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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 11, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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hello. this is bbc news. hello, this is newsday we'll be taking a look at tomorrow and i'm rico hizon in singapore, mornings papers in a moment — the headlines: theresa may and eu officials agree first, the headlines. legally—binding changes theresa may says she has secured to the brexit deal the changes to her brexit ahead of a crucial vote deal that mps demanded after late in the british parliament. night talks in strasbourg — and calls on parliament to vote today we have secured legal changes. for her deal commons tomorrow to bring the country together. now is the time to come together to back this improved brexit deal and to deliver on the instruction of the british people. european commission president jean—claude juncker warns today we have secured legal changes. if the deal is voted down now is the time to come together to back this improved brexit deal and to deliver on the instruction of the there will be no "third chance". british people. eu commission presidentjean claudejuncker warns mps that if they do not vote for theresa may's amended brexit deal — they risk brexit not i'm ben bland in london. happening in any form also in the programme. in politics, sometimes you get a second chance. it is what we do with the second chance that comes because there will be no third chance.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are writer and broadcaster mihir bose and baroness ros altmann, the former conservative pensions minister. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in and, unsurprisingly, they're all leading with brexit. the mail goes for "sealed with a kiss" and asks whether what mrs may has got from today's negotiations will be enough for tomorrow's commons vote. the i calls today's discussions ‘may‘s last throw of the dice'. the telegraph says that theresa may's dash to strasbourg has kept a possible deal afloat. the times suggests the pm's deal is still in jeopardy after it says the eu has resisted her demands to change the backstop. the sun disagrees with that assesment, stating that the last minute deal has secured the legal changes required to get the deal passed. the guardian describes
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the mp's last ditch push for changes to her deal. the express calls for mps to support the prime minister's deal, hoping it will "unite britain". and the metro describes the pm's "may of reckoning". bringing the country together as a tough ask for theresa may, not least when you see headlines like this. on the front of the times. indeed, and i think really watch is trying to do is the party together rather than anything else at the moment because it is one wing of the tory party that has rejected the backstop, plus the dup. and i think as far as many of us are concerned, other parts of the tory party think actually that we must protect the border in
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northern ireland and if there are technical solutions, which can allow the border without friction, we will never need the backstop. if there aren't technical solutions, what we mustn't do is go back to the problems, potential problems we had in the past we had violence, smugglers who are trying to attack border posts. that is how the troubles started and we just don't wa nt to troubles started and we just don't want to be in that position again. the difficulty of the papers, that is just the difficulty of the papers, that isjust one the difficulty of the papers, that is just one example of the headlines. a picture of mr barnier greeting theresa may with the gaelic kiss on the hand. people are going to ta ke kiss on the hand. people are going to take positions tomorrow morning but the papers have to kind of given insta nt but the papers have to kind of given instant verdict. also, if you see the weekend papers, they were quite certain that theresa may wouldn't get anything like this, that you would probably have to push back the vote. not have another repeat of that historic defeat she discovered
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in january. that photograph, that historic defeat she discovered injanuary. that photograph, it has a bit of the godfather about it. the times coverage i thought was the best. looking at this bit of the paper that came out one hour ago, it has a summary, the three elements of the deal that she spoken about. the question is, wet to take us tomorrow? a lot will depend on what geoffrey cox says. it is legal judgement says the backstop is not permanent, we can unilaterally withdraw this whole business about technical arrangements, some sort of magic solution. we don't have a border. we can't be part of the customs unit. are they going to be
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making a political judgement? customs unit. are they going to be making a politicaljudgement? they wa nt making a politicaljudgement? they want to leave presumably with no deal and if they can push it to that, the e r g. what i call the economic ruining group want to do is get down to it. that's nailing your colours firmly to the mast. they wa nt to colours firmly to the mast. they want to get down to the wire which they don't think is now. actually maybe to the 20 april 29 of march, still threaten no deal. caving in and just getting rid of the backstop. the erg have said they wa nted backstop. the erg have said they wanted time limits. we haven't got a time limit from this agreement. they wa nt time limit from this agreement. they want unilateral exit. the unilateral declaration is our declaration. we can leave when we want to. i think the fundamental issue here is, will
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the fundamental issue here is, will the hardliners be willing to compromise at all? and there hasn't been much compromise on their side. let's move across to the i. jean—claude juncker, the president embracing theresa may. that is probably the warmest their body lang which was. they didn't look like that at the news conference. a much delayed news conference. exactly the point that ross was making. the political editor of the sun newspaper has offered these observation on his twitter feed. an arbitration mechanism to escape the backstop at no time limit. legally binding change but not ones that theresa may had initially wanted. an aspiration for alternative arrangements by december 2020 but no ha rd arrangements by december 2020 but no hard date. i suppose the transition
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gets a bit of wiggle room. the aspiration was to do everything by 2020. i think theresa may had suggested there would be something in the withdrawal agreement. there isa in the withdrawal agreement. there is a legally binding declaration which is of the same legal standing as the withdrawal agreement but it doesn't really change what was in it. it's clarifying comments repeating again and one did get the impression that the eu was basically saying, this will be a last time we can give you more saying, this will be a last time we can give you more assurances on saying, this will be a last time we can give you more assurances on the assurances can give you more assurances of] the assurances and they are just repeating the same thing. i think the way they feel, in november, 105 days ago, they agree this, signed off on it, said this was a good
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deal, came back to parliament and said this was a good deal. and because the extreme hardliners didn't find the backstop to their liking, she was forced to then say, maybe it's not a good enough deal and go back and ask for more. they put ina and go back and ask for more. they put in a very difficult position. i do feel for her. it must have been really ha rd. do feel for her. it must have been really hard. you say that but in a sense, if you're the prime minister, you're the prime minister of great britain. should you ever have agreed a backstop in the first place. the potentially divided the uk for economic purposes. the backstop is meant to protect the border in ireland. that is something that is really important to the whole of the united kingdom. quite frankly, if there aren't any technical solutions that can project that border, then the conservative and unionist party, i would have thought, should have
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insisted that we keep the united kingdom together but that means customs union, single market type arrangements, which will protect our industry protect our small businesses, protect our car manufacturers and so on, then so be it. that's a rhetorical question. there are always going to be caveats. if you have a government negotiating with 21 other governments, to negotiating partners —— partners must assume both parties have the power to enforce a deal. what is the credibility of one party, if it signs a deal and comes back. sorry, i knowl party, if it signs a deal and comes back. sorry, i know i signed the deal but i can't get this deal through. that is the position we put ourselves in. that exposes the british government and puts it into a nonsensical government. the
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problem is, we are still potentially 0h problem is, we are still potentially on course for no deal. if we don't this week get legislative mechanisms. 0ut this week get legislative mechanisms. out of the current legislative programme. whatever else happens over the next few days will be relevant. even if parliament votes 100 times that it doesn't want to leave with no deal which clearly it doesn't, it will still happen. to leave with no deal which clearly it doesn't, it will still happenlj think from my perspective, the best thing that we can do if parliament is gridlocked, and we can't find a proper way forward, is to just go back to the british people and check whether this is really still what they want. hang on, that would have to be passed through parliament as well. there is no mechanism. let's
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pull this back to the front pages. i notice among the key bullet points, geoffrey cox has published new legal advice and lots of people are going to wait to see what the affable and congenial member that west devin hester say. is one of the most successful advocates at the bar. —— porridge and west devon. successful advocates at the bar. —— porridge and west devonm successful advocates at the bar. —— porridge and west devon. it is the view of the government. i assume he will be relatively supported but we will be relatively supported but we will have to see. hang on a second. you mean mrs may is already in league with him? he was involved in negotiations. it's that kind of office, isn't it. the tory party is quite split on this. there is the e
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rg quite split on this. there is the e r g which says, the british people are happy with no deal, we know what they wanted. we have to find a way forward. let's see what happens this week. not living there. he had a cabinet meeting. he left the office, he was on his way to the airport, dublin airport for a nice st patrick's day celebration in the united states. the phone rings, its brussels, turnaround. with got some into tell you, convened a special meeting of the cabinet, bang goes the trip to the us. what the irish have said is there is no change to the withdrawal agreement. he is trying to reassure his public that actually they haven't caved in. intriguing stuff. we'll find out more tomorrow. 0n intriguing stuff. we'll find out more tomorrow. on a more sombre note, the front of the daily mirror.
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this is the quite disturbing development as a result of the ethiopian airlines crash yesterday. raising questions about the boeing 737, two bad airline crashes, the latest one about five months ago. united states civil aviation authority has ordered these jets be grounded and some of the other airlines like the chinese and so on her grounded them and without a call from the labour peer lord tunnicliffe that these jets should be grounded. the transport expert. a former pilot. and of course, it raises questions. nowadays, with so many airlines, and also sony budget airlines, airlines using these planes, providing cheap flights, i had my daughters friend on the slight, i was talking to her and
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very often, these are work friends. she was very distressed. this raises very important questions, we live in the age we think all technology works and an airline crashes are rare but this does raise very, very serious issues. and about the ways they have tried to innovate, to get the fuel more efficient, to travel further without spending so much money, that is the doubts that have been raised. that is why this new aircraft, and it is a new aircraft, has been quite popular. because it is able to get the carbon footprint down stop but we have a former pilot and other air safety people saying we ought to ground these aircraft, and then you have the bosses of holiday companies, one of whom said there is no indication we can't operate them safely. clearly there is some indication given that two of them
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have crashed. i think this is a really serious issue, and what the public want to know is that they are safe. and i suspect that, at some point, given that the faa has now come out and said you need to look at remodelling this aircraft, that there will be some action taken. let me move on to the guardian, and this is quite a disturbing statistic. i mean, it is not news that we know that the west midlands, apart from london, is having the biggest knife crime problem but putting the figure on the number of children involved not just on the number of children involved notjust in on the number of children involved not just in fatalities on the number of children involved notjust in fatalities but on the number of children involved not just in fatalities but those on the number of children involved notjust in fatalities but those who have been injured and hurt... 690 children under the age of 16 have been victims of knife crime, and 41 primary school age children. this is just in the west midlands. just in the west midlands, just over the last few few months. we have had the death of 17—year—old jodie chesney
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in london, and deaths in manchester, and birmingham apparently is the area where they are most concerned that the rate of knife crime has been increasing four times faster than in london. so there is a real issue with knife crime in this country. 0ther issue with knife crime in this country. other countries have been through it. we have to learn from what they have been doing to try and reduce this awful epidemic of knife crime, which is so dangerous for our young children. well, i mean, this is obviously a policing matter, policing and resources. this is also a social matter, it is a matter of family relationships, it is a matter of wider society, and particularly certain ethnic groups and so on have a particular problem, and i don't
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think we are looking at it deeply enough. it is notjust a question of having policemen or women patrolling the streets. it is a much bigger issue, which i don't think we have paid enough attention. let's move on to the ft. you are quite interested in the story here about the problem the accountancy watchdog has had, and why it might no longer be up to thejob. and why it might no longer be up to the job. yes, i think the accountancy profession has a big problem, the audit report says the true and fair view, which sounds like a godlike statement. it is not a godlike statement. the accountant is hired by the company, it reports to the directors of the company, so very often it is an insidejob rather than a real stand—alone document which you can look at and say if the accountants have said this, it must be all right. and therefore we need a financial oversight authority which is very independent which can go in and say this is wrong. you rely on these companies, you going to trade deals with them, and maybe the company is
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bankrupt or is about to go into liquidation, and i think the accountancy profession for a long time, and having qualified as an a ccou nta nt time, and having qualified as an accountant a long time ago, i can tell you it hasn't stood up to certain responsibilities on this. and it has become worse in practical terms as the number of big accountancy firms has diminished and so we get these bigger and bigger conglomerations and people trying to work out how you continue to keep a check on their activities.|j work out how you continue to keep a check on their activities. i think there is a fear that the watchdog has been much too slow to pick up on things or even to investigate. you know that from experience campaigning on pensions. 0ften know that from experience campaigning on pensions. often the watchdog is trying to do a sincere job, but they arrive too late. they sweep up afterwards rather than preventing something in the first place. the watchdog hasn't had a proper backstop, you see. you talk about accountants being in the pocket of the companies sometimes, the old joke of the accountant goes to the boss and the boss says, well, what do three and three make? andy accountancy says — — what do three and three make? andy accountancy says —— accountant says
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what would you like it to make? we have had carillion, vhs, lots of big companies have fallen into problems and they haven't been picked up by the watchdog is —— bhs. and they haven't been picked up by the watchdog is -- bhs. ending on a lighter note, also on the front of the ft, this is about the way that inflation is assessed. is it the consumer prices index? the cpi, the consumer price index, the official statistics body takes what they call a traditional or representative basket of goods that the average household would buy, and then finds out what has happened to the price of that over the last month to measure the inflation rate. so we have seen things like envelopes and 3—piece suites have dropped out, hi-fi is 3—piece suites have dropped out, hi—fi is out, but smart speakers are in. popcorn and peanut butter have come in, baking trays have come in
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because we have all watched bake off. that because we have all watched bake off. that is the interesting thing, that has all come full circle. basically i think it is good that we keep up with changes in consumer spending. what will happen after 29 may? 29 march, i mean. anything you miss from the list? i don't know, envelopes not being there, maybe washing powder. washing powder, i have never used washing powder ever since i saw it plug up my drain. 0h dear. thank you both very much. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it is all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers, and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you and goodbye.
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good evening. here is your latest sports news: zinedine zidane is returning to real madrid. it is less than year after since the frenchman left, after winning a third successive champions league title. he oversaw the club's most successful period in the modern era, winning seven trophies in 100 games, a time that included a 40—game unbeaten run. he will replace santiago solari, with real third in the spanish league but out of the champions league. what zinedine zidane wants to do now is to have a team that wins also at home. they've won the league twice in the last ten years — simply not good enough for what he feels is the most important competition of all. of course he's won
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the champions league. it's three times in a row that real madrid did so. still it will be a target. it is about rebuilding. we have to see what happens with gareth bale, for instance. they didn't get on. they are like water and oil. i think one of the things that zinedine zidane wanted was for gareth bale to leave in the summer. they said no chance. well, what now? a birmingham city fan who pleaded guilty to attacking the aston villa captain, jack grealish, yesterday has been sentenced to 1a weeks in prison. paul mitchell hit grealish from behind about ten minutes into villa's game at st andrew's. he admitted assault and encroachment onto the pitch at birmingham magistrates‘ court. he has been banned from attending football matches for ten years. but for some, the punshment doesn't go far enough. i think that, you know, tougher prison sentences would be a start. you know, 1a weeks doesn't seem the punishment to fit the crime. there has to be more as a deterrent.
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and then i think stadium bans — ban the birmingham fans from their own stadium and away stadiums. they have to find a way of hitting clubs in the pocket, because what more is needed is increased security at stadiums, and clubs will have to pay for that. manchester city are set to offer millions of pounds in compensation to victims of historical child sexual abuse. last year, the former youth coach barry bennell was convicted of 43 charges relating to 12 formerjunior players between 1979 and 1990 during his time working for city and crewe alexandra. city know of a0 potential claimants to their compensation fund. victims have been told claims should be processed within 6—7 weeks, and that they will receive a face—to—face apology. kilmarnock ended a run of eight matches without a win and six without a goal as they beat st mirren. they left it late. liam millar popped up in the 87th minute to give steve clarke's side the victory, a result that leaves them a point behind third—placed aberdeen. st mirren remain bottom,
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four points from safety. trevor bayliss, the head coach at england cricket, has shed some light on the recent departure of batting coach mark ramprakash. bayliss says ashley giles, the new managing director at the ecb, made the decision not to renew ramprakah's contract. well, we did have a conversation with him. i mean, i think there's been a few more than — yeah, obviouslyjoe as the captain of the team would have been involved as well. but actually he has got some thought on what he thinks the team in the squad and the coaching staff need to go to, or want to go to. yeah, so that's a decision that's been made. so yeah, look, we will carry on. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we have some stormy weather on the
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way, all courtesy of storm gareth. this will be bringing some heavy rain and also severe gales, very strong winds on the way through tuesday into wednesday as well. here is storm gareth, this area of low pressure you can see approaching the british isles. the low pressure is going to continue to edge in, and it has got some very tightly packed isobars. 0f has got some very tightly packed isobars. of course, it is the spacing of the isobars that tells you how strongly the wind is going to blow, and look how closely they are pinched together into the north—west of the uk. it is going to bea north—west of the uk. it is going to be a pretty rough ride. weatherwise, overnight tonight we have got some wet weather that is going to be pushing its way eastwards, with the wind is continuing to pick up in strength as we go through the night. it could be one of those nights where the winds are strong enough to wa ke where the winds are strong enough to wake you from your overnight slumber, with the wind is gusting to near 70 slumber, with the wind is gusting to near70 mph around slumber, with the wind is gusting to near 70 mph around exposed places
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around the western coast of scotland. inland very blowy as well. temperature—wise overnight we are looking at lows between around eight and ten for england and wales. some cold air tucks into northern ireland and scotland with temperatures dropping here during the second half of the night. i into tuesday, our cold weather front is going to be pushing its way eastwards across england and wales, bringing with it a squally band of rain. that is some strong gusts of wind, surface water and spray on the roads from this feature. as that moves away the sunshine will come out but as the sunshine will come out but as the sunshine comes out the temperatures go down. behind that cold front, cold air will be moving its way in, making it feel quite chilly. northern ireland and scotland, plenty of showers and blizzard setting up across the higher ground in scotland. storm gareth really sta rts in scotland. storm gareth really starts to ramp up the winds. gusts of 70 to 80 mph around exposed coast
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of 70 to 80 mph around exposed coast of northern ireland and not far off thatis of northern ireland and not far off that is likely to cause some significant issues and strong winds through tuesday night into wednesday spread to south—west scotland, england and wales. strong enough winds to bring down some trees in places, so we're talking about the risk of some transport disruption. we are likely to see speed restrictions on temperatures. ferries may be delayed or cancelled and there could be some delays around the airports as well. it stays wet and windy, really, through the rest of the week with heavy rain targeting north—west england. that brings the risk of localised flooding, especially around cumbria. but yes, the weather is going to be pretty rough over the next couple of days.
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