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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 12, 2019 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's tuesday, it's10am, i'm victoria derbyshire. millions of pounds will be offered in compensation by manchester city to men who as young boys, were abused by a former city youth coach. some of the survivors who were targeted by barry bennell may get six figure sums in damages. a year go, one of them gary cliffe told this programme that bennell had abused him on the pitch at man city. i had tracksuit bottoms on and it was a sexual assault. actually on the pitch. two or three times. gary cliffe has told this programme he welcomes the club's decicsion but there is "still a lot of talking to do". we'll have the latest. for mps, it's make your mind up time. has theresa may got enough tweaks ot her brexit deal to get it over the line in tonight's big vote? if we don't back this new, improved
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deal tonight then there are two risks, one is that we may find ourselves having brexit delayed and dilate it and i think that would be a grave error. there is also a risk of us finding ourselves leaving the european union without a deal. we'll ask some mps. paramedics in the west midlands are opening up the chests of knife crime victims on the roadside to save lives. we've had exclusive access to the ambulance service. we've had to open patient‘s chests literally outside their home on the back of an ambulance, so we are doing a massive surgical procedure in the back of an ambulance and a com pletely in the back of an ambulance and a completely un—sterile environment. literally metres from these peoples mums, dads, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters. that report at 10.30. and, 2a hour party people...
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tess daley and claudia winkleman are dancing all day and all night over at radio 2 to raise money for comic relief. i went to dance with them in the early hours of this morning. how many times has somebody said to you overnight, keep dancing? don't! if anybody watches it strictly we are not going to say that at the end, we arejust are not going to say that at the end, we are just going to say have a nice evening, put your feet up! hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until ”am this morning. over a month ago, instagram pledged to remove images of self harm from the site, but we've found that they're still shocking posts showing self harm, including this one, which we have blurred, which are still up there. let us know what you think about that, and about the latest brexit deal at #victorialive.
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send us an email. here's the news with annita mcveigh. theresa may says she's secured "legally binding" changes to her brexit deal ahead of a vote in the commons later today. speaking after last minute talks in strasbourg last night the prime minister said they included assurances from the european union on the controversial irish backstop which aims to prevent a hard irish border after brexit. labour says the agreement contains nothing new. manchester city football club have announced they're setting up a compensation scheme for victims of historical child sexual abuse. the redress scheme will offer damages totalling millions of pounds to victims of the former youth coach barry bennell and another man, john broome, who has now died. singapore and australia's aviation authorities have temporarily suspended the boeing 737 max fleet of aircraft from flying into and out of their countries. it comes after several countries grounded the same type ofjet that
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crashed in ethiopia on sunday, killing all 157 people on board. the boeing 737 max—8 was flying to the kenyan capital, nairobi when it went down shortly after take off. american authorities say the plane is airworthy although software updates are needed. paramedics in the west midlands have exclusuively told this programme they're now carrying out life—saving surgical procedures on the roadside on victims of violent stabbings. the technique, which can involve cutting someone s chest open, allows doctors to gain access quickly and control bleeding from within the body. there have been 269 knife crimes recorded in birmingham so far this year. professor stephen hawking has been commemorated on a new 50p coin with a design inspired by his work on black holes. the royal mint said he was one of the world's most brilliant physicists and a great ambassadorfor science. uncirculated coins are being sold for at least 20 times theirface value.
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it looks rather good doesn't it? that's a summary of the menu so far, back to you. "how can you put a price on losing your chidlhood?" the words of one man who was sexually abused as a boy by a coach at manchester city, responding to the news that the club are setting up a fund to compensate the victims of barry bennell, the football coach who abused dozens of boys linked to the club in the 19705 and ‘80s. the scheme, which launches today, is expected to pay out around £2 million to a0 victims of bennell and a second abusive coach at the club. this programme helped expose the extent of barry bennell‘s abuse leading to his arrest and fourth conviction last year on 43 charges of abusing 12 boys both at manchester city and crewe. one of the country's most prolific paedophiles, bennell was jailed for 31 years.
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you might remember this emotional interview with four of bennell‘s victims from 2016. the abuse started in the car, he used to touch, he used to play games on the card. that's when it all started. that would be on the way to training? on the way to training and on the way back. what age were you? i was about nine. what did you as a little boy think was going on?” i was about nine. what did you as a little boy think was going on? i did not know what was going on, to be fair. i knew where i wanted to get andi fair. i knew where i wanted to get and i thought this is obviously what i've got to go through. and i thought this is obviously what i've got to go throughlj and i thought this is obviously what i've got to go through. i have been carrying this on my life, my career has been ruined, my relationships have been ruined. i had to get it out there because, i've got
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children, this can never, ever happen to any more children. you have done a quite remarkable thing you know, andy. i am totally overwhelmed. last week i was on here andl overwhelmed. last week i was on here and i was on my own and i was so frightened but i knew they were here and honest to god, victoria, i cannot, i cannot thank the public enough, and the media and more importantly the lads for backing me up. chris on the words, steve walters, jason dunford and andy woodward talking. 0ur reporterjim reed is here with more on what manchester city is saying today. some background on the case, you mention some of us already, barry bennell now in prison serving 31 yea rs, bennell now in prison serving 31 years, his fourth offence to do with abusing young boys, 65 years old. he was a coach in the north west of england, a large number of clubs but
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manchester city the most high profile club he was linked to or attach to do, he was there in the late 70s, early 805. attach to do, he was there in the late 705, early 805. we talked last year covering this case about the work we did to show various senior members of the club did have concerns when he was younger mac about his behaviour with young boys which is why you get the issue of compensation and this fund today. which is why you get the issue of compensation and this fund todaym term5 compensation and this fund todaym terms of money what the club saying? this fund is being set up this morning, they say around a0 player5 are going to be eligible, around 31 a55ociated are going to be eligible, around 31 associated with barry bennell in some way, another nine a55ociated with the second w survey found, a man called john broome. that is back in the 19605. they say too much things they are at pains to point out, one is that if you take money from this fund there is no gagging clause attached which has been an i55ue clause attached which has been an issue with some other cases, if people accept compensation they are told they cannot speak out but
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manchester city say that's not the ca5e. manchester city say that's not the case. they also say this will not stop anyone taking any civil action, taking them to court and 5uing them if that's what we want to do but they hope by doing this people can avoid court if they want to and avoid court if they want to and avoid the associated 5tress. manchester city is the first club to do this. there are a number of clubs a55ociated do this. there are a number of clubs associated with barry bennell, manchester city the first to come out to do this, they say if victim5 go through this scheme there could bea go through this scheme there could be a higher level of compensation as a result and people can get claims processed within 6—7 weeks which would be much faster than going through the court proce55 would be much faster than going through the court process and they say once all this is done they expect each individual victim to receive a personal apology for someone receive a personal apology for someone at board level at manchester city. what about those who were abused as young boys, what are they saying? i have spoken to a number of former players, victims of barry
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bennell, one man, gary cliffe, he spoke to us last year and was involved in the trial, one of the victims barry bennell was found guilty of abusing. that was before today's announcement. before we speak about his reaction we wanted to play a short excerpt of that interview we ran last year where he talked about being abused on the pitch at maine road which was the manchester city stadium at the time. but he had got the run of the place, it was me and one other boy. he spied an opportunity just it was me and one other boy. he spied an opportunityjust behind the goal, i think it was the north stand and as he did in those days he always carried coconut oil around with him as some of the boys will know. we had got tracksuit bottoms oi'i know. we had got tracksuit bottoms on and it was a sexual assault. actually on the pitch. two or three times. during pre—season. actually on the pitch. two or three times. during pre-season. that was gary cliffe speaking bravely about the abuse he went through. we spoke to him this morning about this new scheme and he said how can you put a
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price on childhood? it's good manchester city are big enough to accept liability and culpability but there are still a lot of talking to do. i also spoke to another two former players, david white, former england international also abused by barry bennell at manchester city, he said we need to see the details but this has to be seen as a positive step by manchester city pointing out that going to court for victims can be stressful and traumatising so anything which avoids that is a good thing. but another former player i spoke to who i will not name in this insta nce spoke to who i will not name in this instance was much more negative, sitting on first glance he will not ta ke sitting on first glance he will not take it up as he is worried about certain aspects in particular if the clu b certain aspects in particular if the club are technically taking responsibility if you are accepted into this scheme. what gary cliffe said was how can you put a price on losing childhood, that's what he specifically said and felt there was a long way to go. we will talk to a lawyer for some victims later in the
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programme but for the moment, thank you. if you were affected, if you are targeted by barry bennell, do get in touch and tell us how you react to this scheme which has been launched by manchester city. still to come: we've had exclusive access to paramedics in the west midlands who say they are carrying out life—saving surgery on knife crime victims by the roadside. there have been 269 knife crimes recorded in birmingham so far this year and, i paid a 5am visit to strictly presenters tess and claudia who are dancing for 2a hours to raise money for red nose day. we will play you that short interview just before we will play you that short interviewjust before 11. has the prime minister pulled off a last minute deal with the eu which will save her brexit deal? mp5 are set to vote on her deal
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tonight for a second time — when mp5 voted on her proposals in january she suffered a huge defeat. but last night, theresa may travelled to strasbourg for talks with eu negotiators and managed to secure some last minute concessions on the most contentious point — the so called irish backstop. the backstop is basically an insurance policy designed to avoid a hard border in ireland. some conservative mp5 and northern ireland's ten dup mp5 have been concerned that the arrangement could become permanent and keep the uk in a customs arrangement with the eu indefinitely. theresa may told reporters late last night that new legally binding changes will mean the uk cannot be tied to the backstop indefinitely. the backstop cannot be indefinite, cannot become permanent, it is only
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temporary. if it is the case that we we re ever temporary. if it is the case that we were ever to get into the backstop. but what we've also secured and what parliament was very clear that it wa nted parliament was very clear that it wanted was that alternative arrangements could replace the backstop and as i have said here there is a timetable for that such that alternative arrangements will be in place at the end of december 2020 so that if there was, if it was necessary to use the insurance policy it would not be necessary to use the backstop, there would be alternative arrangements. in politics sometimes you get a second chance. it's what we do with the second chance that counts because there will be no third chance. there will be no further interpretation of the interpretations and no further assurances oi'i the interpretations and no further assurances on the reassurances. the interpretations and no further assurances on the reassurances. if weather speak crystal clear, it is
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this deal or brexit might not happen at all. in the next hour the attorney general geoffrey cox is expected to give his legal opinion on the new agreement. many conservative mp5 who back a hard brexit and the dup are waiting for his response before deciding whether to back the deal. in a moment we'll speak to paul scully, vice chair other tory mp5. first sam gyimah. he resigned from the government in november over the prime minister's brexit deal, and is part of the people's vote campaign for another referendum. i have called for a second referendum but i don't think that's the big issue today. are you going to vote for it? i don't think so and the reason why is because the backstop exists because there is an
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insoluble problem at the heart of the deal which is we want to take control of our borders but we don't wa nt control of our borders but we don't want the other side to have a border in northern ireland. because there's been no answer to that problem over two years of negotiations we've got the backstop so the idea we can solve a problem which has not been solved in two years in future i think is frankly not going to happen. the prime minister has got some reassurances on what the eu's intentions are but that problem still exists. the backstop might never be used, as you know. that is what we are being told but it still in the withdrawal agreement, that's a legal would document we will be ratifying if the deal goes ahead.“ there is a free trade deal before there is a free trade deal before the end of the transition period, there will be no need for it. if according to the government we do end up in a backstop we can get out
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of it if the other side, the eu, behaved badly. if there is free trade deal as you say, the free trade deal as you say, the free trade deal as you say, the free trade deal the eu will offer us will bea trade deal the eu will offer us will be a free trade deal which builds on the backstop, it says so in the agreement, so we stay as part of the customs union. so a free trade deal in which we diverged away from eu would require a solution to the northern ireland backstop problem because the eu will say if you are diverging away from us then our border now for customs reasons exist in northern ireland and for that reason you've got to have a border. so you have absolutely no faith in any of your colleagues or those with even bigger brains than your collea g u es even bigger brains than your colleagues to come up with some kind of alternative arrangement to make sure there is no hard border without using the backstop? let's call out where we are today, where we are todayis where we are today, where we are today is there is immense pressure being put in all of us to vote for this dealjust to get brexit done.
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forget about what happens on the other side, we will deal with that tomorrow, let's just vote for this deal to get brexit done. but the real issue and it's notjust about the backstop, is we have no idea where we are going. because we have no idea where we are going the eu has made it very clear that we will bea has made it very clear that we will be a third country, there will be no bespoke deal on the other side for us bespoke deal on the other side for us and so we are about to enter if this deal passes the most one—sided negotiation in history of a country like ours. what we've seen over the last few days and weeks and months is ministers from here rushing to the eu every week to try to get some concession. we will deliver brexit if we vote for this deal but that will carry on. we'll be going cap in hand to them for a deal which is materially worse than where we are today. but better to have a deal than not? it's not a deal, it's a so—called deal, we've got something which deals with our exit but is
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totally open—ended as to what our future is. surely you have to withdraw first, you have to withdraw first and then you work out, i know that's not what was necessarily promised, but then you work out what the future relationship will be. what i am saying is we will be working out this future relationship which you point out, with our hands tied behind our back. we will not be able to extract any meaningful concessions for ourselves as we have seen concessions for ourselves as we have seen with the backstop. the deal that the eu put on the table for us todayis that the eu put on the table for us today is exactly the same deal we had back in january today is exactly the same deal we had back injanuary when the house of commons voted the deal down except they have polished it up. that's going to be the story time and time and time again for us. so briefly your ideal scenario is what right now? my ideal scenario is that we level with the british public and tell them we are a far cry from where they thought we would be and maybe give ourselves more time,
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firstly i would want an extension to actually work out where we are going, and then if we cannot work it out, give the public a say. i think if we can take more time to work out where we are going rather than trying to work it out on the other side when we've handed the initiative in the negotiations to the eu, that i don't think is maximising our national self—interest. maximising our national self-interest. thank you for talking to us. one mp who has not been converted and will not be voting for theresa may's deal tonight. let's speak now to daniel kawczynski. he's a conservative mp and member of the conservative group of mps calling themselves the european research group — whose votes will be key if the prime minister has any hope of getting her brexit deal through. make your mind up time, will you be voting for it tonight? first of all the most important thing i can say is the prime minister has said additional changes, positive changes have been made to this agreement as has david lidington, her deputy. so
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iam has david lidington, her deputy. so i am pleased parliament is fulfilling its role which is to challenge the executive when we feel that a deal is not in our national interest. is it enough for you, will you be voting for it? the second point is we are awaiting the legal advice from the attorney general who will give that legal advice to us this afternoon but in addition to his legal advice the european research group, the people in the house of commons who genuinely want a real brexit which is what the people voted for, we've put together a panel of eight prominent lawyers and barristers who are also members of parliament who will advise us as to whether or not these new changes hold water and whether or not we will have the confidence to be able to support them. do your eight trump what the attorney general says or not? i don't think it's a case of one trumping the other. what if they see different things? we will cross
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that bridge if we come to it, at the moment we want to hear the legal advice from the attorney general and hear what our independent panel have to say and in addition to that me i also say we will be taking advice from our partners the dup. they are at the coal face of this issue, they represent seats in northern ireland, the part of the united kingdom which will potentially be most adversely affected if this backstop is implemented so clearly how they vote will influence myself and many of my conservative parliamentary colleagues. thank you for talking to us. colleagues. thank you for talking to us. i don't know if be enough for theresa may, let's talk to paul scully, conservative mp and vice chairman of the party. is she going to win this vote? i think it well as daniel said to depend on what the attorney general says about later on because with those votes from the drg and the dup we can get this over the line but i think, i hope they
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see that the campaign that voted to leave, this is the last way of getting this across the line. that's what theresa may said last time. why should people believe her this time is my point. we've got the votes tomorrow to take no deal off the table and if we do that and are still trying to negotiate we've lost an important crux because if you cannot walk away from any negotiation you don't have a negotiating position. you move to the next day where we got a vote to extend article 50 and i don't have the confidence that if we extend article 50 that we will be able to negotiate anything. if you spent two yea rs on negotiate anything. if you spent two years on it what are you going to get in another month? she would argue she's got something in the last couple of weeks and we have heard there could be a third meaningful thought. what she has got andi meaningful thought. what she has got and i hope the eternallyjournal backs it up... what is your steer on that? there is legally binding stuff
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in the treaty, the additional document, it will not be permanent, the fact that we will look at alternative arrangements over the next couple of years to be able to leave without a heart border and the fa ct leave without a heart border and the fact is we are also going to make a unilateral declaration that if it falls a pa rt unilateral declaration that if it falls apart we will walk away. it's important to look at the backstop to understand why it's. .. important to look at the backstop to understand why it's... can important to look at the backstop to understand why it's. .. can we do that? yes or no so it's clear for the audience, as a result of what theresa may has achieved in terms of changes, has the backstop now been replaced? no, it's not been replaced. what it is is the fact is it's actually going to allow this to walk away from it, that's the key point. is there an end date to the backstop, that's another thing mp5 wanted, yes or no? in two years' time, at the end of the implementation period if things are falling apart we will be able to walk away, that's the key thing. know you want. in terms of treaty. ..
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you will not be able to walk away unilaterally... not within the declaration but this is the third te na nt of declaration but this is the third tenant of what we are applying to. you have to apply to a arbitration panel. let's be clear, you will not be able to walk away unilaterally, you have to apply to an arbitration panel. can you acknowledge that? so iam right? panel. can you acknowledge that? so i am right? absolutely. so you cannot walk away unilaterally, so stop saying that. you have to be honest. we are going to walk away in two yea rs' honest. we are going to walk away in two years' time if you cannot make this happen but we've got to look at the fact this will not happen anyway because why is the backstop so uncomfortable for the eu ? because why is the backstop so uncomfortable for the eu? if it ever comes into force, if you think about every single country, we will be the only country in the world with full access to the single market and the customs union without paying membership fees and without having
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freedom of movement, there is no way the eu will want that to continue for any length of time. so you are telling people watching now you will find an alternative arrangement by december 2020? this is... michel barnier. .. december 2020? this is... michel barnier... you have december 2020? this is... michel barnier. .. you have not december 2020? this is... michel barnier... you have not been december 2020? this is... michel barnier. .. you have not been able to find it in two years and you're giving yourself another 18 months. michel barnier says if we left with no deal he would be looking at alternative arrangements to stop a heart border. we have asked is for him to do the same within the structure of a deal and that makes a much more sense because you don't wa nt much more sense because you don't want us to leave with no deal, we don't want to leave with no deal is the default position but we need to be prepared to do so. if theresa may loses tonight can she survive?” think she can. how? look at the structure, we need to get this over the line. but her authority will be even more shredded than it already
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is. things will be difficult if we don't succeed tonight but you have to look at where do we go with it? we've got to get the next two votes out, you cannot just we've got to get the next two votes out, you cannotjust replace a leader overnight. those two votes will definitely go ahead if she loses ? will definitely go ahead if she loses? this is what she has said. i have no reason to doubt her. i have known her a long time and she has a lwa ys known her a long time and she has always been a woman of her world. she's changed her mind on a number of occasions since she's been prime minister. that's because we have to have the scope to go back to brussels and negotiate in the past. there is no point banging your head against a brick wall but if you can get something extra from brussels which it looks like we've done then why not go back and take our time and make sure we get this right to give the assurances to people like daniel to get this over the line. we are told theresa may is meeting your collea g u es are told theresa may is meeting your colleagues and about half an hour or so we colleagues and about half an hour or so we will see what emerges, thank you very much for coming on the
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programme, paul scully, conservative mp and vice chairman of the party. paramedics in the west midlands have exclusuively told this programme they're now carrying out life—saving surgical procedures on the roadside on victims of violent stabbings. the technique can involve cutting someone s chest open allows doctors to gain access quickly and control bleeding from within the body. there have been 269 knife crimes recorded in birmingham so far this year. through the whole of last year there were 19 knife deaths — and all the victims were under the age of 25 — in the west midlands. the home secretary, sajid javid, has backed calls from police chiefs for emergency stop and search powers to tackle knife crime, but the shadow home secretary diane abbott has exclusively told his programme she does not think the tactic will make the streets safer. you may find some of the images in noel philips‘ exclusive film upsetting. police are investigating a triple stabbing at a nightclub in birmingham. a 17—year—old was killed
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yesterday afternoon... the knife crime epidemic on the streets of birmingham. for the emergency services, the surge in knife crime has become an everyday norm. last year, 19 people died, having been stabbed with knives in the west midlands, where knife crime has gone up by more than 70% since 2012. i think what we are seeing is possibly a lot more multiple stab wounds, in terms of they could be stabbed in their arms, they could be stabbed in the chest. i have seen people with partial amputations of their fingers when they have been defending themselves from attackers, trying to stop them. —— with attackers trying to stab them. dealing with the consequences of the increased violence on a daily basis are dr polly hayworth and critical care paramedic, kerry from the west midlands ambulance service.
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it is saturday night, and we are on the front line with the medical emergency response team. these specialist medics only deal with the most serious trauma cases, most of which are now stabbings. we are mobile to this incident. any further information? reports coming in now... a 23—year—old male stabbed in the arm. increasingly, we are going out to people who have been stabbed to life—threatening areas, up to and including opening their chest on the roadside to try to stem bleeding and resuscitate them, and hopefully transport them alive to the hospital. the first call comes in, and it is a stabbing just outside birmingham. they arrive to find a 23—year—old man who has been attacked with a machete. he is conscious and talking. are you 0k?
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yes. let's have a look. 0k, all right my darling. what is the damage? put your wrist back for me. dr polly is checking how deep the stab wound is. there have been 269 other incidents like this involving knives in birmingham so far this year. he has been assaulted with a machete, and i think his jacket has saved him from more serious injury. it has penetrated through the jacket and into the outside aspect of his left forearm. a pretty nasty wound, but hopefully something they can close in theatre. just 2a hours before this incident, three other men were stabbed at a nightclub in the northfield area of the city. after they assess his injuries, the man is taken by ambulance to a nearby hospital for further treatment. we have had to open patients' chests literally outside their home in the back of an ambulance, so we are doing a massive surgical
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procedure in the back of an ambulance in a completely un—sterile environment, literally metres from these people's mums, dads, brothers, sisters, sons and daughters. did anybody see what happened? this shocking footage of a man stabbed on the streets of birmingham just two weeks ago prompted west midlands police to impose section 60 orders across the city, meaning they can stop and search anyone without reason. we can't allow the streets of london and birmingham to turn into killing fields. it is a complex issue. there's a number of things that could done, but if you sat, as i have sat, with crying mothers, then you know it is an urgent issue. it is an issue which has led to the government calling for greater powers of stop and search to tackle knife crime, but the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, says the tactic unfairly targets black and ethnic minorities, and will not make
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the streets any safer. i would advise senior police officers to look at the research, including the home office's research, which says, in the medium term, stop and search does not bring down levels of knife crime. it is an easy solution, it is attractive, but the stats tell us that we have to engage on a much broader level. west midlands police say stop and search is a deterrent to prevent violent crime. these are just some of the weapons seized under section 60 orders in areas of birmingham, where some say the police have lost control of the streets. we have not lost control, but the way i put it is it is not under control. there are some areas where people are saying the "swagger" is back amongst some of the criminals. they feel because there is so little police presence on the streets, some of the criminals then are getting up to their activities.
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figures show west midlands ambulance service dealt with at least 1500 incidents involving knives and deadly weapons between 2017 and 2018. but, with serious stabbing is rapidly increasing, medics are warning that not everyone can always be saved. unfortunately, i have treated a 13—year—old, where we performed a thoracotomy. he had been stabbed. we did resuscitate him on the scene, but unfortunately he died later in theatre. i have had the smallest of stab wounds potentially on a patient's chest, and they have been dead. you just don't know what is going on underneath the skin, so it is really, really important that you understand that a two or three millimetre nick externally could cause a whole host of damage.
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ina in a second we will speak to 0fsted's cheapens amanda spielman, but i want to bring you this braking is first. a group calling itself the ira has claimed it sent five parcel bombs to addresses on the british mainland. the devices were designed to start small fires. they were posted to waterloo railway station, officers at heathrow and london city airports and the university of glasgow last week. a group calling itself the ira says it sent those parcel bombs to addresses on the british mainland. inafew british mainland. in a few moments we will speak to our home affairs correspondence about that. let's speak to the 0fsted chief and spectacle amanda spielman. today a report out from school inspectors 0fsted has found there is "no evidence" that the surge is down to kids being excluded. but do you accept there might be a
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correlation? we are speaking about particularly troubled children whose lives are going off track, but we are looking at how they are handled, how the areas in schools where they do the best work are handling that and how every school can get to the same standard. is there a link? i don't think we can say there is a causal link. it would be very hard to prove, but what we know about knife crime does not suggest it is being disproportionately committed by people who have been permanently excluded rather than those who have fallen out of the system. many more children fall out of education without a permanent exclusion than without a permanent exclusion than with one. but isn't there an argument for keeping children in school when a head might want to permanently exclude, for no other reason than keeping them safe? atypical permanent exclusion happens after a long history of deeply difficult and troubling behaviour
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with significant impact on other children. schools do not exclude likely, typically, they do it as a last resort after excluding everything they have in their capacity to do. so we are talking about making sure that we have the right kind of education provision, whether in mainstream schools or alternative provision like people referral units, to make sure the children who need help most get the right kind of help from the experts. some schools are doing really good work, you acknowledge that in this report. what can other schools learn from those carrying out good practice? good coordination between agencies and areas, it sent terribly easily, wouldn't everybody be doing that? surprising numbers were not, lots of schools are not even aware
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of their local area knife crime strategy. in london, where our research was carried out, a patchwork of local authorities coordinate where they can across a dense urban area, it is hard to make coordination work but we need to put that effort into making sure we have consistency, coherence and communication. some people think that they should not share information, it has to be made private, but we need to share information effectively and early. the vice you say it is a last resort and there has often been a history of troubling behaviour before a child is permanently excluded, but permanent exclusions in england increased by 20 —— 56% between 20131a and 2016 slashed 17. it is hard to know whether that is societal circumstances changing and to what extent it is schools doing something differently. the world outside changes. more generally,
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knife crime, as your film horrifically showed, is rising and rising fast. we also know there have been times when exclusions have been much higher than now, not lower but higher. we had a low period, so understanding those factors and the different agencies, people with a contribution to address a deeply worrying trend. thank you very much, amanda spielman from 0fsted. a group calling itself "the ira" has claimed repsonsibility for the devices recieved at london transport hubs, including waterloo station, and glasgow university last week. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford joins me now. police say they are aware of a claim of responsibility made to a media
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outlet in northern ireland yesterday, it is credible in that it seems to have been made by people linked to terrorism in the past, it used a recognised code word that was used a recognised code word that was used in the past. during the claim it said the group was the ira, that is how they describe themselves, they say they had sent five devices. so far, three were recovered in and around london on tuesday last week, one of which went off, causing a small fire, at heathrow airport. and a fourth one in glasgow university. so if the claim is accurate, one device is missing, that is an interesting thing to emerge. in theory, the ira is on ceasefire, so theory, the ira is on ceasefire, so the assessment is that this is some sort of dissident republican group making the claim, a group that has called itself the new ira in the past which sent four letter bombs, said some letter bombs four years ago. there is a likelihood this will
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bea ago. there is a likelihood this will be a dissident group claiming responsibility. it does not mean they sent to the devices, police still need to do the forensic trail to work out who sent the devices. about how alarming is it, whoever sent it? it is worrying, particularly if it is dissident republicans, because it has been some years since letter bombs were sent to addresses in mainland britain. that said, m15 and those assessing the threat level in mainland britain have not changed the threat level from northern ireland terrorism, it is moderate, meaning an attack is possible but not very likely. the threat level in northern ireland itself is at severe at the moment because there is a concern that dissident republicans micro activities are increasing and there is concern that there may be more activity linked to issues around brexit, people may use that as an opportunity to stir up
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trouble. no greater alarming counterterrorism circles at the moment, but a market is being put down and a worry that this could be a harbinger of more to come if it is northern ireland terrorism. peter on email: if the prime ministers deal is defeated the prime minister should make a statement to the effect this house is not worthy, is not capable of carrying out the peoples instructions and therefore should be dissolved and a general election should be called ken on text: there is a brexit elephant in the room that is not really being talked about. basically leaving without a deal is enshrined in law. stopping "no deal". if the law is not changed then we can leave on 29th march without a deal. ken is absolutely right. anon on text: why is the british public not allowed to have a second vote on remaining or leaving now they have further information about the terms of brexit and its effect on their future? do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. you can send us an e—mail.
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tess daly and claudia winkleman last night started an epic challenge, a 2a—hour non—stop danceathon for red nose day, which is this friday. the strictly hosts are attempting to beat the previous record set by radio 2 dj sara cox back in 2017. before work in the early hours of this morning, i nipped into the radio 2 studios to give them a bit of encouragement and moral support. oh, that's nice. what a day in politics, eh? what a day. i mean, it's a big day. yes, it is a big day, brexit—wise. i'm obsessed by it. all i want to do is watch it but instead, no, here i am. that's absolutely fine. i'll watch when i go home. does it make you feel sick that we're moving when you're talking to us? a little. it looks like you're on a boat, and you're swaying. it's odd. we've got a rhythm going. how are you feeling, hours and hours in?
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i won't lie, a wall has been hit a little bit. i felt a bit sick earlier. but i've eaten some salty crisps, because salt apparently helps the nausea. it's a bit like jet lag, you know when you go through the night and you haven't slept and you feeljust a little bit shaky and quite sick? but working through that. yeah. we are looking after each other. we are both strapped up with tape at this point, because our backs started to go... no way! but the tape helped a lot, didn't it? it's amazing. we have a professor here, professor greg whyte, who's gone on all of the... oh, my gosh. ..comic relief missions. wow. 0k. and he's been absolutely amazing and has looked after us. we've had hourly ice baths for our feet, because that stops the blisters, apparently, and helps them. and we have these wonderful, amazing backing dancers who are on three—hour shifts. bit of energy. inspiring you. fresh life into the room. and do you have a signature move, each of you? you don't want to see it.
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i can't dance. we just do what we are told, we are following the choreographers. so i think you've been dancing great, darling. i'm a terrible dancer. you are not. what we have is... well, not right now, but we started with some amount... with vim. we did. and we are only here because of comic relief. so i don't think anybody... i mean, it's fine. yeah, it's fine. we are moving. thank you so much for coming to see us. don't be daft, don't be daft. when someone suggested this to you, way back when, did you think this was a good idea? well, define good idea. erm... no, no. we thought, we like dancing, it's going to be good. but then 24—hours, no sleep. i don't think i've ever gone 24 hours without sleep in my entire life, so, you know? but you just say yes to comic relief, i find. yes. and how many times has someone said to you overnight, "keeeeep dancing!"? don't! and, by the way, just so you know, if you... i mean, you don't have to, but if anybody watches strictly, we're not going to say that at the end. at the end, we're just
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going to say, "have a nice evening. good night. put your feet up. relax. do a jigsaw." you are so over "keep dancing." we're not going to do "keep dancing," yeah. # it feels like i'm in love... is that sugary tea?! yeah! wooh! everybody go like this for the sugary tea! all: tea! tea! here's a live shot of tess and claudia — still dancing. ian has really gotten touch to ask, is that actually dancing? 0nly eight and a half hours to go. for information on how you can donate, go to bbc.co.uk/comicrelief. news just newsjust in news just in about bbc pay practices, the equality and human rights commission has launched an investigation into bbc pay practices over alleged discrimination against women, saying over alleged discrimination against women, saying some women over alleged discrimination against women, saying some women have not received equal for equal work. ——
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equal pay act for equal work. just a month ago, instagram pledged to remove the most serious pictures and videos of self harm posted on its platform to help protect vulnerable people. it came after the bbc brought you the story of molly russell, a 1a—year—old who took her own life after seeing graphic images of suicide online. her father ian told our reporter angus crawford he felt that instagram was partly responsible for her death — and facebook, which owns instagram, promised to review its policy. two weeks later, instagram announced changes to the platform, saying, "we will not show non—graphic, self—harm anyone listening to you to reconcile with what we say you can find on instagram within strength as my policies, the daily mail has reprinted some of it, these are slit
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wrists from instagram. this is blood from instagram. this is a cartoon of a young girl cuddling a teddy bear and saying this world is so cool and i don't want to see it anymore. those are all against your policies but were available on instagram until the bbc found them. we had to make sure that we look at these and ensure they are taken down, if against our policies. two weeks later, instagram announced changes to the platform, saying we will not show non—graphic content. fast forward to today and, despite the promise, this programme has found graphic images of self harm are still easy to find. in just five minutes of searching, we found 31 images including scars, and more worryingly several extreme pictures of people cutting themselves. of the distressing images we saw, many didn't break the rules as instagram allows pictures of healed scars if they are seen to be posted by people who no longer self harming and offering support to others. some images came with a warning before you're able to see them, but not all. of the pictures we found
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there were at least three that were of the most serious nature, showing people in the middle of self harming. some of these pictures were posted as far back as 2016, and some as recently as two weeks ago. we reported these images to instagram. in response, they said this image doesn't break their rules even, though it clearly shows serious self—harm taking place. with me is 19—year—old alisha cowie who is the current miss england, and she says she ended up self harming after facing pressure over her weight on instagram. also here is tony stower, who is the head of child safety 0nline at the nspcc. your reaction to the fact that these images are still available, despite what instagram promised? they should not have made the promise of they can't keep it, making the promise means he will take them time, if you can't take them down, don't say you will. the images do not need to be
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there, i can't see why they are there, i can't see why they are there in the first place. instagram have a huge responsibility to look after people and need to take these down. absolutely right, instagram have a responsibility to users to make sure the content is safe. it is not acceptable for these images to remain when they say they are taking action and making all of the systems and network say. it has not happened yet, it is great they are taking steps, but not enough. their words from the boss, we will not allow any graphic images of self—harm like putting on instagram. we know these images can be incredibly distressing, both to the victims who have self handle might be thinking about it, but also to parents. you mentioned the family of molly russell, who had taken instagram to tass, and my heart goes out to them, they are fantastic
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campaigners. we should not rely on victims and survivors to hold instagram to account. instagram and facebook have made promises they have not kept about privatising child safety. we need to make sure the government listens and puts in place regulations so these companies cannot add on child safety, it needs to be built in from the beginning. so you want legislation? really tough legislation is necessary, we have had ten years of self—regulation where nothing has happened. instagram says, quote on quote, its ban on graphic images will take time. i think so, it is such a big platform with so many people posting daily, but they have the money and resources to do what they need to, but i think they won't until legislation is put in place and they had to. i think they will wait it out until they are made to
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do it, rather than do it off their own back. covers which does not make sense, they have the money and the resources , sense, they have the money and the resources, hire the people and take them down? time and again we have seen them down? time and again we have seen them do that then, they will not do anything until. in the white paper, the government needs to take action with strong sanctions to make sure that companies and perhaps directors are held responsible. one of the images we found, it looks like a of the images we found, it looks likea man of the images we found, it looks like a man puts my hand, with a knife across his wrist, cutting 80. and what looks like blood coming from it. alisha, are you 0k and what looks like blood coming from it. alisha, are you ok if show you this? they said this image does not break their community rules, watch to give think of it?” not break their community rules, watch to give think of it? i don't see how that does not break rules, it is obviously distressing. i saw these images at 13 and it caused me to self—harm, so what is that same two children, teenagers or adults? this is disturbing for me seven yea rs this is disturbing for me seven years later, never mind me seven yea rs years later, never mind me seven years ago. what do you think about
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that not breaking instagram's community rules? it is right, the impact on adult users may be different from a child who has perhaps experienced extreme of these images. in context, it is clear this is distressing and should be taken down. instagram have the largest resources on the planet to deal with this, it is unclear why they have not ta ken this, it is unclear why they have not taken action yet. yeah, instagram says taking these graphic images down will take time to implement and they promise they will not show nongraphic self—harm related content such as heeled scars in searches, hashtags and the explore tab and we will not recommend them. we do not want to stigmatise or isolate people who may be in distress, so we will not remove it entirely. do you buy that? we have asked instagram for the
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expert advice on which they have built these systems and they have not shared it. we want to make sure they take the right actions to keep children safe, which might mean taking these kind of images down. it will mean providing the right kind of support for users who express concern and report the images. we have seen no evidence they are taking these actions yet. thank you both very much, alisha and tony. if you have been affected by anything we've been talking about, or want help and information you can find details of organisations offering support at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 08000155 998. back to the top story today, the news that manchester city are setting up a fund to compensate survivors of sexual abuse. barry
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bennell, the football coach he was jailed last year for abusing bennell, the football coach he was jailed last yearfor abusing dozens of boys, was one of those who, according to people we have interviewed, effectively stole the childhoods from a number of boys he was coaching when he was a youth coach at man city. let speak to a child—abuse lawyer who represents several of barry bennell‘s victims. how do you react to news of the compensation fund? the first thought is that it is a positive step. finally the club by doing the right thing. 0n second review, u nfortu nately thing. 0n second review, unfortunately it is a bit too late. these actions. there has been a lack of care given to survivors, my clients. we were told at the last
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minute, before it was made public to journalists, that the scheme is coming out. i take offence to it being a survivors‘ scheme, it is man city‘s scheme, it is not for survivors. there has been a lack of due diligence and care. and they fail to due diligence and care. and they failto admit due diligence and care. and they fail to admit actual responsibility. lots of it its range of difficulties with civil litigation. man city, you talk about an alternative to litigation. if you had admitted liability i would not have been issuing court proceedings for my clients and we would not have high court case is pending. so you want that to acknowledge this was their responsibility, people high up at the club knew what barry bennell was giving to those boys? they mention the feeder clubs, they make note of the feeder clubs, they make note of the services they obtained from barry bennell as a skeleton to coach for the feeder clubs, they do not ta ke for the feeder clubs, they do not take on board the regulations at that point. that was meant to be no regular football training for boys
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under 1a, yet all my clients were aged roughly between 11 and 1a, some would have been eight. the clubs have never answered that. 0ver would have been eight. the clubs have never answered that. over 2 million p spent and they propose an alternative scheme, it does not a nswer alternative scheme, it does not answer any of my clients peer concerns. provides bespoke to former england international, david white, he was abused by barry bennell. he said at first glance the scheme looked positive and vivid stops players having to go to court for compensation then that would be better and that would be less chance of them being traumatised again? that is what i would want is a solicitor. we want the club to admit responsibility, admit the abuse took place and appreciate the impact on their lives. the litmus test is that if they had done that, i would not haveissued if they had done that, i would not have issued core proceedings. their alternative system is not a real concept. after £2 million, this is all they had to show, it is not good enough. they say 6-figure sums could be paid to victims within a few
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weeks. they focus on the figure and the time. you cannot reach full compensation and a full settlement for a client which entails closure and justice within six to seven weeks, there is no medical report. how can you assess 30 years of pain and suffering within that amount of time? thank you for coming on the programme. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. have a good day. good morning. we have already had some very strong good morning. we have already had some very strong winds and very heavy rainfall moving across england and wales, courtesy of storm gareth. it will bring more strong winds,
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stronger later this afternoon, severe gales with the heavy rain, some of it is likely, there could be minor damage because of the strong winds. as the wind pushes into the south—east of england, some intense rainfall for a short time. things clearing up a bit further north and west, showers could be heavy, perhaps the injury. frequent showers into scotland and northern ireland. temperature is fairly irrelevant because of the strong winds, which intensify in northern ireland this afternoon. 70 or 80 mph across the central belt of scotland, 60 or 70 mph through this evening. and whiteley across england and wales into wednesday, the strong winds continue. stronger winds perhaps in the north—east of scotland. goodbye for now. trasch and widely across england and wales.
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this is bbc news, i‘m annita mcveigh at westminster. the headlines at 11. theresa may urges mp5 to back her brexit deal in today‘s vote, after she secured what she calls "legally binding" changes to it following last—minute talks with the eu. mp5 were clear that legal changes were needed to the backstop. today, we have secured legal changes. now is the time to come together to back this improved brexit deal. the president of the european commission issues a warning to those mp5 threatening to reject the deal. in politics, sometimes you get a second chance. it's what we do with the second chance that counts. because there will be no third chance. i‘ll have all the latest developments as the prime minister

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