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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 10, 2019 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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hello this is bbc this is bbc news — i'm ben brown. event. you can see more of those on the website. goodbye for now. news with ben brown. the headlines at 10:00. the headlines: an ethiopian airlines plane with more than 150 people on board an ethiopian airlines plane has crashed on a flight with more than a 150 people on board has crashed on a flight from addis ababa to nairobi. from addis ababa to nairobi. two leading brexiteers have urged the prime minister not two leading brexiteers urge to delay leaving the eu if she loses the prime minister not the meaningful vote to delay leaving the eu — on her withdrawal deal if she loses the meaningful vote on her withdrawal deal in the commons this week. in the commons this week. two more british women living two more british women living in detention camps in syria, in detention camps in syria, with five children between them, with five children between them, are reported to have been stripped are reported to have been stripped of their uk citizenship. of their uk citizenship. sir cliff richard joins other public sir cliff richard joins other figures calling for a law to protect public figures calling for the law the anonymity of people suspected to protect the anonymity of people of sexual offences until they are suspected of sexual offences actually charged with a crime. until they are actually charged with a crime. the family of a 23—year—old british woman missing in guatemala say they're "desperately worried" for her safety. the family of a 23—year—old british woman missing in guatemala and as part of talking movies 20th say they're "desperately worried" anniversary celebrations — for her safety. damian
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before the papers, sport — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's hugh woozencroft. good morning. wales are on the verge of a six nations grand slam after beating scotland 18—11atmurrayfield. josh adams and jonathan davies scored the tries for wales, as warren gatland's side survived a scottish fightback. they host ireland next saturday and have now won their last 13 matches. i think ithink in i think in the past we would have absorbed that pressure and cracked. i think there were so few occasions when they were pressing against us and we were sort of driving them back defensively, got to 10—15 metres and got a turnover. a big bonus. at twickenham, england walloped italy, scoring eight tries on their way to a 57—14 win. manu tuilagi ran over for two tries, and england can still win the six nations if results go their way next weekend.
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that's providing they beat scotland, which head coach eddiejones says won't be easy. this is their game, you know. so this is the one game they get themselves up for. they pulled our pants down badly last year, so we've got some work to do to make sure we finish the game with our pants up. ireland host france later, in what will be their head coach joe schmidt's final six nations match at the aviva stadium after five years in charge. they have only lost once in his 15 games in charge in dublin. we've had some great years, some great occasions in the aviva and it would be great if this is another really positive experience. and we've been working toward that this week, but it is certainly about the performance that players play under those circumstances. you never know when your next cap is coming and the
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length of your career, so i guess coaches operate like that as well, you know! england's women set themselves up for a possible grand slam by beating italy 55—0 in exeter. there were over 10,000 fans at sandy park — a record for a non—world cup england home game. they play scotland at twickenham next weekend. football can't escape discussions over the video assistant referee — even when it's not in use! manchester city extended their lead at the top of the premier league table. but their 3—1 win over watford wasn't without controversy. raheem sterling opening the scoring at the etihad despite looking to be offside. he went on to score a hat—trick, as city moved four points clear. liverpool have the chance to close the gap when they host burnley in a midday kick off... managerjurgen klopp is staying positive despite a run ofjust one win in their last five in all competitions for liverpool. we are in a position we like to be,
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we liked the position before. it's not a problem. what we always said — we wanted to be in a position to fight for the top spot in the league and we are still in, and that's all that we need to be positive, to be optimistic, to be excited in a very positive way about the challenge and all that stuff. our only problem this weekend is burnley. in the scottish premiership, leaders celtic drew 0—0 with aberdeen. they're eight points clear of rangers in second. elsewhere, livingston beat stjohnstone 3—1. hearts won 1—0 at dundee, and motherwell scored three in their victory over hamilton. britain's sam bird has won the hong kong formula e eprix. but it wasn't without controversy — bird is currently being investigated after nudging germany's andre lotterer, who then suffered a punctured tyre and crashed out.
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lotterer was leading before the nudge. bird said it's a shame the race ended that way. sir mo farah is in action this morning in the big half. it's a half marathon through london that starts at tower bridge and finishes at the cutty sark in greenwich. these are our lives pictures. farah won this race last year. he's among a lead group of three, with belgium's bashir abdi and kenya's daniel wanjiru, who won the london marathon in 2017. three british women currently among the leaders in the women's race. steph twell, charlotte purdue and charlotte arter. live coverage right now on the red button. also on the bbc website and app. matthew fitzpatrick has a one—shot lead over rory mcilroy going into the final round at the arnold palmer invitational in florida.
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fitzpatrick, who is looking for his first pga tour title, has only dropped three shots so far at bay hill. he produced a bogey—free 5—under 67 to take the lead. but mcilroy is on the charge — the northern irishman had been seven back overnight, but he hit seven birdies as he carded 66 to move into contention. that is all the support for now. you can that is all the support for now. you ca n follow that is all the support for now. you can follow the big half on the sport website or app. but now, ben brown with the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review. with me are business commentator josie cox and education editor at the sunday times sian griffiths. welcome to both and thank you being with us. let's take a look
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at the front pages. the mail on sunday says a nurse who took care of renowned scientist stephen hawking is the subject of a tribunal. the sunday telegraph leads with an opinion poll suggesting public support for a no—deal brexit is currently at 44%. staying with brexit, the sunday times says cabinet ministers have warned theresa may she might have to quit if she wants to pass her brexit deal this week. also going with brexit, the sunday express carries a call by conservative backbencher jacob rees—mogg, describing the prime minister's deal as "rotten". and the observer reports a church of england bishop calling home secretary sajid javid a "moral coward" over the death of shamima begum's three week old child. so, a varied set of front pages — let's have a look at some of them in more detail. brexit dominating as you'd expect. let us start with the sunday telegraph story, josie, the public swinging behind a no deal claims the
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sunday telegraph, on the basis of this opinion poll. 44% of the public, they are saying, believe the uk should leave without a deal if brussels refuses to make any more concessions. that is they are saying a six point rise from january, what you make of that? it's interesting, i don't know if this is a genuine reflection of changing sentiments or if this is just a sign we are all com pletely if this is just a sign we are all completely brexit fatigued and want to get on with things. i also don't know whether the people who are responding to this poll understand the full implications of what a no—deal brexit would mean or whether they are basically wanting the whole thing over and done with, of the table, so we can move on and focus on other things. what is clear is this will be a crunch week. on tuesday, another vote on theresa may's existing deal, which for all intents and purposes looking like it won't go through. you think she won't go through. you think she won't make any progress?” won't go through. you think she won't make any progress? i don't see what has changed since the last time
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we had a vote on it. other than the deadline is looming? we always knew the deadline was the 29th of march. the allegation as she has been deliberately running down the clock to concentrate the minds of mps, do you think it will work? just from the rhetoric coming out of the party and beyond, it doesn't seem like sentiment has changed towards her. there are calls for her to resign. there are calls for her to resign. there is speculation that she is not going to survive the next week. on wednesday, we've got the spring statement coming out. we also a p pa re ntly statement coming out. we also apparently have a vote on the table, which could take the option of no deal off the table completely. but whether we get to the point of being able to have that vote is another question. i think what we have to consider is if theresa may doesn't survive the week or doesn't survive the fortnight, who will replace her? that is another question. and is actually, indeed, worth replacing her? because with somebody who replaces her be able to do any
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betterjob of getting us out of this mess? what would be the mechanism for forcing mess? what would be the mechanism forforcing her mess? what would be the mechanism for forcing her out of office, sian? what the sunday times is reporting oi'i what the sunday times is reporting on its splash on brexit, headline, pm told to quit to save brexit. i think what is going on is the brexit isa think what is going on is the brexit is a saying to her, you to agreed step down and we may back your deal. there is talk in the paper that she might be gone by tuesday evening, as early as that. i think what everybody seems to be agreed on is her deal is facing a very rocky time oi'i her deal is facing a very rocky time on tuesday. people are talking again that unless they can be some sort of last—minute cobbling together of an alliance to vote for it, it's very likely to be defeated by up to 100, perhaps more votes. massively defeated last time. massively defeated last time. massively defeated a not very different this time. do you think it will be whittled down a little? it was
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defeated by 230 votes last time and that was catastrophic. it is hard to see it would be bigger than that. people are talking about three figures but not talking about 230. i think it will be whittled down but nevertheless, i don't think it will get through. and asjosie says, where does that leave us, the possibility of taking no deal... possibility of a vote on wednesday which means we don't have a no—deal brexit, but that may not happen, some of the papers are saying. what do you make of her strategy all along? people at least admire that she has stuck to it. her staying power, her stamina. i don't think that will change anytime soon. i think if she does indeed go it will because there is so much pressure on her and she really feels like she has reached a point in the road where she can't go on and she realises that for the good of the country, she has to step down. but, you have to admire the woman, just
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the strength of character, strength of resolve, ambition. she clearly isn't in any of that —— lacking any of that but it will pay off in the long run all the short run is to be seen, i suppose. some people say she triggered article 52 early. there is a lot of criticism of her but what is interesting, in the argument about who will succeed her, it is four men lining up. she is only our second female prime minister. there is no other woman in the frame, the four people being talked about boris johnson, dominic raab, jeremy hunt and sajid javid as leadership contenders. they are all men. as josie says, it's hard to see they are going to be any more successful than she has been in what is a very, very difficult negotiating situation. is your bet a delay, what do you think? i still believe that is the most likely thing to happen.
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to be honest, i can't see an alternative at the moment. i don't think a deal will get approved this week. i don't think that we are going to allow for us to crash out of the union with no deal at all. so i think that a postponement, a sort of kicking the can down the road in true european fashion, as we've seen in the past with the greek crisis etc, is likely to materialise again. the questions that will raise is if we the can down the road once, what stops us doing it again? that raises the question of how long this whole thing will go on for and it might be a question that the eu just continues to allow us to keep delaying until we can reach some kind of agreement with them that is favourable to the way the eu wants us favourable to the way the eu wants us to exit. sian, predictions, what will happen this week?|j us to exit. sian, predictions, what will happen this week? i don't think she will get her deal through. delay inevitable? yes, but i think it's
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possible we are heading towards a general election fairly soon. ok, anything could happen, that is both of your verdicts, i think! thank you for clearing that one up! laughter lets move away from brexit. the 0bserver have this story, sajid javid is quote, a moral coward over the death of shamima begum's baby. this is a church of england bishop and a former director of public prosecutions leading a chorus of outrage directed at the home secretary. tell us a bit more about this one. this comes in the wake of shamima begum's three—week—old baby dying in the camps after she was refused to be let home. the third baby she has lost. yes, and she was stripped of her citizenship, leaving her baby in legal limbo, unable to access their medical facilities that needed to survive, obviously in a
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very vulnerable state, her and her baby. it's difficult to make a judgment on whether it was the right thing to do on the behalf of sajid javid. 0bviously, shamima begum was 15 years old when she left the uk. arguably you could say she wasn't an adult, not conscious of exactly what she was doing. nonetheless, the threat of isis is one we have to ta ke very threat of isis is one we have to take very seriously and we also have to question what kind of signals and m essa 9 es to question what kind of signals and messages they send to other youths who might be considering leaving the ukfor who might be considering leaving the uk for these purposes. however, i think at the end of the day this is a young ba by‘s think at the end of the day this is a young baby's life we are talking about. the charge here, sian, is this as political posturing by sajid javid. lord mcdonnell, the former director of public prosecution says it's an abject decision by home secretary so intent on furthering his leadership ambitions that he has lost sight of sovereignty, treating the uk as a banana republic. what
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you make of that, strong words? they are strong words. i think it was a very difficult decision to take by sajid javid. i don't know the facts that he had laid out in front of him. not many people do know all those facts and the detail of them. imean, i those facts and the detail of them. i mean, i think it was a fair decision to take. and probably a correct decision to take. i think it's not fair to say he took that very difficult decision, for which he's been exposed to a lot of criticism, to further his leadership ambitions, i don't think that is correct. although probably a popular decision among those in the country? with some people but not those who read the observer. what he also is facing, this is not an isolated case. we are hearing this morning that there are two other british women who are in the camps who have between them five children under the age of eight, i think, who went out from britain tojoin isis. again, they would like to come back but
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they would like to come back but they also, i think, have they would like to come back but they also, ithink, have been stripped with their citizenship, the sunday times is reporting this morning for some there are many, many more. i think the right thing to do is tojudge every case on its individual merits. i think that is what sajid javid is doing. ok, let's go on to the inside of the observer. michaeljackson. we have had this documentary, leaving neverland. the question from the observer, won a lot of people will have been asking after that documentary and quite a lot of evidence presented in that documentary, is it still 0k to listen to michaeljackson‘s music? what is your verdict, where you a fan? not a huge michaeljackson fan but i was shocked when he died. he defined an era, was an icon of the 80s and 90s pop. i think it raises a
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very interesting moral question. i don't know the answer to it. you could also apply it to other people in the media who have had their reputations tarred. .. the same as films with kevin spacey. and harvey weinstein and if it's ok to listen to the music of our kelly. the documentary came out a few weeks ago making some very gruesome allegations against that singer. —— r kelly. i personally believe you can enjoy the creative products of individuals without necessarily endorsing or subscribing to the beliefs and the behaviours that they engaged in. sian, do you agree? yes, i think you have to separate the man in the music all the women in the music. in this case, i saw some of the documentary. i don't think the allegations are proved. there were these two, now adults, alleging very
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serious things that happen to them, they say, when they were children, with michaeljackson. there are other now adults who spent time with him as children and they say nothing happen to them. i think the case is not conclusively proved against michaeljackson. ok, let's go on to the sunday mirror. knife crime has been dominating the headlines for days and days. sian, the sunday mirror's headline is expose the sick trade in superhero knives... another angle on the whole knife crime story. this is cut—price weapons, branded with superhero logo is being sold as the knife crime crisis goes on. yes, this story, it's interesting that the sunday mirror has decided to lead on the knife crime epidemic. this story is saying youngsters can buy knives over the internet, many of them branded with things like superman logos and have
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them delivered directly to their homes, and that this is fuelling our very serious knife crime epidemic. there is a bill coming in, offensive weapons bill, which will make it a crime to have knives delivered to residential addresses. crime to have knives delivered to residentialaddresses. i crime to have knives delivered to residential addresses. i think what the websites are doing a sort of saying, order now, quick and get your knives now, in a bid to beat this legislation is that which is obviously very worrying. that is stopping the supply of knives, is it the answer? i think it is part of the answer? i think it is part of the solution. i think there is an ohus the solution. i think there is an onus on retailers and advertisers to prevent glamorising knives and the sale of knives and weapons more generally. that anyone can get their hands on a knife if they want to? absolutely first asda says it will remove single kitchen knives from sale by april. i don't think it will stop the problem. a step in the right direction. the root of the problem lies much deeper. i think thatis
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problem lies much deeper. i think that is something alluded to in the telegraph. they have an interview with matt hancock this morning, saying that it is much more about youth workers going into schools, going education facilities and a&e, where some of the knife victims end up, i where some of the knife victims end ose where some of the knife victims end up, i suppose if they are lucky! and educating and addressing the problem much more early on, before it even gets that far. we have had the debate this week about police numbers and if there is a link between the fall in police numbers and knife crime, what is your view? i think there are a number of issues. i think the fall in police numbers is obviously a factor. i think it's impossible to say you can ta ke think it's impossible to say you can take 20,000 police off the streets and there not be a link. the prime minister says not. yes but the police and crime commissioner says the opposite. and schools are excluding children more than they we re excluding children more than they were expelling children, the numbers of expulsions have gone up and i think that is a factor. when these
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children are expelled, they sometimesjust end children are expelled, they sometimes just end up children are expelled, they sometimesjust end up being educated at home. then they are more vulnerable to being groomed by these gangs who are trading drugs and using knives to attack people. gangs who are trading drugs and using knives to attack peoplem gangs who are trading drugs and using knives to attack people. is it a good thing that at least we are talking about it and debating a possible solution? of course, there have been some high—profile cases in the last few days but it is now a national debate. definitely, definitely a good thing is a national debate. the question is, will it trickle down and have an impact? i do firmly believe that education is the place where it starts, the solution to the problem sta rts starts, the solution to the problem starts with education. a long-term solution. yes. i wonder if the headlines are so present at the moment because we are so bored of brexit, quite frankly because maybe this is quite a tragic thing but the reason we are so focused on knife crime is because we are looking for something else to jump on.
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crime is because we are looking for something else tojump onlj crime is because we are looking for something else to jump on. i am not sure about that. i think the statistics, the number of young people being killed... i think that is what is propelling it. and it rightly should have the front pages. we have a one minute left to talk about the big story. the reunion of the spice girls, announced recently. the sunday telegraph, they have baby spice revealing how she was worried that no one would want to buy tickets for their reunion tour was that we talked about michael jackson, what about the spice girls? afan? 0f jackson, what about the spice girls? a fan? of course, absolutely, as a teenager of the 90s! have you bought your tickets? not yet but i would like to reassure emma bunton i don't think she should be scared about people not buying them. i think a bit of glorious nostalgia is exactly what we need right now! and 13 shows, starting on the 24th of may, it sold out in a few hours. i'm interested in this whole idea
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because when they were the band of the 905, this whole idea that they we re the 905, this whole idea that they were pushing girl power, i'm interested to see what does woman power look like customer now they are middle—aged with kids question but what will their image be? what me55age but what will their image be? what message will they be sending out to show how much women have moved on in the last 20 years? we are excited. we are! good luck to them for their reunion tour. thank you, josie and sian. that's it for the papers. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you tojosie cox and sian griffiths. goodbye.
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good morning, what a dreary picture for the river trent. we have had snow this morning to lower levels. it isn't nice out there for our sunday, with the snow and rain and the strong and gusty winds. there are some hazardous conditions if you are out on the road. you get more from your bbc radio stations and the warnings are on our website. let me show you the rainfall or rainfall, snowfall this morning because the blockhouse know we are cross got them now. quite a lot at this falling as snow over the hills and even at lower levels. that came in from the south of the night, the other weather system coming from the other weather system coming from the west, combining forces, a double whammy. the next few hours look to be nasty, particularly over higher ground in scotland but as i have said, there is snow at lower levels as well stop not just said, there is snow at lower levels as well stop notjust in scotland but in northern ireland and northern england, across the midlands as well. we might even see a smattering
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of snow across east anglia before it clears out the way for some rain further south is moving on. the big problem in the south is the wind. the winds are gusting, 50 miles an hour, 55 miles an hour through heathrow and 70 miles an hour around the coast. that will make it feel a lot colder than yesterday. we had snow showers as well in the forecast. temperatures dipping away in the south as we go through the afternoon to stop cold air with us further north. very wintry feeling picture, it feels like we have stepped back into winter today. that continues, that feed of north—westerly chilly winds through this evening and overnight felt gradually that winds and showers ease. tonight will be cold more widely. the frost in scotland this morning that the frost will be more widespread in the countryside. towns and cities may hover a little above freezing but it will be a cold night across the board. therefore, given we still have no showers around as we still have no showers around as we run into monday morning, it could bea we run into monday morning, it could be a little icy. but otherwise, monday we can breathe a sigh of
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relief. a quieter weather day. there are lighter winds, not as much rain but it doesn't last. as we go through monday night, we have more weight and were very windy weather barrelling its way in from the atlantic, courtesy of this area of low pressure. i wouldn't be surprised if that is or will become a named storm before the end of today. as we go into tuesday, wet and windy to start the day for stop the rain clears out the way, showers follow but another escalation in the wind later, could be quite potent in the north and west. stay tuned.
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