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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 8, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is business live from bbc news, with victoria fritz and maryam moshiri. china's exports plunge by the most in three years, as the trade war with the us bites. live from london, that's our top story on friday 8th march. where is the music?! we believe it good morning, welcome to breakfast is coming. come on, maestro! with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: theresa may urges european leaders to agree to last—minute changes changes on brexit. the slide in chinese exports and imports point to a further slowdown in the world's the eu says she has until the end second—largest economy, of today to make fresh proposals. sending asian markets sharply lower. more than 7,000 head teachers also in the programme... in england write to millions of parents warning norway could today turn up that their schools are facing a funding crisis. the british government ramps the heat on big oil. up its campaign for the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe fromjail in iran, what are we talking about? granting herformal diplomatic protection. with this week that dole at six from lifetime we took the police, victims
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— what can be done to make our streets safer? a battle for debenhams. sports direct boss, mike ashley, plots a coup at the ailing retailer by sacking its top bosses and installing himself as chief executive. arsenal see red in rennes. they suffer an embarrassing defeat in france, in the europa league, while there are no such problems for chelsea. after yesterday in‘s rain, it is a sunny start. later many will see rain. -- sunny start. later many will see rain. —— yesterday's. it's friday 8th march. our top story. theresa may will use a speech to implore eu leaders to give ground and make changes to her brexit deal. negotiators are preparing to work through the weekend in a last ditch effort to secure changes that will gain the support of mps. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley, is in westminster for us this morning. good morning. we are looking at a
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quite public plea when theresa may speaks today but more of last—ditch attempt? she is off to one of the areas most supportive of brexit back in the referendum. that message is not necessarily for us, it is as much for brussels as anybody else. she sang, you want a deal as well. it is in everybody‘s interest but you need to move. —— she is saying. the prime minister doesn't think she will get a deal through parliament on tuesday. why does it matter? we are getting so close to the date we are getting so close to the date we are supposed to leave, the 29th of march and there is fear in parliament that parliament could ta ke parliament that parliament could take control of the parliament and state we're not leaving on the 29th
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and keep it back. the prime minister putting some pressure on brussels. the problem is she has been trying that for a while and so far it has not worked. more than seven thousand head teachers in england have written a letter to parents warning them of a funding crisis in schools. they claim they've been snubbed by the education secretary but the department for education denies the claim. here's our education correspondent sean coughlan. teachers writing to 3500 parents from cornwall to cumbria to warn them that schools are not receiving adequate levels of funding. they say it means fewer teachers, bigger class sizes, cutting out some subject and having less support the children with mental health problems. some children say they will have to close early on friday. pa rents will have to close early on friday. parents have been asked to make donations. head teachers are quoting
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the institute for study saying funding has fallen. the letter to pa rents funding has fallen. the letter to parents also accuses damian hines of refusing a request to talk to them about budget shortages. they are angry. saying the secretary did not have time to meet. the department for education says that this is unfairand for education says that this is unfair and that the minister redly mixed teachers and unions and it is com pletely mixed teachers and unions and it is completely untrue to say that funding is not a pre— are key. it's as they are receiving record levels of funding as they are receiving record levels offunding and as they are receiving record levels of funding and mr hines is putting a treasurer at the head of a spending review. another teenage boy has been stabbed to death in london, making him the 17th victim of knife crime in the capital since january. police say he was found with multiple chest wounds in west kensington and was taken to hospital but died a short time later. no one has been arrested. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe,
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the british—iranian mother detained in iran, has been granted formal diplomatic protection by the foreign secretary jeremy hunt. it's an extremely rare move that signals the uk is no longer treating the case as a consular matter but a formal, legal dispute between britain and iran. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale reports. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been detained in tehran since 2016. the authorities accuse the 41—year—old british—iranian mother of spying, an accusation she has always denied. for years her husband, richard, has campaigned for her release, but to no avail. one thing he and his supporters wanted was for the british government to give nazanin formal diplomatic protection, and now his wish has been granted. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, said he had decided to give nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe this extremely rare status because iran had failed to give her the right medical and legal support required by international law.
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it would not, he said, be a magic wand that secured her release overnight, but it would turn her case into a formal legal dispute between britain and iran. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's new legal status will not force iran to change the way it treats her, but it will allow britain to raise her case with greater ease at international forums like the united nations. richard ratcliffe said the decision sent a clear signal to tehran that the uk was backing his wife, and that their treatment of his wife was unacceptable. diplomats hope the move will focus minds in tehran, particularly among the hardliners who they believe will ultimately decide mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's fate. the question is whether they will respond positively to the pressure, or step up the confrontation. something of a soap opera going on
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at sports direct. remember dynasty, the programme? it is such a drama. 0n the programme? it is such a drama. on one side we have the sports direct boss mike ashley who also owns house of fraser. and on the other the board who are facing this attempted coup. he wants to replace all of them on the board except one and replaced the board with a new team. he would install himself as chief executive. this is an absolute coup if this goes through. he owns 30% and offered to give them a bigger state. assuming he will want to merge the two companies joining
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forces, debenhams and house of fraser is. you now how hard it has been for them on high street. the shares have slumped nearly 90% over the last year. they are now worth just 3p a share. what he is saying isi just 3p a share. what he is saying is i can do this better, much better than you can and therefore you should all leave and install me as chairman or chief executive. debenhams issued a statement saying it is disappointment with the language and approached mike ashley has taken. any idea of time? the way this would work is he has called for a meeting of the board and shareholders. he is not a majority shareholder, the only has 30% so he needs others to back him. interesting times. president trump's former campaign chairman, paul manafort, has been sentenced
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to nearly four years in prison for banking and tax fraud. the 69—year—old's downfall stems from the inquiry into suspected collusion between mr trump's presidential campaign and russia. manafort is due to be sentenced in another case next week relating to illegal lobbying. an ambitious nasa project to get people into space will move a step closer today when a test flight splashes down in the atlantic ocean. the crewless capsule will face its most dangerous challenge yet when it leaves the international space station to begin itsjourney back to earth. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh has more. mission control: we're about two metres away... so far, so good. ca ptu re capture confirmed. cheering and applause. there was a successful docking of the dragon capsule over the weekend, and a warm welcome from the crew of the international space station to the mannequin named ripley. it has been eight long years that the country that won the space race has been grounded.
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the shuttle was withdrawn from service because it was unsafe. if all goes well in the next few hours, the dragon capsule will take astronauts into space later this year. but its biggest test is yet to come. after the capsule undocks, it will make its way back to earth, and then re—entry — the most hazardous part of the mission. it has a heat shield to protect it from high temperatures. retrorockets and four parachutes will have to slow the dragon down before it splashes down into the atlantic ocean this afternoon. we will be following events this morning. 7:30 it separates and then a few hours later it drops down. we we re a few hours later it drops down. we were so a few hours later it drops down. we were so excited at the launch. it was brilliant when we covered it on saturday. i was well excited. was brilliant when we covered it on saturday. iwas well excited. it is
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all was dramatic and we are getting dramatic images from it now. everybody loves a wildlife story. a baby animal. we are going to show what being a born. if you're a bit squeamish you may want to look away now. but it is brilliant, it is a lovely, lovely moment. this is the incredible moment of the birth of a rare baby giraffe caught on camera at chester zoo. the leggy new arrival, who hasn't yet been named, was born to 12—year—old mum dagmar yesterday morning. and it wasn't long before the calf was taking its first steps. how tall do you think it is? six foot tall. i would guess. pregnancy is 15 months. mum is all intact and lovely. you would wake up, dropped
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from five feet. goodness me. imagine being dropped as soon as you are born. i bet there are a number of people who have been dropped and pa rents people who have been dropped and parents don't tell them! arsenal have it all to do, in the home leg of this tie then, after a humiliating night in rennes. they can still turn it around but it will be tough. they have it all to do. it was a humiliating light indeed. they had socratis sent off, and lost 3—1, to the french club, as they try to reach the last eight
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of the europa league. it was however much better for chelsea, who beat dynamo kiev, 3—0, in london. uefa have, opened an investigation, into manchester city, who stand accused of breaking financial fair play rules. it will focus on several alleged breaches of the regulations, that have been highlighted in various media outlets. manchester city deny the accusation. six nations coming up. can wales win it? scotland captain greig laidlaw, has been dropped to the bench in favour of ali price, for the six nations meeting with wales at murrayfield tomorrow. laidlaw's ommission from the starting line—up, is one of four changes made by gregor townsend. and england's chris and gabby adcock are through to the quarter—finals of the all england open badminton championships. they beat their compatriots ben lane and jessica pugh over three sets. i wonder what they were singing on the way to that match. remember, we
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did a feature and they always sing in the car. what were they singing? mr brightside, if i remember right. let's take a look at today's front pages. britain on a knife edge is the headline in the daily mirror. the paper leads on its reporter's firsthand experience of interviewing a trauma surgeon as a teenage knife crime victim is rushed into hospital. don't forget jane is out and about focusing on knife crime. she is in north london. the express also leads on knife crime, and quotes a leading police chief as he calls for those caught carrying a knife to be sent straight to jail. the times is reporting that remain—supporting cabinet members are putting pressure on the prime minister to hold a series of votes on alternatives to her deal if it is defeated for a second time. that vote is next week. the main image shows
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violinist nicola benedetti as she is made a cbe. the telegraph leads on a new code of conduct which has been launched by the treasury and will force banks and other financial institutions to report on how much they invest in businesses run by women. it's part of new measures to help female entrepreneurs. what do you make of that?” what do you make of that? i am sorry. i was not listening at all.|j was not trying to catch you out. crosstalk. a story about how they are trying to encourage more female entrepreneurs and how businesses should be making state m e nts and how businesses should be making statements about how they are treating women were generally in their business. that was the gist of it. you are absolutely right. we are talking about that this morning. as pa rt of talking about that this morning. as part of the review, a government commissioned review about what banks should be doing encourage more women into work and be more entrepreneurs. an interesting subject area and one where there is focus. we will talk to the author of that report later.
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see, i was paying attention. we are talking about women in politics as well. we have rachel reeves coming on. she is looking at the history, goes back to nancy astor, the first female member of parliament, and goes to the modern day. it is brilliant. really interesting. what tony shin? —— what time is she in? 8:50am. he hung new out. we were talking about debenhams a few minutes ago and the potential boardroom coup. we had an update from john lewis. the staff atjohn lewis djeric bonus every year, a proportion of the profits. whether you are the shopfloor worker or the managing director you will share the same bonus. it says it is not great this year, the lowest level in 66 years. that is after sales at waitrose, owned byjohn lewis, fell
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by 45%, sales at john lewis department stores were downplayed 56%. tough times for them. that is reflected in their bonus they receive every year. staying on the retail theme, lk bennett, receive every year. staying on the retailtheme, lk bennett, some receive every year. staying on the retail theme, lk bennett, some of you may know the fashion chain, known as the queen of kitten heels, has been appointed the administrators have been appointed, sales down. that includes 39 stores in 37 concessions. more evidence of a tough time for retail. a favourite of kate middleton. kitten heels?! they are very small a little heels like that. i had to google what they are. a good message on international women's day. on terry gale —— terry dugan. the england star. she was talking about the she believes karp, and her winner this week. beating
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the likes of brazil and japan in that thrilling draw against the hosts, the usa. same with a big move it was going to barcelona and how that has done wonders for her confidence that is encouraging more to do the same. it is the cheltenham festival —— next week. harriet dart up, she is 23, and she was told not to write a racehorse again after her shoulder kept popping out —— harriet taka. she has been rebuilt by the recovery ce ntre taka. she has been rebuilt by the recovery centre by the jockeys rehabilitation fund and will be riding again. look out for her. the other nice bit about this issue will be riding paul nicholls blue poles force in its last race. talking of medical things, to remedy film in
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space, he was reduced to tiny and was travelling around the body —— remember the film? a miniature submarine was injected into a body. i think that it was a remake.|j think i was talking about the remake in the 1980s. that was the 1980s. what thinking about?” in the 1980s. that was the 1980s. what thinking about? i think it was the 1960s. riddell welch. these are about micro— robots. tiny crawly things. it is the smallest one to carry its own computer circuitry. it can fit into blood vessels in the rain. it can carry things like antibacterial medicines and things like that and a quick one. if you're worried about your blood pressure, if you're worried about your blood pressure having a nap this is effective as taking a pill.|j
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pressure having a nap this is effective as taking a pill. i have just remember the name of that film. this is raquel welch in a submarine going through peoples bodies. the fantastic voyage. they miniature is things. that really was a film? it really was a film. i don'tjust make things up. apparently we think about weather a lot. this helps us going to be weather. what do we spend most time thinking about a document during the day. i will tell you. i will just tell you. number one during the day. i will tell you. i willjust tell you. number one is drinking tea, number two is the weather number three is queueing. they are the things we spend our most times thinking about. so disappointing for so many reasons. good morning. good morning all of you. i think weather should be 11. it is in my family anyway. it is friday at long last and the vast
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majority, a bit of sunshine to greet the day. they chilly start. frost around. my big advice is make the most of this morning ‘s sunshine. it will be a day of change. this is yesterday's loud the satellite. it is set to spread in later on. enjoy the clear skies. across england, scotland, and wales are specially. they chilly start. if you are heading out the door frost in some parts of scotland, northern england, especially, sports towards the east. an isolated show in east anglia at the moment. dry and bright whether to ta ke the moment. dry and bright whether to take you through the morning rush hour. rain developing in northern ireland. that spread eastward, taking way that sunshine into the afternoon. 0utbreaks taking way that sunshine into the afternoon. 0utbrea ks of taking way that sunshine into the afternoon. outbreaks of rain developing across scotland, england and wales. the details for the end of the day, you might be going to work dry, many will come home town. stuart cross jutland today. work dry, many will come home town. stuart crossjutland today. so across scotland as reince priebus weigh—in. it is for the evening rush hourin weigh—in. it is for the evening rush hour in scotland. northern ireland will brighten up. and if you have
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your bursts of rain for western areas of england and wales. the rain elsewhere will be lighter and pasta and spreading eastwards on a strengthening southerlies wind. the temperature is the same as yesterday —— pacquiao. patchy rain and drizzle to end the day. into tonight, clear skies around. showers developing to the north and west. lengthier clear skies and the temperatures will drop away close to freezing it again. the reason is picking up and it will be quite a blustery weekend across the country and a cold wind at that, bringing a scattering of showers a mixture of rain, hail, sleet, and so at times. certainly on saturday plenty of showers across the northern half of the country. it could merge into longer smells —— spells of rain. the dry them brightest weather is on saturday. the south—east you are. bolts we get the team here only seven or eight across scotland in northern ireland. —— while we get. some uncertainty in the weekend. it tracks back to wait
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vigorousjet the weekend. it tracks back to wait vigorous jet stream in the skies above us. blowing at around 180 mph. the ripples creek 84 got this weekend. possibly longer smells of rain -- weekend. possibly longer smells of rain —— the ripples could change the forecast. the greater chance of some lying snow across the northern half of the country. certainly to wake up within parts of scotland. we will see the showers come and go throughout the day, heavy at times, a stronger wind on sunday, and it will fill pretty chilly as well when you're out in the wind and the showers were true. in the next few days feeling more winter than into spring for many. that is how it is looking. that year. thank you very much. another teenager has died after he was stabbed in london yesterday afternoon. the unnamed victim was found in west kensington with stab injuries to his chest.
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he died later in hospital. he's the sixth person to be stabbed in the uk in the space of a week. official figures show that fatal stabbings are increasing in england and wales at the fastest rate since records began. between march 2017 and 2018, 285 killings were carried out with a knife or sharp instrument. that's up nearly a third on last year. so how do we solve the problem that police chiefs are calling a national crisis? brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at the london boxing academy for us this morning where they're working with the local community to help reduce crime. we have done interviews this week. we have done interviews this week. we have done interviews this week. we have been talking to people about weighty problem should be tackled, is the police, numbers, getting to the communities and talking to people to prevent situations that are dangerous in the first place? absolutely. we are going to chat to tons of people about those issues, and hear their experiences first—hand. we are at the white hart lane boxing club. thank you for
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coming out this morning. this is attached to a school in totton. the idea is that when the school gates close the schools still have somewhere safe to go to be engaged and involved in the community —— totton. they have lost five students from year over the past seven years. we have two guess this morning, robert, a former gang member, and richard from the west midlands police. thank you for coming down. let us start chatting to robert. when did you first picked up a nice? i was 12 years old. 12 years old. and you used that knife? yes. tell me about it. i would rather focus about what to do to bring people from carrying more knives. but you have spoken about about the fact that you have stab people and have been stabbed. what made you pick up the night in the first place? everyone was doing it at the time. it was the thing to do. you are at a
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disadvantage if you did not have a night where i was growing up at the time. what would have stopped you from picking up and using that knife? what would have stopped me would have been having more hope, more opportunities in school, having things like youth clubs, youth projects. and people, teachers, not giving up on mr quek. you were 12 at the time. that sounds to some people that you are not taking responsibility for your actions, you are blaming other people —— giving up are blaming other people —— giving up on me quick. and definitely taking responsibility. i paid the price as well. you think society needs to be more interested in young people. yes. they need to start funding for youth projects such as uprising. 81 new homes and centres have been closed since 2011. there is nothing for young people to go to. nothing for them to find hope or any intervention. just on the streets, having nothing to do. 0k. we bring in richard cook. this is
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not just a we bring in richard cook. this is notjust a london issue. this is a nationwide issue. you have seen knife crime increased fivefold since 2012. sadly, yes. it is an absolute tragedy. we had three murders of boysin tragedy. we had three murders of boys injust a tragedy. we had three murders of boys in just a few days last week. and we had a girl in coventry the other night stabbed in the neck by another group of young teenagers. what are you doing about it? what we have done in birmingham city centre is we have introduced section 60 which gives us the power to stop—and—search people without reasonable grounds. we think that has been very effective, in response to what is, we believe, an emergency situation of young men, predominantly, carrying knives in that area and been prepared to use them in incidence of violence. what has happened is that has sent a clear message in that area and areas
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that have been beset by disorder around school closing times, that's has died down. and we have taken knives and vicious weapons of the streets that would otherwise and could otherwise have been used to kill or maim children. thank you very much for both coming up this morning. we appreciate it. more from us through because of the morning. now back to you. thank you very much. jayne has been talking to a variety of people. a different take on how to tackle knife crime, rather thanit on how to tackle knife crime, rather than it just being on how to tackle knife crime, rather than itjust being prescriptive, more police on the streets. absolutely. it is time to get the news, travel, and whether where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the mayor will announce funding today to deliver more than a thousand new homes on the site of a former london prison. over £41 million will be provided to develop the holloway prison site in islington. peabody housing association has
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promised at least 600 homes will be genuinely affordable. the mayor is providing a £41.6 million loan from his land fund, helping peabody deliver more than 1000 homes on the site following the prison's closure in 2016, 60% of which will be genuinely affordable. representatives from peabody and london square will show the mayor and jeremy corbyn the site from the rooftop vantage point and explain how it will be transformed. a charity aimed at helping young people at risks from youth violence in east london has been launched. the youth charter is backed by the united nations has for years be working on moss side. now it's teamed up with university of east london to train up volunteers to mentor and inspire local youngsters. i want to be that bridge and actually speak and engaging with these young people, giving them hope, and actually planting seeds. and i know i don't have the resources to do much else. but i know that is a step and that is something that i wish my peers were not here today or are in the prison system did not receive. today is international women's day and all this week bbc london has been meeting women across the capital taking part in activities that were previously closed to them. sarah bowen is the only female helicopter instructor in the uk, and she's about to train the country's first muslim female pilot. she says more advice is needed in schools to encourage women
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into the industry. i would not have known anything about it from the careers advice i had at school. i think is more more important now that people do learn about this at an early age. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube: there are minor delays on the piccadilly line but a good service on all other lines. south—western railway has no trains running between windsor and eton riverside and staines, due to electrical supply problems. 0nto the roads: as you can see traffic is building up on the a13 into town from barking. in leyton, north birkbeck road remains closed in both directions between langthorne road and hollydown way due to a police investigation. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. it is a beautiful start to the day with plenty of early sunshine around, but it isa plenty of early sunshine around, but it is a rather chilly one. a touch of frost out there for the rural spots. the sunshine will last through the morning, but into the
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afternoon we expected to cloud over and eventually we will see outbreaks of rain. quite a cool, but a lovely, bright morning. any early cloud across essex will clear away quite quickly. we will keep the sunshine throughout the morning. then into western home counties first it will cloud over, the weatherfront pushing through. de wit will pick up as well but not as blustery as it was yesterday. for some of us outbreaks of like patchy rain and drizzle as we to the end of the afternoon. it averages 9— 11 celsius. through this evening's rush hour we are likely to see that outbreaks of rain. that is set to clear south—east was as we head through the early hours of tomorrow. clear skies developing. 0vernight lows of 5— eight celsius. not as chilly tomorrow morning. 0ver lows of 5— eight celsius. not as chilly tomorrow morning. over the weekend the wind will pick up at times. mostly dry with some sunny spells. cooler by sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:32. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we're asking whether security flaws in some car alarms are leaving vehicles more vulnerable to being stolen. america's new commercial astronaut capsule will begin the final stage of its demonstration flight in the next hour — we'll catch up with it live as it begins its journey back to earth. and commemorating the centenary of women in parliament — we'll be speaking to the mp rachel reeves about how they've shaped politics. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may will use a speech later today to implore eu leaders to give ground and make changes to her brexit deal. negotiators are preparing to work through the weekend
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in a last ditch effort to secure changes that will gain the support of mps. labour says the prime minister's speech is an admission of failure. more than 7,000 headteachers in england have written a letter to three—and—a—half million families warning them of a "funding crisis" in schools. they claim they've been snubbed by the education secretary which has been denied by the department for education. here's our education correspondent, sean coughlan. head teachers are writing to 3.5 million parents, in areas from cornwall to cumbria, to warn them that schools are not receiving adequate levels of funding. they say that it means fewer teachers, bigger class sizes, cutting out some subjects and having less support for children with mental health problems. some schools have said they might have to close early on fridays to save money. and parents have been asked to make donations. head teachers are quoting the institute for fiscal studies which says per people funding has fallen by 8% since 2010. the letter to parents also accuses
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the education secretary damian hinds of refusing a request to talk to them about budget shortages. the head teachers are angry at a response from officials, saying that the education secretary did not have time to meet. but the department for education says that this is unfair and that mr hinds readily meets teachers and unions and it is completely untrue to say that funding is not a priority. the department says schools are receiving record levels of funding and mr hinds is putting a strong case to the treasury, ahead of the next spending review. sean coughlan, bbc news. another teenage boy has been stabbed to death in london, making him the 17th victim of knife crime in the capital since january. police say he was found with multiple chest wounds in west kensington and was taken to hospital but died a short time later. no one has been arrested in connection with the stabbing. the campaign to free nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe from jail in iran has been escalated by the british government. in a rare move she has been
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granted diplomatic status. it means her case becomes a formal legal dispute between london and tehran. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's husband, richard, said the decision sent a clear signal that the government is backing his wife. president trump's former campaign chairman, paul manafort, has been sentenced to nearly four years in prison for banking and tax fraud. the 69—year—old's downfall stems from the inquiry into suspected collusion between mr trump's presidential campaign and russia. manafort is due to be sentenced in another case next week relating to illegal lobbying. it's hoped new summer timetables offering an additional 1,000 services will relieve overcrowding on trains. last year a similar exercise caused severe disruption on the country's train network. the rail delivery group said the industry had learned lessons and is confident the services will be ready. an ambitious project to get people into space will move a step
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closer today when a test flight splashes down in the atlantic ocean. in underan hour. in under an hour. it will unblock from the international space station. this is saturday. it will touch down before 3pm this afternoon. we are hoping it will be able to set up for people to travel to space. the dummy, replete is fine. —— ripley. to space. the dummy, replete is fine. -- ripley. around 7:30am, we will be able to seek separation occurring and that is the first part of the process. right in the middle of the process. right in the middle of our programme. fantastic. i
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remember last saturday. a lot of people go to rennes for holidays... i have never heard of it. but it was not a happy visit for arsenal. think of something bad that can happen, own goal, penalty. but the manager says do not panic. alex iwobi put them ahead, but after having sokratis sent off, the home side equalised and then an own goal from nacho monreal made it 2-1. ismaila sarr's late header consigned arsenal to their first away defeat to a french side, leaving them with plenty to do if they're to make
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the quarter—finals. it is not a good experience to date because we could not do our work in difficult moments, in difficult minutes, with one less player, like we wa nted minutes, with one less player, like we wanted but i think we can do better. chelsea fared better against dinamo kiev at stamford bridge. goals from pedro, willian , and callum hudson—0doi helped them to a comfortable 3 nil first leg victory uefa has opened investigations into manchester city for alleged financial fair play violations. the probe will focus on city's financial conduct, after a number of claims were made in several media outlets. manchester city say the accusation is false and they welcome the opportunity to end the speculation which they say results from "the illegal hacking and out of context publication of city emails." manchester city captain vincent kompany insists they're not thinking about winning an unprecedented quadruple. city are top of the
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premier league table, have already won the efl cup, and are still involved in the champions league and fa cup. kompany believes the next 7 days could be crucial. it isa it is a defining week for us because —iam it is a defining week for us because — i am sure the manager would have spoken about it—we have three different competitions finals for next week. every day will be a final ina row next week. every day will be a final in a row is difficult. at the moment it is not in our minds. scotland captain greig laidlaw has been dropped to the bench for the six nations clash with wales at murrayfield tomorrow. laidlaw has been left out in favour of ali price, one of four changes made by gregor townsend. finn russell returns from a head injury, with peter horne switching to inside centre. wing darcy graham comes in for his first start. joe cockanisinga will make his first six nations
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start for england on the wingagainst italy at twickenham this weekend. head coach eddiejones has also named the powerful pair of manu tuilagi and ben te'o in the centre. cannot wait for it to return. england's chris and gabby adcock are through to the quarter—finals of the all england 0pen badminton championships. the pair came from behind to beat their compatriots ben lane and jessica pugh over three sets in birmingham the world triathlon series gets underway in abu dhabi later this morning. it's live on the red button and the bbc sport website from 9:50. reigning world champion vicky holland will be one of five female british athletes starting their season today and is proud to be going in as the number one. it is probably more me that it is important for than anybody else. i
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do not think it matters in terms of what i get out off the whole season, 0lympic qualification which happens later in the year but i really wa nted later in the year but i really wanted to go to the first race of the year is the defending world champion, to start wearing the number one. i have never done that before and fahmy that is quite special and i really wanted to go will stop five—time major winner phil mickelson was presented with an unusual challenge on the first day of the arnold palmer invitational in florida. charlie has played golf. yes i have. how did you go? it was ok. did you find yourself on the wrong side of the net? known as lefty, the american uncharacteristically tried using his right hand, with the club face also the wrong way round to get out of trouble on one hole. unfortunately the ball rattled around some netting and promptly popped out not far from his feet.
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ami am i stating the obvious in saying it was obviously going to get caught in the net? it is a difficult one to get out of but such a pro, he still managed to finish on four under par and tied for third. there is a reason why he is one of the best—known golfers in the world. reason why he is one of the best—known golfers in the worldlj was thinking of you, climbing up a steep green. four kilometres of pain. this is the start of the cycling road championships for the first time in 37 years to yorkshire in september. for amateur riders mike purcell, i was trying to chase the hill. how did you go? i did have an inspirational message from grand. if you can do it, anyone can do it.
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it was an awful day as well. the wind was blowing, the rain was falling. i do not want to make excuses. don't look at me when you are in pain. an investigation into some of the biggest names in specialist car alarms sold in the uk has revealed security flaws which left owners' vehicles more vulnerable to being stolen or hijacked. it found clifford and pandora alarms accidentally made it easy for criminals to take control of any car fitted with their smart alarm systems. click‘s dan simmons is here to tell us more. these are secondary alarm systems not the ones already fitted. these are secondary alarm systems not the ones already fittedm these are secondary alarm systems not the ones already fitted. it is budding buying an alarm and adding to it. --it budding buying an alarm and adding to it. ——it is about buying an alarm. the key less fobs we
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sometimes issues, they detect whether it is close to the car and it opens, very handy but criminals are keen to use boxes which are called relay boxes which magnify the signalfrom the called relay boxes which magnify the signal from the key fob, called relay boxes which magnify the signalfrom the key fob, the car thinks it is next to it and the car opens. your fob could still be in your house but they can get into the car. some people thought they could get around that. security companies quick tojump on get around that. security companies quick to jump on this. so they sell car alarms to get around this, protecting you from that specific attack. that was hoped. they do that very successfully but unfortunately these two car alarms, it clifford and pandora, are susceptible to hacking attacks. tell us more about what you found ?
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hacking attacks. tell us more about what you found? essentially, what we did, our security company had a look at the setup of the alarm systems and they were able to access users accounts, change their passwords — these are password to account they don't own — that allowed them to ta ke don't own — that allowed them to take control of the smartphone app that remote starts the car and can unlock the doors and can allow you to get in. this film shows you how a huack to get in. this film shows you how a hijack might work. car following has a laptop and the app installed. they have control of the car in front. they can bring it to a stop? said can't but they can bring the alarms. the alarms are all going. they have control of the doors. 0nce the alarms are all going. they have control of the doors. once the
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driver has turned the engine off, it is immobilised and only the hackers can restart it. that is really frightening. isn't it. what is being done about it? we would not want to go to airand done about it? we would not want to go to air and tell people in the uk, your cart can be stolen and tell people how to do it so we gave the security company seven days to sort the problem out. pandora did it in four days and clifford did it in five. though security doors are fixed. did they fix it without telling people? as far as we know, the people who bought these systems for hundreds of pounds, in both cases, drivers were left vulnerable to this sort of attack. they do not
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know whether the system has been used by criminals but they say they have no evidence it has at the moment but it could have been used and they say they have upgraded their security so we trust them. we tried the same attack again and it does not work. the reassuring thing is for anyone who has bought the systems they have changed things. it is. but we believe for a period of what was probably months this attack was quite possible, very easy, not a loss of specialist knowledge needed by somebody who would want to attack. are there any numbers on how many that happened to? no. as far as the companies are concerned they say they do not know of any attacks. whether there were any or not we cannot tell. that is really
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interesting. bbc click‘s full investigation into the vulnerabilities of car alarms is on bbc news channel, iplayer and bbc world news this saturday and sunday. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. good morning. good morning to you. good morning. good morning to you. good morning. good morning to you. after you see's rain of sunshine to start the day. a lovely start in liverpool. —— after yesterday. red kite in the worn —— morning, a warning sign. just gathering in the atlantic, cloud is edging its way in. in northern ireland at the moment, edging into western parts of great britain. with clear skies and sunny conditions overhead for many it will be quite chilly out there this morning. frost for scotland and northern england. they called morning commute. dry for much of england and wales. the cloud spread eastwards. the sunshine turns hazy. the skies turn grey through the afternoon. 0utbreaks hazy. the skies turn grey through the afternoon. outbreaks of rain erratically spreading to most parts. by erratically spreading to most parts. by the evening rush—hour most will
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be under cloudier skies. later patchy rain across eastern scotland. snow to come in shetland. have you verse snow to come in shetland. have you verse by the evening rush hour into western scotland. they will have cleared in northern ireland. if it is better than you began. while some eastern areas may be dried patchy rain or drizzle across western parts of england and wales. aided and abetted by a strength in south—west wind. temperatures 8— 11 degrees, but without the added chill we had. this evening and overnight, cloud and patchy rain this for a time and then we see shower was put in. longer spells of rain may before 0rkney and shetland. chilly nights across the uk again. temperatures could be low enough for frost into saturday morning. there will be a strengthening winds keeping the temperature is up for some. the weather will be a bit of this weekend. any plans, could be on the chilly side. while we will see some such and there will be plenty of showers around. they could merge into longer spells of rain, sleet, and maybe hell snow across northern ireland, northern england, and central and southern scotland. drier
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and brighter weather across southern parts of the uk across saturday. the wind is certainly picking up. it will not feel chillier than 8— 13 degrees. some uncertainties linked to the weekend forecast. it is down to the weekend forecast. it is down toa to the weekend forecast. it is down to a vigorousjet to the weekend forecast. it is down to a vigorous jet stream blowing around 180 mph above us. the showers could come together into longer spells of rain, sleet, and hillston. it could strengthen the wind. keep that in the back of your mind. —— hill snow. increasing chance of those turning to snow at lower levels for the northern half of the uk, could give coverage across parts of scotland. the further south and east you are, the fewer showers. but be wary. the woods could be even stronger at times and those showers could merge into some longer spells of rain. sunday feeling colder than saturday. that is how it is looking. back to naga and charlie. can you look at your monitor right
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now. this is a live image coming to us from the spacex space station, my apologies. these are being shown to us live now and head of the moment when the capital comes away from the craft. can you tell where that is? not where the space it is, but what bit of earth is being seen?” not where the space it is, but what bit of earth is being seen? i cannot see any land so i cannot make it out. i see any land so i cannot make it out. lam see any land so i cannot make it out. i am thinking somewhere around indonesia. we have been told it is maybe over the pacific. the cloud formation is from above. what an extraordinary image that is. a beautiful sight. peaceful. thank you very much. it is 7:30 a.m.. we will show you more of those pictures ——at 730. --at 7:30 a.m.. show you more of those pictures ——at 730. ——at 7:30 a.m.. we have the docking of the space capital of new zealand. we almost the music for that shot. it is one of those
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incredible moments. a bit of space music. now we will get you stressed again after that relaxing and beautiful imagery. we will talk about the morning commute. there's a high chance you might be relying on ben's next guest. he's joined by the boss of railway ticketing firm trainline. something people use to get their tickets in advance. there will still be delays, probably. good morning. that's right. trainline sells 204 tickets every minute. using new technology — it sold its first ticket online 20 years ago. it works with train companies to help passengers search for and buy tickets. those train firms pay the website commission on each ticket sale. the tickets themselves shouldn't cost you any more than they would if you bought them directly from the company but there is sometimes a booking fee on top. the vast majority of traffic to trainline site is now through mobile phones, but the company is also developing ai technology as well.
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we can talk now to the boss of trainline — clare gilmartin. good morning to you. good morning. we look at the trainline app and we think you are a tanker. but you are a tech firm. we are a tech firm, through and through. 0urjob is to develop technology that makes it easy for customers to find the cheapest ticket. there are many different ticket and fare types, not just in the uk but across europe. 0urjob is to find customers the cheapest and fastest. and on top of that to make it easier to use. do you get frustrated with quite how frustrating it is for people to find the right ticket? as you say there are different types, there are super advances, all that sort of thing, you are trying to make it more simple, but it is not easy. we use technology and ai simple, but it is not easy. we use technology and alto make it easier for customers. it is an engineer's
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into have it is complex. we get customers the cheapest and fastest journey or the option for their journey. and we use a! journey or the option for their journey. and we use alto develop things like price prediction tools, so we allow customers to see into the future, how the prices will change, so they can lock in the cheapest option for them. you talk about adores being a —— the cheapest. they telegraph talked about booking directly with the train firms themselves gave the cheaper price. —— the daily telegraph. how do you make sure you won't have the price? we match the prices every day. we always have the same days as the train companies. notjust in the uk, but in europe. what we do is make it easierfor customers to get the chip is. you go to london to birmingham there are 40 by different setups. we make it easier to get the cheapest testified how frustrating is that for you that you have all this new technology coming at about al, about doing this stuff on the move, and you are
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working with a drain system and a railway network that belongs in the victorian era. how do you make that work, you have such different approaches to this and trying to make new technology work with really alter? we see it as a great challenge. for customers if it is easy people will use trains more. that is a better environmental choice, transport wise. we have worked with the industry on things like rolling out digital ticketing. we felt very passionate about the fa ct we felt very passionate about the fact that everyone is to be able to get a mobile ticket on their phone. we have a together with our industry partners to make sure that roll out has happened fastjob at the rail companies themselves and the government are talking about this ticketless travel so you can just swipe your phone or your payment ca rd to swipe your phone or your payment card to get we want to go. that entirely demolishes your business model, doesn't it? ewenny ticket at all. not at all. --we won't need. customers need to have the choice to get the cheapest ticket. that is what we do in a single app. with a ticket on your phone there is no
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more queues, no more need to queue ata more queues, no more need to queue at a ticket office machine. you just swipe the ticket and go. any plans for automatic compensation, so if the train is late coming have to fill ina the train is late coming have to fill in a tedious form to get it back. if i bought it through the train line can i notjust get a refund? you can get a refund in one click on your app. if you're meeting is overrun or you are taking a later train home. if the train is delayed itself you would get compensation? we are working in the future with the industry, we will be working to make that delay automatic, to make it come to your phone. we want to ta ke it come to your phone. we want to take the work away from our customers and make it as easy and sea mless customers and make it as easy and seamless as possible. you have had quite a career in technology. you joined ebay at 26 and work your way up joined ebay at 26 and work your way up through the company. now you are running the train line. —— trainline. how has it changed for women in technology. it still male dominated. it absolutely is. it was even more male dominated 16 or 17 yea rs even more male dominated 16 or 17 years ago. we deftly have more women
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in the industry. are starting to creep up with the number of girls studying stem —— stem subjects. we definitely. we are introducing more stem. attitudes are starting to change. we did a survey where 70% of young people in tech companies say their attitudes are changing. but our challenge today is on culture and attitudes and making sure that workplaces that might still be male dominated our setup so that women can thrive. really interesting to talk to. thank you for coming in. clare gilmartin, chief executive of trainline. more for me after seven a.m.. a busy day. i still like a paper ticket. i worry about my phone rang out a charger dropping it. i like it. i'm old—fashioned. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the mayor will announce funding today to deliver more than a thousand new homes on the site of a former london prison. over £41 million will be provided to develop the holloway prison site in islington. peabody housing association has promised at least 600 homes will be genuinely affordable. in east london has been launched. the youth charter is backed by the united nations and has for years been working on moss side in manchester. now it's teamed up with the university of east london to train up volunteers to mentor and inspire local youngsters. i want to be that bridge and actually speaking and engaging with these young people, giving them hope, and actually planting seeds. and i know that i don't have the resources to do much else. but i know that's a step and that's something that i wish some of my peers, that aren't here today or in the prison system, did not receive.
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today is international women's day and all this week bbc london has been meeting women across the capital taking part in activities that were previously closed to them. sarah bowen is the only female helicopter instructor in the uk, and she's about to train the country's first muslim female pilot. she says more advice is needed in schools. i wouldn't have known anything about it from the careers advice i had at school. i think is more and more important now that people do learn about this at an early age. let's take a look at the travel situation now. fairly good on the tube — just minor delays on the piccadilly line. the overground is also running with minor delays. south western railway has no trains running between windsor and eton riverside and staines — due to electrical supply problems. 0nto the roads: as you can see traffic is building up on the m4 in both directions through the brentford elevated section. in leyton, north birkbeck road remains closed in both directions between langthorne road
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and hollydown way. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. it's a beautiful start to the day, with plenty of early sunshine around, but it is a rather chilly one. a touch of frost out there for the rural spots. the sunshine will last through the morning, but then into the afternoon we're expecting it to cloud over and eventually we'll see some outbreaks of rain. quite a cool, but a lovely, bright morning. any early cloud across essex will clear away really quite quickly. we'll keep the sunshine throughout the morning. then into western home counties first it'll cloud over, this weather front pushing through. the wind will pick up as well, but it won't be as blustery as it was yesterday. and for some of us, some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle as we head through to the end of the afternoon. top temperatures between nine and 11 degrees celsius. through this evening's rush hour we're likely to see that outbreaks of rain. plenty of thickening cloud. but that's all set to clear south—eastwards as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. clear skies developing. 0vernight lows between 5 and 8 degrees celsius.
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so not quite as chilly tomorrow morning. over the weekend the wind will pick up again at times. mostly dry with some sunny spells. watch out for some showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: theresa may goes public with a last ditch plea for european leaders to make changes to the brexit deal. the eu says she has until the end of today to make fresh proposals. more than 7,000 head teachers in england write to millions of parents warning that their schools are facing a funding crisis. the british government ramps up its campaign for the release of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe from jail in iran, granting herformal
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diplomatic protection. with this week's death toll from knife crime add six, we talk to form a gang members, police chiefs, victims and police about what we can do to keep our streets safe.” victims and police about what we can do to keep our streets safe. i will speak to the woman behind the report looking at women and banks. battle for debenhams — sports direct boss, mike ashley, plots a coup at the ailing retailer, by sacking its top bosses and installing himself as chief executive. your full weekend forecast here on brea kfast. it's friday the 8th of march. our top story. theresa may will use a speech to implore eu leaders to give ground and make changes to her brexit deal. negotiators are preparing to work through the weekend
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in a last ditch effort to secure changes that will gain the support of mps. adam fleming will have the view from brussels, but first our political correspondent, nick eardley, joins us form westminster this is now a public plea. she is talking to people but she knows eu leaders will be listening? absolutely and that is for him this message will be aimed. it is in everybody‘s interest to get a deal but whether or not we agreed some sort of change in the irish border will be the thing to decide whether or not we can get a vote through parliament. why are we at this stage? talks have not gone well. we are not at the stage where the government thinks they can bring something back to get through parliament. number 10 says the talks
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have been tough and they are likely to go to the wire which meets potentially the end of the weekend, sunday night, monday morning. the prime minister said publicly to europe to give us something here. let get it over the line that is not going to happen unless you change your mind. let's go to adam in brussels. explain a couple of things. this deadline of end of business today, that is what the eu said. they had something to take away for homework. what does that deadline meant? i will be diplomatic and say i would not use deadline. that is not what the eu or uk were using. this is a notional ideal world timetable. the uk came with their ideas and the eu had ideas earlier in the week. they did not
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have a good meeting. fresh ideas today. negotiators will work through the weekend. 0n today. negotiators will work through the weekend. on monday the prime minister is coming to see jean—claude juncker. we do not know if that is still the plan. we thought there was going to be a meeting today between the attorney general and michel barnier but that was never confirmed. it is now definitely not happening. officials are still talking today, they are still negotiating at civil servant level and the plan is to carry on working over the weekend. all is definitely not lost but it is not going as smoothly as people wanted at this stage. later in the programme we'll be speaking to the deputy chairman of the conservative party, james cleverly. we will try to get an idea of where he thinks we are and what can be done next in terms of brexit.
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more than 7,000 headteachers in england have written a letter to 3.5 million families warning them of a "funding crisis" in schools. they claim they've been snubbed by the education secretary which has been denied by the department for education. head teachers are writing to 3.5 million parents, in areas from cornwall to cumbria, to warn them that schools are not receiving adequate levels of funding. they say that it means fewer teachers, bigger class sizes, cutting out some subjects and having less support for children with mental health problems. some schools have said they might have to close early on fridays to save money. and parents have been asked to make donations. head teachers are quoting the institute for fiscal studies which says per people funding has fallen by 8% since 2010. the letter to parents also accuses the education secretary damian hinds of refusing a request to talk to them about budget shortages. the head teachers are angry at a response from officials, saying that the education secretary
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did not have time to meet. but the department for education says that this is unfair and that mr hinds readily meets teachers and unions and it is completely untrue to say that funding is not a priority. the department says schools are receiving record levels of funding and mr hinds is putting a strong case to the treasury, ahead of the next spending review. sean coughlan, bbc news. another teenage boy has been stabbed to death in london, making him the 17th victim of knife crime in the capital since january. police say he was found with multiple chest wounds in west kensington and was taken to hospital but died a short time later. no one has been arrested in connection with the stabbing. the campaign to free nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe from jail in iran has been escalated by the british government. in a rare move she has been granted diplomatic status. it means her case becomes a formal legal dispute between london and tehran. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale reports.
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nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been detained in tehran since 2016. the authorities accuse the 41—year—old british—iranian mother of spying, accusations she has always denied. for years her husband, richard, has campaigned for her release, but to no avail. one thing he and his supporters wanted was for the british government to give nazanin formal diplomatic protection, and now his wish has been granted. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, said he had decided to give nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe this extremely rare status because iran had failed to give her the right medical and legal support required by international law. it would not, he said, be a magic wand that secured her release overnight, but it would turn her case into a formal legal dispute between britain and iran. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's new legal status will not force iran to change the way it treats her, but it will allow britain to raise her case with greater ease at international forums
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like the united nations. richard ratcliffe said the decision sent a clear signal to tehran that the uk was backing his wife, and that their treatment of his wife was unacceptable. diplomats hope the move will focus minds in tehran, particularly among the hardliners who they believe will ultimately decide mrs zaghari—ratcliffe's fate. the question is whether it will respond positively to the pressure, or step up the confrontation. james landale, bbc news. president trump's former campaign chairman, paul manafort, has been sentenced to nearly four years in prison for banking and tax fraud. the 69—year—old's downfall stems from the inquiry into suspected collusion between mr trump's presidential campaign and russia. manafort is due to be sentenced in another case next week relating to illegal lobbying. it's hoped new summer timetables offering an additional 1,000 services will relieve overcrowding on trains. last year a similar exercise caused severe disruption on the country's train network.
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the rail delivery group said the industry had learned lessons and is confident the services will be ready. an ambitious nasa project to get people into space will move a step closer today when a test flight splashes down in the atlantic ocean. it will happen in 20 minutes and we will show you the spacex capshaw, cruel is, will face its most dangerous challenge when it on docks from the international space station. that will happen in 20 minutes. then it has a journey down and land near new zealand. nasa is getting ready. gearing up. that is the nasa headquarters. they all seem very calm. a few moments ago, we are
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relying on pictures nasa is offering. they were showing the picture looking down on earth and those pictures are always staggering. we will come back to those pictures in the next 20 minutes or so. were expecting to see the small craft separate from the major craft making its way back to earth. splashdown expected 1:45pm at lunchtime today. if you're a bit squeamish you may want to look away now. this is the incredible moment of the birth of a rare baby giraffe caught on camera at chester zoo. the leggy new arrival, who hasn't yet been named, was born to 12—year—old mum dagmar yesterday morning. and it wasn't long before the calf was taking its first steps. the six—foot tall youngster was born after a 15—month pregnancy.
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it is six foot tall already. the ca lf it is six foot tall already. the calf had a 6—foot drop but it looks higher than that. all is well. very happy about it. let's talk to matt. did icy, in the last time you were doing the weather wind speeds of 180 miles per hour but over the atlantic, i think. way up in the atmosphere, where the planes are flying but that will have a big impact on the weather. not that strong this morning. this is a beautiful scene. most of you seeing more sunshine than yesterday but make the most of it because out into the west, we have
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clouds across ireland pushing across the rest of the country. for it arrives, it clear skies, the rest of the country. for it arrives, it clearskies, chilly. scotland, england and wales a touch of frost. sunshine to compensate. it isa of frost. sunshine to compensate. it is a case of make most of this morning. rain developing in northern ireland. splashes of rain in western scotla nd ireland. splashes of rain in western scotland and western parts of england and wales. pushing eastwards through the afternoon. spell across shetland and a lot more cloud across eastern scotland by the time you drive home. clearing from northern ireland so the end of the day better than you begin. further ease, the rain more hit and missed and lighter. winds picking up through this afternoon. a bit of a fresh south—westerly wind. not feeling as cold. lots of cloud for the start of the night and outbreaks of rain.
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clearer skies developing. showers pushing away from the west. lengthy clear skies, and it will be chilly with a touch of frost. the breeze picking up. the weekend forecast a fairly windy one, cold and some rain and snow around. at the moment it looks like it will be mainly in the form of showers. particularly on a saturday for the north of the country. further south, more saturday for the north of the country. furthersouth, more likely to stay dry through the bulk of the day with good sunshine around. temperatures feeling a bit chilly in the breeze. we have a 180 miles per hourjet the breeze. we have a 180 miles per hour jet stream brewing the breeze. we have a 180 miles per hourjet stream brewing in the skies above us into this weekend and any ripples can have a big impact on what happens at the surface. the chance that you will get longer spells of rain, sleet and snow.
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scattered showers through sunday, a bit of sunshine in between. and the wind stronger than saturday's and it will feel particularly chilly. another teenager has died, stabbed in london. it was found in west kensington and died later in hospital. —— hit. this is the sixth person to be stabbed. the 17th in london alone. officialfigures person to be stabbed. the 17th in london alone. official figures show fatal stabbings are increasing at the fastest rate since records began. between march 2017 and 2018, 285 killings were carried out with a knife or sharp instrument. that's an increase of nearly 33% on the previous 12 months. the question we have been asking is how do we solve the problem that
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police chiefs are now calling a national crisis? brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at the london boxing academy for us this morning where they're working with the local community to help reduce crime. this academy works with the local community to help reduce crime. it wa nts to community to help reduce crime. it wants to tackle it at that crucial point. you have been talking to some interesting people this morning. yeah, all morning. good morning from all of us at the white hart lane boxing academy. this place is attached to a school which takes in kids who might otherwise fall out of education. the idea of this academy is that when the school gates close there is still somewhere safe where children can come and keep themselves busy and active. they have lost five students from this school over the last seven years. i wa nt to school over the last seven years. i want to introduce rosanne. thank you for coming down this morning. i really appreciated. you lost your only child last year. tell me about
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it. it was on the 22nd of march, about 5:30 pm. i received a phone call from his girlfriend to say he had been stabbed. they had been to a funeral that morning, her grandad's funeral. there was an exchange of dirty looks between my son and another boy, they exchanged words. that boy proceeded to make a phone call and four people came in a car and murdered my son. they did not know him... no connection. no connection whatsoever. how on earth, how on earth do you respond? you get that phone call, when you hear what happens? i think you go on autopilot. it is like an out of body experience. like it is not happening to you. you just kind of go and you deal with it. i know you work so ha rd deal with it. i know you work so
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hard in the times as he has died to go into schools and speak to young people, because he himself carried a knife. he did. here. you know, i don't condone anybody carrying a knife. and the reason i'm so proactive and what they do is because since my son died, i was one of those parents who was desensitised to everything going on. it wasn't my problem. but, you know, actually, there is a big, real problem. it is notjust children affiliated with gangs, drug—related or county lines that are carrying knives. boys and girls are scared and they are carrying knives. my son had takena and they are carrying knives. my son had taken a beating when he was 17 bya had taken a beating when he was 17 by a 28—year—old man and it was unprovoked. we reported it to the police. all charges were dropped because of the witness is not coming forward. so my son was then labelled a snitch. and it was very unsafe for him to go out. the crept quiet. he
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did not know how bad it was. what do you think is that the root of this? i think there is a loss of blaming going on. it is the police or the government, collectively we are all responsible for this. we need to get away grassroot level so we start off in the home. we need to monitor what children are watching, what they are doing. i don't hear anybody mentioning serotonin levels, the connection between internet and the endorphins being released. you are talking to me before about videogames. yeah. if you have a teenager who has a loss of games, i don't want to mention which games, where you get points for stabbing somebody or killing somebody, you know, the brain is a magical thing. it is flashing a reward system through when that child is getting points. you think everybody says a responsibility to fix it, what does the government need to do? the
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government needs to employ more people on a grassroots level that i ex gang members, children who have carried knives who have gone through that, parents who have lost children, we need to getting directly to the children and let them see the consequences. do we need stronger sentences? yeah, we do, but two of the perpetrators got 18 years for my son. you can put them in prison for 18 years and throw away the key, but if you do give them help and support and try to rehabilitate them and change their frame of to rehabilitate them and change theirframe of mind, to rehabilitate them and change their frame of mind, you are going to get a worse problem 20 years from now because they will all be released. you are saying the former gang members, now youth workers, is we need to invest more in young people stop yes. thank you so much, roseanne, thank you for coming down today. let us chat to some of young people at white hart lane. this is a lisi. you can relax for a moment. how safety you feel walking around your streets in tottenham ?
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how safety you feel walking around your streets in tottenham? you are 16. you always need to be careful. i was need to be careful. people are really unpredictable. i won't say it isjust young really unpredictable. i won't say it is just young people. really unpredictable. i won't say it isjust young people. i think in general. i isjust young people. i think in general. lam not isjust young people. i think in general. i am not sure what the authorities can do, because there are a lot of people who do not want to comply, a lot of people who won't. i definitely enjoy having my time out and having fun with my friends and do things, but at certain points of the day there are areas i do not go into because i do not want to be under threat. jj, cameron, stop for a moment and have a chat. you guys know people who carry knives, is that right?” a chat. you guys know people who carry knives, is that right? i have heard of if you names, yeah. like roseanne says, they are carrying knives not to use them, but to stay safe, is better ——is that you understand? they feel protected if they carry one. huge issues to
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understand to try to make things safer. five students just from this school have lost their lives in the last seven years. we are going to chat to more guest lebron. for now back to you. fascinating insight this morning —— more guests later on. it is good to be on the ground to understand how people, young people are feeling at the moment and the reasons for carrying knives. and moving to hear from a the reasons for carrying knives. and moving to hearfrom a brief the reasons for carrying knives. and moving to hear from a brief to mother as well. —— a grieving mother. we are going to the brecon beacons today. experts believe a fungus that's deadly to ash trees is spreading more quickly and lethally throughout britain than originally predicted. wales has been hardest hit. 0ur reporter tomos morgan is in the brecon beacons for us this morning. good morning. good morning. as good morning. as you good morning. as you can good morning. as you can see good morning. as you can see there good morning. as you can see there as you can se are good morning. as you can see there are tens of thousands of ashtrays and almost all of these trees are showing signs of having a disease
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thatis showing signs of having a disease that is affecting ashtrays all over the uk. this is causing a huge issue for those in forests across england, wales, and northern ireland. it is causing a particular problem for landowners with trees overlooking vulic roads and highways. the majority of this is ashun you have had to chop it down. these are ash tree is that we had to take down. on gabbin's estate in the brecon beacons there are the 2000 ash trees, and they are almost all showing signs of the dieback. trees, and they are almost all showing signs of the diebackm trees, and they are almost all showing signs of the dieback. it is a tragedy. it has an increasingly big impact on us and diverting us from other woodland management. ash dieback causes loss of lee's as well as lesions on the park and it is usually fatal was the tree is infected. the immune system is infected. the immune system is infected and it has slowly over time. those concerned in uk back in
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2012, the local —— latest forestry commission survey says that wales seems worst affected than the other nations. with more ashtrays in a smaller area than in the rest of the uk, 80% of wales is now infected. 60% of england has the disease and 32% of northern ireland has been impacted. with a smaller number of ashtrays compared to the size of the country, only 20% of scotland has been affected, plus it is thought that the climate for the north has hinted dieback spread their eu have an area that has been affected and it is dead. further south experts believe the spread is far worse than anticipated. it has spread more quickly and more lethally than we had been led to believe at the beginning. it is having a significant impact already on a
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landscape scale, on the british landscape, because ash is such an iconic tree in the landscape. he was governor and said it was working closely with natural resources wales to set up an awareness group —— the world cup meite. landowners like a gabbin spent thousands of pounds dealing with a growing problem. joining mejust outside brecon beaconsis joining mejust outside brecon beacons is chrisjones joining mejust outside brecon beacons is chris jones from joining mejust outside brecon beacons is chrisjones from natural resources wales, a senior tree protection officer. it is not always obvious with these histories which ones have the dieback. here we have a young tree with the classic example of the symptoms you will see on trees that have suffered from ash dieback. what happens if the infection has come down into the leaves, down a side branch, and affected the stem and caused this diamond shaped lesion on the skin. just across the road where we have parked there is a tree overlooking our vehicles and this one has got one as well and will have to be
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taken down one as well and will have to be ta ken down eventually. one as well and will have to be taken down eventually. in these woodland conditions it is not as difficult a problem as it is on these roadside trees, that we can see. this particular tree it is very difficult to tell with the ivy and so on on the tree, but there is infection on the branches, which showed the disease and you can see, i know from what i can look at, i can see where the disease has been. as far as the disease is concerned, he world cup meite has responsibility for tree health in wales —— the welsh government. we try to keep the trees as long as possible and manage them normally. those trees where they could be a risk, landowners will have to take a greater responsibility and start identifying the disease earlier. thank you very much. we will have more on the issue of ash dieback later on the programme. thank you very much. it is a
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fascinating thing. ashes such a popular tree in the uk. some indigenous. it is sad to see it happen. it is one of those days where you have stuff happening in the woods, we are also looking up to the woods, we are also looking up to the skies. extraordinary events happening with spacex. we are expecting it in a couple of minutes. three minutes. the spacex sure will undocked from the international space station to begin hisjourney back to earth. we will bring it to light. find out what is happening where you are and we will see win good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the mayor will announce funding today to deliver more than a thousand new homes on the site of a former london prison. over £41 million will be provided to develop the holloway prison site in islington. peabody housing association has promised at least 600 homes will be genuinely affordable. the mayor is providing a £41.6 million loan from his land fund, helping peabody deliver more than 1000 homes on the site following the prison's closure in 2016, 60% of which will be genuinely affordable. more mental health care for new mothers is being put
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in place by the nhs in london. more than 10% of women develop a mental illness between the time they become pregnant and when the baby reaches 1. £6 million will be used to provide specialist care to more than 5,000 women a year. a charity aimed at helping young people at risks from youth violence in east london has been launched. the youth charter is backed by the united nations and has for years been working on moss side in manchester. now it's teamed up with the university of east london to train up volunteers to mentor and inspire local youngsters. today is international women's day and all this week bbc london has been meeting women across the capital taking part in activities that were previously closed to them. sarah bowen is the only female helicopter instructor in the uk, and she's about to train the country's first muslim female pilot. she says more advice is needed in schools. i wouldn't have known anything about it from the careers advice i had at school. i think is more and more important now that people do learn about this at an early age.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. fairly good on the tube — just minor delays on london overground. south western railway has no trains running between windsor and eton riverside and staines, due to electrical supply problems. 0nto the roads: as you can see traffic is building up on the a40 into town from the greenford flyover. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. it's a beautiful start to the day, with plenty of early sunshine around, but it is a rather chilly one. a touch of frost out there for the rural spots. the sunshine will last through the morning, but then into the afternoon we're expecting it to cloud over and eventually we'll see some outbreaks of rain. quite a cool, but a lovely, bright morning. any early cloud across essex will clear away really quite quickly. we'll keep the sunshine throughout the morning. then into western home counties first it'll cloud over, this weather front pushing through. the wind will pick up as well, but it won't be as blustery as it was yesterday.
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and for some of us, some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle as we head through to the end of the afternoon. top temperatures between nine and 11 degrees celsius. through this evening's rush hour we're likely to see that outbreaks of rain. plenty of thickening cloud. but that's all set to clear south—eastwards as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. clear skies developing. overnight lows between 5 and 8 degrees celsius. so not quite as chilly tomorrow morning. over the weekend the wind will pick up again at times. mostly dry with some sunny spells. watch out for some showers. cooler by sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning to you. we have been
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waiting for a moment in space when the spacex shot on docks from the international space station. it can happen any minute now and then it will begin its final part of the journey back to earth. the picture you are looking at now is pictures of the spacex craft. the camera is attached to the international space station. we are going to stay on the images because we are listing into the commentary. what are we expecting to see? it is in around 60 seconds. we will see the group capshaw. no crew in it. —— crew.
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seconds. we will see the group capshaw. no crew in it. -- crew. we can listen in to what nasa is saying as we look at this. what is difficult about this? not to denigrate it but it is just an hooking... it is happening now. this isa hooking... it is happening now. this is a test missions are it is the first time we have seen anything happens at every step is a first step. let's listen in to the commentary. applause . cheering applause .cheering and applause . cheering and applause. libby, pick up . cheering and applause. libby, pick up on what we are saying. the applause is from mission control. that image now, it isjust applause is from mission control. that image now, it is just drifting away from the international space station. how fast is it travelling?
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just a few metres per second. you do not want to damage the space station with crew in side. it will then fire its rockets and quickly move so they do not hit each other. vehicles are not allowed to approach certain zone. a big part of the test is showing the capsule can move and control itself. right now it is 20 seconds since it started moving away. how far is that from the international space station? 20 - 30 metres as it retreats slowly. i would expect any moment to see the rockets firing and then it will quickly disappear. that is an exciting picture. when the rocket
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fire, what kind of thrust, how quickly it will at start moving? at the moment it is moving a few metres per second. then it will move 17,000 miles an houraround per second. then it will move 17,000 miles an hour around the earth. per second. then it will move 17,000 miles an hour around the earthm is such a thing to get into your head. it is so still but it is travelling at 17 one half thousand miles per hour! yes. you can see it just disappear slowly. all of this is very important because it is a scientific laboratory allowing us to get new ways of getting crew up and down to the international space station. 1:35pm that is when it touched down... splash. splashdown
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when it lands. in terms of all but, what route will be taking. —— orbit it will keep travelling in orbit an splashdown not far from it will keep travelling in orbit an splashdown not farfrom cape canaveral where it was launched. there is a sheep that will go and pick it up to make sure all re—entry is working. you can see the path that shall is allowed to go. you have the vertical marks are different points in that. you can see the shall coming back to that. once it gets over that second line, i would expect it to move more quickly. you can see the light, so everyone knows where it is.” quickly. you can see the light, so everyone knows where it is. i need to see the rocket thrusters! it is quite painfully slow to watch. the
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decision went to fire up the rockets, they had been taken by mission control. there is a dummy sitting in there, replete. when it is piloted by those decisions are taken by the pilot? —— ripley. usually mission control have control but should anything go wrong pilots can pilot it manually. but it can all be done automatically and the crew would be monitoring these things. how big is it in the pod? how much room would we have in there? the capshaw can have seven people but they only use for seats. —— capsule. the whole capsule is a
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few metres across, able to take seven people. it is worth repeating these are like images coming to us from space. the camera is attached to it the international space station. this could be the future of how people may get the space, regular people. absolutely and that is one of the interesting points. this is a commercial company that will be providing services to and from the international space station and they will be able to sell them to companies, wealthy individuals. as time goes forward we may see prices come down and everybody goodbye tickets to space. prices come down and everybody goodbye tickets to spacem prices come down and everybody goodbye tickets to space. it looks suddenly small and lonely. a tiny thing floating in space. it has disappointed me because it has not
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put its thrusters on. i was really looking forward to it. they move very gently and conceded. -- conceded. we will keep an eye on it. thank you for talking us through events and we will come back to it. libby is the way you want. taking us through that. brilliant. landing at 1:45pm the splashdown. here's a summary of this morning's other main stories theresa may will use a speech later today to implore eu leaders to give ground and make changes to her brexit deal. negotiators are preparing to work through the weekend in a last ditch effort to secure changes that will gain the support of mps. labour says the prime minister's speech is an admission of failure. more than 7,000 headteachers in england have written a letter to 3.5 million families warning them of a "funding crisis" in schools. they claim they've been snubbed
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by the education secretary which has been denied by the department for education. the government says funding is continuing to rise to record levels. another teenage boy has been stabbed to death in london, making him the 17th victim of knife crime in the capital since january. police say he was found with multiple chest wounds in west kensington and was taken to hospital but died a short time later. no one has been arrested in connection with the stabbing. the campaign to free nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe from jail in iran has been escalated by the british government. in a rare move she has been granted diplomatic status. it means her case becomes a formal legal dispute between london and tehran. her husband richard radcliffe the action as a big step on the journey to securing his wife's freedom. we will keep an eye on those
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pictures in space. we will go back to it as soon as we can. the prime minister today is game to be speaking and it is a scene as almost a last—minute public plea to the eu to try to save the brexit a deal. time is running out. another key vote by mps on tuesday next week. peter foster atjones vote by mps on tuesday next week. peter foster at jones is vote by mps on tuesday next week. peter foster atjones is from brighton. thank you for your time. would you try and give us your sense of what the eu might make of what theresa may is going to say today. she is speaking to a domestic audience but this is clearly laying down some kind of challenge to the eu today? they do have tvs in russells and they can speak english. ido russells and they can speak english. i do not think it will go down very well at all. —— brussels. she is
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issuing an ultimatum stop geoffrey cox and the brexit secretary meeting came to naught. it is the end of three months going around around the same house with the eu saying we are not game to change the tax top because it is the backstop we built to your specifications. —— backstop. now you want a get out ofjail free cloud. so i do not think theresa may, even for a rattling audience, will achieve anything. —— free card. we have three days in which things could be talked about. is there anything to talk about as it stands now? it is very difficult. geoffrey cox and stephen berkley are not going back to brussels. there was
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talk that would go back for another meeting to hammer out compromises but this has been going on for months. the basic parameters have been set for months and the eu have been set for months and the eu have been saying that the backstop is the backstop and it is there because we wish to make sure there is no return to the trouble in northern ireland and frankie the eu art board of repeating themselves. there is no point going back to brussels until there is something to talk about. talk of a dawn dasha on monday or going back sunday but there is no point going if there is no point. it feels like they have reached the limits of their discussions. we have all been shown the danger in these votes. supposing she loses her vote.
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what attitude will be eu take to what happens next? you know, i think one of the reasons the eu is not moving is because frankly they do not believe she can get the deal over the line whatever concessions that they give her. last time she lost by 230 votes, having told her that she could get the deal over the line. the eu are pretty much resigned that she will lose on tuesday and pretty much resigned that she will have to ask for an extension and, at that point, they hope i think that the british government realise that many‘s deal is not going to get over the line and she is game to have to make a broader church out of this, closer toa broader church out of this, closer to a customs union, the general election, a second referendum. the para meters election, a second referendum. the parameters of deal are set and the eu no there will be a short
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extension and they hope that that will move parliament to a more sustainable, durable consensus.” was going to ask about that next step. people may be confused about that sequence of events. in the event of a no deal, and in the event that the uk parliament says they will not except crashing out, we then, as a nation, have to go to the eu and ask them if we can extend. that is practically how it works. what do you hear about what they will say about the grounds upon which they should offer that to ask? ——to us. which they should offer that to ask? --to us. a short extension is doable, to july if --to us. a short extension is doable, tojuly if the deal has gone through. that will not want to be seen to be driving the bus off the
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cliff at a blind extension will be complex and will come with conditions. they will give us that because in the end that would not wa nt to because in the end that would not want to seem responsible for causing ano want to seem responsible for causing a no deal. when you start to get to a no deal. when you start to get to a longer extension, to the end of the year, people have spoken about a two—year extension, that is much more complicated and that requires us to hold european elections and the eu is going to know why we want the eu is going to know why we want the extension but the basic thing remains that there will not want to drive the bus off the cliff but they will give us the extension so that parliament can come to its senses and everybody realises all roads lead to a deal. 40% of our exports go to the eu. from the eu they want the brits to face up to their choices. —— 48%. the brits to face up to their choices. -- 48%. maybe we will be a
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little clearer by this time next week and i say that with a big cave yet. —— caveat. i don't think one political journalist will think it will be clear in the next weeks. let me show you a picture of us. this is our planet, our home. the view from the international space station this morning, we are fascinated with what is going on up there in the skies, because the x, the crewless sure will has talked or separated from me international space station just a few minutes ago. we were tracking that. it is up there. girevoy touchdown, splashdown at 1:45 p.m.. this is the view above —— gearing for. it is almost cloudless. i don't think that is the picture in the uk. not sure where we are looking at. matt knows everything. not quite. a big storm system coming into view across the pacific.
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these are much quieter here to start the day. the view from the ground is lovely for many, blue skies foremost. a hint of rain on the horizon in the scottish borders this morning. a red sky in the morning, does not half come without a warning. this is the cloud spreading its way in changing from blue to great through the gate and bringing outbreaks of rain. doing so across northern ireland goggly far was in scotland. clear skies across much of scotland, england, and north—eastern wales. temperatures down as low as -3 wales. temperatures down as low as —3 in some parts of scotland and northern ireland. turning hazy through the morning. lasting across eastern england into the start of the afternoon. grey skies, outbreaks of rain in northern ireland and western scotland. spreading into scotland, england, and wales through the second half of the day. splashes of light rain and drizzle through the afternoon into the evening rush hour. this is five o'clock across eastern scotland. heaviest rain in the west. so across shetland through the west. so across shetland through the day. skies will brighten for the
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end of the afternoon in northern ireland after a cloudy and dan day. england and wales, grey afternoon, evening rush—hour, outbreaks of rain. a suffer sprees to go with it. temperatures around 8— 11 degrees. —— showers to go with it. clearer skies for a time and then showers pushed their way in, turning to sleet and snow across parts of scotland. any lengthier clearer skies will lead to temperatures close to frost levels again. a breeze through the night into the morning, keeping the temperatures up a little bit. it will add to a chilly feel this weekend as the winds get stronger and stronger. they mix of showers, which could merge into longer spells of rain and hill snow. particularly for the northern half of the country as we go through saturday. the sunniest of all through saturday. likely to be the southern counties of england and wales. not immune to 12 showers. temperatures 8—13. chillier in the breeze. there are caveats to the
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forecast. mainly driven by a particularly strong jet stream, 180 mph. it could have ripples on it, if it does through the weekend it will change the forecast slightly. keep checking. it could change the showers into longer spells of rain and snow. even strengthen the winds. at the moment it looks at scattered showers for sunday. slow to low levels in the northern areas, so we across scotland and maybe northern ireland. saint—denis between. the best of the south and east. based on the breeze on sunday. a chilly feel as well. that is how it is filling. back to naga and charlie. i have a question that maybe you can look into. when you see winds in the jet stream, 180 mph, is there a calculation or a rule as to how it tra nslates calculation or a rule as to how it translates winds for us? it depends on how thatjet translates winds for us? it depends on how that jet stream translates winds for us? it depends on how thatjet stream meanders and kinks and where we like in relation to it. on it where the wind accelerator can have an impact on the ground, developing weather
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systems, or killing them off. it is very complex. it all depends on how that relates to where we are. just because it is windy in the jet strea m because it is windy in the jet stream does not necessarily mean it will be witty for us either? it depends on where they are strengthening and weakening —— windy for us. it is fascinating. see you later. no disrespect to matt. but i could have given nata nz. no disrespect to matt. but i could have given natanz. it is very complex. -- that answer. is matt still they are. —— there? are you still they are. —— there? are you still there? did you charlie said about you ? still there? did you charlie said about you? i said it is very complex. but it is very crucial what is happening along thatjet stream. i tried to explain it. here is mocking you. other things complex. wa ke mocking you. other things complex. wake up people get support for things they want to do. you are talking particularly and seriously about banks and what they do for female entrepreneurs. do you want to
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come and do this bit as well? yes. you can do anything. this is known as the rose review. alison rose is a senior boss at rbs and was asked by the government to look into why more women aren't getting the support they need to start businesses. well, the report is out today and doesn't make for welcome reading. it shows nearly half of all investment teams — those making the decisions on what to invest in — have no women on them at all. less than 1% of funding goes to all—female teams starting businesses. and the report suggests the uk economy would be £250 billion better off if we backed more female business owners. one of them — affi — started a subscription service for sanitary products. she struggled to get investment. asa as a female founder, first of all it is quite difficult to sell an idea. and the fact that it was an idea aimed for women, it is 51% of the
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population, ifound aimed for women, it is 51% of the population, i found it aimed for women, it is 51% of the population, ifound it was aimed for women, it is 51% of the population, i found it was actually very difficult. men generally will invest in products that either resonate with them or they can relate to it. you talk about eight to be subject, generally periods, i think they will see you because it ta kes a think they will see you because it takes a box that they have spoken to you, but no, it has been extremely hard. there is a lot of noise that has been made that you need to invest in diverse communities, in females, i think it will gradually change. but the world needs more female investors. that will take time. alison rose is with me. she is the author of that report. good morning to you. looking at the figures in your report out today there is a stark difference. talk me through why you think that might be. i think the figures are absolutely very startling. 250 billion value we are leaving on the table for the uk economy shows how important it is.
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there are a number of barriers we have identified. lack of awareness and access to capital is clearly a keel definitely one. entrepreneurs need capital to get going, from entre —— investment capital. any targeted intervention to help them on theirjourney. targeted intervention to help them on their journey. those targeted intervention to help them on theirjourney. those are important. this is not a problem with female entrepreneurs. we have hugely successful female entrepreneurs, great businesses, what we need to do was put targeted intervention to help going forward. there are lots of problems, but lots of opportunities to solve them. to underline that stark difference, male only tyms starting a business has got more than £5 billion in investment. female only funding teams got 32 million. it is an astonishing difference. i wonder if this is because fewer women are applying for that sort of money or is it just applying for that sort of money or is itjust that men dominate and there is outrageous cremation as to where they will put their money?m is all of that. —— alt—right
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discrimination. when we talk to female entrepreneurs they don't know about all the different types of capital and grants that are available. lack awareness is clearly an issue. there is unconscious bias and open bias that exists. we have to tackle both of those elements. it is about getting perceptions understood. there is a misconception that females are more risk averse. they are not. they are more risk aware, but that may come across as being more risk averse which may impact decision—making. if we can create more transparency and awareness and targeted intervention it will make a real difference. is there such thing as a male business and a female business. because if i ama and a female business. because if i am a person who is handing out money to invest in a business i am just looking for a good business, one i will get a return on, one that will
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thrive, one that will be successful. do we need to see it in terms of male and female? your point is exactly right. is it a good business? that is what matters. people will put money into good businesses. the issue we have is that there is clearly a different perception and a barrier between meal and perception and a barrier between mealand —— perception and a barrier between meal and —— male perception and a barrier between mealand —— male and perception and a barrier between meal and —— male and female businesses. investors will invest in good businesses. we seek female lead businesses with the right level of support and intervention are as successful and scale as successfully as mal businesses. investing in good business and taking barriers away to stop people investing getting access to the support they need. in this report you make some strict recommendations for the banks about how they should be lending. you are at natwest, rbs, how many women are on your board and isn't the job for you guys to increase how much money you guys to increase how much money you are lending? yeah. we have it all the statistics in terms of we have very good diverse city, representation on our board. lending to entrepreneurs. i am recommending that banks do more, that vcs do more, that business does more. and by vcs yumi venture capitalists.
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yes. —— you mean. putting a lot of capital into a starter button is often not the right answer. without targeted intervention makes a difference. i've set up 14 free accelerator is across the uk. they have 50—50 male and female representation of entrepreneurs going to those hubs. we put an sme funds, which i launch lost you, of 150 million forfemale funds, which i launch lost you, of 150 million for female lead businesses, as a result of that the lending to female lead businesses has gone up 10%. by not taking a different risk decision, but by making it where it has and available and that is what i am encouraging all banks to do and encouraging venture capitalists to do, so we can help female entrepreneurs get access to the help and support need. really interesting to talk to you. thank you very much. the report out today with some pretty clear instructions to banks about increasing lending to women or female lead businesses. more from me and more on debenhams after eight a.m.. fascinating. very interesting.
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you can change society of the people reflecting it do not reflect society. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. the mayor will announce funding today to deliver more than a thousand new homes on the site of a former london prison. over £41 million will be provided to develop the holloway prison site in islington. peabody housing association has promised at least 600 homes will be genuinely affordable. more mental healthcare for new mothers is being put in place by the nhs in london. more than 10% of women develop a mental illness between the time they become pregnant and when the baby reaches one. £6 million will be used to provide specialist care to more than 5,000 women a year. today is international women's day and all this week bbc london has been meeting women across the capital taking part in activities that were previously closed to them.
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captain sarah bowen is the only female helicopter flight instructor examiner in the uk. she's about to train the country's first muslim female pilot. she says more advice is needed in schools. i wouldn't have known anything about it from the careers advice i had at school. i think is more and more important now that people do learn about this at an early age. let's take a look at the travel situation now. fairly good on the tube — just minor delays on london 0verground. south—western railway has no trains running between windsor and eton riverside and staines, due to electrical supply problems. northwestern railway has no service between watford junction and st albans abbey due to a fault on a train. 0nto the roads: traffic is slow on a406 north circular road southbound past barnet towards henlys corner. in leyton, north birkbeck road remains closed in both directions between langthorne road and hollydown way. the a3 kingston by—pass has a lane closed westbound near the tolworth roundabout for barrier repairs.
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now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. it's a beautiful start to the day, with plenty of early sunshine around, but it is a rather chilly one. a touch of frost out there for the rural spots. the sunshine will last through the morning, but then into the afternoon we're expecting it to cloud over and eventually we'll see some outbreaks of rain. quite a cool, but a lovely, bright morning. any early cloud across essex will clear away really quite quickly. we'll keep the sunshine throughout the morning. then into western home counties first it'll cloud over, this weather front pushing through. the wind will pick up as well, but it won't be as blustery as it was yesterday. and for some of us, some outbreaks of light patchy rain and drizzle as we head through to the end of the afternoon. top temperatures between nine and 11 degrees celsius. through this evening's rush hour we're likely to see that outbreaks of rain. plenty of thickening cloud. but that's all set to clear south—eastwards as we head through the early hours of tomorrow morning. clear skies developing. overnight lows between 5
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and 8 degrees celsius. so not quite as chilly tomorrow morning. over the weekend the wind will pick up again at times. mostly dry with some sunny spells. watch out for some showers. cooler by sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... theresa may goes public with a last ditch plea for european leaders to make changes to the brexit deal — the eu says she has until the end of today to make fresh proposals. more than 7,000 head teachers in england write to millions of parents warning that their schools are facing a funding crisis.
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with this week's death toll from knife crime at six, we are talking to the youth workers, gang members, police chiefs and victims about what we can do to make our streets safe. a battle for debenhams. sports direct boss mike ashley plots a coup at the ailing retailer by sacking its top bosses and installing himself as chief executive. arsenal see red in rennes. they suffer an embarrassing defeat in france, in the europa league while there are no such problems for chelsea. and it is a sunny but frosty started friday for many. already, cloud and rain in northern ireland will spread to all parts through the day. details on that and your full weekend forecast coming up on brea kfast. it's friday the 8th of march. our top story... theresa may will use a speech to implore eu leaders to give ground and make changes to her brexit deal. negotiators are preparing to work through the weekend in a last ditch
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effort to secure changes that will gain the support of mps. in a moment, adam fleming will have the view from brussels, but first our political correspondent, nick eardley, joins us from westminster with theresa may today, there is almost going to be a very public plea, isn't there? she is talking in lincolnshire, but very mindful that eu leaders are listening? she is in grimsby, one of the areas that voted most strongly for brexit in 2016. as you say, her message is to brussels. she is saying that we all want to get a deal, but if you don't give me changes, its very unlikely i am going to get one through. her basic argument is that she has made clear that changes on the irish border issue are the price of getting a deal through. let's get them. what europe does in the next few days will be key to whether she manages to get a deal through parliament next week. why are we at this stage?
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the simple answer is that talks are not going well. there has been no breakthrough so far. number 10 admits that talks have been tough. they are likely to go down to the wire. all the while, there are many in the house of commons still sitting there and going, we have told you we need changes, so far you have not delivered them. if we don't get them, we are not going to be able to vote for this deal next week. as things stand, all of the signs are that it is going to be another tough week for the prime minister. she is saying to brussels, help me out here, give me something ican take help me out here, give me something i can take back to my mps and maybe get things through. adam is in brussels. adam, in a way, theresa may is sending out a slightly challenging tone to the eu, isn't she? she is saying you are the ones that need to come up with something different. how is that going to go down, do you think?” different. how is that going to go down, do you think? i think the eu might be a little bit perplexed about this. this is not a process with leaders standing at podiums in
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grimsby or wherever, making with leaders standing at podiums in grimsby orwherever, making big statements in political terms. the process at the moment is about people being in a room, poring over a document that both sides could sign up to by the beginning of next week, that could help get the deal over the line. that process is not turning out quite as we expected. we thought that steve barclay, the brexit secretary, geoffrey cox, the attorney general, the chief lawyer working on this, would be back in brussels today. it was never confirmed, but it is now definitely not happening. instead, officials and civil servants will carry on meeting and we think they will carry on working over the weekend as well. what they come up with his anyone's gas. whether it will work, anyone's guess, too. is theresa may expected... i mean, it is tuesday, this vote, are they expecting her to return, you mention to being face—to—face? return, you mention to being face-to-face? there was a sort of
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dream a notional timetable floating around the last couple of days, that the uk would taper more proposals today, the eu would give a provisional thumbs up, the negotiators would work over the weekend and then you could see theresa may coming to brussels on monday, shaking hands with jean—claude juncker like the pictures we just saw. that was the ideal world timetable if things went really smoothly. i'm being told by people behind the scenes they are not going as smoothly as that. thank you very much. i'mjust not going as smoothly as that. thank you very much. i'm just taking notes, it is fascinating getting that view from adams in brussels, because we will be talking to james cleverly, the deputy chairman of the conservative party. it is one of those days where we say if nothing is happening that was supposed to be happening, what can you tell us about what is happening? theresa may did not make the speech in the uk, but we will be following up later in the day. more than 7,000 headteachers in england have written a letter to 3.5 million families warning them of a "funding crisis" in schools. they claim they've been snubbed by the education secretary
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which has been denied by the department for education. head teachers are writing to 3.5 million parents, in areas from cornwall to cumbria, to warn them that schools are not receiving adequate levels of funding. they say that it means fewer teachers, bigger class sizes, cutting out some subjects and having less support for children with mental health problems. some schools have said they might have to close early on fridays to save money. and parents have been asked to make donations. head teachers are quoting the institute for fiscal studies which says per—pupilfunding has fallen by 8% since 2010. the letter to parents also accuses the education secretary damian hinds of refusing a request to talk to them about budget shortages. the head teachers are angry at a response from officials, saying that the education secretary did not have time to meet. but the department for education says that this is unfair and that
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mr hinds readily meets teachers and unions and it is completely untrue to say that funding is not a priority. the department says schools are receiving record levels of funding and mr hinds is putting a strong case to the treasury, ahead of the next spending review. sean coughlan, bbc news. another teenage boy has been stabbed to death in london, making him the 17th victim of knife crime in the capital since january. police say he was found with multiple chest wounds in west kensington and was taken to hospital but died a short time later. no—one has been arrested in connection with the stabbing. sports direct boss mike ashley is attempting to take total control of struggling department store debenhams. ben can give some insight. explain the set up, then, at debenhams, what he controls on what he is trying to control? it is shaping up to be a battle of soap opera proportions. you have mike ashley, the man that heads sports direct, in the middle.
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he already owns a 30% stake in debenhams. he also bought house of fraser out of administration last year. as we said, he has sports direct and a number of other retailers. 0n the other side you have the debenhams board. he is unhappy with how they are running the company and says you all need to go. he wants to fire them all, except one. he wants to hang onto the finance director. he succeeded in getting rid of the chairman last year. he says the rest of the board needs to go. he wants to put himself on the board, as chairman or chief executive. he says he could run this better. if you start looking into some of the detail, what many expect is that he wants to merge debenhams with house of fraser and make it a high street retailer to be reckoned with. debenhams is a story that really illustrates the decline in the high street. 0nce really illustrates the decline in the high street. once the pinnacle of where we might go to shop for all sorts of things, it has issued a number of profit warnings last year. the latest, coming just this week.
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it says profits for the year will come much lower than expected. it had a dreadful christmas, and shares have fallen 90% over the last year. they are now worth just 3p per share. something has clearly got to give, something needs to change. mike ashley thinks he is the man to do it. the debenhams board say they are disappointed with the approach. but mike ashley has the power to call a shareholder meeting. he is hoping he can get other shareholders on board to make the change. certainly want to watch, it could be dramatic. the campaign to free nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe from jail in iran has been escalated by the british government. in a rare move she has been granted diplomatic status. it means her case becomes a formal legal dispute between london and tehran. her husband richard radcliffe says the action is a big step towards securing his wife's freedom. first, it recognises very clearly the violation of nazanin's rights. secondly, it recognises very clearly that nazanin is british. and one of the things the iranians always say is she is a dual national and, you know, you can't have access.
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so at the very basic level of being able to get in and see her, check she's ok, that makes it a much stronger claim for the uk. and it also signals that this is intolerable. this has gone on for nearly three years. this is an innocent person being used as leverage. an ambitious nasa project to get people into space has moved step closer today after a test flight set down in the atlantic ocean. the spacex crewless capsule undocked from the international space station to head back to earth. that is the image you can see. that was the momentjust after 7:30am, as it inched away from the international space station. we didn't actually see the moment when it launched its own rockets to power itself back to earth. thatjourney is expected to splash land at about 1.45, we understand, this afternoon. it is beginning its descent now. we
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can show you the live image now, from the international space station. this is obviously the picture from space of earth. it is a remarkable image. we will watch with interest to the rest of the day to see how the rest of the day's events unfold. another teenager has died after he was stabbed in london yesterday afternoon. the unnamed victim was found in west kensington with stab injuries to his chest. he died later in hospital. he's the sixth person to be stabbed in the uk in the space of a week and the 17th in london this year. official figures show that fatal stabbings are increasing in england and wales at the fastest rate since records began. between march 2017 and 2018, 285 killings were carried out with a knife or sharp instrument.
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that's an increase of nearly 33% on the previous 12 months. so how do we solve the problem that police chiefs are calling a national crisis. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at the london boxing academy for us this morning where they're working with the local community to help reduce crime. there are very interesting initiatives and approaches to hitting this problem on the street, hitting this problem on the street, hitting attitudes and tackling the fear that often makes some young people decide they are going to carry a knife because they are scared? yes, that is what we have been hearing this morning. the kids that are carrying knives are not just the kids that are determined to cause harm, they are kids that are afraid of going out. they are doing what everyone else seems to be doing. actually, hearing from everybody this morning, the vast majority of children here do not carry knives. at last chatted to some people that have lived experience of this. bobby, you came out of prison... when was that? four
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years ago. you understand these issues, because this is the life that you lead? it is a thing where kids feel... some of them are scared, some of them it is a trend. i understand it, when i was doing it, all of my friends were doing it, i wanted to be part of that, you thought you were being left out. it's about educating these youths and letting them know there are consequences, life imprisonment, death, murders, people are dying. how have you made a difference? by creating a platform for them, giving them opportunities, sports is a big unifier to control these kids, as you can see here, what these young people are doing, boxing, we do football. it makes a huge difference in their lives. giving them something that is away from the gangs. like i keep saying, we have a thing called think outside the block, it lets them think outside the community and their gangs. do you think you are making a difference? 10096,
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you think you are making a difference? 100%, we you think you are making a difference? 10096, we have kids that have been involved in gangs, they have been involved in gangs, they have been involved in gangs, they have been involved in that life style, have been involved in that lifestyle, and we can influence them away from that. that is a thing that we want to keep pursuing, helping them achieve their goals. you want kids to feel like they have something to live for? let me introduce claudia. claudia, you have been talking about these issues for nearly 30 years now. you were involved in operation trident in the 19905. involved in operation trident in the 1990s. do you feel we have made any progress at all? we are here in 2019 andl progress at all? we are here in 2019 and i believe what we are faced with now is an epidemic. this is a national crisis. in a sense, we need to declare it as such. that means if we declare it as a national crisis, you are recognising you cannot police your way out of this problem, you cannot firefight your way out of the problem, you have to tackle the root causes of what is going on. what's the answer? that means investment. you have to turn to
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communities and neighbourhoods, and give the investment that was stolen from young people. that means youth clubs not to be shot, youth provisions that work on the streets, detached youth work. if i say detached youth work. if i say detached youth work. if i say detached youth work, the vast majority of the population probably doesn't know what that means any more. it was about working with young people in different ways, inside and outside. providing that level of emotional and cognitive support. it means partnerships in schools, having that great sense of schools, having that great sense of schools and communities working together. it means community policing, not policing that is about just targeted policing. it means a whole approach. you want more police not on stop and search, but in schools, talking to young people?” wa nt schools, talking to young people?” want more resources, investment, investment, investment. and i want this tory government to declare this a national crisis because it is an epidemic and therefore it needs change and investment. it needs local authorities having a statutory youth service again and not having centres like this, without any
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statutory provisions at all. lets talk to some of the young people he this morning. chris hall, you run this morning. chris hall, you run this place. thanks for getting up so early this morning. what do you think the problem is? how do you see your role in fixing it? there is a myriad of issues that have come together to make a perfect storm, u nfortu nately. together to make a perfect storm, unfortunately. poor leadership is the prime candidate for responsibility. we need someone to say, i'm going to stop this. no one has. everybody has been deflecting responsibility to other people. nobody has stepped forward and said, iam the nobody has stepped forward and said, i am the person that is going to ta ke i am the person that is going to take responsibility and stop this. no one. that is what we need. philip hammond has said that police have to use their resources, they are not going to throw any more money at the situation. lots of people this morning say we do actually need to throw some money at this. other people say, no, parents at home have got to have more responsibility. yes, but there are many aspects.
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certainly, father poverty is very important. some children don't see their fathers, important. some children don't see theirfathers, or important. some children don't see their fathers, or they see them every few weeks, i think that is very important. we need work for young people to do. they can go out and earn money. lots of factories have shot, there is no production, no mines. if you are 16 and 17 and can't find work it is very difficult. lets bring in the kids, alessia, jj, cameron, are there kids out there that feel they have nothing to live for and they are not scared of the consequences? when you think there is a certain life that has been set out for you, especially if you are growing up poor, always lacking something, if it is a mother figure or father figure, you try to find satisfaction in other places. i think for a lot of young people, considering they can't find jobs, they can't find anything for them, they can't find anything for them, they look to more serious things that they think is going to fit the
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bill. a lot of people turn to drugs, terrible industries, dangerous things. let me briefly say, what is the relationship between young people and the police? 0ur young people and the police? 0ur young people scared of the consequences, do they respect the police?” people scared of the consequences, do they respect the police? i think for young people, the police are the opposition, always against them. when they get approached by police, they might think, they are trying to get me arrested they have a negative response towards them. thank you so much, you have all been brilliant. thanks for having us down. we are almost out of time. richard and roseanne, richard from west midlands police, is there a problem between the police and the public, you are pro stop and search, but do police need to be spending more time engaging? of course we do. the problem at the moment is that policing is like whack a mole. we are running between 909 calls, we don't have time to do stop and search even if we wanted to, let
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alone engage with the community, explain what we are doing. that is what we want to do, treating people with dignity and respect. what marco botti want harsher —— you want harsher sentences as well? a message has to be sent that this is unacceptable, children are dying. it has to stop. repeat offenders need to be sent away. that message has to go out. thank you so much. roseanne, off camera before you set a year after your son was killed you have already forgiven the people responsible, why?” killed you have already forgiven the people responsible, why? i have reached a place of forgiveness, quite early on after his murder. because, you know, if! quite early on after his murder. because, you know, if i am resentful and bitter, i am carrying that message forward. we need to have more forgiveness. we need to not run on pride and ego, and if we can tackle that. but in response to the
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tougher sentences, yes, itotally agree with that. a two of the perpetrators that murdered my son received 18 years, a minimum of 18 years. if there is no rehabilitation for them, when they come out in 20 years' time, we have a whole new epidemic, all of these people that are getting life sentences, they will all be released at the same time, if they are not rehabilitated, they don't get counselling, they don't get all of these things, it is just going to be another whole issue on top. thank you so much for speaking so powerfully this morning. thank you, everybody, for coming down. you have all been great, there are such important issues. what is the answer? hopefully we have tried to shed some light. thank you to all of you and all of your guests. it has certainly got our viewers talking this morning. particularly those that are so closely involved, like roseanne and her story, a big thank you to those involved today. lets talk to matt
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and find out what is happening with the weather. some wind about this weekend? strengthening wind and turning cold. a time—lapse of the sunrise in london, it has been a sunny start to friday for the vast majority. a little bit on the cold side however. at the same time, already clouds are gathering towards the west. this is the latest view from north—west wales. the grey skies are such to bring some rain. that rain is already in across northern ireland and will spread eastwards. here it is on the satellite imagery, edging in. a clear slot after yesterday's cloud and rain. while we have sunshine across a good part of scotland, england and eastern wales, it isa scotland, england and eastern wales, it is a bit chilly, temperatures below freezing for scotland on eastern england in particular. you need a warm jacket it at least to begin with. the sunshine is hazy from the west. brighter skies and eastern parts of scotland and england. in the west, rain this morning, on and off throughout the
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day, spreading into wales, western england and parts of scotland. post a detailed towards the evening rush hour, the odd splash of rain here and there in eastern scotland, some snow in shetland. it clears away from northern ireland, finishing the day brighter than we begin. we will start to see splashes of light rain and drizzle in eastern england by the time we hit the rush hour. patchy rain in the west replaced by something a bit heavy at times, by the time we finished the day. a strengthening south—west breeze temperatures eight or 11 degrees. loud and outbreaks of rain clear away initially and then we start to see more showers spreading their way into longer spells of rain and even some snow across shetland and orkney. where you have clear skies, a touch of frost, but for many the breeze will keep things at bay. this weekend, it is going to be quite a blustery weekend, feeling cold in that wind. while we see some rain, some sunshine in between. a bit of a
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weekend of uncertainty, it is just how long the showers will last. plenty of them for the northern half of the country, turning to snow in scotland. the best of the saturday sunshine at the further south you are, even here, not immune to showers. the weather this weekend is being driven by particularly vigorousjet being driven by particularly vigorous jet streams in the sky above us. that is up to 180 mph at times. that will have an impact on the weather. it could merge the showers into longer spells of rain until snow. a covering of snow for some in scotland on sunday morning. sunshine and showers for sunday morning, and pretty chilly. thank you, we will see you in... 25 minutes! an investigation into some of the biggest names in specialist car alarms sold in the uk has revealed security flaws which left owners' vehicles more vulnerable to being stolen or hijacked. it found clifford and pandora alarms accidentally made it easy for criminals to take control of any car fitted with their smart alarm systems.
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click‘s dan simmons is here to tell us more. it kind of negates the part of a smart alarm system! you are nodding, because you have been looking into it. what has happened? well, these car alarms are fitted to cars after you have bought them. they are third party car alarms. aftermarket car alarms. why would you fit one of those? good question, you would think that cars already have reasonable security, right? 0ver recent yea rs, reasonable security, right? 0ver recent years, we have seen keyless entry fobs, the car knows you are close and it pops open, convenient. criminals have been using relays to boost the signal from your key fobs, which could be sitting at home on a windowsill, and they creep up to the back of your house, they boost the signal, the car thinks you are right next to it, it opens the locks and the criminal is away with the car.
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so, the popularity of third—party alarms and immobilisers has increased over recent years, to stop this carjacking, if you like. paint isa this carjacking, if you like. paint is a picture, you think you have been super careful, you have installed a secondary alarm system, driving your car, you can give a demonstration of how something awful can happen? we have worked with a security company that had been looking into these vulnerabilities. they have shown exactly how you can huack they have shown exactly how you can hijack a car. we can see this. you've got them to act it out? here are the hackers, they are in hoodies, so you know who the baddies are. they have got control of the usehs are. they have got control of the user's account. they have set it off, so the driver pulled over. the hackers come up to the car. the driver tries to lock the doors, but they unlock the doors because the hacker has control of the vehicle.
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0ut hacker has control of the vehicle. outcomes hacker has control of the vehicle. 0ut comes the driver, rather sensibly, moving away. in goes the attacker. he can start the engine and then drive off with the car. give some reassurance, because that is alarming, excuse the pun. has it been sorted? the way the area of the security industry works is that it is called responsible disclosure. so, they tell these alarm companies that they are going to tell everybody, they are going to go on bbc breakfast and tell everybody how you do it in seven days' time. can you do it in seven days' time. can you please fix the problem before then? have they? because it might be on your interests. pandora fixed it infour on your interests. pandora fixed it in four days, on your interests. pandora fixed it infourdays, i on your interests. pandora fixed it in four days, i am pleased to tell you. viper and clifford, they took five days to fix it. did they warn the customers? not that we know that they warned their customers, they agree that all the accounts were vulnerable and people that had these systems were open to these sorts of
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attacks. there is so much to talk about with this. thank you so much. you have whet our appetite. you can see the bbc click investigation tomorrow and sunday. now the weather and travel where you are. good morning. it has been a rather chilly start to the day with some frost across northern parts of the uk. while it is sunny for many this
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morning, on the satellite imagery you can see this mass of clouds moving from the west, and beneath that some rain. by lunchtime that will have moved to northern ireland into much of scotland, north—west england, wales, the southwest. patchy rain spreading into the midlands. the far south—east of england staying driest for longest. maximum temperature is between about seven and 11 degrees. quite blustery but winds not as strong as yesterday. it will be a feature through the next few days, strong winds developing tonight, showers moving into northern ireland, north—west england, falling as snow through the higher ground. not as cold as last night, especially in southern parts. a westerly a i rstrea m especially in southern parts. a westerly airstream will continue to bring very unsettled weather as we go through the weekend. it will feel very chilly at times, there will certainly be snow, perhaps to low levels by sunday. during saturday,
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lots of the snow is in the higher ground of the pennines in scotland. some sunny spells, particularly the further south and east you are. feeling chilly with maximum temperatures of around seven to 11 degrees. further showers on sunday, coming down to a low level. you might get hail, sleet and wet snow down to sea level. the showers will drift south and east. quite significant snowfall over higher ground and really quite blustery conditions with strong winds during sunday, maximum temperatures around 6010 degrees. the finer detailfor the weekend is uncertain, so if you have plans, stay tuned to the forecast. —— the maximum temperatures between six and 10 degrees.
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