clearing and temperatures dropping. a wide spread frosted ta kers dropping. a wide spread frosted takers into tomorrow morning. if not below freezing, temperatures will be just above. tomorrow morning, lovely
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sunrise the many. blue skies for the majority. northern ireland the exception with a lot of cloud. spread into scotland and wales and western england the afternoon. temperatures are similar to today's values but a chilly start but at least the winds will be strong. saturday, lots of showers across the country. someone with sleet and snow across parts of scotland, northern ireland and later northern england. it will fill chilly in the wind. more showers in the forecast. a cold feeling few days ahead. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, hasjoined a dozen police and crime commissioners in urging theresa may to tackle the national crisis
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of rising knife crime. you had this meeting yesterday. was there anything concrete that came out of it? i am assuming you all agree is something needs to be done. the causes of violent crime are complex, there are deep—seated mental health, disparity, exclusion. what we know, on top of the cards in police funding and youth services, many cards to level councils and schools across england and wales we re schools across england and wales were different types of schools, preschools, academies. we have not got a proper system called making what happens to children, sometimes
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vulnerable children. we need leadership now from the government. the bad news is that a recent report from the inspectorate shows nine out of ten young people in custody had been excluded but when i speak to aduu been excluded but when i speak to adult offenders, involved in knife crime, many of them had been excluded. in the past, when there has been an increase in violent crime, prime minister had weekly meetings to make sure each minister and senior officer is doing things they need to do. we are calling on they need to do. we are calling on the prime minister, check cobra, hold people to a count and give us the resources we need to bear down on this issue. you have laid out your background. a couple of things.
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yesterday we spoke to the business secretary and sara thornton from the police. i was struck when i was speaking to her and she seemed furious about the situation, particularly about comments from theresa may that there had been no direct link between the fall in police numbers and the rise in knife crime and she also called for meetings and a minister, a senior minister to be present. when you make that call, and it does not happen, what does that say to you about the relationship between government and the police force in understanding? sara thornton, other chief castles, very rarely are so outspoken and that is how distressing the situation is. we can see how we can try and grapple with
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this issue and we have done it in the past and the frustration thing is, it seems the government is not listening. in london alone, we have a ready loss from our police services more than 800m in pounds. it has to be pound four. we have lost officers. we have fewer officers now that any time after 2003. youth centres have closed. it costs m o ney 2003. youth centres have closed. it costs money to pay for youth workers, it youth centres, police officers. i am workers, it youth centres, police officers. iam not workers, it youth centres, police officers. i am not sure what planet he is on. he was in your chat a few minutes ago. have you had a chance to speak to him? you are the mayor of london. i go back to my last question, what is it saying to you about the understanding between government and the police and what
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is needed. has the relationship broke down? i put the same question to mr clark yesterday. they are so preoccupied with brexit, nothing else matters. by the way, i meet bereaved families all the time and it is hard braking and the government does not do a p to realise the consequences. it is not simplistic to throw money at the police. you looking to prevent things as well. there is evidence that where a prime minister has said, it did our heads together, meet regularly. in 2002, with a massive increase in street crowds, tony blair shared meetings. this is what sara thornton is talking about. this is what previous police commissioners are talking about. the prime minister leading from the
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front. the secretary cannot order things. but the prime minister can. the chancellor says he has never refused money. hold on a sec. we are ina refused money. hold on a sec. we are in a situation over the last nine yea rs we re in a situation over the last nine years were police forces around the country — by the weight the letter is to crime commissioners across the country saying enough is enough— over the last at mayke years have lost a hundred thousand losses in terms of police numbers. posterity has consequences and the prime minister has said that posterity has come to an. we have been waiting three months, a year but i apologise for saying this but we will see a
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situation where more young people lose their lives. sadiq khan, mayor of london, thank you for talking to us on breakfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. survivors of the grenfell tower fire say they feel they're living in limbo with no individuals or organisations being held accountable for the tragedy. it's comes after no charges are likely to be brought in the criminal investigation for at least the next two years. the met police says it would be wrong not to wait for the final report of the inquiry, the second phase of which is unlikely to begin before the end of this year. a charity's calling for legal aid for the families of those who die in state custody. tanya el kyria was helped by the charity called inquest after initially being refused legal aid in the wake of her daughter amy's death. the 1a year—old was found hanged in a mental health clinic in roehampton. the government says for the vast
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majority of inquests, legal representation isn't necessary but the charity says it's essential. around 80 firefighters are dealing with a fire on a metal recycling unit in landau way, erith. a large pile of scrap metal is alight. twelve fire engines from stations including erith, plumstead, and east greenwich are dealing with the incident. in celebration of world book day today special postboxes will be unveiled across london in honour of some of the capital's most famous authors. david walliams is one of them. his work will be celebrated with a bright yellow post box outside the natural history museum. there is another for the tiger who came to tea writer, judith kerr in barnes. let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0n the tubes we've got part—suspensions on both the bakerloo and 0verground. 0n the trains great northern services are suspended between moorgate and drayton park following a signal problem with some services diverted via finsbury park.
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the m25 is closed clockwise atjunction 5 that's the m26 interchange, with the m26 closed eastbound from the m25 to j2a due to damage to the m26 overbridge following a collision overnight. now the weather with elixabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a very windy day of weather ahead. a brisk south—westerly wind blowing, noticebly blustery as that wind strengthens as we head through the afternoon, with some gusts of around 50 miles per hour perhaps across the london area. there will also be a few showers aroud too, but we're starting off with plenty of sunshine. then we'll s tart to see increased amounts of cloud, maybe some showers out towards western counties in particular. many eastern areas possibly staying dry. the wind strengthening as we head through the afternoon. gusts of around 50 miles per hour as we said. and temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. it will cloud over from the north as we head towards the end of the day. again with further outbreaks of rain as we head through the evening rush—hour. but it will be quite showery
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so on and off for a while. the winds will lighten overnight. through the evening we'll see that cloud breaking up too. it is going to be a rather chilly night ahead and a cold start to the day tomorrow, maybe with a touch of frost out towards the rural spots, with those lighter winds. we'll start off the day tomorrow with plenty of sunshine and then we'll see some outbreaks of rain. increased amounts of cloud through the afternoon. turning cooler, staying windy over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. in the last few minutes the chancellor, philip hammond, has told breakfast that police forces need to prioritise the resources they already have available to them in order to tackle
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the surge in knife crime. yesterday, the home secretary, sajid javid, acknowledged that police resources were important in tackling violent crime after holding emergency talks with chief constables. asked whether any new funds would be made available to forces in england and wales, the chancellor said extra money was already in place. there are many, many demands for the funding that's available. today we focused on knife crime, and rightly so, but there are many other demands on available public spending. myjob is to make sure that in dealing with an issue like this we use public resources in the most effective way. meanwhile, sadiq khan, speaking to usa meanwhile, sadiq khan, speaking to us a little later, has urged theresa may to tackle what he calls a national crisis of night —— rising knife crime. he told breakfast ready to be 10,000 officers back on the streets and only the prime minister can make that happen. there was a massive increase in street crime, tony blair chaired meetings, that is
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what sarah thorp was talk about. that is what lord stevens and lord blair were talking about. in the past we have solved this issue with the prime minister leading from the front. with the greatest respect, the home secretary by himself cannot order the chancellor to give you or money order the secretary of state to have a public health approach. the prime minister can. european union officials have urged the government to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of tomorrow, in order to break the deadlock in talks. both sides have described yesterday's negotiations as "difficult", but eu leaders said they would work non—stop over the weekend if "acceptable" ideas are put forward. attorney general, geoffrey cox, is leading the uk team and wants to finalise legally binding assurances on the so called backstop for the irish border. public satisfaction with the nhs is at its lowest point in more than a decade, according to a new survey by the health think tanks, the king's fund and the nuffield trust. the research found that waiting times, staffing levels and concerns over funding were the main causes for concern.
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the department of health says "the long—term plan sets out an effective blueprint for making the nhs fit for the future." survivors of the grenfell tower fire say they're frustrated after being told that will be at least two years before criminal charges are considered. 72 people died in the disaster in june 2017. scotland yard said it would be wrong not to wait for the final report of the public inquiry into the tragedy, the second phase of which is unlikely to begin before the end of this year. matt has a fantastic view over london for the weather this morning, but first it's time for the sport with mike. fantastic news if you are a manchester united fan. it was the most remarkable comeback, one of them, in champions league history. the first time ever a team has been 2-0 the first time ever a team has been 2—0 down from the first leg at home and gone on, overturning that tie in the second leg. history was made by
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0le gunnar solskjaer an desean. it was a scratched him, a young team, against all the odds. fish is —— against all the odds. fish is —— against all the odds. what is it about 0le gunnar solskjaer and late wins in the champions league? he famously won it for united 20 years ago, and last night he saw his side beat paris saint germain in the most dramatic of circumstances. patrick gearey reports. the match that hinged on an elbow, a minute into stoppage time the referee was still studying the replays. was this handball and a penalty? manchester united's champions league hopes depended on his decision. the trial by television ruled in their favour. now marcus rashford, a 21—year—old mancunian, could complete the most incredible comeback. how on earth had we got here? after all, paris saint—germain held a two away goal lead going into this. well, they presented romelu lukaku with the chance to grab one back inside two minutes. but surely that would be less of a choke than a hiccup? after all, just ten minutes later juan bernat had them level on the night. the parisians still couldn't settle. gianluigi buffon is one of the most experienced goalkeepers in the world, and yet
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he presented this to lukaku. two. still not enough until the referee went to check on presnel kimpembe's arm. the debate about video technology rages on, but in rashford's mind there was peace. with 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s manchester united it's never too late. patrick geary, bbc news. incredible most thought it was going for a corner at that point. solksjaer had a couple of other united legends to celebrate with after the win in paris. former boss sir alex ferguson and eric cantona were watching from the stands in paris. and there was an altogether more animated reaction, from united playerjesse lingard who's injured and was watching from home. you should look at that on social media. and eric cantona's is pretty good as well. andy murray says he's now pain free after having hip surgery for a second time, but he still has no idea if he'll be able to play competitive tennis again. he's been speaking to our sports editor, dan roan.
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to play singles at wimbledon, i would say it would be less than 50% chance of playing, you know, doubles, maybe possibly. but beyond wimbledon, there is a realistic chance, that you could get back into serious senior men's tennis as a singles player? well... i think it is possible. but i don't want to say it is highly likely, because it has not been done before. so i can't look at another tennis player and say, yeah, they did it, so why not? i have been told by the surgeons and stuff that you can try that there are certainly no guarantees. johanna konta, meanwhile, is through to the second round at indian wells. the british number one beat france's pauline parmentier in straight sets and will play hsieh su—wei in the second round in california. last week, laura muir claimed the "double—double" when she retained gold in the 1500 metres and 3000 metres at the european indoor
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championship in glasgow. now, one of the all time greats, sebastian coe, is tipping her for olympic glory in tokyo next year. nobody can live with laura muir. she is the best at indoor middle—distance running. laura muir is the champion! and they are all allowing the boss to boss this. it is all about laura muir in the front. the crowd loving it. they are roll on their feet. gold medal, another title —— they are all on their feet. laura joins us now. welcome to the studio. we were watching last weekend when you were lapping virtually everyone in that incredible race. what a start to the year. the first athlete in european indoor history to do this double—double, in front of the home
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crowd as well. it was amazing. i cannot put into words what it felt like in that stadium, on your home, i felt like had to do something really, really special. to do the double was fantastic.” really, really special. to do the double was fantastic. i love the way you celebrated afterwards by going forfish and you celebrated afterwards by going for fish and chips with your mates. we were pretty hungry.” for fish and chips with your mates. we were pretty hungry. i love that. it makes a real difference hearing that a top athlete does that kind of thing as well. i have got to us, it has been a few days, what have you been doing, kind of, in the come down, so to speak? i know you are also preparing for tokyo as well.” was training yesterday and the day before. i got the monday off. my kurt gidley that. just meeting up with friends things and things and celebrating with them, which has really nice. sakho said some really lovely things, which must be fantastic given what he achieved all those years ago —— sebastian coe. he says he sees a change in you, not just the name —— numbers, but the
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result, a changing confidence. is that something you are conscious of, was there a turning point you recognise yourself? yes. i had a turning point after the glasgow come off games, 201a, i had a complete change in mindset after it did not go well for me. the pressure got to mea go well for me. the pressure got to me a lot. now i really love the pressure and that support more than anything else. after glasgow 201a i thought i'm going to enjoy this. that can go both ways. having a bad moment can send you off down a different path. was there something that made you think positively as opposed to a dinner where it is going? what was the difference? thought to myself, you trained so hard, day in, day out, you want to enjoy the comp editions. i really wa nt to enjoy the comp editions. i really want to enjoy that. i don't want to have negative experiences that —— the competitions. i want to enjoy the competitions. i want to enjoy the experience. if i am more relaxed i perform better. just thing be
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medals on the sofa, can we have a little? this history in the making. mae i hold one? so far it has been indoors, but you have the anniversary games and the world championships in doha, how is it to make those switches? is a great atmosphere in doors, but it must be some sort of change. we train indoors a loss of the time, but outdoors is kind of where the main seasonis outdoors is kind of where the main season is that is. it is something a very experienced with as well. a won the european championships last year, outdoors, so i hope to get a world medal out of that.” year, outdoors, so i hope to get a world medal out of that. i think naga is giving them a clean.” world medal out of that. i think naga is giving them a clean. i am conscious of fingerprints on them. when you put all your medals? have a little cabinet in my room. will be danyo bit come off and it will just... i can just danyo bit come off and it will just... i canjust hang it danyo bit come off and it will just... i can just hang it over the edge. we are lucky enough to meet quite a few people from sport, in particular, and one of the things we
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often do, you meet people more often in the real world than we do, but you sometimes have that then we think, they are role bigger than i thought they were or a lot smaller. we both thought the same thing. having watched you on the track, i thought you were taller than you are. i would have said five foot ten or 540 levin easily. and the other women you are running against, they must be quite small —— five foot 11. how tall are you? i am five foot three and a half. the half inch is so important. so am i. jez and is used to talk about this. she used to be up against giants in her sport. —— jessica ennis. how important is your stature to what to do? we all are quite similar in my races. when you look on tv we are all the same height so you are looking at the average size. but we are smaller than everyone else, really, which is quite deceiving. going forward then,
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it is great you can deal with the pressure and use it as a positive thing, there's a massive 18 months, the world championships, people talking about the olympics, which you probably don't want to think about yet... sorry. i mentioned it straightaway. when you have sebastian coe mentioning it. straightaway. when you have sebastian coe mentioning itm straightaway. when you have sebastian coe mentioning it. it is surprising to think rio was almost four years ago now. i am surprising to think rio was almost four years ago now. i am sure surprising to think rio was almost four years ago now. i am sure that you will put on a fantastic show. it is the pinnacle of our ——of athletics. you would go out and do the best you can. what is the average day of training. give us an idea of the schedule of an ordinary day's training. it is day by day. some days ijust have a session, other days i have a double bay. are you up early, are you on the track? —— double day. we train more in the evening. 0urgroup is —— double day. we train more in the evening. our group is a mix of students and people who work. my coachis students and people who work. my coach is to work and i used to be at university. we can only fix it in around as pm until eight p.m.. university. we can only fix it in around as pm until eight pm. we have a very mixed group. you
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re ce ntly have a very mixed group. you recently qualified as a veterinarian. how is it going? recently qualified as a veterinarian. how is it going7m recently qualified as a veterinarian. how is it going? it is good. i have focused on the running since qualified and i had to come back to it in the next few months. for most people, making it as a vet is annexed rod perry achievement in itself. it is amazing that you have managed to do it at the centre ——is an extraordinary achievement. enjoy your week. it doesn't sound like much after what you have done this he already. but enjoy your week. we look forward to seeing it. this sofa is one of your biggest fan bases. your name is mentioned and we all smiles will stop we were ever so excited about you coming in. thank you so much. i will give it back. congratulations. we're big fans. good luck. thank you. matt has a great view over london for the weather this morning. you cannot top what we have
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experience with the double gold winner. i do not think! can. but if you are a runner today, you will have to wrap up well. parts of the country not looking particularly good. feeling much colder than it did during yesterday. strong winds developing and the sun heavy rain developing. the low pressure wrapped around the heavy rain.. we opened the door to even colder air. adding windshield to boot. the wettest of all in the north pushing into northern england east anglia by the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland brightening up. south—west
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england staying dry for a time in the afternoon. the winds will be strengthening throughout the day. strong to galeforce in places. factor in the wind and it will feel much cooler. closer to freezing across parts of eastern scotland and north—east england in the peak year but wherever you are it be a chilly day. ——in particular. it will push over into the north sea, skies clearing and the blue colours appearing is an indication that it will be a frosty night. temperatures if not below freezing, —7 in parts of scotland, close enough to freezing. compared to this morning, tomorrow morning not as wendy. lots of sunshine around with the exception of northern ireland. ——
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windy. as he gave into the afternoon, eastern parts of england staying driest and brightest for longer is full of temperatures similarto longer is full of temperatures similar to the date but not quite as cold. stronger winds back as we go into the weekend. a fair raft of showers across the country on saturday. a bit of sunshine at time. the best across eastern scotland and north—east england. the southern pa rt north—east england. the southern part of the best of the afternoon. a similar story on sunday. sunshine and wintry showers and a chilly wind. how do you link a bucket to climate change? you stick it in the water. i knew he would know. you may not associate the humble bucket with climate change technology, but since the early days of seafaring it's been used as a tool to measure
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sea temperatures. sailors took the readings to help them navigate, and wrote them all down in their log books. now scientists want to digitise those records so they can track how the earth is warming. here's our science correspondent, richard westcott. 0nly only by looking at the past could you understand today's climate. it is fairly obvious if you know the temperature of the sea used to be you can work out how much it has warmed up. for hundreds of years sailors have been taken sea temperature to help them navigate. it was all quite basic. 1863, a ship ‘s hand, he will go. bring it up now. it is not light. they wrote the temperature in their logbooks and now they are comparing those two today to see how much they have change. obviously, the sea is 7096 of the earth's surface so knowing the temperature of the ocean is
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important to understand how global temperature is changing. getting hold of the old weather readings is harder than it sounds. this is the scot poll research institute in cambridge and these are the logbook hunters. sally and clive wilkinson have spent years photographic logs, pa rt have spent years photographic logs, part of a project looking for volu nteers part of a project looking for volunteers from the public willing to log on and help transcribe every snippet of information. filled lighting instruction. it is not a lwa ys lighting instruction. it is not always easy. that looks like petrol... and something gigantic... there could be as many as a million ships logs and related documents in the world and we have onlyjust begun. after it has been checked several times, the information will
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be made available for scientists around the world to use. some of those scientists have already spent yea rs those scientists have already spent years making the old data more accurate, adjusting the different bucket types. the wooden buckets kept the water warmer than the ca nvas kept the water warmer than the canvas ones and then there is the human factor. you can see where you can find human factor. you can see where you canfind human human factor. you can see where you can find human error. how quickly you do it, how you take the temperature readings. we have millions and millions of these observations and we're trying to understand what all these variations and the effects on the data. generations on, the temperature is taken by old sailors in their buckets are helping to shape global decisions on climate change. if you'd like to volunteer to transcribe the log books seen
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in richard's report — you can do so by visiting "southern weather discovery dot org" i quite fancy doing something like that. and you can volunteer.” i quite fancy doing something like that. and you can volunteer. i do not have any white clubs and you need to do that. we are establishing a strawberry figures. the billion pound mark in sales. given that a sausage roll or and i spun does not cost that much it is phenomenal. high street baker greggs has just published its results for last year — sales passed the billion pounds mark for the first time. greggs has transformed itself from a northern baker into a fast food chain with more shops across the uk than mcdonald's.
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it's one of very few high street success stories at the moment. how did you get there? like all these things, it is not an overnight success. we have read around for 80 yea rs. success. we have read around for 80 years. these last five years we have been transforming the business. we hit £1 billion last year and this year we will pass 2000 stores. the first thing people will say to me, is of of egan sausage roll. —— vegan. this is just is of of egan sausage roll. —— vegan. this isjust a big prjob and
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get to the headlines?” vegan. this isjust a big prjob and get to the headlines? i would like to say that was true but it is not. we launched the vegan sausage roll and it is the fastest selling line in my six years in the business. it has reached all stores this week because it is taken as that long to fill the demand. people are turning to alternative food instead of meat and that is a trend we have seen. vegan is an example of that. you have hit this milestone, £82 million profit as well. you want to open more shops. you are bigger than mcdonald's, tesco express, what is your strategy? traditionally you have been on high streets but now it you are talking train stations,
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airports? yes, that is right. we have been busy opening shops in the past five years. all those new shops are in places where we would never have opened a bread shop in the past. retail parks, industrial parks, places where people need quality prepared food at great prices but high streets is still very important to us. 63% of the shops are still in high streets a lot of people work there, a lot of people go about their business and they will stay part of our mixed for a long while yet but all the new openings are away from high streets. what does that tell us? all your neighbours are moving, banks are closing, shops shutting. will you be the only people left?” closing, shops shutting. will you be the only people left? i do not think so. i think the high street is reshaping. it has always been under
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attack. first it was supermarkets, now it is the internet. it needs to redevelop and become more attractive. when they do, we will be there and people will want more food on the go and that will always be pa rt on the go and that will always be part of the mix. you have said you wa nt to part of the mix. you have said you want to get into drab and go, people grabbing food on the way home. you have also talked about putting more healthy stuff in. i am looking at the numbers. a sausage roll, 75% of my daily fat, et cetera. time to change the recipe? we have been. sugar is the tauqir we are after moment, we have reduced salt and fat. we are on target to reduce
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sugar by 20%. we are working alongside public health england to allow people to make healthier choices. we are a traditional baker and products are delicious but they should be it in moderation. if you eat white, it was from greggs but do not eat them all the time. always the salesman! what are your top to sell us? number one, that is the sausage roll, number two i cannot tell you because i do not want our competitors to know. we will find out at some point. a billion pounds in sales greggs for four last year. he knew you could be so secretive about your bestsellers. it shows how cutthroat it is. i am going for the
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doughnut. ice button. no! good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara 0rchard. survivors of the grenfell tower fire say they feel they're living in limbo with no individuals or organisations being held accountable for the tragedy. it's comes after no charges are likely to be brought in the criminal investigation for at least the next two years. the met police says it would be wrong not to wait for the final report of the inquiry, the second phase of which is unlikely to begin before the end of this year. a charity's calling for legal aid for the families of those who die in state custody. tanya el kyria was helped by the charity called inquest after initially being refused legal aid in the wake of her daughter amy's death. the 1a year—old was found hanged in a mental health clinic in roehampton. the government says for the vast majority of inquests, legal representation isn't necessary— but the charity says it's essential.
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around 80 firefighters are dealing with a fire on a vmetal recycling unit in landau way, erith. a large pile of scrap metal is alight. twelve fire engines from stations including erith, plumstead, and east greenwich are dealing with the incident. in celebration of world book day today special postboxes will be unveiled across london in honour of some of the capital's most famous authors. david walliams is one of them. his work will be celebrated with a bright yellow post box outside the natural history museum. there is another for the tiger who came to tea writer, judith kerr in barnes. let's take a look at the travel situation now... 0n the tubes we've got part—suspensions on both the bakerloo and 0verground. 0n the trains great northern services are suspended between moorgate and drayton park following a signal problem with some services diverted via finsbury park. 0n the roads the m25 is closed clockwise at junction 5 that's the m26 interchange. with the m26 also closed eastbound from the m25 tojunction 2a due
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to damage to the m26 overbridge after a collision overnight. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a very windy day of weather ahead. a brisk south—westerly wind blowing, noticebly blustery as that wind strengthens as we head through the afternoon, with some gusts of around 50 miles per hour perhaps across the london area. there will also be a few showers aroud too, but we're starting off with plenty of sunshine. then we'll s tart to see increased amounts of cloud, maybe some showers out towards western counties in particular. many eastern areas possibly staying dry. the wind strengthening as we head through the afternoon. gusts of around 50 miles per hour as we said. and temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. it will cloud over from the north as we head towards the end of the day. again with further outbreaks of rain as we head through the evening rush—hour. but it will be quite showery so on and off for a while. the winds will lighten overnight. through the evening we'll see that cloud breaking up too. it is going to be a rather chilly night ahead and a cold start to the day tomorrow,
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maybe with a touch of frost out towards the rural spots, with those lighter winds. we'll start off the day tomorrow with plenty of sunshine and then we'll see some outbreaks of rain. increased amounts of cloud through the afternoon. turning cooler, staying windy over the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: a new row over knife crime. the mayor of london tells breakfast the refusal of the chancellor to provide new money for policing will cost lives. waiting three months, waiting a year, means, and i apologise for saying this, we are going to carry on seeing a situation where more
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young people are losing their lives. there are many, many demands on the funding that is available. today we are focused on knife crime, and rightly so, but there are many other demands on available public spending. public satisfaction in the nhs falls to its lowest level in over a decade. a manchester miracle in paris. against all the odds, united knock paris st germain out of the champions league, thanks to an injury time penalty awarded by var. the plan was to get the first goal, be in the game with five minutes to go or ten minutes to go and we were. good morning. making a billion from baking. greggs sales hit a record billion pounds for the first time last year. the firm's boss tells me he's still banking on the british high street. and it is much colder today, colder than in recent days, as the winds strengthen and some of you will need
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something ordinary because there is rain around this morning into the afternoon. —— something waterproof. i will have all the details on brea kfast. it's thursday 7th march. our top story: in the past hour the mayor of london sadiq khan has told breakfast that if the chancellor refuses to provide new money for policing then more lives will be lost. a man in his 20s has become the latest victim of knife crime in the uk, after being stabbed to death yesterday in east london, as the prime minister faces growing pressure to give police extra funding. crime is notjust about money. when people say we want more money, you say we are already putting £1 billion of extra funding in, and when they say we need more than that because we are facing a problem right now, what are you going to
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say? in relation to the mayor of london, we make funding available for the mayor of london and it is for the mayor of london and it is for him to decide what the priorities are. right now i am sure the public‘s priority is dealing with knife crime. that means removing officers from other areas of activity to deal with this particular problem that we are facing today. and it also means making sure that the police are operating efficiently. if all police forces operated at the level of the most efficient in terms of eliminating paperwork and the most modern ways of mobile working, we would save an up police time to be the equivalent of about 11,000 additional police officers a year. chancellor, you seem to be saying very clearly that the police force don't need more money, they need to get their act together. everybody can use more money and i have no doubt that police chiefs across the country, if given yet more funding, will use it to increase their effect
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on the street. are we going to get more funding? i feel like we are going round in circles. and they we re going round in circles. and they were to get you is they needed to be more efficient and now you say given more efficient and now you say given more funding they could do a better job so are you going to give them more money or not? that was the chancellor speaking to us earlier with his analysis of weighing up the budgets of where money will go. the request is that police forces across the country, including sadiq khan, for more money. austerity has consequences, and the prime minister said during her party conference speech austerity has come to an end. we now need to see the fruits of that austerity coming to an end. waiting three months, waiting a year means —
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i really apologise for saying this — we're going to carry on seeing a situation where more young people are losing their lives. we're joined now from westminster by our political correspondent nick eardley. 0n the streets there is so much harm being done, and there is a political element to this as well, which we have seen played out this morning on bbc breakfast. yes, which is essentially the debate over whether you start to tackle some of the issues around knife crime by throwing money and more resources at the issue. i think you got a pretty clear impression from the chancellor in that interview this morning that thatis in that interview this morning that that is not the way he thinks he wa nts to that is not the way he thinks he wants to approach it. yes, there will be more money for police in the coming years, but in terms of the current crisis around knife crime, philip hammond is not minded to put more money into it. instead the government is talking about trying to look at other approaches, reprioritising the money that is
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already there, and making sure the different elements of government and different elements of government and different departments are working together to try and get to the bottom of this issue. but as you heard from the london mayor, and as you are hearing from a number of other politicians, some of them conservatives as well, is that call for more money, saying this has gone on too long and it is too big a problem and the best way to tackle it in the short term anyway is to put money into it. this debate will go on, charlie. thank you. public satisfaction with the nhs is at its lowest point in more than a decade, according to a new survey. research found that waiting times, staffing levels and funding were the main causes for concern. the department of health says its long term plan is making the nhs fit for the future. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. satisfaction levels with the nhs have varied over the years, but the latest survey of public attitudes in england,
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scotland, and wales shows growing concern over the state of the health service. in 2010, the annual survey revealed, overall, record levels of satisfaction. a high of 70%. but last year that figure fell to its lowest point since 2007, just 53%. with waiting times, the number of staff, and a lack of funding being the main factors behind dissatisfaction. people who have recently used the service are much more satisfied, so i think a big issue here is access to care, getting those appointments, getting in to see a gp, for example, and i think a lot of us have struggled with getting a gp appointment and that's really having an effect on satisfaction. being free at the point of use, the quality of care, and the range of services were the main reasons people were happy with the nhs, but patients recognise the difficulties the health service faces. i'm satisfied with the service they provide. i'm not satisfied that they have got
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enough funding to have enough people to do the job properly. a few years ago, actually, i changed my gp because i rang up and the first appointment they could offer me was in 21 days' time. people like to take the nhs for granted, and they criticise it relentlessly, it seems, but i think we need to put into perspective the work behind the scenes. there will be particular concern that almost a quarter of respondents were unsatisfied with gp services. but it seems that direct, personal experience of the nhs, for example as a hospital inpatient, gave people a more positive view of the health service. dominic hughes, bbc news. nearly a third of the uk's electricity is set to be generated by wind power by 2030, under a new deal announced by the government. the plan will see the offshore wind sector invest £250 million over the next 11 years, in exchange
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for state subsidies. the government says the sector will create thousands ofjobs. last year, on and offshore wind turbines provided 17 percent of the uk's energy needs. the high street baker greggs has made a lot of money selling sausage rolls and steak bakes, among other thing. they really have sold a lot of other things as well. yes, they don't cost a lot of money. we are not talking about televisions and big expensive items, and we're just talking about a couple of quid, yet they have made £1 billion for the first time last year. their profits came in at £82 million on sales. they have got really big expansion plans. greggs is bucking the trend on high street because we are so used to talking about stores closing. greggs is opening even more stores and they wa nt to opening even more stores and they want to get through the 2000 mark this year and they want to move into other locations as well, notjust high streets but train stations may be, places where people are passing through and they want to grab food
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on the go. it is hard to talk about greggs without talking about the vegan sausage roll that got all the headlines when they launched it in january. i put it to the boss, who i have just been speaking to, and i askedif have just been speaking to, and i asked if it is just a pr have just been speaking to, and i asked if it isjust a pr spin, because they don't sell that many but it got all the headlines. he said it was a good seller. have a listen. we launched the vegan sausage roll in january, listen. we launched the vegan sausage roll injanuary, so it comes with the results were last year, but it is the fastest selling line that we have launched on my five or six years with the business. it is now a top five seller already in greggs and it has reached all the stores this week in fact because it had taken us that long to reach all the stores and catch up with demand. people are turning to plant —based food rather than meat and that is a trend we have seen in the market for some while and the vegan sausage roll is an example of how people are making those choices now. interesting times for the boss. wanting to open more stores. and in terms of the number of stores, they are now bigger than whsmith, which
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you find on most high streets, and bigger than mcdonald's, up to 2500 stores. and you asked him about number one. number five is stores. and you asked him about number one. numberfive is the stores. and you asked him about number one. number five is the vegan sausage roll and you asked what number one and number two were. number one was sausage roll but he will not tell us number two because it isa will not tell us number two because it is a secret and he doesn't want to tell his competitors. i think this is because they are moving into different areas. we might associate greggs with sausage rolls, pies, pasties and cakes, that they are doing things like sandwiches, coffees, healthier things as well. they are doing a low—carb thing. i am debating whether it is that or the breakfast role. they want to keep that corner of the market. it is either a low—carb salad thing or the breakfast role for the commuters. they don't make £1 billion by giving away all their secrets so clever both! and a lot of experience as well. it was a really good chat. it is 8:12am. from a
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success story good chat. it is 8:12am. from a su ccess story o n good chat. it is 8:12am. from a success story on the high street to a small company in germany that is struggling. they make garden gnomes. the company has been making them for 1a5 years that they may be forced to close their doors because the owner is retiring and nobody is coming forward to take the business on. at its peak it employed 60 people that its peak it employed 60 people that it only had three staff now because garden gnomes are not popular, i suppose. they were popular in germany in the late 19th century. in germany, it is thought that the country's gnome population when the census was taken is at 25 billion. imagine conversations about the gnome census! the weather is coming up gnome census! the weather is coming upa bit gnome census! the weather is coming up a bit later with matt and the sport as well.
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cystic fibrosis is a genetic condition that causes fatal lung damage, and it affects more than 10,000 people in the uk. campaigners say people living with the disease are being denied a life—tra nsforming drug because of a row over costs. today mps will meet to discuss how to resolve the ongoing dispute between nhs england and a us drug supplier. last year, breakfast‘s graham satchell spoke to lucy baxter who has cystic fibrosis. before we catch up with lucy, let's remind ourselves of her story. i do all i can at the moment to try and sort of keep alive longer. it's a bit sad in a way that all my friends don't have to worry about this and when i exercise i'm doing it to stay alive rather than for fun. you got this, yeah? yeah. yeah? yes. lucy takes a small mountain of antibiotics to try and stop infections but there is a new drug called 0rkambi. it's the first treatment that tackles the root cause of cystic fibrosis.
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it costs £100,000 per patient per year and nice says it's too expensive for the nhs. lucy and her mum are about to do physio. it takes an hour twice a day to clear lucy's lungs. it shouldn't be where you live. it should be what you've got. people in the uk might die or it might be too late because of a funding issue. it's not really fair. lucy is here with us in the studio, and we're also joined from london by david ramsden, from the cystic fibrosis trust. good morning. lucy, iwasjust asking you off—camera when it was known that you had cystic fibrosis. i was about two and a half when i was diagnosed but it is a condition that you have all your life so i have always had it. you have no memory of not having it?” have always had it. you have no memory of not having it? i have a lwa ys memory of not having it? i have always had it. looking at that video, talking about that drug now, what is your hope? i really hope
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that it will be funded. it has got so much evidence to show that it will really change my life and impact in such a positive way. it would just help all my symptoms and it is the first drug that treats the root cause rather than just the symptoms. it is really good. david, just pick up on some of those thoughts for us. the cystic fibrosis trust. mps are talking about this and what would you like to come out of it? today is an important day because we are hearing from nice, nhs england, and critically vortex pharmaceuticals, as well as people from the cystic fibrosis community and the clinical community. they don't have the power today to authorise reimbursement of the drug, but they do have the power to make recommendations about processes and forward accent that can be taken. critically, what we hope today is that with all the parties in town who can actually make a deal possible for these life—saving
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drugs, that they will finally engage in meaningful negotiations and get this over the line. as lucy quite rightly pointed out, thick stick fibrosis is a progressive disease and it means that every day that passes, more damage is done to lungs and the likelihood of death increases. —— cystic fibrosis. we have been waiting three years for these drugs and we want to get the deal done. what does making a deal done mean? the nice process which happened over two years ago now, where drugs are assessed, came out and they were very clear that the drug was effective and safe. we are not talking about a theoretical benefit but an actual clinical benefit. but it was too expensive. what we need is the drug company who have the drug and the people who are ultimately going to pay for that, nhs england, to get into a room and find a settlement that actually
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works for both parties. at the moment we have this awful situation where people with cystic fibrosis are in the middle, and bluntly shareholder profits and the public purse, and their lives are deteriorating every day because of it. how do you feel about this, lucy? the drug has been available for three years had licensed for use but it does not seem like after this meeting something will come out of this for some time? for everyone's loved one is that it's really heartbreaking. it is frustrating because since i have been born we have been fundraising for the research for these drugs. to have them but not to have access to them it's really frustrating. they will slow the deterioration of the condition and give so many more yea rs on condition and give so many more years on my life. your personal experience, you are living this, as david said. mps are talking about it almost in an academic sense. it must
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be so hard for you to hear people making an argument for it not to happen. i can't imagine how that feels. it is difficult. can you put a price on a life that can potentially... a price on a life that can potentially. . . we a price on a life that can potentially... we can all do great things. we would be able to live so much longer with this. it is hard to hear it talked about in those terms. but with cystic fibrosis we can have good days and bad days and tomorrow i could wake up and have to be in bed all day because i am in that pain. it is difficult day to day. how are you today? you say every day is different. you looked remarkably well, just sitting and talking to us. thank you. i was in hospital in 0ctoberfor us. thank you. i was in hospital in october for over two weeks having intravenous antibiotics because i got a really bad chest bacterial infection and it stayed in one go. i am doing better but i am still recovering. david, when i hear lucy say how can you put a price on someone's life, you can't. morally, you can't. i am sure this conversation has been heard before. what is the moral obligation? when
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these drug companies are charging us money, i understand things need to be paid for, but is there not some morality that comes into the discussion when it comes to cost against profits that they say they need to make? i really hope that all the parties gathering today are listening to this and listening to voices like lucy's and the thousands of people that she represents. you are right. in the middle of this there are lives that are potentially deteriorating because they haven't got access to these drugs. we have repeatedly heard over the last three years from all parties that they are keen to do a deal and i think it is now that we want to see real action. i repeat now that we want to see real action. irepeat again, now that we want to see real action. i repeat again, or other key players that can make this happen are going to be together. i understand there may be high—level meetings over the next few outside of the committee hearings. get into that room and get it done. we don't want people like
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lucy to be in this situation again, people up and down the country. what would your message be to people in that place and time making what is a potentially life changing decision for you? i would probably say to them that in a few weeks i am turning 21 and the biggest gift would be what they take for granted, which isjust to breathe would be what they take for granted, which is just to breathe without difficulty. the drugs coming out would do that. if they could grant that, it would be the best thing in the world. a good note on which to finish. thank you for coming in and we will keep in touch and see what happens in the future. thank you, lucy. 8:21am. let's find out what is happening with the weather. good morning. it is a day to wrap up today and grab the waterproof before you head out. very muggy looking start to the weather. not only will it be cooler than yesterday, especially as the winds strengthen as we go the day, that there is a fair bit of rain around as well, all
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linked to the pressure yesterday. heavy rain at the moment across parts of central and southern scotland, northern ireland, north west england and north wales especially. some showers in southern counties of england at the moment. asa counties of england at the moment. as a low pressure pushes into the northey, that is when we bring down colder air and the winds will continue to strengthen. —— into the north sea. there is some sunshine in southern counties and southern england doesn't fare too badly for the rest of the day. east anglia will only see rain in the afternoon. scotla nd will only see rain in the afternoon. scotland and northern ireland will eventually brighten up. and into the midlands, things will turn gradually wetter. they went macro will strengthen, touching gale force if not more with gusts of 50 mph in some spots this afternoon. temperatures might be eight to 11 degrees on the thermometers, but it will not feel like that. that went macro will make it feel closer to freezing across it in scotland, and north—east england in particular. it
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isa north—east england in particular. it is a day to wrap up. the rain spreads to the east this evening and then cleared into the north seat tonight. this guys will be clear and it will turn much colder. notice the blue colouring, indicating tonight there will be widespread frost and temperatures could get down to —7 in some parts of scotland. we just about all wake up to a bit of frost vesting. compared to today, a brighter start with a lovely sunrise to enjoy. rain spreads into the morning before brightening up in the afternoon. western scotland and wales and england will see rain developing through friday itself. temperatures of eight to 11 degrees again but the winds not as strong as today so it might not feel quite as cold even with that very cold start. into the weekend, the winds are a feature once again. strong and blustery across the country bringing a mixture of sunshine and showers. the best of the morning sunshine will be in eastern scotland and north—east england. the best afternoon sunshine in the southern
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counties of england. the showers where you get them in the north will bea where you get them in the north will be a mixture of rain, hail, sleet and snow, continuing into sunday as well with another chilly day, and windy as well. it has taken a while but i have got my muffin and my coffee and i am going to take a little seat and have a rest. that is perfect. i am so pleased for you. he isa perfect. i am so pleased for you. he is a billy no mates! you are nasty! it isa is a billy no mates! you are nasty! it is a 20 is a billy no mates! you are nasty! it isa20 —— is a billy no mates! you are nasty! it is a 20 —— 8:2aam. you have a great plan for a transport system and you have commuter delays, you make longer trains, brilliant, and you have commuter delays, you make longertrains, brilliant, new technology, but the infrastructure is not in place because the platform is not in place because the platform is not in place because the platform is not long enough for the new train. northern rail had hoped to begin operating peak services into leeds station by the end of this year, but work to adapt the platforms won't be done in time. here's our transport
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correspondent, tom burridge. if there's any kind of trouble on the trains, of trouble on the trains, it's cutting out time that i'm seeing my kids. there was one train recently where, instead of getting home for about 7.00 i got home for about 9.30. see you later guys, love you. for commuting dad dom, a lot is at stake. if the trains carry on the way they're going, i could end up not seeing my children for days. every day he travels into leeds. a service he can't rely on. the only thing that seems punctual about them is the price rises every year. and where space is in short supply. this is why northern says it's going to start running new bigger trains from this spring, butjudging from how crowded it is this morning, they can't come soon enough. but we've learned that northern will not be able to run really long services into leeds station, as it had planned, from the end of this year.
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in fact, six—carriage services will not arrive here for an extra two years, at the end of 2021. it's because platforms at leeds will not be lengthened in time to accommodate much longer trains. we've learned that a letter, signed on behalf of the transport secretary chris grayling, was sent to the boss of northern last summer, confirming that leeds would not be available by december 2019. but the government insists northern knew the work was behind schedule a year earlier, in the summer of 2017. for some it shows how dysfunctional the system can be. there needs to be a systematic change in how it works and that it is letting down, notjust the passenger but the northern economy. passengers are frustrated. they're frustrated because they don't understand why, when they try to get to a train, it's full and they can't get on it. they don't understand why, when they try and get on a train, it's missed,
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it's cancelled, and they need to see greater accountability. and we all the time are getting the complaints from passengers, saying what can we do to solve that, but at the moment the power and the money is not in our hands. more local control of the railways is on the cards. a government—commissioned review will report in the autumn. meanwhile, northern is already testing its new fleet. it says it will start rolling them out from this spring. however, commuters into leeds will have to wait to travel on much longer trains. tom burridge, bbc news, in leeds. you can understand how frustrated people must be. very frustrating. 8:27am. time now for the news, travel and weather where you are.
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pot good morning, it will feel chillier today for many of us, the winter has changed direction, it is coming in from a north—westerly direction, you can see it bringing hill snow across scotland, the far north, the rain for scotland for northern ireland, will clear away but it moves further south and eastwards, but a gusty day really, we will see the gusts of round 35—45mph, up to 50mph, for a time during thursday. and temperatures, they will be down on yesterday. particularly for england and wales. 0vernight tonight that rain will clear away to the south—east, then with lengthy clear spells, it will turn chilly, a widespread frost across northern area, temperatures down to minus five, two to three, during friday, it will be a bright start, some sunshine but the cloud increases, and with that some rain moving into the west. that is it from me. bye.
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