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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 12, 2019 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell and ar longer. an, to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell and ar longer. people which may take a lot longer. people who want to go down that route can do that and then still come back to with dan walker in westminster manchester city for compensation if they are not satisfied with the outcome but manchester city say they where we have day, a big day of are due compensation and they will brexit drama. receive a personal apology from a senior club official. many boys and the prime minister makes a late night dash to strasbourg good morning. and announces she has secured young men affected by what these two the legally binding changes welcome to breakfast, she wanted to her deal with the eu. men dead. thank with dan walker in westminster, where the scene is set for a day mps were clear that legal changes of high drama over brexit. were needed to the backstop. the prime minister makes today, we have secured a late—night dash to strasbourg legal changes. and announces she has secured now is the time to come together, who went missing in guatemala. the legally binding changes catherine shaw was reported she wanted to her deal with the eu. missing after she left a hotel in the san pedro area on march 5th. to back this improved brexit deal. formal identification has not taken place but her family have been informed. mps were clear that legal changes but how will mps react in westminster? has she done enough to several countries have we re mps were clear that legal changes were needed to the backstop. win today's crucial vote? grounded the same type ofjet that today, we have secured with news of last night's crashed in ethiopia on sunday, legal changes. developments still sinking in here, now is the time to come together, we'll be asking what could happen next. killing all 157 people on board. to back this improved brexit deal. in other news this morning — but is it enough for mps manchester city sets aside millions the boeing 737 max—8 was flying of pounds to compensate victims to the kenyan capital, to back her in today's crucial vote? of historical child sex abuse. nairobi when it went down shortly with news of last night's developments still sinking in here, more boeing 737s are grounded after take off. we will be asking as the investigation continues into the ethiopian air crash. the american authorities say what could happen next the plane is airworthy although software updates are needed. in other news this morning: baking trays, peanut butter, manchester city sets aside millions
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of pounds to compensate victims professor stephen hawking has electric toothbrushes been commemorated on a new 50p coin of historical child sexual abuse. with a design inspired by his work are in, 3 pieces suites, more boeing 737s are grounded crockery sets, envelopes as the investigation continues and laundry powder are out. on black holes. into the ethiopian air crash. i'll be giving you the latest on what the statisticians think the royal mint said he was one of the world's most are our most popular purchases. and how they use them to calculate brilliant physicists and a great we will get important figures how prices are changing. ambassadorfor science. on the state of the economy later. look who's back at real madrid. i'll be taking a closer look less than a year after he left, uncirculated coins are being sold for at least 20 times theirface value. at what they might tell us. zinedine zidane has returned look who's back at real madrid. for a second stint as manager — their catch phrase is "keep dancing" and that's exactly less than a year after he left, zinedine zidane has returned he says he's "happy to be home". what strictly duo tess daley for a second stint as manager. he says he is very happy to be home. wet and windy weather around as a and claudia winkleman are doing. gareth approaches our shores, parts they're taking part in a comic relief 2ahr dance—a—thon of southern scotland, northern and have been up all night ireland and northern england, travel strutting their stuff and n weather, storm gareth is set disruption and some damage possible. for the charity. to bring severe gales to parts of it's tuesday the 12th march. you can find out more the uk during the next 36 hours. information by visiting the bbc the prime minister got back homepage at bbc.co.uk. some travel disruption and minor to downing street in the early damage as possible. i will have all the details here on breakfast. —— is hours, after her late night in strasbourg. i expect they are not alone in being possible. it's going to be another long day it is tuesday 12 march. for her today as mps up i expect they are not alone in being up all night because i know many the prime minister got back vote on her brexit deal. lawyers will be poring over these to downing street in the early hours dan's in westminster documents theresa may has now got. after her late night in strasbourg. it is going to be another long day for this morning. we will go back to dan at for her today as mps vote westminster with more reaction as we on her brexit deal.
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dan is in westminster we know a lot of people have had look ahead to the vote tonight. been up all night looking at these for this morning. documents, a really important day. good morning again. good morning, and it will be a busy tension was building in the commons good morning, louise. last night as mps disagreed over day. good morning, louise. the news from strasbourg that good morning to you at home and to theresa may had agreed the man shouting in the background, what she called legally binding it does feel like one of those changes to the controversial we are getting used to that. but irish backstop. dramatic brexit days. very little the prime minister's called for mps you're right, it feels like a to come together to back her deal. significant day based on what we can now speak to happened last night, does it make the shadow brexit secretary happening outside westminster but as and labour mp keir starmer. that breaks, they will be many any difference to the a32 mps who people poring over exactly what we were considering dancing along voted against her withdrawal with them to try to stay warm this agreement back in january? happened in strasberg last night. so voted against her withdrawal agreement back injanuary? we will morning! firstly i am interested in talk to ben wright our political how much sleep you and some of your correspondent in a minute and we many legal questions, i suppose, will be live in strasbourg with our fellow m ps how much sleep you and some of your trying to work out exactly what that fellow mps got last night. not much! statement meant, how it has its ramifications on the various parts brussels correspondent adam flemming, keir starmer is coming in of the eu withdrawal agreement, and what exactly has theresa may managed we were going through the documents, to secure last night? will it enable about five minutes' time, but chris reading them and analysing them so her to win today's crucial vote? —— mason can set the scene on what is we could answer your questions strasbourg. our political correspondent about 2a hours ahead for the prime because the question everyone wants chris mason sets the scene for us. a nswered because the question everyone wants answered is if there is any is this the moment of truth, mrs may? minister. significant change in these a last—minute hurtle is this the moment documents. the promise of about of truth, mrs may? to strasbourg to meet the eu, a last—minute hurtle to strasbourg three changes, what do you think? to meet the eu, and then, and then, late last late last night, an announcement. night, an announcement. firstly there is the power to first, a joint instrument with comparable legal weight suspend the backstop if there is bad first, a joint instrument faith by the eu and the arbitration to the withdrawal agreement with comparable legal weight will guarantee that the eu cannot to the withdrawal agreement
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act with the intent of applying will guarantee that the eu cannot panel finds it as being bad faith. act with the intent of applying that is true but the problem is that the backstop indefinitely. the backstop indefinitely. was in the withdrawal agreement if they do, it can be challenged signed off in november so it's not if they do, it can be challenged through arbitration, and if they are found to be new. she then says actually, the through arbitration, in breach, the uk can and if they are found to be suspend the backstop. backstop does not need to be in breach, the uk can the backstop is the insurance policy replicated in any future suspend the backstop. the backstop is the insurance policy designed to make sure the border arrangement, that's true but the designed to make sure the border on the island on the island of ireland remains problem is that was set out any of ireland remains open open in all circumstances, later on the 1ath of january and in all circumstances, by keeping the uk in a customs union by keeping the uk in with the eu. last night's talks resulted a customs union with the eu. therefore before parliament last time. she says thatjoint letter is in a welter of documents, last night's talks resulted in a welter of documents, now legally binding which is true on legal instruments, statements legal instruments, statements and declarations, some of them and declarations, some legally binding, about how its text but the problem for the of them legally binding, prime minister is back injanuary the backstop could be avoided about how the backstop could be she said it had legalforce, legal and how the uk might suspend it avoided and how the uk might suspend it in some force, legally binding, we could circumstances in the future. argue about that, but it's not any and, if we vote for significant change. as people go in some circumstances in the future. this improved deal... through the detail this morning that's the only conclusion they can mps debated brexit until nearly midnight. this morning, only one reach, we will wait to see what the and if we vote for attorney general has to say but i this improved deal... thing matters — numbers. mps debated brexit until nearly midnight. can the prime minister persuade cannot see on the basis of those this morning, only one thing matters — numbers. enough mps who rejected can the prime minister persuade documents that realistically he can the withdrawal agreement the first now change his mind and say the enough mps who rejected time round, two months ago, to bring themselves to back it now? the withdrawal agreement the first time round,
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two months ago, to bring i will certainly be very influenced backstop is something which cannot themselves to back it now? unilaterally be ended. remind our i will certainly be very influenced by what the dup decide, by what the dup decide, because the essence of this viewers, he will give legal guidance issue is about the union, because the essence of this issue and treating is about the union, and treating northern ireland in the same way northern ireland in the same way as the rest of the united kingdom. as the rest of the united kingdom. on the changes last night, it's northern ireland's democratic unionists are still considering their position. northern ireland's democratic unionists are still interesting because the first thing considering their position. you said was you were waiting for the attorney general this morning, i and, remember, given the scale think a lot of people in that same of the government's defeat last situation are waiting to see how he and, remember, given the scale time, the prime minister could be of the government's defeat last very successful in persuading a lot reacts and will then tailor their time, the prime minister could be of mps to change their minds, reaction. what you are already and she could still lose. very successful in persuading a lot of mps to change their minds, chris mason, bbc news, seeing as i have said these changes and she could still lose. are not significant and i don't chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. think you can realistically change at westminster. his mind, i think dominic grieve the it is one of those mornings where former attorney general has come to let's get some reaction pretty much the same conclusion. the there are so many questions on the from strasbourg now from our brussels correspondent adam fleming. back of that. our political correspondent eyes a re pretty much the same conclusion. the eyes are all on the attorney ben wrightjoins me now. general, he will give advice and i think he needs to come to parliament i suppose first up, what has to make a statement as well so he actually changed ? what can be questioned. there is this i suppose first up, what has good morning adam, what i would love actually changed? what did last night's meeting with jean—claude to know and what the viewers would juncker, thatjoint love to know is what has been said question of the unilateral night's meeting with jean—claude juncker, that joint statement, night's meeting with jean—claude juncker, thatjoint statement, what did it actually mean? well, it has declaration by the united kingdom, publicly and what is being said this was not signed by the eu. it's privately this morning in produced a lot of paperwork which the government planned to stable strasbourg? last night we had a like you or i reading our home insurance policy and saying this is really late press conference with what i think it covers, if the other theresa may and jean—claude juncker
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under the withdrawal agreement and side does not agree it is not true put it in front of mps for them to who did the deal, he said he was go through and digests, and work out account for much. a lot of viewers whether there are now the additional getting in contact, i think there's legal assurances around how this backstop is meant to work for a huge a real level of frustration, i know number of mps to change their minds. happy to provide reassurance and interpretation of the withdrawal that is really what has changed. the agreement as long as it complemented substance of that is going to be you are an individual mp and i am not trying to blame you for this, the deal, he did not use the word but do you think you as a body of debated all day. from what i can tell, what the new documents are change or changes which is how the members of parliament, there is trying to say is that, if the air prime minister describes what she responsibility you need to take for you is proven to act in bad faith in has got. he also said this is a getting to the situation now where second chance for the deal but there two weeks on friday we are due to will not be a third. if mps vote it leave the eu, and literally nothing has been decided. the short answer the future around the backstop, the down to make to the eu will not do is yes, that there is a duty on all of us to find a majority to break any more to help. also intriguingly uk does have a potential route out of the backstop. now, will that be in the small print of a letter the impasse. because i am the shadow brexit secretary i go across the uk enough for tory mps who say that published last night he talks about what the uk really need this some the fact that if the brexit process all the time talking to people who sort of exit mechanism of its own? i voted both ways and it's perfectly am not sure that it does, but the is extended beyond the 23rd of may, true that most of the people i meet brexiteers have their own team of and a lot of people you talk to say lawyers, the attorney general will the european parliament elections, put his own advice before the house the european parliament elections, the uk would be legally obliged to of commons, and that is what matters we are frustrated and just want to ta ke the uk would be legally obliged to take part in them so that's an get on with it. i understand that. today. that is the really interesting subplot. then you talk interesting point, you get the feeling everyone is waiting to see to people privately and they are not but we have a duty not to pass the who moved first in terms of that wrong deal because in months or convinced theresa may has the legal interpretation of what last yea rs wrong deal because in months or years those same people will come numbers to get the deal through back to me if something goes wrong night meant. waiting for the tonight and that any of this will and they lose theirjob, a family
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attorney general, the dup going make any difference at all. thank through this line by line, jeremy member loses theirjob, their corbyn saying there is no change, you adam, it's a day for small print business goes bust, they will come that theresa may has failed to get back and see why did you let that the changes she promised she would and working at legal ramifications. come back with. and you mention the happen? i understand the frustration let's put some of those points to but i think what needs to happen numbers, back in january, this week is that if the deal does ben wright our political come back with. and you mention the numbers, back injanuary, defeated correspondence, interesting detail not go through we need to take the by 230 mp5. can she turn that huge whole idea of no deal on the 29th of from adam, chris mason singh it majority around ? by 230 mp5. can she turn that huge majority around? it is a big ask, comes down to numbers, it's the biggest in the history of march off the table and we need an government. 118 of those 230 were important, if the prime minister is extension. how long are we talking, conservatives, she needs to get able to turn things around this pretty much all of those behind this would be a huge shift from all those deal if it is going to get over the mps who said this was not the three months, six months, nine line. so somehow she needs to find months? it depends what we are trying to achieve, but going back to about 115 new votes that she didn't withdrawal agreement for them back your previous question, we have to have in january, and in january. it would be massive if about 115 new votes that she didn't have injanuary, and it is going to find a way for parliament to decide be very hard. the key thing is the she was able to overturn the defeat, asa find a way for parliament to decide as a whole the way forward. at the and it would be a huge moment for dup, their partners in government. if at some point today the dup come moment the prime minister and said i the country. almost three years on out and say we are ok with this, we am the prime minister, i am not are happy with this, this addresses from the referendum, two years from going to be guided by the majority this negotiation beginning she wants in parliament i will be guided by my oui’ are happy with this, this addresses our concerns, that will switch a own red lines, she's failed once and to get the deal done we can leave huge number of tories behind this i think she will fail again. her deal. it is still thought, though, attitude on thursday is going to be there will be a hard core of a dozen the european union and the uk can critical because if there is an 01’ there will be a hard core of a dozen or 20 tories who are profoundly begin negotiating other trade deals. extension or talk on extension the opposed to this deal on many levels. that would all happen if this deal question is are you know going to notjust goes through. if it doesn't we could drop your red lines and find out opposed to this deal on many levels. not just about the backstop, opposed to this deal on many levels. notjust about the backstop, they don't think this represents proper quickly be into the territory of
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where the majority is? do you think mp's deciding to close down a we will get to a position where the labour party will officially say we no—deal brexit and possibly voting are backing a second referendum? we on thursday for an extension to have already said we would support a talks and that the saga will brexit. they might hold firm, so public vote to operate as a lock on continue. it's a pivotal bay and what mps decide today will have a any deal the prime minister gets huge bearing. you get the feeling through so that's already been said. that quite a few mps have not slept the question is when we get to vote on that and i think that has to come much because they have been when we know what has happened to discussing things i'm trying to work theresa may could entirely defend on the deal, when we take no deal off a handful of labour mps voting with out if what happened last night might makea the deal, when we take no deal off the table and when we know how much the government and defying jeremy out if what happened last night might make a difference to how they corbyn —— depend. 0nly vote today. massive day for all the government and defying jeremy corbyn —— depend. only a few did that in january, extension there is. but certainly we corbyn —— depend. only a few did that injanuary, but more might do that injanuary, but more might do that today. we can talk about this members of parliament. we are having being very, very tight later and it have been arguing for months for a will be a massive day. if this goes tojuggle what their closer economic relationship and two through, that will end talked of a members of parliament. we are having to juggle what their judgment members of parliament. we are having to juggle what theirjudgment and weeks or so ago second referendum. it will conscience tells them, what their closer economic relationship and two weeks or so ago we closer economic relationship and two weeks or so ago we said we would effectively begin phase two of the party association tells them, what back a public vote to that position. brexit talks after the day we leave. if it doesn't go through, the crisis the conservative party chief whip for government deepens tells them, whatjeremy corbyn tells significantly. we will then be into i assume that is not one of the votes ruling out no deal, a possible them, it's a personal decision with attorney general‘s legal advisers? large ramifications so it's a big extension. you know, we have had big dealfor parliament laughter large ramifications so it's a big deal for parliament and mp5. valid points are being made by you days before, but this is a massive large ramifications so it's a big dealfor parliament and mp5. we don't know how it's going to go. he and those shouting in the one. that has set it up nicely for us. one. that has set it up nicely for background. thank you for your time. us. if the vote today is rejected is still fighting. theresa may has there is a vote tomorrow and the no deal possibility, and on thursday big day ahead for all this morning, potentially about extending article 50. soa to boil it down to the numbers and a dramatic day. we talked a lot potentially about extending article 50. so a really big day. we will be
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speaking, louise, to a number of mps throughout the morning. who knows fined 115 mps she did not have in about significance with regards to who will turn up. everyone is january to back this deal. some say these negotiations but today is a crucial day for the prime minister, we will be following it on breakfast assessing what happened last night, and as they do that they might come and as they do that they might come and speak to us on bbc breakfast. we that the brexiteers who rebelled in until quarter past nine and then will speak to you throughout the january are looking for a way out to morning. thanks, dan. throughout the day on the bbc news now for the rest of back the government, the new channel. let's find out what's this morning's news: happening with the weather. very manchester city have announced they are setting up a compensation scheme for victims of historical reassu ra nces back the government, the new reassurances the government have found work to many likely windy here at westminster! child sexual abuse. the redress scheme will offer repackaging of what's already in the damages totalling millions of pounds withdrawal agreement but they might to victims of the former youth provide enough cover.” coach barry bennell, it is and it will get wetter, strong and another man, john broome, withdrawal agreement but they might provide enough cover. i am aware many people are turning on right now who has now died. and picking up on what happened last winds for the rest of the week, sallyjoins us now with more night and seeing what's going to touching severe deal —— del first. happen today, the vote today, what details on the scheme. happened with that, there could be if you are on the move through the further votes tomorrow and on thursday regarding what brexit might week the local radio is your boat what can you tell us? well, —based port of call for travel news look like depending on what she wins manchester city announced this scheme late last night. many people and the bbc weather website has all at home will probably remember the the weather warnings. storm gareth name barry bennell, because he has today? the prime minister set out a been on the news and off a lot sequence today? the prime minister set out a sequence of three days a few weeks recently, one of the most prolific ago. today we have the vote on the paedophiles this country has ever seen. last year he was convicted of repackaged deal. if that passes, 43 charges relating to 12 former brexit continues. at pace. if it approaches. the core strongest winds junior players between 1970 and does not pass, tomorrow the house of commons has been promised a vote on to the south of iceland but the 1990, during his time working for whether or not to rule out a note weather fronts at the moment contain manchester city and crewe alexandra your brexit at the end of march. the
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a lot of rain spreading south and east across england and wales, it feeling is there is no majority for asa manchester city and crewe alexandra will clear and then the strongest as a scout. manchester city are aware of a0 potential cases, a0 a no—deal brexit so that would be winds will push in, the worst of people who would potentially make claims for this very quick shut down. then on thursday mps those closest to scotland, northern settle m e nt claims for this very quick settlement they are offering. but could vote to extend article 50 there are also around 80—90, beyond the end of march and continue ireland and northern england. strong talking so that is the experience we and gusty winds in the forecast, probably 85 or 86, new complaints the club are aware of. they are are expecting if today's vote does not go through. but few people are blowing a0—50 miles per hour. links saying there is still an enquiry ongoing. many people want to pursue to this zone of rain where it's a civil case against the club, but betting on it. 17 days to go until quite persistent at the moment come for people who want to get this march 29, that's the situation we are in and tells you why it's such a on inch or two in one or two spots sorted more quickly, they can make a dramatic day today. we will get the but this green ribbon here it's labour party position in a few stretching across sheffield and moments because we are joined by sir claim for compensation, it will be birmingham and cardiff over the next hour or so which will bring an sorted in six or seven weeks and keir starmer, and i'm sure the they will have a personal apology singing will continue in the intensification of the rain and wind from somebody at the club. thank you background but for the moment we go very much. a body has been found in the search background but for the moment we go strength, pushing across the back to salford. midlands, central and southern for a 23—year—old british backpacker who went missing in guatemala. england and lunchtime the london catherine shaw was reported missing knowledge area could see the rain we will be back with dan shortly. in after she left a hotel languor. brighter skies will develop in the san pedro area on 5 march. formal identification has not taken place, other news. for many, bit of sunshine and a but herfamily have been informed. manchester city have announced scattering of showers most frequent several countries have grounded they are setting up a compensation the same make ofjet that crashed scheme for victims of historical in ethiopia on sunday, child sexual abuse. in parts of western scotland and killing all 157 people on board. the redress scheme will offer northern ireland, it will feel the boeing 737 max—8 was flying damages totalling millions of pounds 00:09:58,218 --> 2147483051:41:43,823 to victims of the former youth coach 2147483051:41:43,823 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 barry bennell and another man, to the kenyan capital, nairobi, when it went down colder, 5—7d as we head towards the
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shortly after take—off. the american authorities say school pick up and the evening rush the plane is airworthy, although software updates are needed. hour. the winds building strength 0ur news correspondent again and this is where the worst of the winds will be into the night, ben ando reports. central and southern scotland, north—west england, 60—70, may be the field of debris is vast. 80, causing problems on the roads, slowly, carefully, and respectfully, ferries and bridges, and possibly investigators pick their way damage as well. and the winds will through, hoping that among the smashed engines, shredded wheels, and possessions be rattling across the rest of of those who died, there may, england and wales as they strengthen perhaps, be answers. here into tomorrow morning rush hour, the north—east of mainland scotla nd hour, the north—east of mainland scotland seeing winds top 60 mph may be 70 at times. into tomorrow because, in the wake of this crash in ethiopia that cost 157 lives, morning it will be windy for the there is a big question morning it will be windy for the about the aircraft came down — morning commute, could be ongoing a boeing 737 max—8. disruption from the overnight strong winds, temperatures around seven or in service for less than two years, already two have crashed, eight and whilst it will remain wendy on wednesday with deals in the other a lion air flight that place they will ease as we go plunged into the sea last october. through the day, a story of sunshine and showers tomorrow, cloud is it bad luck, or the symptom of a design flaw? increasing towards northern ireland later as we see the next bout of wet boeing has released a software and windy weather pushing and for update, and the faa in the united states wednesday night and into thursday. says the plane is safe. for the rest of the week it's very
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but around the world, from china and singapore to mexico and argentina, airlines likely indeed. are grounding their max—8s. in britain, few operate the plane. with 18, norwegian has the most, using them primarily between london gatwick, what do statisticians think are our edinburgh, and scandinavia. most popular items? what's going on, holiday airline tui has 15, operating between manchester, spain, greece, and north africa. what are we buying? the office for but budget airline ryanair has 135 on order, with the first due to arrive next month. and ceo michael 0'leary has said he has no plans to delay introduction. national statistics will look at all the different things we are buying in ethiopia, the black box flight and then try to put together a recorders have been found. basket of goods. these are the analysing them will be a priority, things that they think you're a as airlines and their passengers wait nervously to find out typicalfamily are things that they think you're a typical family are buying the whether the boeing 737 max—8 things that they think you're a typicalfamily are buying the most often spending the most money on and is unsafe orjust unlucky. then they will look at how those ben ando, bbc news. prices change over time. in total you are talking about 180,000 prosecutors are to be issued with revised guidelines on dealing with defendants with different prices collecting every mental health issues. the crown prosecution service said its guidance has been updated month from 1a0 locations around the to reflect growing understanding of different conditions. uk. what's interesting is what gets a random sample of nearly a00 cases from across england and wales found taken out and put into the basket each time. i love looking at the that one in five involved a defendant, victim or witness list, added this year we have got with a mental health issue.
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popcorn, smart speakers, baking trays, because there's lots of popular cookery shows.” professor stephen hawking has been commemorated on a new 50p coin with a design inspired trays, because there's lots of popular cookery shows. i don't have by his work on black holes. a smart speaker but i've got most of the royal mint said he was one these, definitely but a baking tray of the world's most brilliant this year. flavoured tea is popular, physicists and a great ambassadorfor science. uncirculated coins are being sold for at least 20 times you can see in the supermarket there theirface value. isa you can see in the supermarket there is a massive display. electric toothbrushes are in. my favourite is peanut butter. some people hate it. look at those, they look absolutely you have contributed to that, it's now in the basket. but things going amazing. i would love to know if any out are interesting, coaches have of you have seen them. fantastic. i didn't even know they were out yet, replaced sweets crockery sets to be honest. what is it they say, replaced sweets crockery sets replaced by dinner plates, we are more likely to buy individual plates rather than a full set. stereo never say never again, never look back, never go back. guess who has systems have been replaced by gone back. that chap behind you with a giant trophy, zinedine zidane. it portable speakers, most people was less than a year ago he walked buying them as portables. washing away from real madrid saying i have powder has dropped in favour of
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done it, i have peaked. ta blets powder has dropped in favour of tablets instead, all the little capsule things. and dry dog food replaced by dog treats. so it gives you a sense of how things are after leading them to a third straight champions league title. changing. very interesting, thank but they are having a rocky season, so they have signed him up again. you. zidane says he has recharged his batteries and wants to put the club do you remember snoop? back where it belongs. not the rapper — he's the dog more on that in the paper review in who went viral after being abandoned a second. a birmingham city fan has been on the side of the road days before jailed for 1a weeks for attacking christmas. well the good news the aston villa captain is he's found a new home jack grealish during and breakfast‘sjohn maguire has a game on sunday. paul mitchell has also been fined been to find out how and banned from attending any he's settling in. football matches in wait, wait. the uk for ten years. snoop, the staffordshire bull horse racing's big week begins today with the start of the cheltenham terrier, couldn't be happier at his new home butjust 12 weeks festival. much attention will be focussed on welfare reforms put in place ago, his life was very different. after seven horses died of injuries this cctv footage shared and viewed by millions sustained in last year's races. of people was heartbreaking. and an eye on the weather as well. filmed the week before christmas, and england will be without influential forward it shows the moment maro itoje for theirfinal six nations game with he was abandoned in stoke—on—trent. scotland on saturday. he is back with his club, saracens, you can see his bed left to continue his rehabilitation by the side of the road. after two separate knee injuries. he seems to think it's all a game, but it wasn't. his owners drove off and left him. soi so i mentioned cheltenham. the i was quite shocked, yeah. weather there yesterday looks pretty
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grim. yes, it did. i don't think it i watched it and it really pulled will get much better, but i have an on the heartstrings. to abandon such a nice dog. expert on hand. here is matt. you are right, it is not going to get but it all turned out well and maybe that much better. good morning, some very windy weather through the rest they didn't understand of the week. severe gales possible that the rspca would re—home strays at times and during the next 36 and so maybe it was an act hours the weather system named by of stupidity rather than cruelty. the irish met service as a storm gareth will be with us. severe but yeah, he certainly hasn't left gales, heavy rain with that, and any long—lasting effects some travel disruption and also on him, as you can see. minor damage. could be some trees down as well. if you are about to he was rescued by the rspca, head out, bbc local radio is the given the name snoop best port of call on the move for the latest travel information, and and in the process of treating him the latest travel information, and the latest travel information, and the latest weather warnings on the and finding him a new home began. bbc website as well. looking at the it took a bit of time to know big picture, this massive swirl of what would be the right home for him because he was obviously very cloud, this is storm gareth. the nervous, and what had happened core of the storm is here, just to to him had affected him quite a lot, the south of iceland. that will and we could tell that too, bring even stronger winds later on, so we spent a bit of time getting but to start with a weather front to know him and then lawrence got pushing a across england and wales this morning. things getting even in touch with us and he sounded like the perfect owner for snoop. we found the right home for him. he's got a home for life now
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with lawrence and it's brilliant. such was the publicity snoop's story received, even his namesake, the american rapper snoop dogg, offered to take him in, but herefordshire seemed a better fit than california. the rspca is still investigating the owners who abandoned him. meanwhile, snoop's new priorities are adapting to his new life — safe, secure and much loved. john maguire, bbc news, herefordshire. worse across northern parts of the uk is going to tonight. this morning clearly very happy, what a lovely for the rush hour, very gusty winds. story. time now to get the news, take note if you are about to head travel and weather where you are. out, especially across england and wales, a0 or 50 mile—per—hour gusts, especially around southern and western coasts. heavy rain over the last few hours, turning more showery in scotland and northern ireland but persistent rain into north—western parts of england, north and west wales. and within that you can just see this little ribbon of green, what we call line convection. the rain becomes intense, the wind becomes strong and gusty, pushing into the midlands, south—west through the morning rush hour, through the morning rush hour, through to late afternoon into parts of the south east and east anglia. the winds actually strengthen as we go towards lunchtime in east anglia three metropolitan police officers we re three metropolitan police officers and the south—east. brightest go were found to have failed to protect through the afternoon with some a model. she was killed by her ex sunshine, frequent showers, hill snow across parts of scotland and
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northern ireland. it is here where into the afternoon and evening the winds will strengthen again so the evening rush hour could cause partner into thousand 13. she made problems. winds could pick at 80 mph numerous calls to police before she for some around the coast of was stabbed to death in front of her northern ireland, south—west scotla nd northern ireland, south—west scotland and even inland those two—year—old daughter. provides the independent 0ffice two—year—old daughter. provides the independent office for police conduct than the others is guilty of gross misconduct. a container packed with 100 million worth of cocaine headed for london damaging winds could be around. has been intercepted by customs in elsewhere through the night we will america. the us authorities were see winds are strong in the north sea, 50 or 60 mph gusts quite tipped off after 1.5 tonnes of the widely. frequent showers, some clear class a drug was discovered at the skies to go with it as well. into port of new york. the daughter of a tomorrow morning, it will be another problematic start to the day with russian xl found strangled in strong gusty winds. temperatures for your morning commute tomorrow around south—west london is appealing for seven or eight degrees. tomorrow information on the anniversary of will be another windy day, the his death. he was a retired strongest of the winds will be in the morning. widespread gales easing just a little bit through the day. financial director and found dead at compared to today, a story of sunshine and showers across the uk, some seeing sunshine and showers across the uk, some seeing more sunshine and showers across the uk, some seeing more of one than the other before cloud gathers across his home in new malden one year ago the west of northern ireland, and temperatures tomorrow probably today. nobody has ever been charged, around 9— 12 degrees. it will feel a despite detectives contacting more than 1800 witnesses. little bit cooler in the breeze and a new app will be able to tell it doesn't just end little bit cooler in the breeze and it doesn'tjust end there. the next weather system is waiting on the
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winds to take us through wednesday night and into thursday. that will people working outdoors in london spread across the country. whether you see the isobars tightly packed how much air pollution they are on the chart. they will see gales in many areas once again and even once that has cleared, we have another weather system waiting in the winds which two northern parts of scotland being exposed to. the qatar canary could bring severe gales. certainly app has been developed by kings within the next 36 hours, very couege app has been developed by kings strong winds and the forecast. keep college london. research suggests more than 9000 people in the capital up—to—date with the latest weather die prematurely each year because of and travel details with us here on poorair die prematurely each year because of poor air quality. now the travel. the bbc. i will hand you back to louise. dirt are the front pages, theresa may's brexit talks in strasbourg last night dominate nearly all the papers. "sealed with a kiss" says the daily mail's headline, with a picture of the prime minister being greeted by the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier. guardian claims the developments secured by mrs may are "still not certain to be accepted by hardline eurosceptics" in the conservative party and the dup. "backstop from the dead" is the headline on the front page now the weather with elizabeth. good of the sun, which says mrs may secured a "dramatic" breakthrough and "breathed new life" into her deal. and the mirror is the only paper not to lead on brexit. morning. some very unsettled weather instead it calls for boeing's 737 max 8 models to be grounded around this week and some strong winds headed our way, notjust today following sunday's plane crash in ethiopia. it's the second time one of the jets but tonight and into tomorrow from has crashed in five months. and trending online stone gareth.
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is the 2a—hour dance—a—thon for comic relief, which which we can more on that in a moment. set to stream to you live now! turn very wet and windy today, a if you're feeling a bit groggy this morning spare a thought for strictly‘s tess daley fairly mild starch, lots of cloud and claudia winkleman who've been up all night strutting their stuff for charity. you can find out more information, including how to donate on the bbc around already, strong gusts of wind. the heaviest rain coming our homepage at bbc.co.uk. way is through the late morning and into the first part of the afternoon. as that pushes through we will see very strong gusts of around if you're feeling a bit groggy this morning spare a thought for strictly‘s tess daley and claudia winkleman who've been up all night strutting their stuff for charity. 50 mph, even over in some places. showers towards the evening still living! —— they are still rush—hour. top temperatures between eight and 10 celsius, but they are largely academic. we have a met 0ffice weather warning for strong winds until around 3pm tomorrow, moving. you can find out more information, including how to donate on the bbc homepage at bbc.co.uk. thatis to be honest with you, they've been winds until around 3pm tomorrow, that is due to storm gareth. a5 to dancing a long time. what did think? potentially 55 mph. a very windy night, showers into the morning. some strong gusts of wind tomorrow, far too good and healthy and sunny spells and showers. glamorous being up all night. i will be back atjust after 9am, far too good and healthy and glamorous being up all nightm think it would be easy but it looks but now here is louise in salford
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hard. we will be checking in with and diane in westminster. them throughout the morning and speak to them and see how they feel. did you have a look at the inside pages? in every so often we analyse theresa may says she's secured legally binding changes to her brexit deal ahead of a vote how much things are going up buying in the commons later today. in price and what the office for national statistics do is work out speaking after last minute talks in strasbourg the prime minister said what it is now buying and it always they included assurances from the european union changes. instead interest in what on the controversial irish backstop. goesin changes. instead interest in what goes in and out, that's in quite a few of the papers so smart speakers are now counted as something we buy quite a lot of. they using the change in price of them to work it out. have you got smart speakers? i don't. i'm still a bit scared of them. it's really spooky. sometimes, it doesn't understand. things that aren't there any more, washing powder. it must be because we are using tablets. at 3— piece suite.
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envelopes, tea sets, hi—fi systems. blair is peanut butter in? yes, it is. i have a lot of peanut butter in my house. i'm kind of surprised that popular. electric tooth brushes. nobody buys a 3— piece suite any more, we buy corner sofas. i'm doing a fashion thing this morning. the back page of the guardian, this chap, the main headline, as in an things are done. —— zinedine zidane. deep inky didn't expect it? he had skinnyjeans with cuffs turned up. this man can do almost anything.
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it's all about athleisure now, isn't it? athleisure, i've never heard of that. that's what all the youngsters are wearing, athleisure. you live in athleisure. are knew? congratulations to this man, lee spencer. he is an amputee, the first disabled rohit across the atlantic unsupported. he's done it, many congratulations. he says he knows it's a cliche but that beer was amazing, the first thing he had when he got there. he says he hadn't been able to relax the whole time. he mapped into — hour shifts and kept awake. we all know that is not good. huge congratulations. very quickly, i've got the story here which is in
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the telegraph, women's world cup this summer. this spoke design just remember the first time. it is brilliant. how does it differ, what do women want to work? the men like tightfitting tops because they want to feel like superheroes. the women wa nt to to feel like superheroes. the women want to be a bit more covered up and co mforta ble. want to be a bit more covered up and comfortable. because they know thou superheroes. exactly. that is of a quick look at this. how can we nation? a simple solution is bring back the bill. a happy about that? i quite liked the bill, it was a rite of passage, everyone has been on it. a bit like home and away in australia. 47 to up to 4796 of people
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in three demographic groups, making it the most consistently liked on television. it was cancelled in 2010. you are keeping me company throughout the programme. we are sharing it between us. the inventor of the world wide web has warned it's become a space for those who spread hatred. sir tim berners—lee has called on the public and politicians to come together to end its misuse in a letter to mark its 30th anniversary. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones has more. what kind of document was it? it was a mac word? some sort of word processor. 30 years ago, a computer scientist at the cern particle physics lab near geneva was thinking of a better way to share information. and with
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sirtim way to share information. and with sir tim berners—lee's idea, the world wide web was born but is worried about what it's come, the vehicle for spreading hate and misinformation. i feel for most people out on the street the tipping point was that cambridge analytica moment because most people, they knew internet privacy was something other people worried about and then when the cambridge analytica thing went down, they realised elections had been manipulated. who do you blame for that? this person got all the starter and got it under the pretext that he was going to use it for research purposes and it actually is an election. at that point, was being used for one purpose and abused, a clear breach. i.e. 0ptimistic it can be sorted? 0ptimistic in general? i think so. a new generation of young people who
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are also pretty active about things like their privacy to a certain extent where they weren't before. it but the ability and the motivation to try and do the right thing for both governments and companies, so long as individuals aren't necessarily protesting in the streets, holding them to account. 0ver streets, holding them to account. over the last 30 years, would you still believe the web has been a force for good? a force for good for first 15 of those but right now, it's really in the balance whether, i'm very concerned about nasty nurse and misinformation spreading. i think within midcourse correction, the to the web is like, let's stop this downward plunge towards a very dysfunctional future, let's turn it around the turnaround, a midcourse
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correction, i am optimistic it can. very interesting hearing in talk about nasty nurse. —— hearing him talk about nasty behaviour. that was sir tim berners—lee speaking to our technology correspondent rory cellanjones. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. the singerjames morrison has faced a tough few years with family tragedies and being dropped by his record label but he's back with a new album which he says better reflects his true soul style. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. the container packed with more than £100 million worth of cocaine has been intercepted by customs in america. the uk's national crime
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agency tipped off us authorities who found 1.5 tons of the drug in the port in new york. 60% of londoners living in poverty are now based in boroughs away from the centre of the capital including croydon, newham and barnet. it's the finding of a report by researchers from the smith institiute which suggests 1.a million people are affected. the report is calling on politicians to provide better paid jobs and affordable housing which it says are desperately needed in outer london. a new app that can tell people working outdoors in london how much air pollution they're being exposed to is being unveiled later. king's college london have developed the canairy app as part of the british safety council's time to breathe campaign. air pollution — which is linked to up to 36,000 early deaths a year — is considered the biggest environmental risk to public health. the daughter of a murdered russian national from southwest london is appealing for information on the anniversary of his death. the retired financial director was found dead at his home a year ago.
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0fficers dead at his home a year ago. officers are also reassuring images and footage of a van that was seen near his house the night before he died. let's take a look at the travel situation now. water works continue on the south circular between forest hill and dulwich — the road is down to one lane and sydenham hill is closed. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some very u nsettled hello, good morning. some very unsettled weather around this weekend some strong winds had our way, not just today weekend some strong winds had our way, notjust today but weekend some strong winds had our way, not just today but tonight and into tomorrow from storm gareth, more on that in just a moment. today not the greatest day of weather, set to turn very wet and windy with some
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showers around this morning and a fairly mild start, lots of cloud around already with strong gust of wind, you can see in the black circles in the heaviest of the rain is coming our way through the late morning to the first part of the afternoon is that band of rain pushes through, we will see strong gust of wind, 50 miles per hour or even gust of wind, 50 miles per hour or eve n over gust of wind, 50 miles per hour or even over 50 miles per hour in some places and showers into the rush—hour. winds will ease slightly, tops between eight and ten but they are largely academic. strong winds ballad from eight o'clock tonight right up until three o'clock tomorrow afternoon from storm gareth. do expect to see potential disruption, gusts of a5—55 miles is so disruption, gusts of a5—55 miles is so very windy night, showers into tomorrow morning and that's how we start the day tomorrow and again some strong gust of wind tomorrow, sunny spells and action showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to louise in salford and dan in westminster.
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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker, who is in westminster for us this morning ahead of the government's crucial vote on theresa may's brexit deal. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: after a spate of fatal stabbings, we will be talking to the new director of public prosecutions about what he thinks needs to be done to tackle knife crime. and box set britain. we will find out why nearly a third of households say that streaming is the primary way they view tv and films at home. and remember snoop, the dog who went viral after being abandoned on the side of the road, days before christmas? we will be catching up with him at his new home.
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here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: theresa may says she has secured legally binding changes to her brexit deal ahead of a vote in the commons later today. speaking after last—minute talks in strasbourg, the prime minister said they included assurances from the european union on the controversial irish backstop. labour says it contains nothing new. dan is live westminster throughout the programme, and we will be hearing more form him in a few mintes. several countries have grounded the same type ofjet that crashed in ethiopia on sunday, killing all 157 people on board. the boeing 737 max—8 was flying to the kenyan capital, nairobi, when it went down shortly after take—off. the american authorities say the plane is airworthy although software updates are needed. a body has been found in the search for a 23—year—old british backpacker who went missing in guatemala. catherine shaw was reported missing after she left a hotel in the san pedro area on 5 march. formal identification has not taken place,
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but herfamily have been informed. manchester city have announced they are setting up a compensation scheme for victims of historical child sexual abuse. the redress scheme will offer damages totalling millions of pounds to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell, and another man, john broome, who has now died. prosecutors are to be issued with revised guidelines on dealing with defendants with mental health issues. the crown prosecution service said its guidance has been updated to reflect growing understanding of different conditions. a random sample of nearly a00 cases from across england and wales found that one in five involved a defendant, victim or witness with a mental health issue. professor stephen hawking has been commemorated on a new 50p coin with a design inspired by his work on black holes. the royal mint said he was one of the world's most brilliant physicists and a great ambassadorfor science. uncirculated coins are being sold
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for at least 20 times theirface value. i love the look of those. sally is here with an update on a return. yes, zinedine zidane said he had had enough of real madrid after being really rather successful as their coach, pictured behind you with this champions league trophy. i wish we could show you the full outfit he was wearing for his press conference. steph calls it athleisure. i was dying to say look who has turned up, because he is turned up. zinedine zidane is returning as head coach of real madrid, less than year after he left. he oversaw the club's most successful period in the modern era, winning seven trophies including three straight champions league titles. but real are struggling in the league, 12 points behind the leaders, barcelona. translation: i'm happy to be coming back. what i want is to get to work again,
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and to put the club back in where it has to be. and now, the only important thing for me is to start work tomorrow. that's it. a birmingham city fan has been jailed for 1a weeks for attacking aston villa captainjack grealish during the championship derby on sunday. paul mitchell ran on to the pitch and hit grealish from behind. he has also been fined and banned from attending any football mathes in the uk for ten years. as well as the attack on grealish, there were incidents at arsenal and hibernian over the weekend, and ahead of their champions league match tonight, manchester city manager pep guardiola added his voice to the condemnation of the pitch invasions. he believes the problem is not confined to football. maybe it is a problem with society, not just a football event. maybe it is a problem with society, notjust a football event. and of course, the people who are involved, i know it is just regarding birmingham in that case, or arsenal in that case, of course it can
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happen here. you know, today it is not world, it is not... you know, it can happen. to work in the beginning, to work about the culture, to work for better human beings for both these kinds of things. kilmarnock scored their first goal in six games last night. liam miller was the man who eventually found the net to give them a 1—0 win at st mirren, and take them to within a point of third—placed aberdeen in the scottish premiership table. england will be without influential forward maro itoje for theirfinal six nations game with scotland on saturday. the saracens lock has returned to his club to continue his rehabilitation after two separate knee injuries. scotland wing tommy seymour has been ruled out of the match with a damaged rib, the same problem affecting his opposite winger, blair kinghorn. both were hurt on saturday against wales. olympic and commonwealth medallist anthony 0gogo has announced his retirement from boxing. 0gogo won bronze at london 2012, but his professional career has been blighted by a serious eye injury, and he hasn't fought since fracturing an eye socket against craig cunningham 2.5 years ago.
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assad but probably a very wise decision from him. —— a sad. the cheltenham festival begins today with the champion hurdle the big race. much attention will be focussed this year on safety, with major welfare reforms brought in after seven horses died as a result of their injuries sustained in races last year. all of the team here absolutely concentrate on equine welfare as it is of paramount importance. we do everything we can to minimise the risk to horses and to ensure the surfaces, defences, the hurdles are all the best possible way can be. and the festival going for the rest of this week and mike will be there on friday. and finally, many sports can be cancelled by bad weather, but one taking place on the north—west coast of the republic of ireland needs a perfect storm. watch this. this is windsurfing at its most extreme.
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0h oh my goodness. the red bull storm chase only takes place when a suitable storm develops to make the conditions difficult for the eight riders. say they all have to be ready for the weather to be bad enough. —— so they all have to be ready for the weather to be bad enough. they earn points forjumps, tricks and wave riding. the competition is due to finish today in donegal. some of them landed the most incrediblejumps some of them landed the most incredible jumps and somersaults. that has got to be extremely exhilarating. and dangerous, i would think. yes, yes, that too. it's another big day for theresa may as mps prepare to vote on the latest changes to her brexit deal. dan is in westminster this morning. she spoke about 11pm last night, so many lawyers must have been working
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all night, they will be some tired people. i think you are right, good morning to you and good morning to you at home. it is a very windy westminster, we will get the weather with matt shortly. it is chilly here and all those lawyers poring over exactly what was said last night. does it make a difference, will it make the numbers on the boat taking place later today? i know we showed you the papers but let's see how many are assessing what happened last night in strasbourg. there is the picture of theresa may and jean—claude juncker. theresa may secures an improved deal, but will it be enough, says the guardian. sealed with a kiss, says the daily mail. again, that question of will it be enough for the crunch vote tonight. we are joined now by sonia soda, who writes for the observer and sherelle jacobs from the daily telegraph. it has the feel of an important day, but the crucial question is what has changed and will it be enough to changed and will it be enough to change minds in westminster?” changed and will it be enough to change minds in westminster? i think there are two questions, first the
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question of what has changed substantially about the withdrawal agreement, and the second question is what has changed politically, and is what has changed politically, and is it enough to bring mps around? i am pretty sceptical, actually. i think what we kind of sore emerge last night, it was the eu moving a bit in response to theresa may's please to get the deal over the line, but not a huge amount, and no—one expected it to move a huge amount because it already made a huge compromise with the backstop. so the question is will it swing the dup, and the very eurosceptic tory mps behind the deal? i don't think so. mps behind the deal? i don't think so. because the numbers, to remind people watching this morning, a 230 majority against theresa may's plan, and they will be going over this this morning trying to get legal direction to see if they can back this. the problem is not one word has changed in the withdrawal agreement. we have got the
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declaration, changes to the political declaration, we have an instrumental change to the withdrawal agreement, but no actual text change. we are still 1 withdrawal agreement, but no actual text change. we are still! million miles away from a unilateral exit mechanism, and these weather things being asked from the dup and the erg. it is difficult to see how they run get behind these changes, especially because the changes were made 12 hours before a vote on brexit, when trust is so low, trying to balance mps to get them behind the vote is difficult at this point. i think one of the reasons why the vote has not been delayed tomorrow is theresa may doesn't want to give people too long to go over it. many people too long to go over it. many people making that point this morning. i know this is a hard question to ask in terms of what will happen next, because nobody
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knows, and what we have learnt from the brexit few months is anyone who makes predictions hasn't been paying much attention, but in terms of what might happen, do you still think there is potential for an might happen, do you still think there is potentialfor an extension to article 50? it is two weeks friday is meant to be the day we leave. i don't necessarily think it is inevitable. a lot of people think it is inevitable that if this deal fails we will have an extension. i think the prime minister can call the bluff of some of these remainer mps, because if she doesn't have the vote on the extension to article 50, people might work out, there are talks of mps leaving and defecting, but i think they will not want that, because it might precipitate a general election, and to be honest, the independent group would be wiped out at a general election at this point. i think that if theresa may stands firm, you might not necessarily see that fracturing that would otherwise happen. necessarily see that fracturing that would otherwise happenlj necessarily see that fracturing that would otherwise happen. i don't think that is politically tenable
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for her. i think if she loses a vote on this deal, the threat from people in hercabinet to on this deal, the threat from people in her cabinet to walk away is very real, and that could cause her a real, and that could cause her a real blow, actually. but i do think what will happen, i think if she loses the vote today, as i expect, she might pull something out of the bag, but i think she will lose it, the big fight will move onto the length of the extension. she is very much going to be reluctant to ask for anything but a three—month delay. because a three—month delay is quite a good way of recreating an even sharper cliff edge at the end ofjune to even sharper cliff edge at the end of june to get even sharper cliff edge at the end ofjune to get her deal through. for me, the really key thing is will mps do the brave thing and force her through a vote in the commons tomorrow or thursday, to ask that you for a substantial extension that would actually allow something to sort this good luck out, for example a referendum. yes, we have also ignored the fact that if there was an extension to article 50, a lot of people would be very angry, very disillusioned. a lot of people would see that as the end of brexit, or a movement being put in place to end
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brexit. i think even if you did get toa brexit. i think even if you did get to a point where there was a proposal put to the ear for an extension of article 50, they will present their terms, the terms may not be favourable, and then it will be very interesting to see mps, especially in seats where they will be feeling a lot of pressure, a lot
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of letters coming into the constituencies, and they may decide that it constituencies, and they may decide thatitis constituencies, and they may decide that it is not a good idea to be seen that it is not a good idea to be seen to be stopping brexit.|j that it is not a good idea to be seen to be stopping brexit. i have to say, i think that the erg are going to be very angry if there is a delay. i'm not so sure that extends to the vast majority. trying to keep everybody happy seems impossible. absolutely, and i think actually the public are pretty pragmatic on this. there is not a lot of support in the public for theresa may's deal. i think there is a very effective case to be made for a referendum. we know the terms of our withdrawal now, it isjust preposterous the terms of our withdrawal now, it is just preposterous to think you wouldn't put it back for ratification to people. we didn't know this back in 2016. it is very dangerous to try and distil this down to erg headbangers, 60% of labour seats, for example, voted to leave the eu. but that doesn't relate to labour's ao% of people now support a no deal. the public is coming behind a no deal. they support no deal over any other option at the moment. so it isn't just, you know, and erg phenomenon. it makes you realise how complicated this issue is. and just to clarify things a little bit, i know it is ha rd to clarify, things a little bit, i know it is hard to clarify, there is a vote today which takes place on the withdrawal agreement. then as you mentioned, tomorrow, potentially, if thatis mentioned, tomorrow, potentially, if that is rejected there is a deal on whether no deal would be a viable alternative, and on thursday, coming back to see whether there should be
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an extension to article 50. it feels like a significant day—to—day, and thank you so much for your assessment of whether theresa may will be able to turn that majority around. we will be speaking to mps throughout the morning. i will tell you who we have lined up. we have dominic grieve lined up at 7:10 a.m., anotherwho dominic grieve lined up at 7:10 a. m. , another who supports dominic grieve lined up at 7:10 a.m., another who supports the deal, and keir starmer, shadow brexit secretary, will be with us at 8:10 a.m.. everyone at the moment holding onto their hats and deciding exactly which way they are going to go, waiting for that legal assessment of exactly what was talked through in strasbourg last night. 0ne exactly what was talked through in strasbourg last night. one thing we can be sure of, it is a bit chilly down here today. my bbc weather app tells me a 97% chance of rain at westminster. who knows? i would put it at 100%. the wind is the key to the forecast over the next few days. got some very strong winds all linked into what is storm gareth.
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just to the south of iceland, we've seen just to the south of iceland, we've seen whether funds crossing the country through this morning. it will bring are strengthening winds, low pressure working in through tonight. for the morning rush—hour, wind in excess of 50, 60 miles per hour. the strongest of those wins linked into an area of pretty intense wane. it's been clearing away from scotland, northern ireland. turning more showery here. northwest england, a band of heavy rain. line convection weather rain picks up in intensity. pushing across much of northern england through this morning. by the end of the morning, that will be across the south—east into the london area and across east anglia as well. staying which it was the end of the afternoon. the sunshine comes out elsewhere. particularly to northern ireland in western scotland. showers heavy, thundery and wintry. chile,
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around 5—8d. as we go into the end of the afternoon, evening rush—hour. further travel disruption, wind possibly 80 miles an hour. the winds will also pick up tonight across england and wales, stronger than they are this morning. by the end of they are this morning. by the end of the night into tomorrow, another wave of strong winds to the north—east of scotland. clear spells and showers to take us through the night and into tomorrow morning's rush—hour. if you are on the move, bbc local radio, the latest weather warnings on the website as well. you may need all that tomorrow morning. temperatures around seven or eight celsius but given the strength of the wind, it will feel much colder. forgot the strong winds, still potentially damaging the morning. but it is really a story of sunshine and showers. later on, the cloud
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increases towards northern ireland with more on the way the outbreaks of rain. temperatures tomorrow afternoon, higher than this afternoon. it will feel much chile given the strength of the wind. you will have a bit more sunshine to compensate but that area of cloud just their pushing its northern ireland, the next weather system which will strengthen wins wednesday night into thursday. widespread gales yet again. some heavy rain pushing across the country thursday, clearing to sunshine and showers and just behind me, this is the next weather system which could bring serbia's —— severe gales to northern scotland. a turbulent week of weather ahead. the next 36 hours could be crucial, travel disruption and damage around as well. we will watch storm gareth very carefully. later this morning we'll get the latest official figures on how the economy is performing. steph‘s taking a look at what they might tell us. this week we'll be getting a couple
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of economic updates. in a few hours we'll get the official numbers from the office for national statistics on how the economy performed in the first month of 2019. we'll also get an economic update on wednesday from the independent body that oversees the government's finances. so what might they tell us and what do we already know about the health of the uk economy. vicky price is a board member at the centre for business and economic research how is the economy doing? we've seen a slowdown. what is happening is, the manufacturing has been declining. if you look at the purchasing managers' index, expectations of anyone buying things or doing things in the manufacturing sector, we see expert orders.
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looking stagnant, that is mainly because the world economy is slowing down. there's been a huge amount of uncertainty on the brexit front which means investment itself has been falling for the last two quarters and that's a serious issue. we hear of course a bit more about the withdrawal agreement later on today but businesses want a lot more insert —— a lot more certainty. today but businesses want a lot more insert -- a lot more certainty. on this programme, we've been talking to lots of businesses. as he said, this investment has been held. but the case that once you find out more of what has gone on, things will come once again? investment will come once again? investment will come back but a bit worried about that. what we've seen happening is a lot of stockpiling because people started getting worried, particularly manufacturing companies. about what may happen if there is no an extension. in terms of where we might end up. if there
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isa of where we might end up. if there is a deal, will that stockpiling be reversed? perversely, is a deal, will that stockpiling be reversed ? perversely, we is a deal, will that stockpiling be reversed? perversely, we may see a slowdown in the economy. 0ther producing more thinking investing more. the real worry is, what's going to happen at the end of the transition period? what type of trade arrangement are we going to have? are we likely to stay in the single market? what sort of relationship are we going to have? if businesses don't know that, affecting quite a lot of small people around the country, the likelihood that there will be boosted investment is quite small. either any positives? jobs figures are still quite good. that is true but the jobs are still quite good. that is true but thejobs figures are still quite good. that is true but the jobs figures are the opposite of the investment side. businesses have been meeting demand by hiring more people. they have not
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been investing, so it's been the opposite impact if you like that's affected productivity very negatively. we have to be very competitive and innovate. any certainty would be good news. are there still going to be concerned about where we might end up? we know the bank of england has now reused its forecast this year. the 0ecd, the group of rich countries, has reduced its 21.8%. even if we have a benign exit. investors falling by the 2%. anything could happen. sentiment could change overnight. it's also important to say these figures, that still growth, it's not like going backwards into recession. just not as much as we would want. we may well see a recession. if
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there is a deal, if there is an extension, we are not there to see as much. a huge amount of that growth has been an estimate by the bank of england. we are not growing as fast as we should have. on government finances, obviously will get the latest figures out from the 0ffice get the latest figures out from the office for budget responsibility. they are telling is the chancellor is able to collect more revenue than expected. it suggests there is a bit more money to get to the economy. he is going to have to use it. vicki, thank you, lovely to see you. sorry to talking so loudly, steph, while you are doing that. we are professionals, we didn't get distracted. i was thinking about the da ntz distracted. i was thinking about the dantz maradona tess sedon claudia
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are doing. do you remember snoop? not the rapper — he's the dog who went viral after being abandoned on the side of the road days before christmas. well the good news is he's found a new home and breakfast‘sjohn maguire has been to find out how he's settling in. wait, wait. snoop, the staffordshire bull terrier, couldn't be happier at his new home butjust 12 weeks ago, his new home butjust 12 weeks ago, his life was very different. this cctv footage shared and viewed by millions of people was heartbreaking. filmed the week before christmas, it shows the moment he was abandoned in stoke—on—trent. you can see his bed left by the side of the road. he seems to think it's all a game, but it wasn't. his owners drove off and left him. i was quite shocked, yeah. i watched it and it really pulled on the heartstrings. to abandon such a nice dog. but it all turned out well
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and maybe they didn't understand that the rspca would re— home strays and so maybe it was an act of stupidity rather than cruelty. but yeah, he certainly hasn't left any long—lasting effects on him, as you can see. he was rescued by the rspca, given that a snoop and in the process of treating him and finding him a new home began. it took a bit of time to know what would be the right home to him because he was obviously very nervous and what had happened to him had affected him quite a lot and we could tell that to we spent a bit of time getting to know him and then laurence got in touch with us and it is sounded like the perfect owner for snoop. touch with us and it is sounded like the perfect ownerfor snoop. we found the right home for him. he's got a home for life now with lawrence and it's brilliant. such was the publicity snoop's story received, even his namesake, the
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american rapper snoop dogg, offered to ta ke american rapper snoop dogg, offered to take him in but herefordshire seemed a better fit than california. the rspca is still investigating the owners who abandoned him. meanwhile, snoop's new priorities adapting to his new life. safe, secure and much loved. john mcguire, bbc news, herefordshire. i'm so glad you found a home. throughout the morning, having a little bit of a look at the dance marathon going on for comic relief. tess daly, claudia winkleman. you are watching wreckers. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. as the world wide web turns 30 we'll find out from the man who invented
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it why he's worried about its future. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a container packed with more than £100 million worth of cocaine that was headed for london — has been intercepted by customs in america. the uk's national crime agency tipped off us authorities who discovered 1 and a half tonnes of the class—a drug in a truck at the port of new york. 60% of londoners living in poverty are now based in boroughs away from the centre including croydon, newham and barnet. it's the finding of a report by the smith institiute which suggests 1.a million people are affected. the report is calling on politicians to provide better paid jobs and affordable housing. a new app will be able tell people
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working outdoors in london how much air pollution they're being exposed to. the canairy app has been developed by king's college london. research suggests more than 9 thousand people in the capital die prematurely each year because of poor air quality. -- 9,000. the daughter of a murdered russian national from south west london is appealing for information on the anniversary of his death. nikolay glushkov, who was a retired financial director, was found dead at his home in new malden a year ago. officers are also reissuing images and footage of a van that was seen near his house the night before he died. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, thejubilee line is part suspended between london bridge and waterloo. and there are minor delays on the metropolitan line. these are the waterworks on the south circular between forest hill and dulwich. you can see the road is down to one lane and sydenham hill is closed. in stoke newington: the pavement and bus lane remain closed on the high street northbound after some bricks fell
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from a building on sunday in the strong winds. and in mitcham: cricket green is closed northbound for roadworks — this has been causing delays in the area. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some very unsettled weather around this week and some strong winds headed our way, notjust today but tonight and into tomorrow from storm gareth, more on that in just a moment. today not the greatest day of weather, set to turn very wet wet and windy. there's some showers around this morning and a fairly mild start, lots of cloud around already with strong gusts of wind, you can see those in the black circles here. the heaviest of the rain is coming our way through the late morning to the first part of the afternoon as that band of rain pushes through, then we will see strong gust of wind, 50mph, even over 50mph in some places and showers into the rush—hour. winds will ease slightly, tops between eight and ten celsius but they are largely academic. met office warning for strong winds
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valid from eight o'clock tonight right up until three o'clock tomorrow afternoon from storm gareth. do expect to see potential disruption from these high winds, gusts of a5—55 miles is so a very windy night indeed, showers into tomorrow morning and that's how we start the day tomorrow and again some strong gust of wind tomorrow, sunny spells and action showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker in westminster, where the scene is set for a day of high drama over brexit. the prime minister makes a late—night dash to strasbourg and announces she has secured the legally binding changes she wanted to her deal with the eu. mps were clear that legal changes were needed to the backstop. today, we have secured legal changes. now is the time to come together, to back this improved brexit deal.
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but is it enough for mps to back her in today's crucial vote? with news of last night's developments still sinking in here, we will be asking what could happen next. in other news this morning: manchester city sets aside millions of pounds to compensate victims of historical child sex abuse. more boeing 737s are grounded as the investigation continues into the ethiopian air crash. nearly a third of households say that streaming is the primary way tv and films are viewed at home. so just how are our viewing habits changing? i'll be taking a closer look. look who's back at real madrid. less than a year after he left, zinedine zidane has returned for a second stint as manager. he says he is very happy to be home. and two ste nts and two stents of particularly strong wind today due to storm gareth arriving on our shores. travel disruption and some minor
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damage, i will have all the where the details here on breakfast. —— stints. it is tuesday 12 march. the prime minister got back to downing street in the early hours after her late night in strasbourg. it is going to be another long day for her today, as mps vote on her brexit deal. dan is in westminster for this morning. good morning, louise. another one of those significant brexit days at westminster. we saw the prime minister making that late —to the prime minister making that late — to strasbourg yesterday, and it is an assessment moment this morning before the vote takes place. everybody is sort of looking through what has happened, looking at the legal ramifications of what was said last night between theresa may and jean—claude juncker, before at last night between theresa may and jean—claudejuncker, before at some stage coming out and telling us exactly how they will approach things a bit later on. we will be speaking to adam fleming in strasbourg, and to ben wright in
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westminster, but first a political correspondent chris mason can set the scene. is this the moment of truth, mrs may? a last—minute hurtle to strasbourg to meet the eu, and then, late last night, an announcement. first, a joint instrument with comparable legal weight to the withdrawal agreement will guarantee that the eu cannot act with the intent of applying the backstop indefinitely. if they do, it can be challenged through arbitration, and if they are found to be in breach, the uk can suspend the backstop. the backstop is the insurance policy designed to make sure the border on the island of ireland remains open in all circumstances, by keeping the uk in a customs union with the eu. last night's talks resulted in a welter of documents, legal instruments, statements and declarations, some of them legally binding, about how the backstop could be avoided and how the uk might suspend it in some circumstances in the future.
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and, if we vote for this improved deal... mps debated brexit until nearly midnight. this morning, only one thing matters — numbers. can the prime minister persuade enough mps who rejected the withdrawal agreement the first time round, two months ago, to bring themselves to back it now? i will certainly be very influenced by what the dup decide, because the essence of this issue is about the union, and treating northern ireland in the same way as the rest of the united kingdom. northern ireland's democratic unionists are still considering their position. and, remember, given the scale of the government's defeat last time, the prime minister could be very successful in persuading a lot of mps to change their minds, and she could still lose. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. so that is the assessment from chris mason. let's get some reaction from strasbourg now from our
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brussels correspondent adam fleming, who is there for us this morning. what is the feeling this morning? well, the u is happy to provide reassurance to theresa may and clarification about the deal that was done last year —— the eu. but jean—claude juncker, who did was done last year —— the eu. but jean—claudejuncker, who did the deal last night, said this compliments the withdrawal agreement to the brexit treaty. he doesn't use the word that theresa may uses, which is that it amounts to changes to the withdrawal agreement. he was also happy to give what he calls a second chance to the deal, but he says they will not be a third. in other words, if mps vote the deal down again tonight, then the eu will not make any more changes, not make any more clarifications or provide any more clarifications or provide any more clarifications or provide any more interpretations. and if you speak to officials and diplomats in private, they say they are not convinced that theresa may has the numbers to get the deal through, and that any of this has made any difference. thank you for that.
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0ur political correspondent ben wrightjoins me now. numbers are huge, aren't they? a massive defeat for her back in january, adam saying, quietly, in brussels and strasbourg, she can't make that step up to overcome the 230 against her. it is the biggest defeat ever for a sitting government, and on a colossal important piece of legislation. to get this over the line today she needs to find another 115 votes that she didn't have them. and it is a very big ask. a lot will come down to what the dup decide to do today. the dup and the tory brexiteers have assembled their own group of lawyers, a group of eight, who will be sitting down to work out whether it matches the billing. does it substantially change the way the backstop is going to work? if they think it does, there is a chance they then stated tory brexiteers, who rebelled en masse back in
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january, we think you can vote for this. and that will make a huge difference to theresa may's chances of getting this through. she also has hope she gets a few labour mps to defy has hope she gets a few labour mps to denyeremy corbyn, across the floor and vote with the government, but it is a huge number to overturn. so we have that, and depending on what happens in that vote today, a series of votes could take place later this week, one on whether mps wa nt to later this week, one on whether mps want to go for a no deal, and potentially on thursday about extending article 50. so i must have asked you 100 times what happens
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now, but you get the feeling the next 2a—a8 hours are crucial for the prime minister, particularly, aren't they? they are colossal for the prime minister, but for all of us. if this goes through today than the political, legal, economic and social consequences could be very big. this would be the withdrawal deal ratified by the european parliament, it would end phase one of brexit, talk of a second referendum would i think fizzle out because parliament had gone for brexit and then we would begin the process of negotiating the free trade agreement and all the rest of it afterwards. if it doesn't go through today, then the sequences, as you sketched out, tomorrow there will be a vote on ruling out no deal, if they do that then thursday there would be a vote on possibly extending talks. so it is a pivotal day, no question. and we will be speaking to one of those tory mps that theresa may needs to win over, dominic grieve, in ten minutes' time. and you will probably hear from steve throughout the morning as well. he has become a familiar sight television screens. we will be talking about that throughout the programme, speaking to various politicians about the implications and what may or may not happen. manchester city have announced they are setting up a compensation scheme for victims of historical child sexual abuse. the redress scheme will offer damages totalling millions of pounds to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell,
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and another man, john broome, who has now died. sally has more details. and this is a huge amount of money, manchester city have set aside millions of pounds in compensation for the victims of the paedophile barry bennell, convicted of a3 charges relating to 12 formerjunior players between 1975 and 1990, during his time walking for manchester city, but also crewe alexandra. many people will choose to pursue a case against him through the civil court. that might take many years so what manchester city are offering is the chance to settle are offering is the chance to settle a claim quite quickly, within six or seven weeks, and offering a six figure sum and a personal apology from the club before the treatment they had during that time. many
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people who spoke out during that time were simply not believed. so for the people who are affected by this, if they want to pursue a civil claim, they can still do that. they can take the civil route festival and still come back to manchester city if they are not satisfied with the outcome of that particular claim. just one little note i should let you know. crewe alexandra, where he also worked, they are actually doing the opposite, in a way. last month former player steve walters wa nted month former player steve walters wanted to take them to court, he said he wanted to reach a settlement with the club, but crewe have denied liability on a technicality. so they say the victims they're waited too long to report what happened. thank you very much, thank you. a body has been found in the search for a 23—year—old british backpacker who went missing in guatemala. catherine shaw was reported missing after she left a hotel in the san pedro area on 5 march. formal identification has not taken place, but herfamily have been informed. several countries have grounded the same make ofjet that crashed in ethiopia on sunday, killing all 157 people on board. the boeing 737 max—8 was flying to the kenyan capital, nairobi, when it went down shortly after take—off. 0ur correspondent tomi 0ladipo
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is in nairobi for us this morning. good morning to you. and more is emerging about the people who are on board this flight. what can you tell us? yes, indeed. as the debate goes on about what caused the crash, we are hearing more stories about the kinds of people who were on—board. for example, a family of generations from canada were coming here to kenya on holiday. a couple, a daughter, her husband and their two grandchildren. joanna toole, from exmouth, she worked in animal welfare. there were 22 delegates coming toa welfare. there were 22 delegates coming to a conference here on the environment, nations conference. they were also caught up in that. how many people from 30 nationalities, so that is the human cost of this crash. now, the
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investigation is going on and we expect to hear more over the next few days as to what exactly caused this plane to come down. thank you very much indeed. and later we will be speaking to an expert in aviation about what may or may not have happened. so we know that theresa may arrived backin so we know that theresa may arrived back in downing street this morning. back to dan now, who is in westminster for us this morning. good morning to you, louise. hello to you at home as well. it is tuesday morning, much to discuss at westminster with regards to brexit. a big day ahead, theresa may made that dramatic — to strasbourg last night to try and push forward a few more changes and get this brexit deal through parliament today. the question is will it be enough to change the minds of the a32 mps who voted against her back injanuary in the last two months. we are joined by dominic grieve.
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can you explain how you will be voting today and what has brought you to that decision?” voting today and what has brought you to that decision? i will be voting against the deal. as i have said ina voting against the deal. as i have said in a number of occasions, if the prime minister were willing to put this deal to the british people and offer it to them, i would support her in doing that and in getting the necessary legislation through so it could be implemented immediately if people wanted it. but the difficulty as it is entirely different from what we were debating on the 2016 referendum, and there is a lot of evidence that, over the 2.5 yea rs a lot of evidence that, over the 2.5 years plus that has passed since
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then, people's opinions are evolving. so to drag the country out of the eu on these terms seems to me to bea of the eu on these terms seems to me to be a very unsatisfactory and undemocratic thing to do. and that is why i will continue to argue that the proper thing to do is to put it back to the public in a people's vote, ina back to the public in a people's vote, in a second referendum. you say people's opinions are evolving, iam sure say people's opinions are evolving, i am sure the prime minister would argue that her withdrawal agreement is evolving as well. why were you not convinced by what he says are some legal assurances about the irish backstops which he is hoping will change some people's minds? well, i have looked very carefully overnight at the document which have been produced and i have also seen advice produced by lord anderson, david anderson, the very eminent lawyer, and it confirms my view that what has been negotiated in the last a8 hours doesn't make any significant difference to the terms of our withdrawal and the northern ireland backstop. it really doesn't. the only thing that can be said of it is that in the event of the ear
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acting in bad faith in negotiations, it reiterates the uk's rate in those circumstances to suspend the operation of the backstop. but the one thing it certainly does not do asa one thing it certainly does not do as a matter of law is to give us a right to come out of the backstop if the negotiations were to break down. that is absolutely transparently clear. just to be clear on where you stand on this, then, if there was some way that the backstop situation could be resolved to make it legally binding and to get those assurances you are talking about, would you then vote for a deal? know, because then vote for a deal? know, because the backstop has never been the issue for me. i want to make this clear. the backstop is an issue for my colleagues in the erg, and they will want to consider the government's document, and they will wa nt to government's document, and they will want to consider the legal advice produced. you told us the reason you didn't want to vote for this was the backstop. no, i didn't. excuse me, look back on what i said to you. you asked me to question what i was doing today and i explained why i would be voting against this deal, because it bears no resemblance to what we were debating on the 2016 referendum, and i believe it should be put back to the public. if the public want to leave on these terms, then i have to accept that these are
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probably the only terms available, then so be it. i will accept that without difficulty. but for us to leave on these terms, which i have to say takes us into a second—rate relationship for the future, and one which i think we'll do this country economic harm, i am unwilling to do that without the public confirming their view. now, the backstop is a separate issue. but you asked me to question do the changes to the backstop make any difference? no, they don't, because the changes that have been negotiated do not make any significant difference to the backstop itself. you mentioned there in your answer that you said you listen to the will of the people. cani listen to the will of the people. can i ask you this morning, if some of your constituents had come to you and set actually a few years ago we voted to leave in your constituency, how do you then answer them?” voted to leave in your constituency, how do you then answer them? i am very mindful that many of my constituents did vote to leave. but it is perfectly clear when i look at my e—mails and what they say to me that the nature of what they were voting for was not crystallised. we hadn't got down to the detail. we now have a much clearer idea about
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what the detail is for the future. look at what was said during the 2016 referendum. we will have no difficulty getting a deal with the eu which gives us all the advantages of membership, without the drawbacks. well, one thing i am quite clear about is that we have not achieved that. we're going to have many drawbacks, and we have many of the advantages of membership are going to be lost. that is the reason why i think we should be taken this deal back to the public. it is painfulfor me to taken this deal back to the public. it is painful for me to have to come to that conclusion. it would be much easierfor me, to that conclusion. it would be much easier for me, and to that conclusion. it would be much easierfor me, and doubtless my life would be easier, if i took a different view. what did think if we left on my
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train without a deal?” what did think if we left on my train without a deal? i can't see how we can possibly leave them. we had to enact them, a major piece of constitutional legislation which will be as important to the country over the next few years as the european community act passed in 1972. how on earth can we do that in the course of a fortnight? thank you very much arejoining us. dominic grieve, the tory mp. we'll speak to the shadowed brexit secretary kier starmer coming up at around 7a5 today. a busy day at westminster. you can see the beautiful building behind those from the sky is quite dark. it's quite cold, very windy. let's find out exactly what's happening. it's a bit of a storyline. matt can give us all of
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the details it's going to turn windier and wetter in the south—east later this morning. the wind and rain, key features. the next 36 hours, we will see winds. certainly the chance of travel disruption and minor damage as well. the latest travel news, warnings are there. weather comes courtesy of storm gareth, named by the irish met service yesterday. at the core of the service wrapped around. still a little bit away. got an active weather front. torrential rain, little bit away. got an active weatherfront. torrential rain, gale force winds pushing eastwards. it into the northern half the country, closer to the centre of the storm we will see the strongest of the winds. heading out of the next few hours, the winds could touch gale force, especially across parts of england
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and wales. to go with that, lots of heavy rain as well. up to 50 millimetres. that brain is now persistent across northern england and western parts of wales and within that little line of green, an indication we will see short bursts of torrential rain and stormy winds. through the midlands, lunchtime, across the south—east corner and east anglia. sunshine developing to many. a scattering of showers. frequent into the afternoon. wintry over the hills. a cold fill this afternoon, temperatures dropping through the day 5—8d as we head towards the school pick—up in the evening rush hour. the winds pick up again across parts of central and southern scotland. northern ireland could see wind top 80 miles per hour. that will certainly cause a minor damage. the winds pick up again across england and wales.
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50-60 again across england and wales. 50—60 miles per hour gusts into tomorrow morning. strongest across parts of north—east scotland. that's how we start around tomorrow morning's rush—hour. the story of sunshine and showers through the day. more of one than the other but the winds will be particularly strong during the morning. staying blustery and still a rather cool peel as well. we will see some potentially damaging winds across the country this morning. especially southern scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england. thank you very much, matt. knife crime hasn't been out of the headlines recently following a spate of fatal stabbings. it's an issue the new director of public prosecutions max hill qc will be involved in tackling. we can talk to him about this and his new initiative introduced to help the justice system deal with defendants with mental health issues. hejoins us from our
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london newsroom. i know you're going to be changing the guidelines about mental health issues. we issue legal guidance on the way we apply the law. it's accessible, so over and can read it and it's there to help our prosecutors guide cases throughout the life of the place. where we are dealing with issues. we want to do a bit more in terms of being aware of the conditions some people suffer from when they are the subject of the proceedings. when they are the defendants charged with crime. at one end of the spectrum, there may be cases where it is not appropriate to prosecute. despite the condition, though still legally culpable and need to be put through the justice system but we are there to provide a fair trial and process. that's what we are consulting on today. what sort of thing you think might change? i think that all of our
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experienced, dedicated prosecutors need to keep in their minds the various aspects of behaviour that might be impacted by long—standing or short standing condition, mental health condition or other disorder. that can impact on the ability of the person to enter a plea to the crime alleged that can also impact on their ability to follow the proceedings. sometimes they need help with that and we are refreshing our guidance, opening at the 12 week ‘s consultation, and would like all of those vehicles stakeholders in the area to come forward and express their views, including leading mental health charities, the police, the judiciary mental health charities, the police, thejudiciary and mental health charities, the police, the judiciary and an open conversation can only lead to better process and procedures from our behalf. what seems to be a recent spate of fatal stabbings involving
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young people. what can the crown prosecution service do to try and stop that type of thing happening? clearly, there are any number of political and policy initiatives around knife crime which may be brought forward to try to stop people from committing crime in the first place. the crown prosecution service stands ready whenever a crime is committed to act swiftly. the prosecutors on standby in london and around the country to deal with knife crime cases. that means we have very experienced lawyers who can deal with and explain the consequences of knife crime and sometimes it can be important for prosecutors to come out of the courtroom, whether they are going to schools, into communities in conversation with the police and others, to say, do you realise this is the impact that your activity is having on the just your victim but on society as a hole. we can play a pa rt on society as a hole. we can play a part in that but principally, our role is when people enter the
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criminal justice system role is when people enter the criminaljustice system to deal robust lee as we always do with knife crime issues. i want to ask you if we could about shamima begum implications of that case. if someone implications of that case. if someone like has chosen to go to islamic state and comes back to this country, are their robust procedures in case to talk about what's happened, to investigate what's happened, to investigate what's happened, prosecute people. there area happened, prosecute people. there are a range of legal measures already in place to deal with individuals it that a young woman or anybody else who returns from foreign conflicts, whatever role they played. 0ur principal interest is to look for evidence of a commission. we have prosecuted those. we will not hesitate to do so again. the wider ramifications of the laws and procedures that we have in place are that in appropriate cases where free example there is no
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evidence were it's not possible to put somebody through the court system, there are nonetheless robust procedures to deal with those individuals and that may notjust the cps, our police community based organisations but we do have, coming back to my role in all of this, laws in place to deal with terrorism, whether it is committed in this country or overseas. thanks time here on breakfast. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. remember snoop? the dog who went viral after being abandoned on the side of the road days before christmas. we'll be catching up with him at his new home. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield.
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three metropolitan police officers we re three metropolitan police officers were found to have failed to protect a model who raised concerns, after raising concerns about her ex— partner, making numerous calls to police after being stabbed to death in front of her two—year—old daughter. the independent officers —— the independent office found the officers guilty of misconduct. a container packed with more than £100 million worth of cocaine that was headed for london — has been intercepted by customs in america. the uk's national crime agency tipped off us authorities who discovered 1 and a half tonnes of the class—a drug in a truck at the port of new york. a new app will be able tell people working outdoors in london how much air pollution they're being exposed to. the canairy app has been developed by king's college london. research suggests more than 9,000 people in the capital die prematurely each year because of poor air quality. the daughter of a murdered
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russian national from south west london is appealing for information on the anniversary of his death. nikolay glushkov, who was a retired financial director, was found dead at his home in new malden a year ago. no—one has ever been charged that despite detectives contacting 1800 witnesses. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, thejubilee line has severe delays and there are minor delays on tfl rail. 0n the roads, these are the water works on the south circular between forest hill and dulwich. in stoke newington: the pavement and bus lane remain closed on the high street northbound after some bricks fell from a building on sunday in the strong winds. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some very unsettled weather around
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this week and some strong winds headed our way, notjust today but also tonight and into tomorrow from storm gareth — more on that in just a moment. today not the greatest day of weather, set to turn very there's some showers around this morning, a fairly mild start, lots of cloud around already with strong gusts of wind, lots of cloud around already some strong gusts of wind, you can see those in the black circles here. the heaviest of the rain is coming our way through the late morning into the first part of the afternoon as that band of rain pushes through, then we will see strong gust of wind, 50mph, even over 50mph in some places and showers into the evening rush—hour. the winds will ease slightly, tops between 8 and 10 degrees celsius but they are largely academic. we've got a met office warning for strong winds valid from 9 o'clock tonight right up until 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from storm gareth, we do expect to see potential disruption from these high winds, gusts of a5—55mph so a very windy night indeed. some showers into tomorrow morning and that's how we start the day
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tomorrow and again, some strong gusts of wind tomorrow, sunny spells and some showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to louise in salford and dan in westminster. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin, and dan walker is live in westminster for us this morning. theresa may says she has secured legally binding changes to her brexit deal ahead of a vote in the commons later today. speaking after last—minute talks in strasbourg, the prime minister said they included assurances from the european union on the controversial irish backstop. labour says the agreement contains nothing new. dan is live in westminster for this morning, and just after 8:00am, we will be speaking to the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, about labour's reaction to mrs may's deal. several countries have grounded the same type ofjet that crashed in ethiopia on sunday, killing all 157 people on board. the boeing 737 max—8 was flying to the kenyan capital,
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nairobi, when it went down shortly after take—off. the american authorities say the plane is airworthy, although software updates are needed. a body has been found in the search for a 23—year—old british backpacker who went missing in guatemala. catherine shaw was reported missing after she left a hotel in the san pedro area on 5 march. formal identification has not taken place, but herfamily have been informed. manchester city have announced they are setting up a compensation scheme for victims of historical child sexual abuse. the redress scheme will offer damages totalling millions of pounds to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell, and another man, john broome, who has now died. the inventor of the world wide web
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has warned it has become a space for those who spread hatred. sir tim berners—lee has called on politicians to come together to prevent its misuse, at an event to mark its 30th anniversary. he said he hoped events such as —— phenomena such as misinformation could be tackled. their catch phrase is "keep dancing", and that is exactly what strictly duo tess daley and claudia winkleman are doing. they are taking part in a comic relief 2a—hour danceathon, and have been up all night strutting their stuff for the charity. you can find out more information by visiting the bbc homepage at bbc.co.uk. hopefully if they are not too tired we will be speaking to them a little bit later here on bbc breakfast. i have been watching them, sally and i have been watching them, sally and i have been watching them, sally and i have been watching. we have a little
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screen. we are over here, and blessed them, they have been dancing all night. they look weary, i think they have tactics. they have people going in to keep them company. their marathon tactics mean they are going slow and steady. eating, as well, that would be my top tip. and they are drinking, we can tell you that. someone who will not be going slow and steady is zinedine zidane. zinedine zidane is returning as head coach of real madrid, less than year after he left. he oversaw the club's most successful period in the modern era, winning seven trophies including three straight champions league titles. but real are struggling in the league, 12 points behind the leaders, barcelona. translation: i'm happy to be coming back. what i want is to get to work again, and to put the club back in where it has to be.
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and now, the only thing for me is to start working tomorrow. that's it. the former manchester united manager louis van gaal has retired from football to repay his wife for sacrificing her career to support his. (00v) van gaal is 67 and says he won't even be a tv pundit van gaal is 67 and says he won't even be a tv pundit because his wife, truus, gave up herjob for him 22 years ago and she was entitled to a life with him outside of football. he said she was very happy about it. isn't that lovely? he is repaying the debt he owes her. does that mean he will be making her lunch? who knows? a birmingham city fan has been jailed for 1a weeks for attacking aston villa captainjack grealish during the championship derby on sunday. paul mitchell ran on to the pitch and hit grealish from behind. he has also been fined and banned from attending any football mathes in the uk for ten years. as well as the attack on grealish, there were incidents at arsenal and hibernian over the weekend, and ahead of their champions league match tonight, manchester city manager pep guardiola added his voice to the condemnation of the pitch invasions.
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he believes the problem is not confined to football. maybe it's a problem with society, not just a football event. and of course, the people who are involved, i know it'sjust regarding birmingham in that case, or arsenal in that case. of course it can happen here. you know, we must work — you know, it can happen, to work in the beginning, to work about the culture, to work for better human beings, for both these kinds of things. kilmarnock scored their first goal in six games last night. liam miller was the man who eventually found the net to give them a 1—0 win at st mirren and take them to within a point of third—placed aberdeen in the scottish premiership table. england will be without influential forward maro itoje for theirfinal six nations game with scotland on saturday. the saracens lock has returned to his club to continue his rehabilitation after two separate knee injuries.
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scotland wing tommy seymour has been ruled out of the match with a damaged rib. the same problem affecting his opposite winger, blair kinghorn. both were hurt on saturday against wales. olympic and commonwealth medallist anthony 0gogo has announced his retirement from boxing. 0gogo won bronze at london 2012, but his professional career has been blighted by a serious eye injury, and he hasn't fought since fracturing an eye socket against craig cunningham 2.5 years ago. the cheltenham festival begins today, with the champion hurdle the big race. much attention will be focussed this year on safety, with major welfare reforms brought in after seven horses died as a result of their injuries sustained in races last year. all of the team here absolutely concentrate on equine welfare, as it is of paramount importance. we do everything we can to minimise the risk to horses, and to ensure the surfaces, the fences, the hurdles, are all the best
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possible way can be. and a bit stormy out there today, with storm gareth. and finally, many sports can be cancelled by bad weather, but one taking place on the north—west coast of the republic of ireland needs a perfect storm. this is windsurfing at its most extreme. the red bull storm chase only takes place when a suitable storm develops to make the conditions difficult for the eight riders. they earn points forjumps, tricks and wave riding. the competition is due to finish today in donegal. so they have all been on standby, presumably. waiting to do the huge kind of somersault leaps. they get points for the amount of loops they do. and staying on your surfboard. nearly a third of households say that streaming is their preferred choice for watching tv and films at home.
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so just how are our viewing habits changing? steph is taking a look. it is an interesting one, this, and i don't think people will be shocked that things are changing when it comes to how we watch tv. this is some research from the professional services firm ey. they say that 30% of households are watching tv and films via streaming as opposed to the traditional way. the figure doubles for 18— to 2a—year—olds. we asked these people about their viewing habits. i've got my sky, and normal bbc and the itv channels, and that is as much as i do. i like that you can watch what you choose and not sit through lots of adverts... well, there are some, but generally the choice aspect. i think it's quite a good way to watch tv, with the streaming, but yes, it's kind of a
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shame, ina streaming, but yes, it's kind of a shame, in a way, because we used to be able to, i suppose, tune in for something at the same time each week, or whatever it was. martyn whistler is global lead media and entertainment analyst at ey. thank you forjoining us. it is not a shock, is it, that people are changing the way they are watching tv and films. what are your thoughts? absolutely not, and we have done some research, 30% of people are primarily streaming things to their phones, increasing exponentially for younger audiences. we tend to think a little bit of this battle where winner takes all between traditional channels and the streaming channels. although we are becoming a nation of streamers, we still enjoy watching a lot of
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content on the traditional channels. are we watching television live, is there much of that going on? there will always be an element of that taking place, content like news, sport and reality television where you need to watch it in the moment. but as audiences we like choice, we like variety, we like different options. that means we like catch up, boxed sets, and that is where streaming comes into its own. up, boxed sets, and that is where streaming comes into its ownm up, boxed sets, and that is where streaming comes into its own. it is interesting, because often i will watch things on demand, and you don't know where things are coming from. they are losing their identity. it is absolutely a challenge, and in our survey, we found that about a quarter of people we re found that about a quarter of people were really struggling with that. they didn't know where their content choices were. if you think about the amount of devices and content services we have access to, it is really ha rd to services we have access to, it is really hard to kind of keep track of that and keep following that. that isa that and keep following that. that is a challenge for the industry to keep pace. we have talked on this programme before about the amount of money for example netflix are spending. and recently we had the announcement from the bbc and itv they were bringing out their own devices. is this kind of saturated, do you
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think? despite the huge amount of spending, we like big content, we like big shows, so it is not necessarily winner takes all, depending on how much you spend. we asked audiences about quality, and a lot of traditional channels came out top in terms of the ranking of quality. so we still like those kinds of things. it doesn't necessarily need to be driven by big budget expenditure. and overall, we watching more tv and films? overall we are, as a nation the british people love sitting down in front of their devices and watching the biggest shows, the biggest hits. so overall we are watching more content and i am sure we will continue to do so. thank you very much for your time. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. we are already feeling the effects
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of that storm. severe gales at times across the country and when the winds really pick up they could lead to travel disruption and the potential for some damage as well. if you are on the move, bbc local radio is your best port of call for your latest travel news as you are out and about, and there will be details on the bbc weather website and app. taking you to storm gareth, it is this big swell of cloud, the co re it is this big swell of cloud, the core of it to the south of iceland, but this mass of cloud across the uk has brought torrential rain across parts of scotland and northern ireland. it will sweep its way across england and wales, preceded by strong to gale force winds, and the sting in the tail as winds pick up the sting in the tail as winds pick up further and storm gareth moves in through the night. if you are heading out shortly, not a great day to be on the bike across england and wales, the strongest gusts in excess
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of a0 or 50 mph for one or two. heavy rain across northern england and wales and within that we are seeing a narrow ribbon of pretty torrential rain accompanied by the strongest wind gusts, as a little line of green pushes its way across northern england, south west through the morning rush hour. by lunchtime that hits the south—eastern east anglia so winds will continue to pick up and it will get wetter. north and west, the skies will be bright. some sunshine at times but showers will pack in across western areas. the winds become gusty at times once more and the showers containing snow off the hills of scotland. compared with this morning it will be colder this afternoon for some of you. 5—8d the general temperatures as we go to the school pick—up in the evening rush hour. it is into the evening rush hour whether winds will strengthen and some of the strongest gusts will be felt, 70 or 80 mph around some of the coast of northern ireland, south—west scotland. that will certainly cause problems on temperatures, the ferries, could cause some damage as well, and we will see winds pick up compared with today across england and wales. a fair few windows rattling tonight
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and into the morning. into the rush hour, some of the winds strongest across the north—east of mainland scotla nd across the north—east of mainland scotland and parts of shetland as well. temperatures for your morning commute, seven or eight degrees, lower than today and it will certainly feel colder they are given the strength of the wind. the forecast for wednesday, maybe a story of sunshine and showers, some seeing more of one than the other, dry weather at times but the winds will still be strong. strongest in the morning, easing off a little bit into the afternoon but it remains blustery. adding to the cold feel, and then later in the day, cloud and more rain spreading its way into northern ireland, and that comes with yet more strong winds to take us with yet more strong winds to take us through wednesday night into thursday. another weather system pushes its way through. that will lead back into another weather system lurking behind me and bringing severe gales to northern
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parts of scotland on friday. certainly in the next few days it is looking a little bit wild and windy at times. the inventor of the world wide web has warned it has become a space for those who spread hatred. sir tim berners—lee has called on politicians to come together to prevent its misuse, at an event to mark its 30th anniversary. he said he hoped events such as phenomena such as misinformation could be tackled. what kind of document was it? was it it? some sort of word processor on the mac. 30 years ago, a computer scientist at the cern particle physics lab near geneva was thinking up a better way of sharing information. from tim berners—lee's idea, the world wide web was born, but today he's worried about what it's come, a vehicle for spreading hate and misinformation. i feel for most people out on the street, the tipping point to a certain extent was the cambridge analytica moment because most people, they knew internet privacy was something other people worried about and then when the cambridge analytica thing went down, they realised that elections had been manipulated
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using data that they contributed. who do you blame for that? this person got all this data and he got it under the pretext that he was going to use it for research purposes and he actually used it to manipulate an election. i think at that point, when data was amassed for one purpose and abused, a clear breach. are you optimistic it can be sorted? 0ptimistic in general? i think so. a new generation of young people who are also pretty active, pretty activist about things like their privacy where to a certain extent where they weren't before. i think we've got both the ability and the motivation to try to do the right thing on both governments and companies, so long as individuals, not necessarily protesting in the streets, holding them to account.
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over the last 30 years, would you still believe the web has been a force for good? i think it's force for good for first 15 of those and right now, it's really in the balance whether. .. i'm very concerned about nastiness and misinformation spreading. i think with a midcourse correction, the contract for the web's about, let's stop this downward plunge towards a very dysfunctional future, let's turn it around. with a turnaround, a midcourse correction, i am optimistic it can. it's interesting to hear what he thinks. that was sir tim berners—lee, talking about nasty and is on the internet. do get in touch with us and let us know your thoughts and perhaps what can be
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done to change things around. let's ta ke done to change things around. let's take a look at the front pages. sealed with a kiss, says the daily mail, with brexit dominating. there is the prime minister being greeted by the eu's chief brexit negotiator. the guardian says the deal is still not certain to be accepted. backstop from the dead as the headline on the front page of the sun which says she secured a dramatic breakthrough and breathed new life into her deal. joining me now from westminster is brexit minister kwasi kwarteng. we know that lawyers are poring over the detail. what's changed? what has changed materially is the fact that the three things now. relating to
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the three things now. relating to the backstop. we've got this joint interpretive instrument. got a unilateral direction on the uk. thirdly, taking very seriously the alternative arrangements. but the brady amendment mentioned. it's the documents which came from the discussions, the agreements. there isa discussions, the agreements. there is a big change. i'm hoping the dup are looking at it. they haven't rejected it out of hand, they said they are going to consider what's happened. 0nce they are going to consider what's happened. once they consider it, hopeful they will actually support the deal and if they do, many of my
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collea g u es the deal and if they do, many of my colleagues in the conservative party, erg members and others will be able to support the deal. just back to your comments. he need three points there. what is legally binding in this? the first joint interpretive instrument is legally binding and gives us the reason if they want to keep a sin, we can take them to court effectively. we didn't have that mechanism before. it's a huge improvement on the original deal. i back the original deal. it delivered on most of what i campaigned for is a brexit supporter. you forgot those terms to three years ago, many brexit supporters, the majority of brexiteers, would have jumped supporters, the majority of brexiteers, would havejumped at this deal. i'm very hopeful that on
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the basis of the improvement. we've been speaking to people here, dominic grieve has a legal background, he says it does not make any significant difference. dominic has his own axe to grind. he thinks brexit is a disaster. he's not alone in that. this is part the political debate. they will be people who say the deal is a terrible deal, people wa nt the deal is a terrible deal, people want us to stay in the eu, other people who feel the perfect brexit that they'd imagined for a0 years won't be delivered. this deal largely delivers 90% on the boat. what the prime minister got last night would secure at, legally binding assurances that we will be able to leave the backstop at a time of our choosing. hopeful we can win
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the boat. dominic grieve will end his career. i don't think he is right. i reject his views and i think the country spoke in the referendum. 0f think the country spoke in the referendum. of course people are going to complain. i'm interested in getting majority in the house of commons. so that we can win the vote tonight. from what you've been saying to me, this all hangs on what the dup are going to decide.” mention the dup because they are an important part of this process. after all, the backstop relates to northern ireland. of course, they are going to be an important part. it's not all about the dup, there are it's not all about the dup, there
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a re lots of it's not all about the dup, there are lots of people across the house. a number of people have supported the government consistently. there are other people who want to frustrate the process, you want even now to reverse brexit and it's within the right to do that but let's be very clear about where they are coming from. when you quote dominic grieve to me, let's not pretend his sole aim in this is to try reverse brexit? what happens tonight if theresa may doesn't get what she wants and it doesn't go her way? is it a vote of confidence in her? i don't think it's that, at the it's a very clear choice the house of commons has tonight. it can either vote to the deal and say we can move on, but this phase of the brexit process to bed and move on to securing a free trade agreement or the house if it chooses to both the deal down will essentially prolong the uncertainty, along the endless discussions we seem to be having
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about brexit and i think that will be to the detriment of the economy and millions of people in this country. we saw yesterday, the pound rallied to a 2— year high against the euro on the back of this agreement. that was the market giving an endorsement. if the deal gets through, it will be a huge boost to the economy and to confidence in this country. have you got a plan to this week if it doesn't? the prime minister made it clear commitment last week that there would be subsequent votes on no deal and they would be another vote on extending article 50. extending article 50 would not be a sensible thing to do. my focus is to get the vote through tonight. there has been talk about cliff edges. in less tha n
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has been talk about cliff edges. in less than 12 hours, mps have got to look at this what you say is significant changes. it seems extraordinary that after all these negotiations, this is what comes down to, 12 hours, make a decision. we've been debating this for 2.5 yea rs. we've been debating this for 2.5 years. many mps fully know what views are on this question. what the house identified at the end of january is this issue of the backstop in northern ireland, the republic of ireland border, was crucial and we have language, for pages, five pages of carefully worded legal language about this issue and it's perfectly right that people should be focusing on that. we don't need huge amounts of time to try to work out whether this actually satisfies people or not. the attorney general will be coming up the attorney general will be coming up in his opinion in a few hours. the dup have said they are carefully considering the language of these documents carefully and we will then have a debate and vote. very
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briefly, what is your response to jeremy corbyn saying negotiations have failed? he was always going to say that, there is no way he would say that, there is no way he would say they are successful. is the leader of the opposition. bizarrely in my view because his manifesto committed labour to honouring the result but he has his own motives and reasons. now he's tried to frustrate the process. that's exactly what you would expect him to do. it's all about short—term tactical advantage. thank you for your time. we will be speaking shortly here on breakfast kier starmer. thank you for your time. dan is down in westminster. now time to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield.
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to protect a model who was murdered days after raising concerns. lina kayza from leyton was killed by her ex—partner in 2013. she made numerous calls to police before she was stabbed to death in front of her two—year—old daughter. the independent 0ffice for police conduct found the officers guilty of gross misconduct. a container packed with more than £100 million worth of cocaine that was headed for london — has been intercepted by customs in america. (00v) the uk's national crime agency tipped off us authorities —— the uk's national crime agency tipped off us authorities who discovered 1 and a half tonnes of the class—a drug in a truck at the port of new york. the daughter of a russian exile found strangled in south west london a year ago today says his death will "haunt" her forever. nikolay glushkov, who was a retired financial director, was found dead at his home in new malden. no—one's ever been charged despite detectives contacting more than 18 hundred witnesses.
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a new app will be able tell people working outdoors in london how much air pollution they're being exposed to. the canairy app has been developed by king's college london. research suggests more than 9,000 people in the capital die prematurely each year because of poor air quality. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, the central line has minor delays, there are severe delays on the jubilee line. the 0verground has no service between sydenham green and west croydon, and there are minor delays on tfl rail. 0n the roads, the north circular southbound is down to one lane after the m11 charlie browns interchange because of a crash. it's slow for several miles. in finsbury park: green lanes is closed because of a fallen tree. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. some very unsettled weather around this week and some strong winds headed our way, notjust today but also tonight and into tomorrow from storm gareth — more on that in just a moment.
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today not the greatest day of weather, it's set to turn very wet and windy. there's some showers around this morning, a fairly mild start, lots of cloud around already some strong gusts of wind, you can see those in the black circles here. the heaviest of the rain is coming our way through the late morning into the first part of the afternoon. as that band of rain pushes through, then we will see strong gust of wind, 50mph, even over 50mph in some places then showers into the evening rush—hour. the winds will ease slightly, tops between 8 and 10 degrees celsius but they are largely academic. we've got a met office warning for strong winds valid from 9 o'clock tonight right up until 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from storm gareth, we do expect to see potential disruption from these high winds, gusts of a5—55mph so a very windy night indeed. some showers into tomorrow morning and that's how we start the day tomorrow and again, some strong gusts of wind tomorrow, sunny spells and some showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to louise in salford and dan in westminster. see you soon.
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