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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 12, 2019 10:45pm-11:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. ‘ lost control, now it she has finally lost control, now it is going to be in the hands of mps and the house of commons to describe what kind of brexit we have, and indeed if we have brexit at all because theresa may's package, which she put together meticulously over 242, the noes, 391. the last few years has been rejected the prime minister suffers a second heavy defeat for the second time today, on her brexit deal, this time by a majority of 149, fourth—largest defeat in house of leading to further commons history. the idea that she confusion on the way ahead. can come back for a third time, which is somewhat —— what some in i profoundly regret the decision this house has taken tonight. i westminster are talking about seems far—fetched. we will have more continue to believe that by far the best outcome is the united kingdom votes, but clearly, theresa may, it leaves the european union in an is totally gone over this, she has not won over her party, she has not orderly fashion with a deal. the one labour mps over and i don't government has been defeated again think anyone can see what is going by an enormous majority and they to come next. if it is parliament must now accept their deal, their proposal, the one the prime that controls the process, does it have a consensus view on where it goes? no, it isn't in controlyet, there are amendments down that might
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give parliament a degree of control, but only to the extent they are then issuing instructions to theresa may, so issuing instructions to theresa may, so she becomes the slave of parliament rather than leading government through parliament, which is the normal way of doing things. it wasn'tjust the is the normal way of doing things. it wasn't just the vote, which was, as sebastien says, the fourth worst, which is a bit of an achievement, because last time was the worst! she is gradually bringing the majority against her down. it has been worked out that it would take another 23 votes at this rate of attrition before she gets it through! others believe she may have one more go at it before the existing deadline, at the end of this month, but it does seem the end of this month, but it does seem pretty unlikely, but it wasn't just the size of the defeat, you could sense her authority fading away, she looked and sounded like a defeated woman in the house of commons. and a lot of the newspapers and the chatter around westminster, is also about her future, not just
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the future of the country. let's come to that now, driven to despair, thatis come to that now, driven to despair, that is the front page of the times, that is the front page of the times, thatis that is the front page of the times, that is her being driven from parliament, i think, that is her being driven from parliament, ithink, tonight, and... issue on her way out? under any normal circumstances, yes! not just a historic defeat early in the year, but by losing for the second time, on the key piece of legislation, the mere existence of the whole government is to see brexit through, she would be gone, but the fact is because the conservative party tried to get rid of her in december and failed in that failed leadership attempt, she is safe in the party leadership, until december, unless the men in grey suits, the party grandees, come to her and say, the game is up, and in the times tomorrow, some speculation there will be an emergency cabinet meeting, we do know that, there is some speculation she may come to her and say, you need to resign, or, you need to say you will resign after
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the deal is passed. so, they can try to push her out, but we have seen one thing, really demonstrated in the house of commons today, the prime minister does not give up, that croak in her throat which we remember so well from the party conference in 2017 was back again... to be fairto conference in 2017 was back again... to be fair to her, she had been travelling to strasbourg. no doubt, no doubt. she said that jean-claude juncker‘s voice was even worse. there comes a time when that workload takes its toll. incredible tenacity to keep on going but i think mps asking tonight, to what end? this deal has been rejected twice and we don't know what will happen next, and we cannot forget, 16 days before we leave. if the men and women in grey suits... if they file into her office, into the cabinet and say, time for you to go,
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surely they would then have to agree on an alternative or who a successor would be. that is what gives her hope of hanging on, under normal circumstances, she would be toast, underany circumstances, she would be toast, under any normal circumstances, any other prime minister, but the circumstances are anything but normal, it is still possible, margaret thatcher was brought down by one cabinet minister after another, going into her office and saying, time is up, you cannot carry oi'i. saying, time is up, you cannot carry on. if that were to happen, couldn't she technically say, i don't care what you say, i am staying. yes, but she has to find people who are willing to serve in her cabinet, the politics can bring her down. but, they can also keep her in place because as you suggest, the conservative party is not going to coalesce around an agreed candidate to replace her, if they were, it would be straightforward, she would be out, somebody else would be in and on we would go, plenty of people
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jockeying for position and already thinking about how they vote tomorrow, on this vote of whether we rule out no deal altogether, if that we re rule out no deal altogether, if that were possible, and what that means to leadership ambitions. lots of jockeying for position going on, but everyone is jockeying for position going on, but everyone is aware jockeying for position going on, but everyone is aware of the fact it takes time to hold a leadership election, unless you push back brexit, you cannot do it. what happens next, the guardian focusing oui’ happens next, the guardian focusing our minds, with the number of days left until brexit... only 16. in just over two weeks' time we are set to leave the eu, extraordinary, businesses, voters, the eu, the rest of the world has no idea! there are ships currently sailing from japan with cars on that will arrive in the uk after brexit day, manufacturers have no idea... we have had only three years to think about it(!) to an indictment of the whole political process that we are at this stage, it is intolerable, quotes from the
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cbi saying this really has to be the end of failed politics. we will have another vote tomorrow, on whether we should have a no—deal brexit, the cabinet was split on that, there will be some of those, particularly those jockeying to be will be some of those, particularly thosejockeying to be after that, it is going to be a question of extending, delaying brexit, and thatis of extending, delaying brexit, and that is where the debate goes next, do we have a short extension or a longer extension, but, that is not all in our power, it has to be up to the commons but also up to the eu, once the commons decides on that, then next week, one week before brexit, for them to decide whether they will agree to extend. and talk that they may just say, extension they will agree to extend. and talk that they mayjust say, extension of one year, either no extension or a minimum of the year. this should be,
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"sixteen days until brexit?", really, with a question mark, we do not have any control over that, the only thing we have control over is revoking article 50 altogether and the one point theresa may has been consistently write about is, you cannot take no deal off the table unless there is an alternative, the only alternative wholly in the hands of the british parliament, apart from no deal, is revoking article 50 altogether. is unthinkable for her? yes, the parliament to have the power to do it, what they don't have is the power to determine how long an extension of article 50 oaks to be, that involves negotiations and they may take place at the eu summit, which is going to happen just one week before brexit. that means, the uncertainty, and the uncertainty we all face, and business faces, will go literally into the last week, which is
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incredible. daily telegraph, theresa may clings on despite a second humiliating defeat. there is a commentary therefrom allison pearson, like a dying sopranos with a dalek croak, painful to watch, anybody with a bad voice is a little bit painful to watch, let alone a prime minister on a very dismal day of her premiership. watching from the press gallery, it was, you felt sympathy for theresa may, clearly under the weather, works to the bone to get these compromises, only to see them thrown back in her face. mps feel increasingly, we feel sorry for her, we admire her tenacity but this is all of her own making, she created the red lines that produced the deal we have now, she is the one not reaching out to other parties. people say if she went for customs
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union, soft brexit, it would split the tory party. other people say, the tory party. other people say, theissue the tory party. other people say, the issue is to avoid a chaotic no—deal brexit. the issue is to avoid a chaotic no-deal brexit. there is an obvious majority for a brexit where we remain in the customs union, labour, the snp, the lib dems want that, but theresa may would not do that. would any tory leader do that? david cameron may have done that, may have taken a more sensible approach, but ultimately, theresa mayjoined the conservative party as a teenager, when she was 16, she is not going to... that should have been taken to end —— two and a half years ago, when this all started, or when the general election produced an inconclusive result and a hung parliament. but she will not do it 110w. parliament. but she will not do it now. theresa may loses control, on the financial times. where do you see, if you have two bet on what happens next, what would you be
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saying. almost certainly, there will be an extension, there will be a last—minute decision on the extension, there will be tough negotiations which presumably she will be there to lead, if they fail... negotiations with. . . ? will be there to lead, if they fail... negotiations with...? over how long the extension to article 15 -- 50 how long the extension to article 15 —— 50 shades of grey should be. that is all she is “ over —— over how long the extension to article 50 should be. that is the point that should be made, a short extension could be the worst of all worlds, not least because we would have to sit around the table for another two months and say all the same things again. one of the story is dominating the front pages, boeing, reeling after the crash, what you make of that? if we take a side what has been going on, rumination in westminster, huge
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story, boeing 737 has been grounded across europe following the horrific crash of the ethiopian airlines, 157 we re crash of the ethiopian airlines, 157 were killed, it is also following another crash, eerie similarities between the plane flying and suddenly losing altitude, and people being very cautious here. this has hit boeing shares, down 6%, and norwegian air, the biggest customer for this plane, has grounded the entire fleet, its shares are down in a big way. really big problems for boeing, a lot of hugejets, very concerning. huge crisis, running out of time, thank you very much for joining us. we will be back, 11:30pm, extended look at the newspapers, you can see the front pages online on the bbc news website. if you missed the programme, you can always watch it
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later on on the bbc iplayer. goodbye from us. storm gareth will bring some very wild weather to the british isles for the next 24 hours, with a high likelihood of disruption from severe gales likelihood of disruption from severe gates and further heavy rain as well, which could lead to localised flooding. stay tuned to bbc radio and subsequent weather forecast, this swell of cloud, storm gareth, hurtling in from the atlantic, pushing on across the shores, strongest wind across the southern flank. stopping first of all across northern ireland into south—west scotland, transferring a little bit further south—east into northern parts of england and north wales. the early part of the night looking very stormy across into the north of the uk, gusts of 80 mph in some places, across northern ireland into south—west scotland, strong wind
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pushing into north—west england, down towards north wales. this means heavy showers, pretty atrocious night here. stays very windy across northern areas, strong winds developed, further south, 40 to 50 mph, maybe even more than that as well. lots of showers, wintry over the scottish hills, in between clear spells at times, those temperatures i'io spells at times, those temperatures no lower than three to seven celsius. tomorrow looking extremely windy, we will see a swathes of strong wind, north wales, northern england, gusts here, 55 to 65 mph, again, could cause travel disruption and damage as well. into the afternoon, showers will ease down, more sunshine around, temperatures 12 degrees in the south—east, will not feel like that because of the strength of the win. into thursday, the next area, hurtles in off the atlantic, bringing yet another spell of rain and gates but the heavy rain should have cleared away from the
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south—east, for the early part of thursday, that will leave a very blustery day, scattered showers, some could be heavy, rumble of thunder, and wintering us over the higher ground of scotland. through the afternoon, increasing amounts of sunny spells, which could push temperatures up to 13 degrees in the south—east. as we end the week, and into the weekend, very unsettled, further spells of rain and gates, particularly on friday.
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