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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  March 8, 2019 1:30am-1:46am GMT

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i'm ben bland with bbc news. our top story: president trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort‘s jailed for 47 months. it's a considerably shorter spell in prison than was expected after he was found guilty of a number of fraud offences. his conviction stems from the inquiry being conducted by robert mueller. britain says it will grant formal diplomatic protection to nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian dual national detained in iran. the foreign secretary says iran hasn't given her the medical and legal aid. and this story is trending on bbc.com. a pretty cobbled street in paris has become such a huge hit on instagram that residents of rue cremieux are calling on the city council to restrict access to users looking to take the perfect photo. a blogger says this illustrates how the search for the perfect picture could become a problem. that's all. stay with bbc world news. and the top story in the uk:
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knife attacks have led to the deaths of two more people in london in the last 2a hours — the latest victim was a teenage boy in fulham. huawei's legal case. all the latest developments as the chinese technology giant sues the us over its equipment banned. and making quirks work, what electric car makers are doing to stand out at this he's geneva motor show. hello and welcome to the friday edition of asia business report. and sharanjit leyl asia business report. and sharanjit leyl. in a us state department declined to comment directly on the lawsuit brought against the government for banning federal agencies from using huawei's products. but at the same time it
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said that generally washington wants telecoms networks that are free from suppliers that would, quote, posed risks of malicious cyber activity. international negotiator martin madeira is offered this analysis.” think it is pretty typical. you don't comment on pending lawsuits, that the trend and in this case, the united states, will make itself heard in the court of law. and there isa heard in the court of law. and there is a general matter i think it first movies to file a motion to dismiss, similarto movies to file a motion to dismiss, similar to the conspiracy case, because, essentially, there is a huge difference afforded the us congress when they make laws about security and this is exactly what this law is aimed at. you referred to be russian cyber security firm. they stopped using a lot of their products in governance agencies.
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tell us how might this lawsuit impact huawei. our things different this time —— our things different this time —— our things different this time? i think it a strategic litigation. huawei is a smart. they know this is a lawsuit, there is a geopolitical component to this. and i think that, you know, the us and different allies have, there has been a snowball effect, it is based ona uk been a snowball effect, it is based on a uk cyber security study in 2013 that mentioned huawei's concerns. so the snowball has been a rolling way before the current state of us china trade regulation, but i think you have japan and new zealand and australia signing on to barring huawei. i think huawei is getting out ahead of the issues and saying i wa nt to out ahead of the issues and saying i want to stop this is no borlee little bit, because the us, through diplomacy, it's talking to our
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allies, including ones in the european union, and sharing information about huawei.“ european union, and sharing information about huawei. if you didn't already know, today is international women's day. if you could grant one wish for women worldwide, what would that be? we sent our reporters to ask that question in sydney, singapore, yangon, and mumbai, and this is what we got. women should get the freedom of walking, talking, any time of the day, and we should be safe and secure day, and we should be safe and secure in the country, which is not happening at the moment.” secure in the country, which is not happening at the moment. i have a young daughter who is turning 18 very soofi. young daughter who is turning 18 very soon. my wish is that we create an environment that not only recognise women as an integral part
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of the society, but also gives them the due respect and the quality they deserve. my wish is women are powerful, we all are the queen of our own lives. so every boys of every woman from everywhere should be listened to and respected. -- bullies. everyone should recognise and rememberevery woman internationally. migrant women, trans women, women of colour, every woman is amplified. for every woman to be more educated. my wish to international women's day is for girls oraround international women's day is for girls or around the world to get equal access to education. my wish for women worldwide is to see more women in engineering and signs. this is because it is important to have diverse city in a field that is mostly male dominated.” diverse city in a field that is mostly male dominated. i wish for women worldwide is the end of donald trump, because he stands for a masculinity that has gone very, very
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wrong. you have people's pushes for international women's day around the world. globally, the feminine hygiene industry is expected to be worth nearly $40 billion by 2025. while india is one of the fastest—growing economies in the world, the majority of women are not buying sanitary products. we found out why. menzies, and flow, time of the month, there are thousands of euphemisms to describe the taboo topic of menstruation. but shehadie mehain has embraced it. she left a career in banking to manufacture sanitary napkin machines which produce cheap products for indian women, some who have had to improvise and cut up all those maccoll close. almost 70% of women in india were contracting
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infections. it was really shocking. she is not alone. 0ne infections. it was really shocking. she is not alone. one of asia's largest slums. social enterprises like this one had built mini factories in the community is to cut down on presentation costs. they also hire local women to make the pads and sell them. translation: i only have two working forfour translation: i only have two working for four hours and translation: i only have two working forfour hours and i am also able translation: i only have two working for four hours and i am also able to ta ke for four hours and i am also able to take care of my children. local companies and grassroots operations like this one aren'tjust creating jobs, they are creating products that are reasonably priced and, in this case, they are 100% compost. but feminine rights activists say this is just part of a solution to a much bigger problem. religious and cultural taboos handed down to young girls for generations have had a devastating effect on their health,
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education, and social opportunities. whenever they talk, most of the information passed on from mothers to daughters. and they don't have any place where they can validate that information. we not only took about sanitary napkins... for this woman, teaching girls and boys about menstruation is also profitable. she and her husband created a comic and turned it into a business. the most common feedback that i get is where was this book when was growing up? it is now translated into 16 languages and in each of those cultures for hope is to raise another generation of girls who no longer think of menstruation as a dirty word. monica mueller, bbc news, mumbai. this week's geneva motor show has shown hundreds of electric cars all vying for attention. so how do you stand out from the crowd? theo
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leggett takes us to the show floor. let us start with this one. as you can see, its defining feature is it is pretty small. it does not use up much road space. it is good for use in cities. clever. well, maybe not this one. it is a 1—off from ducati —— bugatti. it is a cool and $19 million. well, how about this, it may look like an old—style land rover defender, because that is what it is under the skin, but this one has been re—engineered by a uk firm to make it that bit better. you come
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around here and this one has got a bar in the back will stop gin and tonic in your boot. i call that quirky. well, how about this little number? it comes from estonia. it looks old, it is actually brand—new. it is an electric freewheel. it is a concept of ecological motoring. —— three wheeler. do you know what, we might have a winner. this is an ultramodern electric supercar. it has 1930s styling, that is quirky. and it does cost about 1.5 million euros. if you will excuse me i will give my bank manager a call. we will see you later. hello, yes, i need 1.5 million euros... for a car. i hope he at least got the chance to
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ta ke i hope he at least got the chance to take that for a spin. let us look at the markets. not a great friday for the markets. not a great friday for the markets. not a great friday for the markets in the region. they are all of. too much following on from wall street's losses. —— all love. injapan and has some good news. gdp has been revised upwards to 1.9% through the october— has been revised upwards to 1.9% through the 0ctober— december months. good news for the japanese will stop it doesn't seem to be impacting the sentiment on the stock market at all. they are all falling at the moment. there is caution and of those in usjobs numbers that at the moment. there is caution and of those in us jobs numbers that are due out later today as well. that is it for the programme. thank you for watching. this is bbc news. the top stories this hour: president trump's former campaign chairman paul manafort‘s been sentenced to 47 months in prison for tax fraud — a considerably shorter spell than expected. britain says it will grant formal diplomatic protection to nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian dual national detained in iran, due to lack
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of legal and medical aid. the secretary of state for northern ireland, karen bradley, has apologised for saying that deaths caused by the security services during the troubles were "not crimes". she says she's "profoundly sorry" for any hurt caused. here's our ireland correspondent, emma va rdy. explosion. more than 3,000 people lost their lives during northern ireland's 30—year conflict, many at the hands of republican and loyalist pa ramilitaries. but around 350 killings, some of unarmed civilians, were attributed to police or the british army. their deaths are still being investigated today. a commons question about killings during the troubles prompted this answer. the fewer than 10% that were at the hands of the military and the police were not crimes. they were people acting under orders and under instruction, and fulfilling their duties in a dignified and appropriate way. she later clarified her comments, but faced a barrage of criticism. you've got to be very careful when you're making statements
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on such a sensitive series of subjects as the killings during the troubles. you've got to get it right, and she didn't get it right. after calls for her to resign, today, karen bradley said sorry. i did not mean to say it in that way. or at all. i did not mean to say... it's not what i think, it's not what i mean. so i said something wrong and i have apologised. her comments could hardly have come at a more delicate time. next week, british army veterans will be told whether they will face prosecution for the deaths of 13 civilians on bloody sunday. for families of victims and some politicians in northern ireland, her apology is not enough. she says that the man who shot my daddy 14 times done that in a dignified and appropriate way. and for somebody to say that, she needs to resign. she needs to resign. this is not the first time
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karen bradley has slipped up over the complexities of northern ireland. she still has the backing of theresa may, but gaining the confidence of people here — a place still healing its own divisions — will be a much harder task. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. you can read more about that online. you can reach me on twitter — i'm @benmbland. now on bbc news — sport today. from the bbc sport centre this is sport today, with me chris mitchell. coming upforyou: the king surpassesjordan. the king of tennis is 100—not out. can federer make it six of the best in indian wells? and rennes come from behind to beat arsenal in the europa league.
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it isa it is a remarkable story. it really is. as a kid lebronjames had a wall plastered with pictures of michaeljordan. the lebronjames then — who was constantly on the move and growing up with his mother gloria — could never have imagined that some day he would surpass his hero on the list of all time scorers in the nba. but on wednesday, the la lakers star moved abovejordan into fourth place on the all—time list. he did it scoring 31 points in a loss against the denver nuggets. claire thornton reports. he knew this moment was likely to come before even taking to the court. commentator:

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