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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 13, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here in westminster. mps are urgently working out their next steps over brexit — after rejecting theresa may's deal for a second time. the eyes to the right, 242, the noes to the left, 391. so the noes the ayes to the right, 242, the noes to the left, 391. so the noes habit, the noes habit. and grab —— have in the face of her loss by a massive majority, the prime minister confirms a vote today on whether to leave the eu without a deal. these are unenviable choices. thanks to the decision that the house has
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made this evening they are choices that must now be faced. it's a stormy morning outside the houses of parliament — we'll be trying to get a sense of which way the political winds are blowing. good morning. and that storm is something that is being felt by businesses. i am at a manufacturers in birmingham. i will be talking to them about how they are preparing and what they think is going on. more on all of that later. in other news — three people are killed in an avalanche on ben nevis. australian cardinal george pell is sentenced to six years in prison for sexually abusing two choirboys. seven goals for manchester city in the champions league, as they thrash schalke 7—0 at the etihad to go through to the quarter—finals. good morning. storm gareth today bringing gales, even severe gales,
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leading to the potential of some disruption. we will have some sunshine and some heavy showers. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it will be a busy programme today. it's wednesday the 13th of march. our top story is here in westminster, where mps will hold a further vote on brexit, after their resounding defeat of theresa may's withdrawal agreement last night. her plan was rejected for a second time by a majority of 149 triggering a new round of political turmoil. mps will now have a say on whether or not to leave the eu without a deal. our political correspondent iain watson reports. it was a thumping defeat, a majority of nearly 150 against the prime minister's brags a deal. and 75 of her own mps defied her. a voice betrayed the strain of two years of talks. i profoundly regret the decision that this has taken tonight. i continue to believe that by far the outcome is that the united kingdom leaves the european
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union in an orderly fashion, with a deal. the prime minister's usual ellaz, northern ireland's dup, did not back ideal, and they don't want her to rule out the option of no deal either. if you take the possibility of walking away off the table, you actually end up in a counter—productive situation where you get offered terms you cannot accept. with the prime minister's deal now defeated twice in parliament, labour said she should consider their proposals.“ parliament, labour said she should consider their proposals. if she really thought about the country she would have at least listened to us when we talked to her or try to talk to her about how another deal is possible. and that is why whereby we remain in the customs union. in some of maples own mps are questioning how long she can go on in number 10. if parliament does start to dismantle the strategy that makes her position very difficult and that isa her position very difficult and that is a conversation i think the cabinet will want to have with the prime minister about how long she will want to go on four. brexit is
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still proving divisive between and within the main parties. in watson, bbc news, westminster. —— iain watson. so what happens next? we will try to get some of the a nswe i’s. later today mps will vote on whether the uk should leave without a deal. if parliament votes in favour of no deal then brexit will go ahead as planned on the 29th march. if parliament rejects no—deal, then there will be another vote tomorrow. the prime minister will ask mps to decide whether to extend article 50 and for how long. if that passes, then then the prime minister will need to ask the eu for an extension to article 50 and explain what the extension is for. if it's rejected, then we're back to leaving on the 29th of march without a deal. everybody got it? we're joined now by our political correspondent, alex forsyth, who can tell us more about what's happening today.
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good morning to you. it is very much up good morning to you. it is very much up in the air. yes. in this world of known unknowns, which we have been for some time with brexit, i think what happened last night cements that. even theresa may herself stood up, her credibility again initiated by the fact you cannot get her mean big policy through the house of commons. she hasn't got the backing of her own party, she stands up and says you can have a vote now on what happens next, shall we live without a deal, i think most mps would say not, should we extend the whole process 7 not, should we extend the whole process? and even theresa may said if we do that whatever does that mean? because parliament is deadlocked. do you want another referendum? do deadlocked. do you want another referendum ? do you deadlocked. do you want another referendum? do you want an even longer delay? do you want to not leave the eu? parliament cannot make up leave the eu? parliament cannot make up its mind. that is why we find ourselves stuck in this deadlock yet again. you havejust under ourselves stuck in this deadlock yet again. you have just under three out of the so many different questions. there are 16 days to go. itjust seems extraordinary that this is
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where we are. i think when you speak toa where we are. i think when you speak to a lot of mps across the road. i was there last night after the vote. there is a swell of activity, everybody comes out and they try to diejust what it everybody comes out and they try to die just what it means. the point is eve ryo ne die just what it means. the point is everyone has their view on what should happen, but gnabry knows what will happen. everybody talks about finding a consensus and a compromise, but very few people are willing to budge their own position. there is an awareness that without some significant moves from people who have been fairly dug and then we will find ourselves going around in circles. we had an interesting conversation yesterday on this programme with sir keir starmer, we talk about the westminster bubble. you have all these discussions going on and yet the vast majority of our viewers are just so fed up and frustrated with the situation we find ourselves in. as louisa said, 16 days to go, almost nothing seems to be decided and many people watching this morning just get on with it, whatever it is just get on
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with it, whatever it is just get on with something. i think they cannot decide what it is. you hear mps say the same. let's get with it. for some it is getting on without a deal. 0thers some it is getting on without a deal. others get on and have another vote or put this whole process to bed and not leave. that is the whole problem. this was a divisive issue from the beginning. the referendum, 52- 48% from the beginning. the referendum, 52— 48% and the division has continued from top to the bottom and thatis continued from top to the bottom and that is why it is proving so difficult. i think they know there is this frustration across the country which is really now beginning to bubble up. what else is happening today, we know there is a cabinet meeting at eight o'clock and will keep our eyes across that. you will keep our eyes across that. you will be with us throughout the morning and we will be speaking to various mps. there are 70 different sides. 0n various mps. there are 70 different sides. on all sides. various mps. there are 70 different sides. 0n allsides. ——so various mps. there are 70 different sides. on all sides. ——so many different sides. we will try to run you through as many of the permutations as much. we should mention the brief statement. that has been overlooked. when we talk about money for a while. that is also happening. and we will be talking about new tariffs and plans
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in the event of no deal, that will be published around seven a.m.. it is one of those busy days where we will try tojuggle is one of those busy days where we will try to juggle everything and bring everything we can. make sure you leave for work, leave for school, however long you watch us for you have something to take away with you what is happening at parliament today. in the meantime, let us tell you about the other news. one of the most powerful men in the roman catholic church has been sentenced to six years in prison for sexually abusing two choirboys in australia in the 1990s. cardinal pell is the highest ranking catholic priest to be convicted of child sex offences. hywel griffith is live in melbourne for us this morning. how has the country reacted to this sentence how? this sentence is meant to send out a message that however high, however
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eminent the offender is they should not be above the law. a six year jail sentence for a man who was already 77 and, according to the judge, there is a possibility that he may not live long enough to be released. cardinal george pell, more than 20 years ago, when he was archbishop of sydney, in this cathedral, abused two choirboys he found playing in the back of the cathedral. in the words of his judge, his offences were breathtakingly arrogant. we knew we had enormous power over his victims and they would be silent for decades. they were. he rose up through the ranks of the church becoming one of the most powerful people in the planet when it comes to the catholic church. but he has 110w to the catholic church. but he has now been brought to justice. however, since the conviction was revealed two weeks ago, some in australia have questioned the jury's verdict. cardinal pell has some vocal supporters, some of them were in court to see that moment when he was sentenced. and many more are likely to return to another court when his appeal is likely to be heard. some are saying there might
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be grounds for this verdict to be overturned. but today cardinal pell is heading towards a jail cell where he is due to spend more than three yea rs, he is due to spend more than three years, at least, before he will be considered for parole. it's business as usual for the chancellor, philip hammond, who will provide his latest update on the country's economic health. the spring statement comes at a crucial time, with brexitjust two weeks away. so what can we expect to hear? steph's at a factory in birmingham this morning and can tell us more. a third person has died following an avalanche on britain's highest mountain, police have confirmed. two climbers died at the scene and a fourth person was injured in the incident on ben nevis yesterday. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw reports. in driving rain and low visibility, a coastguard helicopter helped with effo rts a coastguard helicopter helped with efforts to find the climbers swept
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away by an avalanche on britain's highest mountain. they were in an area on the north face of the mountain called number five gully, which is known for avalanches. the bad weather the operation to try to rescue them was particularly challenging. it has been very difficult conditions that the rescue teams have faced. the coastguard helicopter faced difficulties in that regard as well. it has taken them more time to get off the hill than at other times when the weather is more clement. an air ambulance helped get them off ben nevis, but only one of the four people in the party has survived. that person was airlifted to hospital in glasgow. these are not the first people to die on ben nevis at this winter. two young climbers died in separate accidents in december and january. this mountain attracts thousands of climbers and hillwalkers every year, but there are dangers which can catch out even the most experienced. james shaw, bbc news, fort william. the us federal aviation administration says there is no basis to stop the boeing 737 max 8
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airlinerfrom flying. many countries — including those in the european union — have grounded it following a fatal crash in ethiopia at the weekend. 0ur north america business correspondent samira hussain is at the boeing headquarters in chicago, and sent us this report earlier. 0utside boeing's headquarters in downtown chicago, the company remains tightlipped. but there is no doubt that this is a company that is trying to avert a full—blown crisis. now the aviation authorities here in the united states have again reiterated their confidence in these boeing 737 max 8 planes and they see no reason to ban them from american skies. and boeing as well has said that they are also confident in these planes. that said, there is growing concern from a lot of people, including investors. fortwo consecutive days we have seen that boeing share price has dropped by
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more than 6%. a growing number of us lawmakers are calling on the aviation authorities here to follow suit of other countries and to ban these planes from american skies. and something that boeing will certainly be looking at is that there is now some american flyers that are hesitating about getting on some of these jets. heavy rain and strong winds are starting to hit parts of the uk as storm gareth moves east. there are warnings of disruption as the storm, which started yesterday, moves over northern ireland, scotland, and north—west england. winds are forecast to reach speeds of 80 miles per hour along the coast of northern england later — and there are warnings it could impact those travelling during the rush—hour this morning. it is definitely windier here. it is definitely windier harem it is definitely windier here. it is a blustery day. the strictly come dancing presenters tess daly and claudia winkleman finished their marathon dancing challenge last night —
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and vowed never to dance again. the pair raised more than £782,000 by dancing non—stop for 24 hours and five minutes. they battled through back injuries and sickness to raise the money for comic relief. they were joined by various people over the course of the 24 hours as well. i watched a lot of it on brea kfast yesterday well. i watched a lot of it on breakfast yesterday and they looked very tired. well done to them for finishing. tonight there is a documentary about kilimanjaro. sorry about the blood. let's take a look at today's front pages. the daily mail blames mps for plunging our "despairing nation into chaos", branding the house of commons a "house of fools". the guardian describes mrs may's commons defeat as humiliating. it also highlights there are just 16
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days to go until the uk is due to leave the eu. the daily express asks "how much more of this can britain take?" the paper, which campaigned for leave in the 2016 referendum, says brexit is now hanging in the balance. and the times leads with the headline "driven to despair" reporting that the pound fell against the euro and the dollar following tuesday's vote. and one of the stories trending online this morning is the tweet from larry the cat, who lives in downing street, who writes, "at this moment of deep uncertainty for the uk, "i'm offering to take over brexit negotiations. "i couldn't exactly do any worse."
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we are at westminster trying to find out what happened last night. we know there will be a cabinet meeting that starts, bring you the details of that. our announcements about new ta riffs of that. our announcements about new tariffs on plans. no deal breaks it. making sense of what's happened. cowley is back. we are gusts have gust of wind on the north coast of ireland. in the south, that is going
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to happen mid—morning. storm gareth, an area of low pressure. showers in the north and west, blowing further east. through the afternoon, the storm pushes in the direction of denmark. still windy across northern ireland. also parts of south—west scotland. review are today, it is going to be windy. easing through the day, most of us will end up this afternoon with some sunshine. you
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can already see what is happening, a repeat performance more or less. their presence being made felt. through this evening and overnight, most of us will cease and rain. further rainfall totals to you. it's not there to be a particularly cold night but a wet and windy one. making it down, clearing from the south but behind it, you can see a bit more space in ice above, just not quite as windy. there will be some jails, especially with
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exposure. some hill snow. some jails, especially with exposure. some hillsnow. it's some jails, especially with exposure. some hill snow. it's going to feel cooler. we're looking at maybe 14. then as we move from thursday night into friday, again, you can see an affront coming up in the south—west. another one not too far away. we are going to have quite a lot of rain actually during the course of friday, moving from the north—west, pushing southwards. showers following on behind and another difference in the south on friday because although it will be mostly dry, also fairly cloudy. temperatures could hit 14 or 15 here, much cooler in the sunshine and the showers further north. 6—8. you've kind your comeback perfectly, carol. back into a big weather story. when i left, it was lovely
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and sunny, it was 21 degrees. we remember that, quite a lot has happened. this is an indication of how it is here today. carol will be keeping us up—to—date with storm karen —— storm gareth and other things. we live from westminster for you today because later today, mps get a vote on whether we should leave the eu. if that fails, but how do the 17 million people who voted to leave feel about that? feel about that? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to bolton — which voted leave in the referendum — and watched last night's result there. who says size doesn't matter? i've got all that on a tray there for a fiver! in bolton, the bunting is out, but no—one is partying. the future of this town's football club is as uncertain as the brexit they voted for. carlton tells me that the two are linked. you can't blame bolton's crisis on
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brexit. it has ruined everything. you angry, carlton? yeah, lam. because almost 60% of people in bolton voted for brexit, now it's a dirty word. no, no, i'm not talking about brexit. no, no, no, we cannot talk about brexit, we are talking about food. you can't have enough chicken fusion. this is what alan wants to talk about. it does not end, that is the problem. it goes on and goes on and goes on, and you think when is it going to end? it's the same in the market pub. i know it's 50p in the swearjar if you mention brexit. but phil, a former teacher, says she isn't fazed. i'm not worried about it, i'm not worried in the slightest. it might be a bit of a tough time, but we will get through it because i think that is us as a nation. across town in what i am told is the world's biggest darts warehouse, they're less confident. germany, as you can see,
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is very popular at the moment. it is! in a couple of weeks's time, it might not be so popular. these darts sell in 130 countries. some of our customers, we are talking to people in holland and germany, are telling us what we are going to have to do. this tariff will go up, this increase will. .. they know more than we seem to? well, they certainly give that impression. and that's quite alarming with two weeks go. with two weeks to go, the government has only signed continuity trade deals in six countries and 30% of trade here goes overseas. are we really concerned what is going to happen to that 30%? well, yeah, there is an element of that. however, people are notgoing to stop playing darts. thank god there is some certainty in the world. i am absolutely certain. but in bolton's little lever, where there are lots of levers, there really never was any doubt. they knew theresa may's deal
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would never hit its target. sean was once a labour councillor, but is now one of the three ukip councillors here, in what is brexit heartland. how many times are we going to vote for this? it's never going to happen, is it? wendy, the captain of the queen anne darts team, tells me her vote has been betrayed. they will extend it because nobody will make a decision, they're all scared. in my opinion, out. 0ut, out, out! it's what they voted for here, it's what they want, even if it means crashing out with a no—deal vote tonight. they're losing faith they'll ever get it. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. those are the thoughts of some people there in bolton. but where is this all leave british people living
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abroad? i think the government is betraying the british people. they voted to come out, to get these deals, no—one is interested. let's just get out and stand on our own two feet. so you will be happy with no deal on leave like that, whatever the consequences? whatever the consequences. i'm happy with no deal andi consequences. i'm happy with no deal and i live in spain. i would have to go back to britain, i would prefer that. people voted to leave, we should be leaving. simple. you are saying regardless of your situation, you want your resolved with a second house you but you still want the british out of the eu. yes, we still wa nt british out of the eu. yes, we still want the british out. because it's what the british people voted for. we should definitely be able to have another boat and if the vote goes
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against her, she should look at resigning. i prefer to be out. we are a strong enough country on our owi'i. are a strong enough country on our own. and that's it really. we can stand on our own two feet, kindly. so the two of you don't really see item high. we don't ever. if it wasn't the british people who are in this restaurant, this bar would be closed. do you not think that europe needs us more than we need europe? the views from bolton and the views from benidorm. you've seen the front pages dealing with what happened here in westminster last night. that's the big question. speaking with a number of mps. rebecca
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long—bailey from the labor party and nigel dodds from the dup who voted against the deal yesterday and largely that was based on the attorney general‘s legal advice which persuade quite a few people. we've asked the questions but nobody is going to come and talk to us this morning but that may well change at any point. we'll keep things normal is well. we are going to get the news, travel, and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a ban's been introduced on flying drones within 5km of the capital's airports from today. the no—fly zone's been extended after gatwick had to be closed for more than a day last december following repeated drone sightings near the runway. it caused chaos for travellers, affecting more than 1,000 flights and about 140,000 passengers.
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it's anything from a fine all—out to life imprisonment if you are putting somebody‘s life at risk at an airport so there are significant penalties and proportionate penalties and proportionate penalties as well so what we want to do is ensure that people are not only aware of the law but also aware of those penalties so that followed the rules and ply their drones safely. the bank of england risks damaging its credibility if it doesn't overhaul its working practises— according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee has strongly criticised the bank, highlighting a lack of diversity and that it needs to cut costs. a report in decemberfound that there were eight hundred desks sitting empty in the threadneedle street offices. a spokesman for the bank said it would respond "in due course". hackney council has said it will give more protection to creative businesses whose work and studio space could be under threat from redevelopment. the area around hackney wick and fish island has long been
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popular with artists, but there have been fears that rising rents are pushing people out. the new plans include a cap on rent, and insist landowners must re—provide existing creative space if they plan redevelopments. let's take a look at the travel now. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. well, in the way of storm gareth is set to be a very windy day to day and the met office hasissued windy day to day and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds. 45-55 miles per hour. it's a breezy start but
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the wind will continue to strengthen through the morning. some sunny spells, you could see one issue —— what to showers which will blow through fairly quickly on its strong north—westerly wind. that wind will make things feel pretty chilly despite the temperatures reaching around 12 celsius. the wind will fall a little bit lighter overnight, it would disappear completely but it would be quite as windy yesterday. it is going to turn rather wet. some heavy rain, persistent rain as we had to tomorrow morning. minimum temperatures between five and seven celsius. but when will gradually clear and we will see sunny spells through the afternoon. the wind will start to strengthen through the course of thursday. it stays pretty u nsettled course of thursday. it stays pretty unsettled for the rest of this week into the weekend in the wind remains pretty strong. i'm back in half an hour. you can catch up with the day's top stories on our website hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and louise minchin — live from westminster. it isa it is a very blustery day. we live in westminster today. we will bring you a picture of what happened last night, another defeat for the prime minister in the commons, but also what might be because from here forward. i suppose the assessment has changed depending on where you are looking from. it seems to be there are potentially seven different options of what could happen from this point forward. you know i am a fan of a flowchart. today there is this a vote on whether or not there is a no deal, they have an option to reject no deal. that is the first thing that will happen. it could potentially be another vote at some stage on potentially a different deal between now and the 16 days we have got until we are officially meant to be leaving the european union. so many questions. i am going to guide you to the flowchart later. there is a
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mega flowchart on the bbc news website. we could completely renegotiate, they could be a general election, more likely after last night's vote, another referendum, a minimum of 22 weeks they say that would take to organise, no brexit at all, or a no—confidence vote. would take to organise, no brexit at all, ora no—confidence vote. of those seven things, one of them, many of them could happen over the course of the next few weeks. and given what we know, it could be something else. let us get you up—to—date with what we do know. we're live from westminster where there was that vote. they will hold another vote after that humiliating defeat for theresa may. her plan was rejected for a second time by a majority of 149 triggering a new round of political turmoil. mps will now have a say on whether or not to leave the eu without a deal. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. it was a thumping defeat, a majority of nearly 150 against the prime minister's brexit deal. and 75 of her own mps defied her. her voice betrayed the strain
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of two years of talks. i profoundly regret the decision that this house has taken tonight. i continue to believe that by far the best outcome is that the united kingdom leaves the european union in an orderly fashion, with a deal. the prime minister's usual allies, northern ireland's dup, didn't back her deal, and they don't want her to rule out the option of no deal either. if you take the possibility of walking away off the table, you actually end up in a counter—productive situation where you get offered terms you cannot accept. with the prime minister's deal now defeated twice in parliament, labour said she should consider their proposals. if she really thought about the country, she would have at least listened to us when we talked to her or tried to talk to her about how another deal is possible.
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and that is one whereby we remain in the customs union, close to the single market. and some of may's own mps are questioning how long she can go on in number10. if parliament does start to dismantle the strategy that makes her position very difficult and that is a conversation i think the cabinet will want to have with the prime minister about how long she will want to go on for. brexit is still proving divisive between and within the main parties. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. brexit definitely dominates things today. it's business as usual for the chancellor today as he delivers his spring statement. phillip hammond is unlikely to include any major spending announcements but he is expected to say that he needs to be cautious because of the uncertainty around brexit. we will have more on brexit shortly. and to tell you about the other news. one of the most powerful men in the roman catholic church has been sentenced to six years in prison in australia for sexually abusing two choirboys in the 1990s. cardinal pell, who's 77, is the highest ranking catholic priest to be convicted of child sex offences. thejudge in melbourne said he may not live to be released from prison. the cardinal maintains his innocence and is appealing against his convictions.
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three climbers have died and one other has been seriously injured following an avalanche on ben nevis, britain's highest mountain. police scotland was alerted to the incident in an area known as number five gully which is known for avalanches. officers say they are working to establish the identity of the climbers. two other climbers recently lost their lives in separate incidents on the same mountain. the us aviation regulator says there is no basis to stop the boeing 737 max 8 airliner from flying. many countries, including those in the european union, have grounded it following the fatal crash in ethiopia at the weekend. the federal aviation administration said a review had showed no systemic performance issues with the aircraft. heavy rain and strong winds are starting to hit parts of the uk as storm gareth moves east. there are warnings of disruption as the storm, which started yesterday, moves over northern ireland, scotland and north—west england. winds are forecast to reach speeds
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of 80 miles per hour along the coast of northern england later — and there are warnings it could impact those travelling during the rush—hour this morning. so please check, look outside and be careful out there today. the good news is that carol is back to guide us news is that carol is back to guide us through what is happening. news is that carol is back to guide us through what is happeninglj news is that carol is back to guide us through what is happening. i do like mad, but it is good to have carol back. we are both here with westminster. that leaves sally back on her own in the studio in salford. you have a lot to talk to us about this morning. it is nice and toasty and warm here. it was a magnificent seven for manchester city last night, as they absolutely thumped shalke in the champions league. sergio aguero, leroy sane, raheem sterling, and bernardo silva were all amongst the scorers in what was — at times — a breathtaking performance
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from city at the etihad. teenager phil foden also got in on the act with his first goal in europe. city through to the quarter finals of the competition — winning10—2 on aggregate, and making a real statement of intent. an awful night for schalke on the pitch, but their german fans did catch have fun in manchester city centre before the game. around 3,000 supporters gathered in the northern quarterfor a big old chant, before marching to the etihad. look at that. there was a brilliant comeback in last night's other match. a hat—trick from cristiano ronaldo — who else — helped juventus overturn a 2—0 deficit from the first leg against athletico madrid to sent juve through to the quarter finals. well, tonight liverpool are hoping to make it four english teams out of four in the quarter finals. they go to bayern munich with the tie poised at 0—0
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from the first leg, and jurgen klopp reckons that winning in bavaria could give them momentum in the premier league too. if we deserve to go through, if we play good football, it could mean it could change the world for us. if not, on thursday morning, we say it's over now, let's concentrate on fulham. it's only one game, a very important game, and more important games will come. rangers are out of the scottish cup. they were beaten 2—0 by aberdeen in the quarterfinals. niall mcginn and teenager connor mclennan with the goals to send them through to the semis where they'll play celtic. elsewhere hearts came from behind to beat partick thistle 2—1. and there were a couple of cracking goals from pablo hernandez as leeds united went back to the top of the championship by beating reading. it's so tight at the top of the league, sheffield united also won last night to stay in the chase and norwich will go back top if they win tonight. kyle edmund's through to the last 16 at indian wells. the british number one beat moldova's radu albot in straight sets in california. he'll have his work cut out to get
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through to the quarters though, he plays roger federer next. novak djokovic though is out. he was furious with himself as he lost to phillip kohlschriber, who'd lost his last seven matches against the world number one. the match was supposed to be played on monday, but had to be put back a day because of heavy rain. the weather is also affecting the cheltenham festival. very strong winds expected so there'll be a course inspection this morning. if racing doesn't go ahead, the whole card will be moved to saturday. yesterday, there was a shock fall for the favourite in the day's headline race — this was buveur d'air falling in the champion hurdle — a race that the horse had won twice in a row. it meant a clear run for the line for espoir d'allen to give trainer gavin cromwell his first win at cheltenham. there was a fall for the favourite
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too in the mares hurdle, where the odds—on favourite benie des dieux went at the last fence. that left the 20 to one shot roksana to come through for a shock win. benie des dieux was unharmed, but there was a first fatality of the festival in the final race of the day when the willie mullins trained ballyward fell at the 17th. and how about this for a prank? david beckham was left — bewildered — shall we say, after he was set up byjames corden at an official reveal event for a statue of him at la galaxy. corden even brought a fake sculptor along. beckham told the sculptor he looked like stretch armstrong. i want to show a bit more of that. shall we do it again? this is him seeing the statue for the first time with the real sculptor. all that
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back. and that is david beckham in his la galaxy kit. look at his face. laughter. i really, really hope dan and louise could see that. i hope they have a monitor. i don't know if you know this, both of you, david beckham had complained, not complaint, he had given feedback about the statue initially seen that the bottom was too big and the chin was wrong. what james corden got them to do was to make the chin even began the bottom use. that is not the real statue. he reacted quite well just use. that is not the real statue. he reacted quite welljust make any bottom is huge. he asked filming to stop at one point and asked the sculptor what he had done. it ended up sculptor what he had done. it ended up nicely the end. thanks, sally. will be back in with you later. we are at westminster. because there
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was another vote last night. so we know later today mps here will vote on whether the uk should leave the eu without a deal. but it's notjust the uk that has a stake in all of this — europe is also keeping a close eye on parliament's next steps. to give us an idea of how things are being viewed there, we're joined by the telegraph's europe editor peter foster. thank you so much. and shaming us by just wearing a shirt and jacket this morning as well. very impressive. good morning. it seems all the mood music, the news is coming out from brussels and strasberg yesterday is, right, we are disappointed with what has happened, but sorted out, somehow sorted out in the commons. disappointed but not surprised. my european contacts have been telling me for weeks they don't think this deal goes over the line and they don't think the various bits of fixes and fig leaves they got in strasberg would ever do the job. when they say sorted out in parliament, what they mean is find a brexit for which there is a majority, because this brexit which
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is designed to appease the democratic unionists and the hardline clean democratic unionists and the ha rdline clean break democratic unionists and the hardline clean break tori brexiteers doesn't work. it does not go over the line. this isjust doesn't work. it does not go over the line. this is just the divorce. the eu are looking forward to a five year plus trade negotiation with a renegotiate an entire new relationship with this country and they look at our politics and they see complete and utter dysfunctionality. i keep hearing that europe wants a deal. and there might be some sort of magic moment when they move again, but you don't think that will happen. europe wants a deal but they don't want a deal at any a deal but they don't want a deal at a ny cost. a deal but they don't want a deal at any cost. europe have their own interests to defend. the single market, this group of 28, soon to be 27 countries, only functions if eve ryo ne 27 countries, only functions if everyone follows the same rules. and we wa nt everyone follows the same rules. and we want to go on and play football but can we use our hands please, can we have a ball with effectively no checks in ireland in order to leave the customs union and have our
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buccaneering free trade? the answer is no. nobody has that. norway is incredibly highly aligned with the uk, but trucks there got stopped five or ten minutes to go across the border. what the europeans want is credible and cogent answers and for the british to make answers. 16 days away from march 29, still very little in place. do you think they look at it and think why has there been such a lack of clarity, a lack of direction for the last two years. the europeans only one level was sympathetic to mrs may. everyone has issues with populism. look at matteo salvini in italy, look at poland, look at the yellow jackets in france, this is not a unique problem. we happen to have expressed it in problem. we happen to have expressed itina problem. we happen to have expressed it in a unique way in brexit. what
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you have seen in europe is patients running out. theresa mayjust failing to grasp the metal of these choices. the entire process has been infected by wishful thinking. remember this stuff about we like our cake remember this stuff about we like ourcake and we remember this stuff about we like our cake and we like to eat it. that has gone on for two and a half years and we have reached the end of the road where we have not made the choices that are implicit in our own decision to leave. we know there are more choices today. mps vote on whether or not to reject no deal. 0ne whether or not to reject no deal. one of the likelihoods is that they will have to go back to ask for another extension. they will vote on that. what will the eu's reaction to that. what will the eu's reaction to that be? if you had asked me that a month ago you would have got a more relaxed answer. you would have got, the british need more time, none of us the british need more time, none of us want to leave without a deal, let us us want to leave without a deal, let us give them an extension. i think there will be a tougher message from brussels in the next 24—48 hours. the choice will be a very short extension which will run up to the 23rd of may when the european elections start. if you can't tell us elections start. if you can't tell us what it is for, i mean, we can do that pretty much easy, or a no deal, if that is what you really want, but
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we don't believe that you do, of go and vote this deal over the line. and if you want a longer extension, and i'm not sure how theresa may could at this point ask that extended, but if you did it would come with conditions attached. you will not get a seat at the table for laws that will be made that will be implemented after the uk exit. you know, strings. one more thing, people arguing keeping no deal on the table forces the eu's had a little bit. is there a chance that by saying that with that cliff edge on march 29, that that could force the eu into some last—minute negotiations? deal happen right up to the line, don't they? they do, but i think they happen for members, not necessarily departing members. you have to protect the member states. i think also, you know, the eu has reached a limit of patients. they have decided to make they have
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never believed we would go for a no deal. we are about to announce we will have no tarus. no defence for our importers. they will be charged ta riffs our importers. they will be charged tariffs on the way out but everything coming in is coming in tariff free. what will they do for businesses in northern ireland? a smuggling bonanza. along with that last? not very long. a deal leads to ano last? not very long. a deal leads to a no deal. we do that essentially from our knees, we will be stuck. there will be no legal umbrella and they will call all the shots. not a very optimistic picture you are painting. peter foster from the daily telegraph, thank you very much for your views. the reason why we are impressed that peter is wearing are impressed that peter is wearing a jacket and churches because it's very cold and very windy here. carol, you've returned to the uk for the full force of the storm. good morning. this morning, storm gareth is very much packing a punch across our shores. with a gust of wind at 80 miles per hour. south—west
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scotland, 75 miles per hour. the most of the uk, it has been pretty windy. the southern half is yet to peak, particularly so. we are looking at gales, severe gales. also sunshine and showers and some of showers will be heavy. a lot of showers will be heavy. a lot of showers in the north—west. driven further east on the strong winds. the circulation of cloud that you see here is actually storm gareth. to the course of the day, it will drift towards denmark sent through the afternoon, wind will start to ease slightly but still windy as you can tell. the first thing this morning, the rush—hour, the strongest winds, and you are from liverpool down towards the wash. still very windy across northern ireland in south—west scotland. if you are in high sided vehicle, do
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ta ke you are in high sided vehicle, do take extra care. you might sun —— mightfind take extra care. you might sun —— might find some disruption on the ferries. what jaffa that might find some disruption on the ferries. whatjaffa that had fallen branches from trees. you can see the lines of showers moving from the west towards the east. still very windy. into the afternoon across the southern half of the uk. temperature—wise, fairly academic. the wind in the showers, heavy at times. by the end of the afternoon, many of us will be seeing some sunshine. what kind of gusts can we expect in the afternoon? still quite high. 44, not far away from london. as we go through the latter part of the afternoon into the evening in overnight, we will see more rain. we will have three or four inches of rain. across much of the uk, there
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is the risk of some flooding. but keeping a very close eye on it. it's getting to be very windy. we start tomorrow with a weather front producing this rain. and once again tomorrow, is going to be windy, not quite as windy yesterday but it will bea quite as windy yesterday but it will be a noticeable feature of our weather. there goes the front taking the rain with it. i did, a good packet of showers again on this north—westerly wind, coming in from the north—west. but we are also looking at a lot of sunshine. temperatures tomorrow could get up to around 13 degrees but it will feel cooler as we push further north. we can tell you, it is blustery. the question is, would you like porridge or toast? what is the
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time? it is 6:49 a.m. we're here this morning getting reaction to last night's brexit vote in westminster — but away from here, what's the verdict of british businesses? steph's at a firm in birmingham that makes metal components. inside one of the machines where they make metal parts, they pressed them from sheets of metal. look at this, it's huge. this bit of kit is brand—new. they spent about £350,000 of it to them, this is crucial, a crucial investment. it works out about1.6 crucial investment. it works out about 1.6 billion tools from metal. and they make the tools to help all the basemetal bits be made. we have
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the basemetal bits be made. we have the chief executive here. can you tell me a bit about your business? who these customers are, where they go? we employ 64 people, ten of which are apprentices and we are shipping these pieces of metal to 22 different countries across the world. 75% of our turnover is exported. where would we see these bits of metal? if you made a cup of tea, you would have relied on one of our components. they are in 90% of the world volume of kettles. when you run your to feel your cattle up, you run your to feel your cattle up, you rely on may macro —— brandauer component. and he tetra pak components when you pour the milk. so many things. how do you been
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preparing for brexit? two years, since the results. primarily, business as usual. talking to customers. what does that mean in reality? we are holding some extra stock for contingencies. 0ur customers are more aware of the supply chain so we can deal with any scenario, the worst case being a wto exit. how did you feel last night when you heard what happened? unsurprised that disappointed. whatever your political view is, whatever you want to happen, manufacturing needs certainty. so we can get on and plan for it. so far, has it been costly? absolutely, in terms of time and effort and we are holding about £150,000 worth of stock and we still don't know whether that is going to happen. thank you very much. i'm just going to nip over here. sally, tell me a
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little bit come all we've heard from one business but how are other businesses preparing? businesses are anxious that we are 2.5 weeks out and no uncertainty as to what it means. what businesses are doing is exactly what they have been doing, hoping to the best, planning for the worst. we are expecting news on ta riffs worst. we are expecting news on tariffs later. thank you very much. more form you are at the morning. it's always —— it's always fascinating seeing these places but more from me later. step inside a machine, that's very impressive. we've been hearing this morning from people here in the uk and their thoughts about this latest brexit development. but where does all this leave british people living abroad? lucy williamson is live in the dordogne region of france for us this morning. good morning from the dordogne, from
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the pretty village of cognac—sur—lille, home to 30 british expats. they are wondering what will happen to their residency rights, pensions, —— access to healthcare. brenda henderson and anita leyland. anita, he watched the vote last night. i wasn't too sure what jeremy corbyn was going to do. i feel let down that he didn't say much about the option of another referendum and i think there should be another referendum, simply because the first one was built on lies. it might be just a political thing in london but here, practical repercussions. if there is no deal, then we lose our driving licences, we don't know when that pensions will come, cars might not work. it's affected people directly. people can't sort that
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out. let me ask you about that brenda. you've talked to a lot of people here. what are their main concerns? i've seen attitudes change over the last couple of years. people are very, very, very angry. they feel hurt and betrayed and they are determined to stay here. great, thank you very much. talking to people across france, brits across france, opinions are divided, some very despondent about last night's boat and others who see it as the first step in starting to overturn brexit. lucy, thank you very much and we will see later. live from westminster, we are here until 8:45 a.m., speaking to mps in assessing what happened last night in the commons were theresa may was again defeated for her withdrawal agreement. slightly smaller defeat on the one injanuary but still significant and humiliating in so
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many questions this morning about what happens from this point forward. it means mps will get another chance to vote today on the vote is whether or not they reject no deal. if they did and it went through, we would be leaving on the 29th of march but that is and if. we'll be talking to alex forsyth because i want to know about the numbers of this vote as well because we talk the other thing we need to mention is, if this no deal vote happens, we are offered no deal but if that is rejected, there is another vote tomorrow and that is a request to the eu to extend article 50 but let's just a request to the eu to extend article 50 but let'sjust a request. we are approaching seven o'clock. can i get you anything? tea, porridge, and your old scarf. not that the marking. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a ban's been introduced on flying drones within five kilometres of the capital's airports from today. the no—fly zone's been extended after gatwick had to be closed for more than a day last december following repeated drone sightings near the runway. it caused chaos for travellers, affecting more than 1,000 flights and about 140,000 passengers. the penalties run anything from a fine all the way up to life imprisonment if you are putting somebody‘s life at risk at an airport, so there are significant penalties and proportionate penalties as well, so what we want to do is ensure that people are not only aware of the law but also aware of those penalties so that they follow the rules and fly their drones safely. the bank of england risks damaging its credibility if it doesn't overhaul its working practises, according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee has strongly criticised the bank, highlighting a lack of diversity
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and that it needs to cut costs. a report in decemberfound that there were eight hundred desks sitting empty in the threadneedle street offices. a spokesman for the bank said it would respond "in due course". hackney council has said it will give more protection to creative businesses whose work and studio space could be under threat from redevelopment. the area around hackney wick and fish island has long been popular with artists, but there have been fears that rising rents are pushing people out. the new plans include a cap on rent, and insist landowners must reprovide existing creative space if they plan redevelopments. let's take a look at the travel now. now the tube so far is all looking good. no reported problems on any of those lines. the disruption train services from victoria to gatwick airport has cleared. we have some roadworks
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to tell you about — the a205 london road, there are temporary traffic lights at the junction with sydenham hill. and in mitcham, the a205 cricket green is closed northbound from madeira road to london road too. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. well, in the wake of storm gareth, it is set to be a very windy day today and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds, 45—55mph. it's a breezy start but the wind will continue to strengthen through the morning. some sunny spells, you could see one or two showers — they will blow through fairly quickly on that strong north—westerly wind. now, that wind will make things feel pretty chilly, despite the temperatures reaching around 12 celsius. now, the wind will fall a little bit lighter overnight. it won't disappear completely but it's not going to be quite as windy today. but it is going to turn rather wet. some heavy rain, persistent rain as we head through
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to tomorrow morning. minimum temperature between 5 and 7 celsius. now, that rain will gradually clear. sunny spells, some showers through the afternoon. the wind strengthens through the course of thursday. it stays pretty unsettled for the rest of this week and into the weekend and the wind remains pretty strong. i'm back in half an hour. you can catch up with the day's top stories, on our website. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin, in westminster. mps are urgently working out their next steps over brexit after rejecting theresa may's dealfor a second time. the ayes to the right — 242. the noes to the left — 391. so the noes have it, the noes have it. unlock. in the face of her loss by a massive majority, the prime minister confirms a vote today on whether to leave the eu
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without a deal on 29th march. these are unenviable choices. thanks to the decision that the house has made this evening they are choices that must now be faced. it's a stormy morning outside the houses of parliament. we'll be trying to get a sense of which way the political winds are blowing. good morning. that storm is being felt by businesses. i am at a manufacturer in birmingham to find out how they are preparing and get their thoughts about everything that is going on. in other news, three people are killed in an avalanche on ben nevis. australian cardinal george pell is sentenced to six years in prison for sexually abusing two choirboys. seven goals for manchester city in the champions league, as they thrash schalke 7—0 at the etihad to go through to the quarter—finals.
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good morning. storm gareth today packing a punch once again, bringing in gales, even severe gales, possibly leading to some disruption. as well as that, there will be some sunshine but also some heavy showers. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. it hasjust gone good morning. it has just gone seven o'clock. this is breakfast on the bbc. it's wednesday the 13th of march. our top story is here in westminster where mps will hold a further vote on brexit following a humiliating defeat for theresa may. her plan was rejected for a second time by a majority of 149 triggering a new round of political turmoil. mps will now have a say on whether or not to leave the eu without a deal on 29th march. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports. it was a thumping defeat, a majority of nearly 150 against the prime minister's brexit deal. and 75 of her own mps defied her. her voice betrayed the strain of two years of talks.
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i profoundly regret the decision that this house has taken tonight. i continue to believe that by far the best outcome is that the united kingdom leaves the european union in an orderly fashion, with a deal. the prime minister's usual allies, northern ireland's dup, didn't back her deal, and they don't want her to rule out the option of no deal either. if you take the possibility of walking away off the table, you actually end up in a counter—productive situation where you get offered terms you cannot accept. with the prime minister's deal now defeated twice in parliament, labour said she should consider their proposals. if she really thought about the country, she would have at least listened to us when we talked to her or tried to talk to her about how another deal is possible. and that is one whereby we remain in the customs union, close to the single market. and some of may's own mps are questioning how long she can go on in number10. if parliament does start to dismantle the strategy that makes her position very difficult
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and that is a conversation i think the cabinet will want to have with the prime minister about how long she will want to go on for. brexit is still proving divisive between and within the main parties. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. so what happens next? so many questions. we will try to a nswer so many questions. we will try to answer some of them. later today, mps will vote on whether the uk should leave without a deal. if parliament votes in favour of no deal then brexit will go ahead as planned on the 29th march. if parliament rejects no—deal, then there will be another vote tomorrow. the prime minister will ask mps to decide whether to extend article 50 and for how long. if that passes, then then the prime minister will need to ask the eu for a delay in brexit. if it's rejected, then we're back to leaving on the 29th of march.
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hopefully, i am hopefully, iam not hopefully, i am not sure we have cleared everything up. that gives you an idea of how things might pan out in the coming days and weeks ahead. there has been reaction overnight. senior eu figures reacted with disappointment at the defeat of the deal, with chief negotiator michel barnier, tweeting that the eu had done everything it could to help get theresa may's agreement "over the line" and said "no—deal" preparations are now more important than ever. adam fleming is in strasbourg this morning. those involved in the negotiations will be watching things very closely. last night everyone was saying you have to sort it out there at westminster. first of all, just to explain where we are, outside a conference room in the european parliament in strasberg. michel barnier is in there. you can probably see him through the door which is about to shot. he is about
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to speak to senior meps about the situation. he spoke was on the way in. he said it is another defeat for theresa may and is a problem that can only be solved in london. there are further meetings in the eu institutions today and they are pursuing a 2—pronged approach stop number one, prepare for no deal, because they think the chances of the uk leaving without any deal at all have gone up. and the other thing they are going to do is to start to prepare their position if theresa may comes to ask for a delay to brexit, an extension of the brexit negotiations which would be allowed under the eu treaties, it does not have to be two years if the leaving country asks for it to be longer. at the eu hasn't come to a position as to how long that extension should be and why they would actually granted. i have to say, speaking to people behind the scenes, even people who are normally optimistic, pragmatic —— pragmatic, and levelheaded, they are miserable and levelheaded, they are miserable and bleak now. they look at parliament and think it is so
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divided and think that any deal of any kind and what if it can get through. adam, thank you for that. fascinating to see adam in the corridors of power there. right outside meetings that will have a bearing on what happens today. we are trying to watch things closely as well. coming into us, we knew there would be an announcement about ta riffs if there would be an announcement about tariffs if there is no deal. i have the press association, "britain will slash tariffs on a range of inputs from outside the european union, if mps of dues devote on living without a deal. some products coming from the remaining eu member states which are currently imported free of ta riffs are currently imported free of tariffs will now face levies for the first time. " we will talk about that throughout the programme. we're joined now by our political correspondent, alex forsyth, who can tell us more about the votes happening today. we know what happened last night. there is another voted today. just
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explain to us what is likely to happen with this. this is a vote on an idea that the government has put forward. what the government is saying is, look, we want you to vote on this. we don't like the idea of leaving without a deal on much 29, when we are currently due to leave, but we also note that if there is not a deal in place by that time we will leave without a deal. right, so thatis will leave without a deal. right, so that is what theresa may is putting forward. mps will get a chance to try and change the wording of that. what is likely is that mps will say thatis what is likely is that mps will say that is not good enough. we want to reject the idea of leaving without a deal completely. so going further than the government. because we have had similar votes like this in the past, what would it mean? it does not mean in law that it would be another clear expression of the will of the house of commons, that there isn't a majority, but there are not enough mps that would back the idea of leaving without a deal. again, as the political pressure on the mps and the government, to say that they
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will not go without a deal. the times are reporting a delegation of senior tories may ask the prime minister to resign, some are saying that after another defeat yesterday should that have been the point for her to step down. it seems from what we know about her and her character, she will not be standing down. she will try to tackle this had on. the prime minister's spokesman spoke about this yesterday. as you might expect, she is not considering resigning, that has never been a factor in her mind. what is interesting is her credibility has again been hugely damaged by losing another key vote on her biggest policy that she is trying to get through. there is no doubt that there are conversations being had now. if you ask this question
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sometime ago most conservative mps would have said we're not talking about changing our leader. now, very quietly, some mps are saying there isa quietly, some mps are saying there is a point of this becomes unsustainable for theresa may if she just can't get anything through the commons, because it is a question of credibility. i don't think we are there right now. not least because there right now. not least because there is no obvious replacement. thank you very much. there is a cabinet meeting at eight o'clock. we will watch out for what happens there as well. alex, thank you very much. we are speaking to andrew bridgen from the tory party later on. the potentialfor andrew bridgen from the tory party later on. the potential for a andrew bridgen from the tory party later on. the potentialfor a no deal, i managed no deal, we'll talk about that in a few moments. it's business as usual for the chancellor, philip hammond, who will provide his latest update on the country's economic health. the spring statement comes at a crucial time, with brexitjust two weeks away. 16 days. so what can we expect to hear? steph's at a factory in birmingham this morning and can tell us more. without your head in a machine, this time. good morning. iwill show without your head in a machine, this time. good morning. i will show you the machines later on. amongst all the machines later on. amongst all the brexit shenanigans the chancellor have to just may have to get up today and deliver a speech on what is happening on the economy and the government finances. what we
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expect to hear is our economic growth for this year has been downgraded. from 1.6% to 0.8%. that basically means we are still expected to grow this year, but it will be slower than what they originally thought. the good news is we are expecting the chancellor to talk about the record employment, the record number of people in work, and the fact that, on average, wages have been going up. now, of course, when we earn more money that means we pay more tax. so also the chancellor is likely to tell us that more money has been coming in from taxes, so they have a bit more money. 0bviously taxes, so they have a bit more money. obviously there is a lot of pressure at the minute about where to spend money, isn't there? people saying it should be spent on front—line services like the nhs and the police. we won't know today where the money is going, because, of course, because of this brexit mess it means that the chancellor wa nts to mess it means that the chancellor wants to hold off announcing where the money will be spent until ministers have got a clear idea of
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where things are going. but of course for companies like this one this uncertainty, as for every business i have spoken to, it is not good for them. i will be here throughout the morning talking to them about how they are preparing and what this latest setback means for them. will be back with you later. thank you. ——we will be back with you. one of the most powerful men in the roman catholic church has been sentenced to six years in prison for sexually abusing two choirboys in australia in the 1990s. cardinal pell is the highest ranking catholic priest to be convicted of child sex offences. hywel griffith is live in melbourne for us this morning. how has the country reacted to this sentence? good morning. it is a case that has shocked many. and so the sentence for that has shocked many. and so the sentence for some that has shocked many. and so the sentence for some people was an incredible moment, because his fall from grace could not be any greater.
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cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic in this country, one of the most senior in this world, is tonight in a melbourne jail. some of his supporters think that he has been dealt with wrongly, that the jury's verdict a few months ago was wrong. they can't, may be, believe he abused two choirboys here over 20 yea rs he abused two choirboys here over 20 years ago in his time as the archbishop of melbourne. however, there are many more australians to see this as a significant moment, that a person so high, so powerful, so that a person so high, so powerful, so revered has been brought to account. there is no—one above the law stop and the judge, as he account. there is no—one above the law stop and thejudge, as he handed down at 60 sentence, made it clear that cardinal pell had to be brought to account —— six year sentence. he said his offences had been breathtakingly arrogant, brazen, and that he has so much power over his victims that only a lengthyjail sentence was appropriate. ok, thank you. three climbers have died and one other has been seriously injured following an avalanche on ben nevis, britain's highest mountain. police scotland was alerted to the incident in an area known as number five gully which is known for avalanches. officers say they are working to establish the identity
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of the climbers. two other climbers recently lost their lives in separate incidents on the same mountain. the us aviation regulator says there is no basis to stop the boeing 737 max 8 airliner from flying. many countries, including those in the european union, have grounded it following the fatal crash in ethiopia at the weekend. the federal aviation administration said a review had showed no systemic performance issues with the aircraft. it is very windy at westminster this morning. heavy rain and strong winds are starting to hit parts of the uk as storm gareth moves east. there are warnings of disruption as the storm, which started yesterday, moves over northern ireland, scotland and north west england. winds are forecast to reach speeds of 80 miles per hour along the coast of northern england later — and there are warnings it could impact those travelling during the rush—hour this morning.
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i have a friend called graham. you have a director called gareth. hello, gareth, a lovely director. —— a lovely director. meanwhile, six fishermen have been airlifted from a french fishing boat off lands end in "atrocious" 20ft waves and storm—force winds, the maritime and coastguard agency has said. the emergency services were alerted at around 10pm last night after the boat suffered engine failure and was caught up in storm gareth. the six crew on board were airlifted from the fishing vessel by newquay coastguard rescue helicopter. i like the way you said gareth there. later today mps will vote on leaving the eu without a deal. many say that's a bad thing, but others think it could actually be beneficial. mp andrew bridgen voted against the revised deal last night, and has previously shown support for a no—deal brexit. hejoins us now.
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good morning to you. why did you vote against it? i told the prime minister injuly the chequers proposal will not a basis for a withdrawal agreement. she pressed on withdrawal agreement. she pressed on with that. we ended up with a withdrawal agreement. the legal advice had changed since the last time we voted. einstein's definition of insanity is repeating an experiment and hoping to result. tables, this is actually a hotel california style brexit. we'd be trapped in a backstop indefinitely. why would got brexit across the line, when we realised we were
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trapped in negotiations with the european union and hamstrung, there would have been a great deal of upset by the country. i'm interested in yourthinking, upset by the country. i'm interested in your thinking, how do you approach this deal about potentially taking no deal off the table. but your colleagues in the tory party. leaving on the 29th of march with all without a tear —— with all without a deal. we said in our ma nifesto, without a deal. we said in our manifesto, no deal is better than a bad deal and the withdrawal agreement we were offered as a bad deal, defeated in the house of commons and be clear, any mp votes to ta ke commons and be clear, any mp votes to take no deal of the table, what they really want to do is stop brexit but they cannot openly say that because they know that two thirds of our constituencies voted to the european union. you talk about your constituencies, a station on so many about your constituencies, a station on so many different levels, the decisions are not to be taken. 16 days to go, when is the going to be
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some kind of movement? how are you voting tonight, for starters? i'll be voting to keep no deal on the table. it will force the european union backed to negotiate. they have repeatedly said that this is it, no third chances, no movement. they said there would be no second chances before this last round of negotiations. they said they weren't going to bail greece out, and they did. that's a negotiations go. we got to hold a nerve. that is the end of any meaningful negotiations. 0ne —— what are the eu going to charge us —— what are the eu going to charge us foran —— what are the eu going to charge us for an extension? whatever they want. can i ask you, and it is worth reiterating this point, he said and no deal would be as bad as many as suggested. how do you feel? steph has been at business is talking
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about the uncertainty. the imf, the cbi, the british retail consortium all talking about the fact that it will be a really bad idea and damage the economy. none of those organisations wanted to leave the european union. businesses prepared with all without a deal. government is prepared to leaving without a deal on the 29th of march. the only way to end the uncertainty is to leave on the 29th of march. if you wa nt to leave on the 29th of march. if you want to stop talking about brexit, that's what we need to do. offer the european union tariff and quota free trade which we can have up to ten yea rs. trade which we can have up to ten years. that's another whole period of negotiation. we can't negotiate our future reagent —— of negotiation. we can't negotiate ourfuture reagent —— relationship. immediately offering them tariff and quota trade. the eu will respect that because we sell twice as much as they do in goods. you had a busy
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night, thank you. storm gareth is out there. carol can tell is all about grey and gareth. i can only tell you about storm gareth this morning. it is already been packing a punch. 75 miles per hour in south—west scotland, north—west england, 69. blackpool, 60 and manchester, 54. it's going to be very windy wherever you are today. we think more or less the wins have peaked in the northern half of the uk. as well as the wind, we are looking at a day of sunshine and some heavy showers. this area of low pressure is storm gareth and through the day, it will drift towards denmark and later on, the showers and the wind will he is. it will still be fairly windy. 0r
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and the wind will he is. it will still be fairly windy. or the rush hour, the strongest winds in the light from —— a line from liverpool to the wash, even in the light from ——a to the wash, even in the light from —— a line from liverpool to the wash, even inland. similarly so across northern ireland. easily looking at gusts 50—60, more than that with exposure especially on the coasts. if you are travelling on a high sided or light vehicle or bike, do take extra care. you might find some disruption. branches down. ferries weighing well be delayed. check your travel plans before you set out. through the day, we will find the strongest winds transferred. showers particularly in the north—west. they into the afternoon, so many of us will end the afternoon with a fair bit of sunshine. temperatures fairly academic but we are looking at 8—12. three o'clock this afternoon, these are the gusts of wind. still strong.
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then we have the next system coming in from the west. more wet and windy weather. three or four inches of rain in parts of cumbria. more persistent rain coming your way tonight. that combination could beat issues with localised flooding. through tomorrow, the front producing all that rain will quite quickly clear away from southern england, allowing brighter skies to follow—on but you can see the isobars are still close together so not going to be as windy yesterday. it's still going to be noticeably windy with some of us still seeing gales. we lose the rain, a packet of showers follow—on behind. in the west, some of those will be wintry but in the strong winds, some of those blowing of towards the east. the temperature range, 7—13. 0n thursday to friday, a repeat performance almost in that we have a front moving from the west towards the east. still pretty windy and
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another front follows on behind. the first one comes our way. scotland, northern ireland, heading into north—west england and pushing south. really weakening before it pushes south. southern areas will see a bit more cloud. behind it, much cooler with wintry showers on the hills. we are in fran unsettled speu the hills. we are in fran unsettled spell of weather. thank you very much. we want to show you, carol. live pictures from across the river from us. the palace of westminster and you can hear in the background, clocks chiming here. it's a blustery day, stormy and reflects the mood, doesn't it. we were already spoken to a couple of mps after that defeat for theresa may. rebecca long—bailey from the labor party and the dup. we are
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asking to speak with someone from the government but we have been told no. we will be listening to see if they got anybody who is talking this morning as well. later today mps get a vote on whether the uk should leave the eu without a deal and, if that fails, on whether brexit should be delayed. but how do the 17 million people who voted to leave feel about that? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to bolton — which voted leave in the referendum — and watched last night's result there. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to bolton — which voted leave in the referendum — and watched last night's result there. who says size doesn't matter? i've got all that on a tray there for a fiver! in bolton, the bunting is out, but no—one is partying. the future of this town's football club is as uncertain as the brexit they voted for. carlton tells me that the two are linked. you can't blame bolton's crisis on brexit. brexit.
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it has ruined everything. you angry, carlton? yeah, lam. because almost 60% of people in bolton voted for brexit, now it's a dirty word. no, no, i'm not talking about brexit. no, no, no, we cannot talk about brexit, we are talking about food. you can't have enough chicken fusion. this is what alan wants to talk about. it does not end, that is the problem. it goes on and goes on and goes on, and you think when is it going to end? it's the same in the market pub. i know it's 50p in the swearjar if you mention brexit. but phil, a former teacher, says she isn't fazed. i'm not worried about it, i'm not worried in the slightest. it might be a bit of a tough time, but we will get through it because i think that is us as a nation. across town in what i am told
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is the world's biggest darts warehouse, they're less confident. germany, as you can see, is very popular at the moment. it is! in a couple of weeks's time, it might not be so popular. these darts sell in 130 countries. some of our customers, we're talking to people in holland and germany, are telling us what we are going to have to do. this tariff will go up, this increase will. .. they know more than we seem to? well, they certainly give us that impression. and that's quite alarming with two weeks go. with two weeks to go, the government has only signed continuity trade deals with six countries and 30% of trade here goes overseas. are we really concerned what is going to happen to that 30%? well, yeah, there is an element of that. however, people are notgoing to stop playing darts. thank god there is some certainty in the world. i am absolutely certain. but in bolton's little lever, where there are lots of levers, there really never was any doubt. they knew theresa may's deal would never hit its target. the noes have it, the noes have it!
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i am not surprised by this result. sean was once a labour councillor, but is now one of the three ukip councillors here, in what is brexit heartland. how many times are we going to vote for this? it's never going to happen, is it? wendy, the captain of the queen anne darts team, tells me her vote has been betrayed. they will extend it because nobody will make a decision, they're all scared. in my opinion, out. 0ut, out, out! it's what they voted for here, it's what they want, even if it means crashing out with a no—deal vote tonight. they're losing faith they'll ever get it. we've also been live in the dordogne
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to get the views of british system —— citizens. and also in benidorm. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will be speaking to nigel dodds from the democratic unionist party in about ten minutes' time. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. (pres) a ban's been introduced on flying drones within five —— a ban's been introduced on flying drones within 5 kilometres of the capital's airports from today. the no—fly zone's been extended after gatwick had to be closed for more than a day last december following repeated drone sightings near the runway. it caused chaos for travellers, affecting more than a thousand flights and about 140,000 passengers. the penalties run anything from a fine all the way up to life imprisonment if you are putting
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somebody‘s life at risk at an airport, so there are significant penalties and proportionate penalties as well, so what we want to do is ensure that people are not only aware of the law but also aware of those penalties so that they follow the rules and fly their drones safely. as we've been hearing mps return to the commons today for a further vote on brexit. bbc london has been speaking to wholesalers and traders at new covent garden market. about what it would mean for their businesses if the uk left the eu without a deal. if you talk about accepting the bill, we don't even know what it is, it could be a bad deal, i would never accept a bad deal, i would a lwa ys never accept a bad deal, i would always have the courage to negotiate my position and sometimes, sometimes you have to say no. i think it's had an effect on all businesses. it's difficult to plan, we don't know what's going to happen. the bank of england risks damaging its credibility if it doesn't overhaul its working practises— according
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to a group of mps. the public accounts committee has strongly criticised the bank, highlighting a lack of diversity and says it needs to cut costs. a spokesperson for the bank said it would respond "in due course". let's take a look at the travel now. now the tube so far is all looking good— no reported problems on any of those lines. 0n the roads let's take a look at the a40 in acton— as you can see it's the usual rush hour stuff, traffic building heading into town, approaching gypsy corner elsewhere— it's roadworks slowing things down— on the a205 london road— there are temporary traffic lights at the junction with sydenham hill. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. well, in the wake of storm gareth, it is set to be a very windy day today and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds, 45—55mph. it's a breezy start but the wind will continue to strengthen through the morning. some sunny spells, you could see one or two showers — they will blow through fairly quickly on that strong north—westerly wind. now, that wind will make things feel pretty chilly,
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despite the temperatures reaching around 12 celsius. now, the wind will fall a little bit lighter overnight. it won't disappear completely but it's not going to be quite as windy today. but it is going to turn rather wet. some heavy rain, persistent rain as we head through to tomorrow morning. minimum temperature between 5 and 7 celsius. that rain will gradually clear. some sunny spells, some showers through the afternoon. wind will strengthen through the course of thursday. pretty unsettled for the rest of this week and into the weekend and wind remains pretty strong. i'm back in half an hour. you can catch up with the day's top stories, travel and weather on our website. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin live from westminster. it isa it is a blustery day. we are
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bringing you all the latest news from westminster were last night theresa may was defeated in the house of commons with her withdrawal agreement. mps will return later today for a further deal on brexit after their resounding defeat of theresa may's withdrawl deal last night. the plan was rejected for a second time by a majority of 149. now mps will be given a vote on whether to block the uk from departing without a deal on the 29th march. we have told you already today that there is a cabinet meeting taking place at around about eight o'clock this morning. in about half—an—hour. it is business as usual for the chancellor today as he delivers his spring statement. phillip hammond is unlikely to include any major spending announcements. he says he will need to be cautious because of the uncertainty around brexit. more of that later. all those votes about brexit, business and the commons has to continue as well.
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one of the most powerful men in the roman catholic church has been sentenced to six years in prison in australia for sexually abusing two choirboys in the 1990s. cardinal pell, who's 77, is the highest ranking catholic priest to be convicted of child sex offences. thejudge in melbourne said he may not live to be released from prison. the cardinal maintains his innocence and is appealing against his convictions. three climbers have died and one other has been seriously injured following an avalanche on ben nevis, britain's highest mountain. police scotland was alerted to the incident in an area known as number five gully which is known for avalanches. officers say they are working to establish the identity of the climbers. two other climbers recently lost their lives in separate incidents on the same mountain. the us aviation regulator says there is no basis to stop the boeing 737 max 8 airliner from flying. many countries — including those in the european union — have grounded it following the fatal crash in ethiopia at the weekend. the federal aviation administration said a review had showed no systemic performance issues
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with the aircraft. very windy and a bit chilly down here this morning. heavy rain and strong winds are starting to hit parts of the uk as storm gareth moves east. there are warnings of disruption as the storm, which started yesterday, moves over northern ireland, scotland and north—west england. winds are forecast to reach speeds of 60 miles per hour along the coast of northern england later — and there are warnings it could impact those travelling during the rush—hour this morning. if you are heading out take care out there today. meanwhile, six fishermen have been airlifted from a french fishing boat off lands end in "atrocious" 20ft waves and storm—force winds, the maritime and coastguard agency has said. the emergency services were alerted at around 10pm last night after the boat suffered engine failure and was caught up in storm gareth. the six crew on board were airlifted from the fishing vessel by newquay coastguard
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rescue helicopter. those are some of your main stories around today. we are at westminster, which means the studio is empty of us, but sally is in there. she is looking after it on her own today. good morning to you. good morning to both of you. a bit lonely, but i have some cracking goals for you. talk about raising expectations — it was a magnificnet seven for manchester city last night as they absolutely thumped schalke in the champions league. sergio aguero, leroy sane, raheem sterling, and bernardo silva were all amongst the scorers in what was — at times — a breathtaking performance from city at the etihad. teenager phil foden also got in on the act with his first goal in europe. city through to the quarter finals of the competition — winning10—2 on aggregate, and making a real statement of intent. an awful night for schalke on the pitch, but their german fans did catch have fun in manchester city centre
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before the game. around 3,000 supporters gathered in the northern quarterfor a big old chant, before marching to the etihad. there was a brilliant comeback in last night's other match. a hat—trick from cristiano ronaldo, who else, helped juventus overturn a 2—0 deficit from the first leg against athletico madrid to send juve through to the quarterfinals. well, tonight liverpool are hoping to make it four english teams out of four in the quarterfinals. they go to bayern munich with the tie poised at 0—0 from the first leg, and jurgen klopp reckons that winning in bavaria could also give them momentum in the premier league. if we deserve to go through, if we play good football, it could mean it could change the world for us. if not, on thursday morning, we say it's over now, let's concentrate on fulham. it's only one game, a very important game, and more important games will come. rangers are out of the scottish cup.
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they were beaten 2—0 by aberdeen in the quarterfinals. niall mcginn and teenager connor mclennan with the goals to send them through to the semis where they'll play celtic. elsewhere hearts came from behind to beat partick thistle 2—1. kyle edmund's through to the last 16 at indian wells. the british number one beat moldova's radu albot in straight sets in california. he'll have his work cut out to get through to the quarters though, he plays roger federer next. novak djokovic though is out. he was furious with himself as he lost to phillip kohlschriber, who'd lost his last seven matches against the world number one. the match was supposed to be played on monday, but had to be put back a day because of heavy rain. couple of big names out in the women's draw too. world number one naomi 0saka is gone — as is world number two simona halep. she lost to the unseeded czech teenager marketa vondrousova.
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0n the subject of weather, racing at cheltenham will go ahead today. there were concerns about high winds, but after an early inspection organisers are happy for everything to continue as planned. yesterday, there was a shock fall for the favourite in the day's headline race — this was buveur d'air falling in the champion hurdle — a race that the horse had won twice in a row. it meant a clear run for the line for espoir d'allen to give trainer gavin cromwell his first win at cheltenham. there was a fall for the favourite too in the mares hurdle, where the odds—on favourite benie des dieux went at the last fence. that left the 20 to one shot roksana to come through for a shock win. benie des dieux was unharmed, but there was a first fatality of the festival in the final race of the day when the willie mullins trained ballyward fell at the 17th.
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that is after considerable efforts to make the course at cheltenham saverfor to make the course at cheltenham saver for the horses. and how about this for a prank? david beckham was left... ..bewildered, shall we say, after he was set up byjames corden at an official reveal event for a statue of him at la galaxy. this is not the real statue. this is a fake statue they made. look at his face. incredibly unflattering. they are all there with glasses of champagne, ready to celebrate. ready to celebrate the revelation of that statue. that is not the real one. the real one as much, much better. it's what sport should be all about — inclusion for everyone — and the special olympics certainly does that. it's been changing the lives of people with intellectual disabilities for 50 years and the games in abu dhabi get under way tomorrow. there'll be 129 gigabytes athletes participating in 17 sports. tim muffett has been to meet some of them.
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glasgow, and for members of the special olympics great britain team, it is almost time to... we are very honoured. excited. the special 0lympics world games are held every two years. they alternate between winter and summer. in other derby athletes from across the world will compete in 24 sports. and how does it feel to be going to the special 0lympics? it is great to get picked. it good. why is it good? it is friends. what is the atmosphere like? cheerful and confident. what impact does it have on those who
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ta ke impact does it have on those who take part? massive. notjust from us, but socially, mentally, physically, it shows that people with an intellectual disability can ta ke with an intellectual disability can take part in a variety of different sporting events. you have already taken part in the special olympics in los angeles. what was it like?m was amazing. it was a really good experience, cycling on a main road and just getting to meet all the other athletes and stuff is really good. more than 7000 athletes from more than 190 nations are expected to compete in other derby. there is afar to compete in other derby. there is a far cry from the first special 0lympics a far cry from the first special olympics in chicago in 1968. that was set up by eunice kennedy shriver, sister of presidentjohn f. kennedy. she was inspired by their sister rosemary, who had an intellectual disability. that event lasted one day. in other derby will bea lasted one day. in other derby will be a week of competition, including a wide range of sports. a sport
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called boccia, it is part of the bolts family. cannot wait to go and have a good time. this is my partner here. it gives you a good sense of purpose and how to compete at an international level. it would not necessarily get that chance. the experience to go to another country and hopefully come back with a metal. fingers crossed. yeah. the special olympics has been described as the least cynical, most empowering sports event on earth. special in so many ways. tim muffett, bbc news, in glasgow. brilliant. good luck to all of them. if you fancy a break from brexit chat today, have a read about the special olympics. it is a wonderful, wonderful event. back to westminster though. i think a paper review with
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my chilly colleagues. it was wonderful to see them all. we were watching that. we will look at the papers. i think you can guess what makes the front page is this morning. we need a breakfrom brexit. this is a big day. we look at the daily mail. they are blaming mps for plunging a despairing nation into chaos. there is the front page with theresa may looking glum and branding the house of commons a house full. last night if you are watching she was losing her voice as well. the guardian describes the defeat is humiliating. it highlights that there are just 16 days to go until the uk is due to leave the eu. we show you the front page of the express. how much more of this can britain take? they campaigned for leave in the 2016 referendum and say brexit is now hanging in the balance. only time sleeves with the headline driven to despair,
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reporting that the pound fell against the euro and the dolo following tuesday's voges and the time leads with. a bit of light relief. we have this tweet from larry the cat or the account pretending to be larry the cat. he has got his own little microphone. that has got to be photoshopped. larry the cat. his views this morning. we know there is a cabinet meeting. not sure whether he is invited. that is happening at eighta.m.. i he is invited. that is happening at eight a.m.. i suspect ministers are on their way to that meeting. we would love to be at that meeting to hear what is going on. a fly on the wall. we will hopefully hear at least the tone of what has been set a little later. we can, we can show you downing street this morning. cabinet ministers on their way into
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number10. cabinet ministers on their way into number 10. that is going to take place at eight o'clock today. the prime minister will then be addressing the house and talking about preparations for no deal. 16 days away from march 29 stop a vote today will decide whether to keep no deal on the table or to take it off the table for that date, march 29. that is not to say that would not be another proposal put forward by mps, another proposal put forward by mps, a managed no deal, an extension, no deal down the line. more answers during the programme. we know that storm gareth is here. we can feel the effects. carol, what is going to happen? while the wins have been pretty gusty. the strongest ones have not reached england. south—west scotland, 75 miles per hour. manchester, 54 miles per hour. if you are travelling, do bear this in mind, especially on a high sided bike. some nasty travelling
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conditions. you might find some disruption as well. delays are even cancellations. very windy today. sunshine and also heavy showers. this area of low pressure. through the day, drifting towards denmark. the showers will fade in the wins will be quite a strong late afternoon. we are looking at very gusty winds across parts of scotland and also northern ireland. if you look at a line from liverpool down to the wash, 55—65 miles per hour. even in man. some really nasty travelling conditions. trees will be strewn across the road, for example.
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pushing further east, the strongest winds developing across southern parts of england mid—morning. it will still be windy. it would be as windy. the afternoon gusts, it is still very windy. as we head into the evening and overnight, our next set of fonts will be producing heavy rain and also some gusty winds. many across rain and also some gusty winds. many a cross m ost rain and also some gusty winds. many across most of the uk. we've already had three orfour across most of the uk. we've already had three or four inches of rain. this is going to exacerbate the situation. something else we are keeping an eye on. tomorrow morning, quite smartly, we lose this front. lots of showers back in behind and as you can tell by looking at the isobars, is going to be another windy day. not quite as windy yesterday. you will notice it. there goes the rain. following behind
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other showers and equally some sunshine. temperatures in all of this, fairly academic. looking at seven to about 13. for thursday to friday, the next front coming in from the west, pushing steadily eastwards. that will be bringing rain with it as well. the isobars close together. here is our rain coming in across scotland and northern ireland. for southern england, there will be a bit more cloud around but behind this rain, once again looking at bright spots, sunshine and showers. some of the shows will be wintry. we are keeping you up—to—date with editing brexit. i willjust reduce some comments from the brexit secretary stephen barclay, has been speaking on the radio. he says no deal is going to be very disruptive for the economy, no deal also has serious questions for the union weather is the in
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place. there are questions for the union in terms of no deal. this is stephen barclay. no brexit is catastrophic for our democracy between those very pleasant choices. i think no brexit is the biggest risk. that is the view of one government minister. we know there isa government minister. we know there is a cabinet meeting happening in the next ten minutes. we are getting reactions, also away from here. what is the verdict of british businesses? steph is out and about ata businesses? steph is out and about at a firm in birmingham that makes lots of metal components. good morning. this is brandauer. they make lots of metal components that have these massive machines. you can see this one. they have the water inside. it's like a mini swimming pool inside. it's like a mini swimming pool. that is will the cutting is done. this machine will be making
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parts like this in that part will be put on another machine and that will make this little part in this part goes inside of here which you might recognise. they make billions of metal things every single day in this business. they employ around 65 people as well. let me grab the microphone, i knew! people as well. let me grab the microphone, i knew i would. there we are. tell me a bit about your business, rowan. where would we see them? brandauer exports 75% of their components to 22 countries worldwide. europe, north america and asia, china being our biggest revenue market. when you say parts, where would we see them? there is the one from the plumbing. you are going to see those parts in kettles,
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plumbing fittings, every automotive vehicle in your rearview mirror, control systems, lots of safety critical items inside automotive ca rs. critical items inside automotive cars. you are a business that's doing well, 65 employees. 65 of which we have ten apprentices. dean and ollie, year 3 and four apprentices. this particular section we are walking down is new tooling, new orders from european and the rest of the world customers. this is a new bit of kit. we are currently building up this tool. we've got the drawings here. a component of the tyre pressure sensors. tell me, what's it been like preparing for brexit? what have you been doing?‘ huge amount of work. we have been preparing for it for over two years now. the way we've been doing it is more regular discussions. all of us
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in the supply chain. customers understanding what goes where. we're not sure quite where we are going to end up. ensuring continuous supply. at the moment, that's what's on the table. i hope so. we've prepared for the worst case scenario. it is no deal brexit on wto rules. we are ready to that. our customers are confident in our supply chain and we are winning business from european customers still today. we leave the eu without a deal. has this been costly for your business. time management, people's time and effort to go into this. intangible, money
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terms. circa £150,000. as a contingency to get over any delays in getting stuck in and out of the uk. so what you guys want a certainty. certainty is what any manufacturer needs is the least we can plan for whatever the outcome is. ijust want can plan for whatever the outcome is. i just want to introduce you to sally who is from deloitte g helps businesses prepare for brexit. some news about tariffs. we've had the uk government announcements of the ta riffs government announcements of the tariffs on imports into the uk. they've said 87% of goods are going to come in without any tariffs at all which means 13% will have tariff rates and those have been picked to protect uk domestic industries that would otherwise be suffering from competition if we let goods in without tariffs. doesn't that they make it difficult for us to negotiate future trade deals with
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countries are already giving reduced ta riffs countries are already giving reduced tariffs on low tariffs on things? this is a temporary measure. it will apply to 12 months and then be revisited and that will be taken into account but it's one of many bargaining chips which make up free trade negotiation. back to you. bargaining chips which make up free trade negotiation. back to youm interesting to hear those different points of view. are you 0k? interesting to hear those different points of view. are you ok? you are properly cold. it's very chilly here this morning. i'm not moaning about the weather. we will get you a cup of tea, i promise. lucy williamson is in the dordogne price this morning. good morning from the dordogne, the little cafe
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here in cognac sur l'ile is filling up here in cognac sur l'ile is filling up this morning. the 30 also brits believe you have come for a copy this morning, watching the brexit negotiations to find out what's going to happen to their pension rights, their residency rights, their access to healthcare. with me are two of those bits, john leyland, dennis baxter. john, i will start with you, you watched the vote, your reaction? i would have preferred the vote to go through because that means at least some of the status stays. i didn't want brexit to happen ever. what he most worried about? banking, driving, health. happen ever. what he most worried about? banking, driving, healthlj don't even know if the card i got is going to be valued. dennis, you said you would have voted leave if you live here in france. i would vote to
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leave if i lived in the uk. i didn't. i left the uk 12 years ago to come to france because we like the french way of life however we don't like the bureaucracy of fossils and neither do the french. however, it is what it is and we will deal with it. thank you both very much. the bits are in france will keep on watching what's happening with the negotiations. 0pinion is divided amongst the community but now, back to london. there are concerns about the uncertainty they are. what's happening today? the headline soon. a cabinet meeting taking place. four minutes' time at number 10. i'm interested to hear the man next guest, a former director of strategy and speechwriter to theresa may and he knows are extremely well, great to getan he knows are extremely well, great to get an insight into what might be going on, how she might be of
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poaching the next hours. another humiliating defeat of the prime minister but what happens next? now, the news, travel, and weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a ban's been introduced on flying drones within 5km of the capital's airports from today. the no—fly zone's been extended after gatwick had to be closed for more than a day last december following repeated drone sightings near the runway. it caused chaos for travellers, affecting more than 1,000 flights and about 140,000 passengers. the penalties run anything from a fine all the way up to life imprisonment if you are putting somebody‘s life at risk at an airport, so there are significant penalties and proportionate penalties as well, so what we want to do is ensure that people are not only aware of the law but also aware of those penalties
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so that they follow the rules and fly their drones safely. as we've been hearing, mps return to the commons today for a further vote on brexit. bbc london has been speaking to wholesalers and traders at new covent garden market about what it would mean for their businesses if the uk were to leave the eu without a deal. if you talk about accepting the deal, we don't even know what it is. it could be a bad deal. i would never accept a bad deal — i would always have the courage to negotiate my position and sometimes, sometimes you have to say no. i think it's had an effect on all businesses. it's difficult to plan... we don't know what's going to happen. the bank of england risks damaging its credibility if it doesn't overhaul its working practises according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee has criticised a lack of diversity and demanded it cut costs. a spokesperson for the bank said it would respond "in due course".
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let's take a look at the travel now. now the tube so far is all looking good. no reported problems on any of those lines. in mitcham, the a205 cricket green is closed northbound from madeira road to london road too. over to kate kinsella now with the weather. good morning. well, in the wake of storm gareth, it is set to be a very windy day today and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the strong winds, 45—55mph. it's a breezy start but the wind will continue to strengthen through the morning. some sunny spells, you could see one or two showers — they will blow through fairly quickly on that strong north—westerly wind. now, that wind will make things feel pretty chilly, despite the temperatures reaching around 12 celsius. now, the wind will fall a little bit lighter overnight. it won't disappear completely but it's not going to be quite as windy today. but it is going to turn rather wet. some heavy rain, persistent rain as we head through
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to tomorrow morning. minimum temperature between 5 and 7 celsius. now, that rain will gradually clear. we'll see some sunny spells, some showers through the afternoon. the wind will start to strengthen through the course of thursday. it stays pretty unsettled for the rest of this week and into the weekend and the wind remains pretty strong. i'm back in half an hour. you can catch up with the day's top stories, travel and weather on our website. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin in westminster. mps are urgently working out their next steps over brexit, after rejecting theresa may's deal for a second time. the ayes to the right — 242. the noes to the left — 391. so the noes have it,
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the noes have it. unlock. in the face of her loss by a massive majority the prime minister confirms a vote today on whether to leave the eu without a deal on 29th march. these are unenviable choices. thanks to the decision that the house has made this evening they are choices that must now be faced. the prime minister losing her voice last night. the flags outside the houses of parliament this morning, fluttering in the breeze, various colours, and we will try to get a sense of which way the political winds are blowing. and it's a storm businesses are certainly feeling. i am at a manufacturers in birmingham to find out how they are preparing for brexit and what they think of the shenanigans we are facing now.
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in other news — three people are killed in an avalanche on ben nevis. seven goals for manchester city in the champions league. as they thrash schalke 7—0 at the etihad to go through to the quarter—finals. storm gareth is upon us and we are looking at gale force winds and rain. welcome to westminster. it's wednesday the 13th of march. hustle and bustle behind us. a quiet morning but now the crowds are gathering and discussing what happened last night and speculating on what might happen later today. there was an atm cabinet meeting taking place at number ten. some pictures from people entering. word from work and pensions secretary amber rudd who spoke outside her house this morning, who says she was
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disappointed by conservative collea g u es disappointed by conservative colleagues who chose not to vote for the prime minister's brexit deal last night. she said it was a free vote and everyone can do what she thinks is best for the country for stop talking about the vote tonight of taking no deal of the table. i know many people think no deal would be bad for the economy and bad for security but i'm disappointed with so security but i'm disappointed with so many of my colleagues not voting for the withdrawal agreement yesterday, a good deal that was a sensible way of leaving the eu and delivering on the referendum. she was also asked if she still thought the prime minister had the confidence of the party and she said, she has. 0ur political correspondent iain watson reports it was a thumping defeat, a majority of nearly 150 against the prime minister's brexit deal. and 75 of her own mps defied her. her voice betrayed the strain of two years of talks. i profoundly regret the decision
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that this house has taken tonight. i continue to believe that by far the best outcome is that the united kingdom leaves the european union in an orderly fashion, with a deal. the prime minister's usual allies, northern ireland's dup, didn't back her deal, and they don't want her to rule out the option of no deal either. if you take the possibility of walking away off the table, you actually end up in a counter—productive situation where you get offered terms you cannot accept. with the prime minister's deal now defeated twice in parliament, labour said she should consider their proposals. if she really thought about the country, she would have at least listened to us when we talked to her or tried to talk to her about how another deal is possible. and that is one whereby we remain in the customs union, close to the single market. and some of may's own mps are questioning how long she can go on in number10. if parliament does start to dismantle the strategy that makes her position very difficult
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and that is a conversation i think the cabinet will want to have with the prime minister about how long she will want to go on for. brexit is still proving divisive between and within the main parties. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. so what happens next? later today mps will vote on whether the uk should leave without a deal at the end of this month. if parliament votes in favour of no deal then brexit will go ahead as planned on the 29th march. if parliament rejects no deal, then there will be another vote tomorrow. the prime minister will ask mps to decide whether to extend article 50 and for how long. if that passes, then then the prime minister will need to ask the eu for a delay in brexit. if it's rejected, then we're back to leaving on the 29th of march.
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in the last hour the brexit minister stephen barclay told the today programme he thought a no—deal brexit would be "very disruptive" for the economy. ultimately, john, if you push me to the absolute end point where it's a choice between no deal and no brexit, and i don't think that's what the vote today will specifically be on, but ultimately on that i think no deal will be very disruptive for the economy and i think no deal also has serious questions for the union, for example in northern ireland where there is a government in place, serious questions raised by the head of the civil service, and i think there's questions over the union in the case of no deal. but i think no brexit is catastrophic for our democracy. between those very unpleasant choices, i think no brexit is the bigger risk. that was brexit secretary stephen barclay speaking on the hook today programme earlier today. while this is happening the government has said
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it will not introduce new checks or controls on the island of ireland if we leave the eu without a deal this month. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardyjoins month. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy joins us month. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardyjoins us now from stormont. you have been looking at the details surrounding tariffs. it's quite an extraordinary arrangement and it has been announced this morning that in order to give mps the full details of what a no deal scenario would look like a head of the vote tonight. bear with me, look like a head of the vote tonight. bearwith me, it look like a head of the vote tonight. bear with me, it is a bit technical but if the uk was to leave the eu without a deal then that would potentially mean new tariffs on goods that come from the eu into the uk in the future and that will happen. new tariffs particularly on agricultural products, things like beef and dairy. but there will be a special exemption for goods coming from the republic of ireland into northern ireland, so republic of ireland producers will be exempt from any of those tariffs that other
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eu producers sending goods to great britain would have to pay. that is in order to protect the open border on the island of ireland. the uk government says it knows this is a rather exceptional circumstance. it leaves a back door open that could be exploited for smuggling, but the uk government has said it has looked at the circumstances in a no deal scenario and this is the only way it can take unilateral measures to protect the open border on the island of ireland, but because of all the risks i have talked about, the government says it will review this very carefully and it is strictly only temporary and if the no deal scenario were to come about and this was to be enacted, it would have urgent talks with the eu commission and the irish government in order to find a longer term solution. emma vardy, we excuse you the technicalities, very well explained and thank you. reacting to yesterday's vote,
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the snp leader, nicola sturgeon, has told theresa may that she and her mps should hang their heads in shame over brexit (pres) 0ur scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, is in glasgow this morning. brexit is top of the debate wherever you are this morning. it is. the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon is frankly angry at how these events are unfolding, and she says it has been put about by a westminster government that is incompetent, has failed to listen, and has brought to scotland to the brink of catastrophe. nicola sturgeon says that over the last two yea rs or sturgeon says that over the last two years or so sturgeon says that over the last two years or so her sturgeon says that over the last two years or so her government sturgeon says that over the last two years or so her government at holyrood have tried to find compromise but in that time scotland's needs and voice has been ignored by a westminster government that she says has effectively ceased to function. as you mentioned earlier, she says the prime minister and her team should be hanging their heads in shame. as to the independence debate, that's ongoing in scotland, she argues that what has happened over the last few days has happened over the last few days
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has been clarifying with regards to independence and once this phase of the eu debate ends she will put forward her stall on that. but now she says to the house of commons that they should abandon the idea of a no—deal brexit, believing they should have been whipped on that, and she believes there should be time to hold another referendum on eu membership. lorna gordon, thank you. strong words from scotland and the latest from ireland. you can see how events taking place at westminster last night, very much the big topic of discussion wherever you look this morning. we're joined now by our political correspondent, alex forsyth, who can tell us more about the votes happening today. so many unanswered questions. we know the cabinet meeting started ten minutes ago, and there is another vote later today. i expect the cabinet meeting to be pretty fractious and i expect a lot of senior ministers to have a lot to say about what has happened and where we should go. there will be
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another series of votes today in parliament, focused on the idea of whether the uk should leave the eu at the end of march with no deal. mps will get their chance to have a say on that and chances are, if i was daring to predict anything, i would predict most mps would say they don't want to leave without a deal. if that happens then we look forward to, what does that mean? could the whole process be delayed on that? and then we would have a vote on that, whether there should bea vote on that, whether there should be a delay because they have to take that back to the eu. if parliament says today they don't like the idea of leaving without a deal, that doesn't mean the law has changed and that's definitely off the table, but it's the will of parliament. there will be a vote tomorrow to ask if we should delay the process. theresa may then has to ask the eu, how long would the delay be, and what would the delay before, because the eu would not be up for delaying the process if we kept going round in
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circles. what about the prime minister's authority this morning? yesterday with the attorney general and then the dup, blow after blow, and then the dup, blow after blow, and losing her voice in the commons, and losing her voice in the commons, a tough day for the leader of the tory party yesterday. she's had a few tough days in that position, but you can't underestimate the fact this is her big policy. brexit is the thing she is trying to do above everything else. and she has twice now suffered a really resounding defeat in the house of commons. if these were normal times and many prime ministers would have fallen for less. these are not normal times and theresa may seems determined to carry on but be in no doubt that her credibility has once again been damaged. very good to talk to you. inafew damaged. very good to talk to you. in a few minutes we will speak to a former director of strategy and chief speech writer for theresa may who will be talking about her potential strategy. interesting to see her husband philip may turn up in the public gallery yesterday. we
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will get an insight into that relationship as well. it's business as usual for the chancellor today as he delivers his spring statement. phillip hammond is unlikely to include any major spending announcements but he is expected to say that he needs to be cautious because of the uncertainty around brexit. we live in a democracy and people are voicing their opinions behind us. are voicing their opinions behind us. so that is what you may be able to hear. three climbers have died and one other has been seriously injured following an avalanche on ben nevis, britian's highest mountain. police scotland was alerted to the incident in an area known as number five gully which is known for avalanches. officers say they are working to establish the identity of the climbers. two other climbers recently lost their lives in separate incidents on the same mountain.
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the us aviation regulator says there is no basis to stop the boeing 737 max 8 airlinerfrom flying. many countries — including those in the european union — have grounded it following the fatal crash in ethiopia at the weekend. the federal aviation administration said a review had showed no systemic performance issues with the aircraft. heavy rain and strong winds are starting to hit parts of the uk as storm gareth moves east. there are warnings of disruption as the storm, which started yesterday, moves over northern ireland, scotland and north west england. winds are forecast to reach speeds of 60 miles per hour along the coast of northern ireland later — and there are warnings it could impact those travelling during the rush—hour this morning. meanwhile, six fishermen have been airlifted from a french fishing boat off lands end in "atrocious" 20ft waves and storm—force winds, the maritime and coastguard agency has said.
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the emergency services were alerted at around 10pm last night after the boat suffered engine failure and was caught up in storm gareth. the six crew on board were airlifted from the fishing vessel by newquay coastguard rescue helicopter. the strictly come dancing presenters tess daly and claudia winkleman finished their marathon dancing challenge last night — and vowed never to dance again. the pair raised more than £782,000 by dancing non—stop for 24 hours and five minutes. they battled through back injuries and sickness to raise the money for comic relief. 0n on that comic relief trend, many of you on breakfast were supporting the climb up kilimanjaro ten days ago and the programme on that is on bbc 0ne tonight at nine o'clock. we have
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already raised about £885,000. and that's all down to your generosity. so many people giving liberally to comic relief this year. an hour—long documentary tonight that's voiced by a very special person. i don't know if i'm allowed to say who it is but it's very impressive. last night it was clear that days of intense negotiations had taken their toll on theresa may, as she struggled through her speech in the commons with a croaky voice. so how will she be feeling about yesterday's developments? to give us an insight into number 10 we have herformer director of strategy and chief speech writer chris wilkins, who joins us now. thank you so much forjoining us. looking forward to talking to you because a lot of people are speculating about what is going through the prime minister's head this morning. but you have been there, seen a tent on it and understand how she works. going back to last night, it was a damaging
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defeat. —— but you have seen it and done it. yesterday was clearly really damaging. it was brutal, after the events of the night before, and i think it was really optimistic, dashing to strasbourg, and a series of things chipping away at the confidence through the day. after the results last night you could see quite an angry prime minister, somebody who felt she had really given her all, she had spent so really given her all, she had spent so much time on this and making the sprint to strasbourg and it was voted down yesterday for some serious reasons, but some people who really just wa nted serious reasons, but some people who really just wanted to vote against anything, she might feel, and there was almost nothing she could have done to win. she doesn't respond well to that kind of politics. she thinks it's rather more important than that. she uses the phrase a lot
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that politics is not a game and she felt there was a bit of that going on. at that point, does she dig in, is that what you think she would do? i certainly wouldn't rule out the vote coming back. she might bring it to the commons again? there is definitely a sensing number ten and she feels she might bring the vote back to have another go. so she will ta ke back to have another go. so she will take in in that sense. but i think the statement she delivered after the statement she delivered after the vote last night was the clearest exposition yet of what the alternatives actually are and there isa alternatives actually are and there is a realism there, may be for the first time about 0k, is a realism there, may be for the first time about ok, let's work through those other alternatives now. as she said to the house of commons, now it's time to face up to those tough choices that they have to make. one thing she has been accused of in the last few years is not reaching out, not talking to other areas of the house and finding cross— party other areas of the house and finding cross—party alliances to try to bring brexit through. who is talking to her? we saw her husband philip
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may in the public gallery yesterday. so who is advising her and who is in that circle? it was significant that philip turned up yesterday. he is not often about and the fact he showed up yesterday showed how significant the day was. they are a close tea m, significant the day was. they are a close team, more so than many other political couples i have known in my time in politics. they work very much as a team on these big issues. and both of them are steeped in the conservative party, being in the party for many years. she has worked her way up from being a councillor to where she is now, so the sense of reaching out across the house is probably not easy for someone who is so probably not easy for someone who is so embedded in the party in that way. there is a close team around her and way. there is a close team around herandi way. there is a close team around her and i think in number ten there are some differences of opinion about the way forward but ultimately the decision was, let's try to get this through with the votes of the conservative mps and the dup and it failed. it will be fascinating. they
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are 19 minutes into a cabinet meeting this morning. how does she approach that sort of meeting and what will be atmosphere be like?m would be fascinating to be in there. i used to sit in cabinet meetings when i was at number ten. give us some insight. they are not always as exciting as people think they are. they are strange affairs. it could be quite fractious. the meetings are very ordered with the prime minister introducing a topic and then literally people put up their hands to speak and the prime minister chairs it in that way in a formal sense. i wonder today what sort of formality will remain because there will be such differences of opinion around the table. i'm sure she will give people their freedom around the table. i'm sure she will give people theirfreedom of around the table. i'm sure she will give people their freedom of speech. she has said today will be a free vote and that is to allow cabinet ministers to vote in the way they wa nt to ministers to vote in the way they want to and not have any resignations. i think she will open it up toa resignations. i think she will open it up to a wide—ranging discussion andi it up to a wide—ranging discussion and i suspect it will go on for some time. can i ask about regret. is she
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the sort of person who, at some stage down the line when she is perhaps writing a book about everything that took place, will she look at things like calling a general election and see that as a big error? i was on the council to call the general election. you told her to do it at the time and thought it was a good idea. i did, and i still think it was the right thing to do, it was not winning that was the problem! they have been other m ista kes the problem! they have been other mistakes in the last few years. two in particular. after winning the general election, not taking the opportunity to reach out in the way you have described, that could have been a way of forcing the brexit deal through. after the last defeat of meaningful vote number one, as it's called, at that point, deciding not to reach out, i think, as yesterday proved, was an error as well. those are the two big things for me. what does she want her legacy to be? is it all about brexit
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or is it beyond that? part of the tragedy of theresa may in a sense is that when she went into number ten she had a broader agenda that she wa nted she had a broader agenda that she wanted to deliver. brexit was about so wanted to deliver. brexit was about so much more than europe, it was about a number of grievances that people had, that sense that politics wasn't working and those of the things she wanted to change and what she wanted her legacy to be. but after the election and it went wrong, and she didn't get the majority she wanted, it all became about brexit. the tragedy now is we are having these discussions, trying to get brexit through, and we are talking about customs unions and all the rest of it, and it seems we have com pletely the rest of it, and it seems we have completely forgotten about why we started this in the first place, which is so much more thanjust started this in the first place, which is so much more than just our relationship with europe. that's what she would have wanted it to be. chris wilkins, thank you forjoining us chris wilkins, thank you forjoining us this morning. fascinating insight. i was down here yesterday,
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and louise rang me and said, how cold and windy is it and i said, not too bad. have you changed your mind? there is certainly a storm afoot. storm gareth. let's catch up with all of that with carol. gusts of wind in london around 35—40 mph, but they will strengthen to around 45—50 through the morning. these are some of the gusts this morning. we think more or less now, the wind in the northern half of the uk has peaked, but they have not yet peaked in the southern half of the uk. what we have today, severe gales, but also some sunshine and showers and some of those showers will be heavy through the day. storm gareth is here, this area of low pressure moving off to denmark during the day, and the wind this afternoon will be slightly lower
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than this morning, but still windy. this morning, anywhere from liverpool they down to the wash, looking at 55—65 mph, even in land could be 60. moving north, northern ireland and scotland, the wind coming down a touch, having reached their peak, but around the coast you could still see 70, so if you are travelling in a high sided vehicle or light vehicle or bicycle, bear that in mind. there could be destruction and branches across the road. showers this morning, some of them heavy, being blown from the north—west to the south—east on that strong wind. the wind peaking this morning across southern areas. through the afternoon it will slowly start to ease a little bit. temperatures are fairly academic. these are the wind gusts you can expect as we go through the afternoon so you can see they are still pretty strong. through the evening, the next system will show
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its hand in the west, introducing rain and windy conditions. the wind will pick up. most of us will see rain through the course of the night. cumbria has seen a bit of rain of late, three orfour night. cumbria has seen a bit of rain of late, three or four inches with more heavy and persistent rain coming later tonight and there is the risk of some flooding. the weather front producing that through the course of tomorrow morning will quickly move away and then behind it there will be some showers and you can tell from the isobars that it will still be windy but not quite as windy as today. the rain, showers from the north—west, blowing from west to east. but they will be quite a bit of sunshine around as well. temperatures, eight and nine in the north and 11—13, possibly 14, in the south. moving into friday, the front leaving. things pivot around and we have a front coming from the west and another from the north—west. u nsettled and another from the north—west. unsettled sums up the friday
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weather. there is the first front heading east. the second one bringing rain across scotland and northern ireland and into northern england and the midlands. but weakening. southern counties are looking at a fair bit of cloud but fairly mild, 14 or 15. behind that, cold with sunshine and showers, some wintry over the hills. just looking at those temperatures and dreaming of them. we would love and dreaming of them. we would love a 14. we are at a blustery westminster today. carol telling us about the storm hitting part of the uk today. looking at yesterday's vote and looking ahead to the next few days as well. yesterday's vote caused a flurry of activity on twitter, with politicians from the uk and from the eu voicing their displeasure with the result... chief brexit negotiator michel barnier said "the eu has done everything it can to help get the withdrawal agreement over the line. the impasse can only be solved in the uk." he added no—deal preparations are now more important than ever before.
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guy verhofstadt, chair of the eu's brexit steering group tweeted that brexit was about taking back control, and criticised the uk for spinning out of control. and the dutch prime minister mark rutte sent a number of tweets, including this one, expressing worry for the dutch citizens living in the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. storm gareth gave us some very strong good morning. storm gareth gave us some very strong winds through tonight and the first part of this morning. gusting up to 70 to 80 mph in parts of northern ireland and western scotland. it will stay very windy today with a mixture of sunny
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spells and showers. he is the sense of storm gareth, on the satellite imagery, moving eastward, moving out into the north sea. but around that area of low pressure, winds from the north west. you notice the isobars, the white lines closely packed together, all of us seeing strong gusts. these are typical goes through this morning. 1455 mph. they will ease slightly across northern and western areas throughout this morning. —— 55 mills per hour. showers in scotland, northern ireland and north west england, though showers working further south with sunny spells in between the showers. the winds will stay strong physically around the liverpool bay area towards the wash with gusts up to 60, 65 area towards the wash with gusts up to 60,65 mph. area towards the wash with gusts up to 60, 65 mph. this evening, area towards the wash with gusts up to 60,65 mph. this evening, rain spreads back into northern ireland into scotland, through northern england and across wales. the winds will have eased through the first pa rt will have eased through the first part of tonight but gradually as we go through thursday, they will pick
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up go through thursday, they will pick up again. these are the overnight temperatures, six or seven celsius, but during thursday, looking at strong winds once again. this weather system is moving south east, but wind from the north west is going to be blustery thursday. it will dry with the rain and the showers quite quickly towards the south east, so sunshine developing across scotland, northern ireland, wales, the midlands and northern england, throughout the afternoon, and temperatures on thursday night at 30 celsius, there are —— the last of the rain clears later in the day but still quite blustery conditions. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock. in westminster. and ben bland here in the studio. more misery for may. the british parliament rejects her brexit deal and will now vote on whether to leave the eu without a deal. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, march 13th. in the last hour and a half, the uk says if there is no deal, it will slash tariffs on some imports from outside the european union, but some products from inside the eu would face new tariffs.

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