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tv   The Briefing  BBC News  March 11, 2019 5:45am-6:00am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: details are emerging of the 157 that killed all 157 people onboard. people who lost their lives in the air disaster in ethiopia — joanna toole who worked the daily telegraph looks at how for the united nations was among british prime minister theresa may 7 british people risks facing punitive measures on board the flight. from the european union in the case of a brexit delay, as well as a possible china has taken swift action leadership challenge. in reaction to the crash and ordered all of its airlines to ground the same model the front page of the gulf news of the boeing 737 jet covers the forthcoming general elections in the world's largest democracy, india, where more than 900 million people for safety checks. will cast their votes in april and may. downing street admits the sun leads with the attack talks between the uk and the european union remain deadlocked as theresa may battles to save her brexit plan before mps on aston villa captainjack grealish vote on it tomorrow. by a spectator who ran onto the pitch in the championship match at rivals birminghan city. and — the guardian features a story on how the uncertain times we're living through may be causing some people stress.
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but they're good news for the authors of self—help books — sales of self—help books have risen by 20% in britain. so, let's begin with the ethiopian airlines crash. with me isjonathan charles, managing director of communications at the european bank for reconstruction and development. have you written a self—help book? not yet, but i'm thinking about it...! not yet, but i'm thinking about it. . .! apparently it's big business! let's start with the front page of the independent. lots of pictures everywhere. i mean, horrific, terrible tragedy — 157 people dying. a lot of pictures, as you say, sal. some of them of the actual debris on the ground, bits of that ethiopian airlines plane, some of those who we re airlines plane, some of those who were killed, including joanna toole, the british un worker — truly, truly grim... ourthoughts the british un worker — truly, truly grim... our thoughts have to be, obviously, with the families. it's an international story. very. we've got many canadians, people from all over the world... a staggering number of nationalities. if you think about those people and that
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pa rt think about those people and that part of the world — a lot of international workers of international workers of international organisations. that's what we saw on this plane. the big question — what caused it? someone who went to many, many air crashes in my time as a bbc foreign correspondent — i know the key now for the investigators will clearly be the black box flight recorders — not just what went on technically be the black box flight recorders — notjust what went on technically on the aircraft, but what was being said between the pilot and control tower, and between the cockpit and the crew as well. all of that will be on those flight recorders, and they will give us some indication, perhaps, of what went wrong. we're seeing now these airlines grounding the 737 max - seeing now these airlines grounding the 737 max — very bad news for boeing. they've got 5,000 orders, of course, for this aircraft — almost 5,000. extremely popular. a key to profitability for boeing going forward. you've got to remember, as well, boeing also have some issues with the 787 still — particularly those with rolls—royce engines. so they will want to find out very, very quickly what went wrong with this aircraft, whether it was something technical, or whether, indeed, it was perhaps something to do with the way pilots are trained on the new aircraft — particularly
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if they have to override some of the technical systems. it is a technologically more complex aircraft than the old 737. everybody‘s drawing lots of conclusions between what happened yesterday and what happened towards the end of last year... lion air plane, yes. ..off indonesia. as you say, lion air is still being investigated, what happened there too. we can't draw conclusions yet... ican too. we can't draw conclusions yet... i can see why people want to err on the side of caution with this aircraft, but we'll have to see what that investigation brings. most of the newspapers in the uk have got the newspapers in the uk have got the headline — the newspapers in the uk have got the headline - the gift that keeps on giving — brexit! the headline - the gift that keeps on giving - brexit! to our viewers, the daily telegraph front page line on this is "the eu is ready to charge £1 billion a month for a brexit delay." 0ther newspapers have different lines. leading brexiteer borisjohnson is a regular columnist on the daily telegraph. the daily telegraph has made it pretty clear
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where it stands on this story. indeed. it's not - we would be paying into the budgetjust as we are in returning for being an eu member and having all that free—market access. here we are — momentous week, sal, i think, free—market access. here we are — momentous week, sal, ithink, one way or the other. supposedly, the vote will take place tomorrow. we will see. i think you've got other papers — including the times — making the point that theresa may is under massive pressure from some in the conservative party to, once again, kick that very battered can down the road and not hold the first of the three votes this week that are meant to happen tomorrow because she will be subject to a massive defeat. well, it does say in this article, actually — in the daily telegraph — that she's being asked foran telegraph — that she's being asked for an extension this week. as you say, to delay things. wouldn't she come under so much criticism from eve ryo ne come under so much criticism from everyone else within the house of commons if she were to do that at this stage? i think that her word would be shredded, because mps have taken her to her word that she will
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give them a chance to have the meaningful vote this week. in return for that, of course, meaningful vote this week. in return forthat, of course, mps meaningful vote this week. in return for that, of course, mps held back bringing forward other motions which would actually rule out a no—deal brexit, which would extend the article 50 process. so, so much is riding on this. i think a key point to mention here is what's not happening. she's not, at the moment, flying to brussels today. that is a sign that these negotiations over the weekend have just gotten nowhere. and i always ask you this, jonathan — what do you think‘s going to happen? so, my money at the moment — and it has been, and i think i've said this to you many, many times over recent months — is still on the idea of extending article 50. i can't see any way out of this. the negotiations with villto — i don't think mps will come around without a significant change this week. the question is — how long? three months? well, that is a difficult one, because i doubt whether progress will be made in three months. you could say we'll have a 2—year extension, and if it happens earlier, it happens earlier. to make it even more complicated, of course, in the european parliament, they have their own elections in may
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in that 3—month period. they have their own elections in may in that 3-month period. if it stayed beyond next summer, when the new parliament sits the uk would have to have representation in that parliament, otherwise british citizens could take the uk government government to the european court of justice government government to the european court ofjustice for non—representation. this is an unenviable position for this government to find itself in. there are no exits which are easy from this terrible box of a problem that it's got itself into. we shall watch this space. yep, going to be fascinating. outside westminster throughout the week. i'll be watching with great interest. maybe for the next few months — you never know! i'll be camping...! gulf for the next few months — you never know! i'll be camping. . .! gulf news looks at the high—stakes poll battle to begin from april 11 — this is the general election in india. the bbc has got this sort of — "11 things you need to know about this election." no. 1 — "it's mind—bogglingly big." election." no. 1 — "it's mind-bogglingly big." this is the world's biggestdry. it's staggering. 900 million voters this time. just the logistics of that alone is
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incredible. six weeks of elections. you can't get it done in one day, as you can in many countries. the final count won't begin until the end o—may. it is absolutely stunning. some other great facts, actually, about this election — pretty much for the first time, there are as many women voters as men voters — that's a big change. turnout tends to be pretty big in indian elections, as well. and of course, it isa elections, as well. and of course, it is a bit ofa elections, as well. and of course, it is a bit of a referendum on prime minister modi. he came to power — he swept the board, pretty much — on the assumption that he would be able to deliver great economic change. we haven't really seen all that being delivered. 0n the other hand, the congress party — his opponents — are also still fairly weak. that's the party of the gandhi family. still a gandhi in control of that family, by the way — i think it's fourth—generation now — but it's going to be a very interesting election. and i'm sure he is going to—ina election. and i'm sure he is going to — in a way, it's almost like a presidential election, even though it's a parliamentary election — because all the focus will be on prime minister modi and for him to prove, "0k, prime minister modi and for him to prove, "ok, i
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prime minister modi and for him to prove, "0k, ididn't prime minister modi and for him to prove, "ok, i didn't quite deliver last time. i'm going to deliver next time." to be fair to lim, he did try to deliver on many issues — remember the famous moment where they removed the famous moment where they removed the certain banknotes. .. a bit of a problem for the economy...! demonetisation of the economy... indeed. not handled in the best way. the other thing you've got to remember as well, of course — he's a hindu nationalist, and that has caused issues as well with the muslim minority in india. jonathan, we've got about a minute to go. what do you want to say about what happened on the football pitch? on the pitch, you've got this pitch invasion which happened at aston villa. very serious. a player was attacked. 0ne villa. very serious. a player was attacked. one thing i would say is — it shows that security has got to be improved again. there is something wrong if people can get so easily onto the pitch. you never know what will happen. maybe we should reach for a self—help book... will happen. maybe we should reach for a self-help book... i'm staggered by this. a 20% increase in the brits buying self—help books. lot of celebrities are writing them... by the way, if you're watching, i would say to you — listen, don't read a book. listen to
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music! it's much better. you're a huge fan, of course? when i'm stressed, i listen to music. i was reading the other day, a lot of experts are saying music is the key. listen to music — that will be better than a book. i find these self—help books make you even more stressed — they're telling you about what you're not doing "if you're not sleeping for this length of time, everything could unravel for you." we should knock off a quick self—help book, get it to the market, and make a fortune off this! and not get up at 2am! sounds perfect. thank you, sal. most of you have been in touch today to say you're not a fan of self—help books. has anyone out there read a good one?! get in touch, and i'll see you very one?! get in touch, and i'll see you very soon. one?! get in touch, and i'll see you very soon. bye—bye. good morning.
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a stormy week ahead, severe gales at times, a severe gales at times, different story further soutt across a different story further south across england and wales. there was sunshine, but fail force gusts at winds, strong enough at times to uproot trees. and it looks as though the winds will certainly be a key feature to our weather forecast throughout this week — potentially for severe gales, and there'll also be heavy rain, particularly on tuesday into wednesday. but fingers crossed some drier, brighter interludes. we can actually see this little bump of high pressure building as we speak, allowing for a quieter day today, but waiting out in the wings is another area of low pressure to arrive for tuesday. a few wintry showers further north and west of thing. they will ease, it is going to be a breezy day throughout the day, the further north and west will have a windy start, but nowhere near as strong as the winds yesterday. sparkling sunshine — highs around 8
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to 11 degrees will feel more promising as the winds are a tad lighter. by the end of the day, gales starting to strengthen in the far north—west as this area of low pressure looks likely to move in from the atlantic. it will bring significant rain — a couple of inches along west—facing slopes for a time — and some strong— to gale —force a time — and some strong— to gale—force gusts of winds. quite widely 5040 miles per hour to 50 miles per hour. clearing on tuesday afternoon, and behind it, sunny spells and scattered showers. some of these showers with hail and sleet and snow mixed in too. as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, we could see the strongest of the winds through the night. to the southern flank of that low, as it drifts off into the north sea, we could see a speu into the north sea, we could see a spell of severe gales for a time. that's certainly worth bearing in mind. if you're going to be travelling on the roads tuesday night into the early hours of wednesday morning, it's worth bearing in mind and keep abreast of
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your weather forecast and your bbc local radio station will tell you if there is any disruption. as we move into wednesday, it looks as though the winds will slowly start to ease through the day. it is going to be a windy but showery day. i suppose the good news with the strength of the winds is those showers will rattle through at quite a pace. after those severe gales, the winds will start to slowly abate as we go through the afternoon. temperatures will probably peak at 9 to 11 degrees as the overall high. take care.
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