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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  March 13, 2019 2:30pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching today at 5 we're live at westminster — the as mp5 prepare to give their opinion ii‘ul‘ei offic— the office for budget responsibility had slashed afternoon live. its growth forecast for 2019 to — on leaving the eu without a formal deal. today at 3: the day after 1.296, its growth forecast for 2019 to in his spring statement, the prime minister's deal 1.2%, rather than its growth forecast for 2019 to 1.2%, ratherthan1.6%, the chancellor says that brexit was heavily defeated — its growth forecast for 2019 to 1.2%, rather than 1.6%, predicted its growth forecast for 2019 to 1.2%, ratherthan1.6%, predicted in and the vote to reject the eu mps are to vote on a no—deal last yea r‘s 1.2%, ratherthan1.6%, predicted in last year's budget. let's give you a withdrawal agreement flavour now. police forces in are casting a "cloud of uncertainty" brexit on 29th march — as mrs may insists an agreement over the british economy and warns is still possible. of the risks of leaving i want to leave the european union england will receive an immediate without a deal. with a good deal. i believe we have a good deal. £100 million to help tackle a rise in knife crime. leaving with no deal would mean yes, no deal is better than a bad the chancellor also announced a £3 significant disruption in the short deal but i want us to leave on the 29th of march billion affordable homes guarantee and medium—term and a smaller, less and leave with a good deal. scheme, which will be aimed at building 30,000 affordable homes for prosperous economy and the long—term but for labour — thanif prosperous economy and the long—term than if we leave with a deal. we jeremy corbyn accused the prime first—time buyers. minister of plunging the country and all secondary schools and have just witnessed a display by the into chaos — and he called for a general election. colleges in england will receive the prime minister's free sanitary products from chancellor of this government's deal has failed. she no longer has the ability to lead. toxic mix of callous, complacency this is a rudderless september. over austerity and its grotesque government in the face of the chancellor announced £100 million of extra funding for police incompetence over the handling of forces in england to deal with knife brexit. among a handful of announcements, crime. police forces in england are to get police funding is due to from april. an extra £100 million to tackle the recent surge in knife crime. after the overwhelming defeat in the commons last night for the prime minister's
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withdrawal agreement, mps prepare to debate and vote many police and crime commissioners on whether to leave the eu have committed to use this extra funding to recruit and train without a deal on 29 march. additional police officers, but that ta kes additional police officers, but that takes time, and action is needed this is the scene live in the house of commons, where mps 110w. takes time, and action is needed now. so the prime minister and i are due to start debating a no—deal have decided exceptionally to make brexit ahead of this evening's vote. available immediately to police forces in england an additional £100 the government says it would slash taxes on a range of imports from outside the eu if there was a no—deal brexit million over the course of the next and there'd be no new checks year, ring fence to pay for across the irish border. coming up on afternoon live, additional overtime targeted specifically on knife crime and new all the sport with 0lly foster. violent crime reduction units to deliver a wider cross agency the cheltenham festival has beaten response to this epidemic. ahead of the weather. the big race isjust half an hour away. and england have the spending review, my right named their squad for their opening honourable friend the home secretary will work with the police to euro qualifiers and islands young consider how best to prioritise player of the year is in line for a resources going forward, including first cap. thanks 0lly, and ben rich newly funded manpower, to ensure a has all the weather. lasting solution to the problem. storm gareth brought wind gusts of 75 mph across areas. it is still webb but the shadow chancellorjohn windy and will stay windy over the mcdonnell responded saying there had
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next few days. more rain in the been a callous complacency over austerity and a forecast as well. the details later mishandling of brexit. we have just witnessed a display by on. thanks, ben. also coming up, later this the chancellor of this government's afternoon we'll be answering your questions on the no—deal debate and the announcement toxic mix of callous complacency on tariffs on goods in a bbc over austerity, and its gross ask this at 4:30pm. incompetence over the handling of brexit. whilst teachers are having to pay for the materials their pupils need, working parents are hello, everyone. struggling to manage, and schools this is afternoon live. close early and their children are after the house of commons rejected theresa may's brexit sent home, 5000 of our fellow agreement for a second time last citizens will be sleeping in the night — it's another big day in parliament. mps are preparing cold and wet on the streets tonight. for another important vote this evening at 7pm on whether to leave the eu without a deal on 29 march. young people are being stabbed to meanwhile, a new tariff deathin young people are being stabbed to death in rising numbers, and the regime has been announced chancellor turns up today with no by the government that would be imposed in the event of a no—deal brexit. also today, the chancellor philip hammond has been real end or reversal of austerity. delivering his spring statement on the state of the government's finances. and to threaten us, because this is what he means, that austerity can
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only end if we accept this in his spring statement, the chancellor warned that brexit government's bad deal of a brexit. and the vote to reject the eu withdrawal agreement was casting a "cloud of uncertainty" over the british economy and his most it has been a busy day in urgent task is to lift it. he said the office for parliament, not only the spring budget responsibility had slashed its growth forecast for 2019 statement but earlier today the to 1.2%, rather than the 1.6% prime minister told mps she wants to predicted in last year's budget. here are some other key leave the eu in 16 days' time, and points from the statement. police forces in england will receive an immediate her withdrawal agreement is still a £100 million to help tackle a rise good deal, despite her second heavy in knife crime. the chancellor also defeat in the commons last night. announced a £3 billion mps are expected to block no deal when they vote again this evening, "affordable homes guarantee scheme", which would lead to a vote on which will be aimed at building 30,000 affordable home whether to delay britain's departure. the issue of brexit forfirst time buyers. dominated prime minister's questions and all secondary schools in the commons this lunchtime. now a and colleges in england will receive free sanitary flavour of some of the exchanges between theresa may and jeremy products from september. corbyn. i want to leave the european union let's hear now from with a good deal, i believe we have the chancellor as he announced a good deal, yes no deal is better that extra funding for police forces than a bad deal, but i want to leave in england to deal with knife crime. with a good deal. there may well be other votes, and her brexit strategy police funding is due to rise by at
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is clearly in tatters. her deal has been twice rejected, and is now dead. i may not have my own voice a £970 million from april. many police and crime commissioners have already committed to using this but i do understand the voice of the extra funding to recruit and train country. people want to leave the eu additional police officers. but that they want to end free movement, they ta kes wa nt to additional police officers. but that takes time and action is needed now. they want to end free movement, they want to have our own trade policy, they want to make sure laws are made the prime minister and i have in this country and judged in our courts, that is what the deal decided exceptionally to make available immediately to police delivers, that is what i continue to work to deliver. he needs to believe forces in england and additional £100 million over the course of the that too why is he trying to next year. ring fenced to pay for frustrate it? the prime minister, a additional overtime, targeted little horse—macro, somebody in fine voice, my colleague simon mccoy, specifically on knife crime and for new violent crime reduction units to live at westminster, let's join him. deliver a wider cross agency response to this epidemic. ahead of the conservative mp and chair of the select committee, nicky morgan, he the spending review, my right with me now. then any other year we honourable friend the home secretary would be having listened to the will work with the police to spring statement be going and analysing that, but we are not consider how best to prioritise really going to, are we? i know you resources going forward, included wa nt really going to, are we? i know you want to. i would love to, because i newly funded manpower, to ensure a lasting solution to the problem.
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think it is genuinely interesting, although the prime minister did not did not want a physical event, there isa did not want a physical event, there is a series of announcements, but it shows what extraordinary times we live in that the spring statement is barely getting a mention, and what let's ta ke he was saying is it is impossible to let's take you to the house of commons. michael gove is on his feet. theresa may remaining seated know really, until there are four customers there but they will have because of her voice. to be updated depending what happens with brexit. what is making news is his call for consensus. is that a breakfrom his call for consensus. is that a break from theresa may's position? theresa may wants there to be consensus theresa may wants there to be consensus but she wants people to back her agreement. he was looking at the labour benches when he said it. he has said as well, a number of i won't at this stage. this house people stand up and say they want certainty and this and that, and he says why don't you vote for the voted to give the people of this agreement? everyone has had a principle objection not to. what he country a choice over whether or not is trying to say is if we can't get we we re country a choice over whether or not we were to remain or leave the things through, if people vote for european union. 17.4 million, a an extension of article 15 tomorrow, we have to use that period, how are clear majority, voted to leave, that we have to use that period, how are we going to build a consensus to get isa clear majority, voted to leave, that is a mandate that we must respect a deal through? and an instruction that we must deliver. it is also the case that at
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we going to build a consensus to get a dealthrough? how long we going to build a consensus to get a deal through? how long will that require and will the eu grant it?|j the last general election both can't speculate. yes you can. i can't speculate. yes you can. i can't tell you the answers. the eu principal parties stood on have said the indication as they ma nifestos principal parties stood on would grant an extension but they manifestos that pledge them to have to know what it is for and how deliver our departure from the it will be used. there is still a european union. it is vitally important that we honour that consensus it will be used. there is still a consensus to be found across the house but it will take time. if ma nifesto there is a short extension, is that important that we honour that manifesto promise, those preparing for not having an instructions, and our democracy and agreement or trying to get the those outside this house who sent us agreement or trying to get the agreement through, or further negotiations on the agreement? if it here to act on their way land to isa deliver that mandate will take a negotiations on the agreement? if it is a longer agreement extension, it has to be longer. if no deal is off very, very dim view of those who the table, as i don't expect an is seek to frustrate, deny or dilute the table, as i don't expect an is the vote tomorrow as you say. but the mandate that we were given. i am those who perhaps would have said we more than happy to give way.” favour a no deal and they would have to refocus, will they refocus on the mandate that we were given. i am more than happy to give way. i thank my fight —— right honourable friend theresa may's deal and then on that for giving way. will he agree with basis does she say i will give this one more go, she could bring it back me that the successful vote leave campaign of which he was part made next week? i think she might try to bring it back again, probably after clear during the referendum campaign the european council meeting next that one of its primary objectives week, just in care there would be any death in case there would be any in winning the campaign would be to
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further movement, though the eu said deliver an exit from the eu with a that would be unlikely. i honestly don't know, i find it a curious deal in an orderly fashion? my situation that a number of us who did not complain to leave the european union have voted for an honourable friend is absolutely agreement last night that doesjust right and honourable friend is absolutely rightandi honourable friend is absolutely right and i should also take this that, and the people who wanted to opportunity to pay tribute to his leave the european union have not voted for the agreement. i consistent championing of eu understand why and i hear what they citizens in this country. but it is say and all the rest of it, but if the case that the vote leave they don't do that, then they will campaign made clear that it was find article 50 has been extended andl seeking a mandate to leave the find article 50 has been extended and i think you are right, that is house of commons probably will buy a european union and to conclude a free trade deal with the eu. that majority take no deal off the table, the question is whether they vote to was the explicit aim of the campaign ta ke the question is whether they vote to take no deal of 29th of march on the and it is the policy of this government and i am happy to give table, or whether it is no deal way to the right honourable whatever. or are we a step closer to gentleman. might i suggest that if another referendum ? whatever. or are we a step closer to another referendum? there is no we gentleman. might i suggest that if doubt the people who are going to we do which to get an orderly brexit ta ke doubt the people who are going to take no deal off the table tonight and want to extend article 50, a around the prime minister's deal, numberof them want and want to extend article 50, a number of them want there to be a second referendum. for various one way of doing that would be to invite him and his colleagues to reasons i don't think that is a wise vote for the motion by the member for meriden, which will take off the course to take. there is in a table a crashing out of the european
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union, which will maybe convince majority of that by any means. going some of his friends that is no back to the spring statement, what the country needs, what businesses needis the country needs, what businesses need is 70, and the second referendum is not going to create longer an option and if we are to that certainty. what this country deliver on our promise, the only way needsis that certainty. what this country needs is certainty, we have been hearing that for two years plus and we can we are on deliver on our promise, the only way we can deliver on our promise is the hearing that for two years plus and we are on day one after the prime ministerup we can deliver on our promise is the prime minister up the sd land might he consider when we will have referendum result. no nearer. ijust another opportunity when we are not going to crash out, considering voting on the prime minister of of wonder about theresa may's approach the stl again? i will go on to say a as you backed it last night. do you think she made a fundamental error with the red lines, and they are going to have to be moved? i'm little bit about the amendment as it afraid i do, setting red lines so early on in a negotiation and then stands. but one thing that we should not being prepared to revisit their all be clear is that the only way to makes it very difficult, i think, to achieve a compromise or to achieve a ensure that we take no deal off the negotiated outcome. how, ithink achieve a compromise or to achieve a negotiated outcome. how, i think the prime minister has not shown any table is either to revoke article inclination to revisit some of the 50, which would dishonour the fundamental red lines, and i think mandate, or to deliver a deal and thatis has the right honourable gentleman fundamental red lines, and i think that is what we are looking for knows, the deal that the prime tomorrow, for a very clear steer minister put before this house last from the government. but it won't be night which sadly did not command a majority, allows us to leave the from the government. but it won't be from her. i am afraid to say i am on
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european union in an orderly fashion re cord from her. i am afraid to say i am on record as well that if she lost the ina way european union in an orderly fashion in a way that honours the democratic re cord record as well that if she lost the re co rd la st record as well that if she lost the record last night and the votes mandate and also preserves our tonight and tomorrow go against her, i think the cabinet or other senior economic advantages and it is much to the regret of people outside this people in the cabinet will have to have a conversation about whether her position is tenable. on monday? house that we were not able to command a consensus for it there.” she might say i hear what you say, am grateful to him for giving way. we will change and do something else but it is difficult to predict. but he seems to be making a speech about they will have to have a conversation it has to be in the la st he seems to be making a speech about last night's to bite instead of next few days. we haven't got very tonight. —— debate. can he imagine long before the 29th of march. thank you for coming, nicky morgan. vicki if he was the prime minister, coming to the house and having a vote of young is in the houses of parliament and once again, ratherfutile this importance are the government not having an opinion on whether atmosphere. that's right, a lot of their own not having an opinion on whether theirown members not having an opinion on whether their own members should vote for or against it? the honourable gentleman excitement about philip hammond, the has a wonderful cheek in saying that end of his statement there, about the economic situation, he talked of i was speaking about the events of course about brexit, and rejection last night when he sought to of that deal last night being a intervene on me in the very first second of my own speech. perhaps he cloud hanging over the economy and suggesting that if a deal was to go through, they could be a brexit has pretensions to clairvoyance. i dividend, which basically involves him potentially splashing loads of have none, so i do not know what my cash on public services, so a bit of right honourable friend will ask.
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a message to mps. but then right at the end, far from talking about the sadly, in his undoubted wisdom, the econon'iy, the end, far from talking about the economy, he moved on to talk about speaker did not select the amendment brexit in more detail. this is what he had to say. in my name which instructs the government to keep no deal on the table during negotiations with the eu. will my right honourable friend prefer it to be the policy of the government to keep no deal on the table, otherwise how else will leap we table, otherwise how else will leap well, he didn't say anything there we get a better deal? the motion obviously, sorry about that, we don't seem to have that, but what he did say was all of the people in makes it clear that we do not believe that we should leave on parliament had a solemn duty in the march the 29th without a withdrawal days ahead to put aside their agreement. but it does not take the differences and seek a compromise on option of no deal off the table which the house can agree in the because as i underlined earlier, the national interest. lots of people saying that is him basically saying only way in which that can be done theresa may's deal is dead, now it comprehensively is in agreement to a is time for parliament, in a deal and my right honourable friend cross—party is time for parliament, in a cross— party manner, is time for parliament, in a cross—party manner, to get together wa nts to deal and my right honourable friend to find some kind of solution. he wants to make a point. there is also urged mps to take an imminent going to be a choice in the end no also urged mps to take an imminent no deal off the table, because he said it would be bad for the between the prime minister's vision of brexit and the leader of the econon'iy. said it would be bad for the economy. i am joined said it would be bad for the
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economy. iamjoined by said it would be bad for the opposition. the leader of the economy. i am joined by the conservative mp peter bone. i opposition's vision is to remain in presume you won't be voting to take a single market and customs union no presume you won't be voting to take no deal off the table tonight?|j and maintain free movement of union. in no sense that honours the shall no deal off the table tonight?” shall be supporting conservative party policy that no deal is better thana mandate. my honourable friend makes party policy that no deal is better than a bad deal and i am very surprised that the chancellor had said what you have just quoted, an admirable point. the leader of because he seems to be going against the opposition is not in his place government policy. that seems wrong. today. i note also that in a point of order last night he did not refer to the newly adopted policy of theresa may's motion tonight is embracing a second referendum, which saying no deal should not happen at is now labour's position. to add to least on 29th of march.” saying no deal should not happen at least on 29th of march. i don't the incoherence of the labour party think it does say that. it does say position in saying they want to be that, it also adds it is the default ina single position in saying they want to be position, but she is making it clear in a single market and customs union that no deal on 29th of march will and to accept free movement, they not be government policy of that also want to overturn the promise goes through. what she is saying she they have made two are not the wants a deal before 29th of march referendum mandate and not to bring and if we don't get a deal we will forward a second referendum. i'm be coming out on a no deal basis. that is what the motion says. be coming out on a no deal basis. that is what the motion saysm be coming out on a no deal basis. that is what the motion says. it is afraid that the labour front bench not what it says. it says on 29th of are letting this country down and march no deal will not happen and she says no deal will remain if more importantly, letting their voters down. i will accept more there is then an extension of article 50. i'm sure you know better interventions in due course. as a
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about what parliament is saying then ido... about what parliament is saying then result of the house's failure to i do... that is how it has been explained to us by government. that agree to the deal that the prime is absolute rubbish, it is not what minister presented last night, we is absolute rubbish, it is not what is on the order paper. you will vote now face a number of unattractive for the motion? i don't think i said choices and it is important that the house realises that all of these that. i am for keeping no deal on the table. there are a number of choices are less attractive than amendments that will be voted on support for the deal that the prime before that, and one of those minister negotiated. we can choose amendments is something called the asa malthouse compromise, which brings minister negotiated. we can choose as a house to leave without a deal. conservative mps together to vote for a way forward, and i will be but there are significant economic supporting that. where you think political and constitutional that has a chance of going through? challenges if we do embark upon that cause, which i will go into a just a 0h, absolutely. it is also an second. we could accept a deal less amendment that has support from the dup and from labour benches, so we have every chance of getting it attractive than that which the prime minister secured and as my right through. when it comes to the deal, honourable friend pointed out, it is philip hammond is saying mps should the case that there are many people vote for the deal, the one that you in this house who would have us voted against last night. you voted leave the european union in a way against it, yet there are many that does not honour the referendum mandate and does not honour the including philip davies, nadine ma nifesto mandate and does not honour the davies —— nadine dorries, your manifesto promises at the last general election. doing that would fellow brexiteers, who voted for it, not only circumscribe this country's
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you didn't, why not? it was defeated sovereign right to make decisions on its own interest, it will also by 149 votes to the house of undermine faith in democracy. but we commons, a huge defeat, following three are talking about eroding the previous defeat of 230 votes. faith in democracy, then either frustrating the vote altogether by revoking article 50 or seeking to clearly a sizeable number of conservative mps voted against it because we don't believe the overturn it with a second referendum, those would be choices proposal put forward by the prime minister delivers brexit. but david of far greater magnitude and to my mind, far more damaging. and i am very happy to give way to the right davies thinks it does, so how do we honourable lady. thank you for as observers understand that two people, you both agree on the same thing, brexit, he thinks it does giving way. the cat is now out of deliver brexit. i don't think he the bag, mr speaker, on his own does think that, i think he thinks thatis admission, this motion does not take does think that, i think he thinks that is a way forward, and later on no admission, this motion does not take no deal off the table. i will be we that is a way forward, and later on we might get brexit. i disagree with that and i think we need to get guided by you but my understanding brexit now. if tomorrow parliament was at the dispatch box, this house voted to extend article 50 to delay was at the dispatch box, this house was givena was at the dispatch box, this house was given a guarantee that today, we brexit, how you feel about that? would have the opportunity to take voted to extend article 50 to delay brexit, how you feel about that7fi depends, if the malthouse compromise no would have the opportunity to take no deal off the table. would the is passed, it calls in that for a delay until 22nd of may so i think
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honourable gentleman not only we delay until 22nd of may so i think we have to wait to see how the votes confirm that, mr speaker, but also ta ke we have to wait to see how the votes take place tonight and what happens. inform us of this, is it the case that the government is offering a lam quite take place tonight and what happens. i am quite happy to compromise on free vote on the amendment that mr something that will deftly get us out of the european union with an speaker has called which i believe his amendment f, in the name of the end date and something that clearly right honourable gentleman for will unite conservative mps. aren't ashford, and yet it is whipping you concerned the prime minister doesn't seem to be in control of the brexit process, and that it does look like mps might try to seize against the amendment a, laid in the control of her? oh, ithink name of the right honourable lady look like mps might try to seize control of her? oh, i think the prime minister is in control of the for meridian? they do not want to government, i think the government is in control. if there was an attempt by parliament to set up an hear it but it is a shameful carry on alternative government, effectively an alternative prime minister, that hear it but it is a shameful carry on whena hear it but it is a shameful carry on when a former chairman of the clearly would be unacceptable to the prime minister and the cabinet and conservative party is with against they would have to take swift action to the extent she will not push that to deal with it, which i guess if that happened, and i don't think it amendment to the vote. this house will be denied the chance to take no would happen, i don't think that deal off the table. that is the process would happen in parliament, truth of it, isn't it? the right but if it did i'm sure the honourable lady is a distinguished parliament —— the prime minister criminal barrister and now i know would say i can't have this and we would say i can't have this and we what it is like to be cross—examined would have a general election. you are hoping she will adopt the by her but i also understand why
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malthouse compromise, so far she has lawyers are paid by the hour. not shown any indication she will. may i asked about her at pmqs and she did not say whether she would or wouldn't. do you think she is showing enough leadership?” wouldn't. do you think she is showing enough leadership? i think she is showing leadership, but obviously i want her to go in a iam going certain direction. the most i am going to... i am going to... important thing for the prime minister is she takes lots of strip point of order, anna soubry. mr sills and gets better soon. peter bone, thank you very much indeed. speaker, it is debatable as to lots of mps really urging the prime whether i was ever a distinguished memberof the bar whether i was ever a distinguished member of the bar but i can tell the minister to go lots of mps really urging the prime right honourable gentleman as a ministerto go in memberof the criminal lots of mps really urging the prime minister to go in different right honourable gentleman as a member of the criminal bark, we were directions. she can't please all of never member of the criminal bark, we were never paid by the hour when i was at them of course. vicki young in the the bar. in fact, repeatedly, i central lobby in westminster. what do people think of the continuing worked pro bono, as many criminal deadlock? 0ur correspondence fiona barristers have to do, and his cats! trott has been to hartlepool, which voted strongly to leave in the referendum to gauge opinion there. —— under his cats! another morning when nobody knows what the day will hold. paul thompson runs i don't think we should get into a restaurant in hartlepool. it trains and employs young people from disadvantaged backgrounds. that. let's focus on the terms of the debate. the secretary of state. in this town, some 70% voted leave. the things that people really
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want to know in towns like hartlepool are things like, you know, are my gas bills going to go up and down? i believe that is what is known as a what's going to be refresher. but thank you. not at the cost of utilities? what are food costs going to be? we want to know what the real impact this stage. not at this stage. just is going to be to people like us. the things like borders and unions to clarify briefly, the point and that are very abstract proposals for a lot of everyday people. concerning the right honourable what will the reaction be in this town if we don't leave member, can be minister confirm it the eu on march the 29th? is the government's position that we if politicians don't listen to that very strong are ruling out leaving on march the message that was sent out, particularly from towns in the north, there will be 29th with absolutely no arrangements at all? we are ruling out the absolute chaos and anarchy. complete collapse of all our legal and trading arrangements with the in this butcher's shop, there's disappointment in mp5. continent which we have built up i just think the politicians over the last 50 years? yes, and i are acting like a pack of schoolkids in the playground, fighting and bickering amongst each would not use exactly the same other, backstabbing. language but his point is correct. and at the end of the day, the motion commits the government they need to get their heads down not to leave on march the 29th and get the job done. and for this customer, without a withdrawal agreement. i a complete change of heart. hope that is clear and unambiguous. brexit should be abolished. it should be just stopped now. the also —— it also makes clear that because what they told us the default position in law is that at the beginning has all been a pack of lies. we do leave the european union it's never going to end.
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u nless we we do leave the european union so cancel it. unless we can secure a cent to here at hartlepool marina, withdrawal agreement and that is why they are restoring the coronia, a ship which has historic ties do so disappointing that we did not with europe, and evacuated 900 soldiers from dunkirk secure. . . do so disappointing that we did not secure... we did not secure a during the second world war. mandate last night. i will give way first of all to the right honourable how do you want your gentleman and then to my right mp to vote today? i want him to vote honourable learning friend. could he for a hard brexit. now we need to come out now, honourable learning friend. could he now attempt to answer the question of the honourable member and explain because we have had two and half years of negotiations and it hasn't got us anywhere. the media reports, given the prime i agree totally with minister last night promised free what eric hasjust said. we just want to leave. votes on... yes, she did. don't let's leave now. back in 2016, people shake his head. free votes at the in this town wanted to set sail on a new adventure. dispatch box last night, can he but like these boats, explain the reports that she has they're not going anywhere yet. fiona trott, bbc news, hartlepool. quoted that the amendment in the name of the honourable member for ashford will be a free vote on the conservative benches but the amendment in the name of the and coming up on bbc ask this — honourable member for meriden will at 16:30 today trade expert, david hening and our chris morris be whipped against? that is an from bbc reality check will be absolute disgrace and in bad faith answering your questions on brexit to this house. if only the labour trade tariffs and explaining exactly what is going on in the commons today. party would give its own members a free vote and then we could find out
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so if you're confused what they really think. it seems to and what some help understanding these latest developments then please send your questions in to us. you can text — 61124 me that the difficulty which may be or email: askthis@bbc.co.uk of tweet us on #bbcaskthis arising across the house is this, if the house passes this motion this evening andl the house passes this motion this evening and i shall be... i have no reason not to support the motion in tonight at 7pm the terms of ruling out no deal, it andrew neill presents, live from westminster, must of course follow from that that as mps prepare to vote in orderto must of course follow from that that in order to achieve that, two things on whether to rule out leaving have to happen, firstly we need to the european union on 29th march without a deal. get an extension to article 50 and secondly we were going to have to you can watch it on the bbc news channel and bbc two from 7pm, make a change to primary legislation follow it on bbc news online, in the withdrawal agreement act and and hear it on radio 5 live. i assume that the government is undertaking if this motion is passed in its own terms that it will do let's get the latest business news. exactly that. i am very grateful actually to my right honourable learning friend for his point because it does allow me to susanna shooter is in the studio underlined it is absolutely correct with a camera not doing as it's told, but if you can still hear that tomorrow the house will have an me...| told, but if you can still hear opportunity of the motion persistent me... ican, told, but if you can still hear me...|can,| told, but if you can still hear me... i can, iwill still be —— tonight we decide how to seek an told, but if you can still hear me... ican, iwill still be there. you are about to come back into extension. an extension is not
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shot, there you are, what is something we can insist upon and business reaction to what the chancellor had to say today? automatically see delivered. it is business reaction to what the chancellor had to say today7m business reaction to what the chancellor had to say today? it is in the gift of the year and it not really easy, is it, trying to requires the assent of all 27 other present a spring statement when of members but of course there will be course economic forecasts are certainly very difficult to predict. an opportunity to debate that further tomorrow. i want to... i but also they are overshadowed by that really big uncertainty of wa nt further tomorrow. i want to... i want to... i want to stress... i will give way... i will give way. of brexit, giving it a vote in the commons on a no—deal brexit is course, sorry. there is a second ahead, but he certainly had a spring in his step in the spring statement. pa rt course, sorry. there is a second part to the question which is tax receipts are higher than equally critical. we are going to forecast. spending on debt interest have... the government will have to is lower and the government will be bring statutory instrument to this borrowing less than predicted, and house to alter the departure date there was a big carrot being dangled set out in the withdrawal act and i when it came to brexit. the assume the government is undertaking chancellor has pledged to spend in those circumstances to do exactly £26.6 billion on boosting the that? the prime minister and others economy if mps vote to leave the european union without a deal. have said that previously. i am happy to place on the record exactly however, he said these spending that commitment. i do want to make a plans were based on a smooth brexit, little progress but they will be time for others to intervene and i and warned a disorderly brexit would deal a significant blow to economic am conscious that others want to activity in the short term. what
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does the city make of this? let's speak. i stressed earlier that if we do choose to leave without a deal on speak to craig earle now, senior march the 29th, they will be market analyst. thank you for coming economic, political and constitutional challenges that this on the programme. what do you make country will face. we are a great of what the chancellor had to say? country will face. we are a great country and we would get through it. the public finances certainly looks we would in due course ensure that to be in better shape, what has the this country is more prosperous, impact been on sterling? there were freer and successful and of course, certainly words of encouragement government has been working hard in order to ensure that we can be from the chancellor. it was also prepared for any eventuality and we can mitigate the risks of leaving without a deal and can i add this stage paid nicola tribute to civil accompanied by a slight downward revision to growth as well. in terms serva nts stage paid nicola tribute to civil se rva nts a cross stage paid nicola tribute to civil servants across government to have of the impact on sterling, it has been working exceptionally hard and with great skill in order to ensure been relatively muted. we have seen sterling on a positive trajectory we are ready for any eventuality. we generally today, and there we have don't often enough a tribute to civil servants in this house in actually seen on the back of the diameter sure that across this house brexit story that has been eve ryo ne diameter sure that across this house everyone will recognise how important their work is, but i developing, but the impact of the actual statement itself has been stress that work is work to mitigate quite minimaland actual statement itself has been quite minimal and that is pretty typical of this. this was more of an the challenges. if you were to leave on march the 29th without a economic summary but there were a withdrawal agreement, we will be few exa m ple economic summary but there were a treated as a third country by the
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few example announcements on a £3 european union and that would mean that we would face tariffs on many billion affordable homes scheme. was that what house—builders were hoping of our products and i am acutely for order they want something more? aware that some of the highest and most severe tariffs would be imposed i think this was a bit of a loose on food. we would face our sheep commitment at this stage and it is still quite a small commitment, and the fact people are looking at this farmers and beef farmers would face, is still being a situation whereby if we left on march the 29th, the it is depending on the outcome of insta nt if we left on march the 29th, the instant imposition of tariffs of at this boat and whether we get a least 40%, in some cases more than smooth transition as well, that is also quite important and something people are taking into 100%. their livelihoods and indeed consideration. do you think this is the economic and social health of a real hint that the days of our countryside would face very, austerity are really over or do you think it will really depend on the very challenging circumstances. none outcome of brexit? i think it will of us... none of us can be blithe or heavily depend on the outcome of brexit, something that was very blase about those challenges. more clear in the chancellor's message himself. thank you very much, craig. than that... i am happy to give way and just a second but ijust want than that... i am happy to give way and just a second but i just want to com plete and just a second but i just want to complete this section of the argument. it is also the case that we know there are at least 145,000 businesses in this country that susanna, we've been hearing from the trade with the eu and of course do, boss of ethiopian airlines today on is in the uk but don't trade outside boeing. what has he had to say, the eu. as soon as we become a third
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because that investigation begins today, doesn't it? he really did country, they will need to register with hmrc in order to ensure that their trade can continue. they need think that all boeing 737 max eights at least 145,000 of them to secure should be grounded. he also said the the numbers and documentation necessary to trade. at the time of investigation is fully under way, the black boxes have been recovered speaking, only around 50,000 of from the wrecks, which they had to those 145,000 businesses have made those 145,000 businesses have made dig out from underground. it will those preparations. that means a significant number of businesses in this country when we are just over a provide vital clues. did the same fortnight away from the prospect of issue arise as on the lion air leaving without a deal do not flight issue arise as on the lion air flight that crashed in october? soon after that, it was incorrect data have... do not have the wherewithal, collected by a sensor on the aircraft could cause it to nosedive. the means and the appropriate documentation in order to be able to carry on trading. on top of that, it regulators right across the globe including the uk civil aviation is also the case that as well as authority have grounded the plane customs and other checks, products but they are still flying today of animal origin if they are across north america. the us exported to the european union need regulator, the federal aviation authority, maintains the boeing 737 to be checked at a border inspection max eight is say. so let's bit of a post for sanitary checks. a significant amount of our products
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listen as to what the chief goes through the narrow streets and executive said about why he thought crosses from dover to calais or goes through eurotunnel. it is the case of at the moment at the time of aviation administration in the united states did not. they have speaking there is no border inspection post at either of those ports. now, of course, there are gone through the process to certify many things that this government can the aeroplane, so they must have do to mitigate the consequences of no deal but we cannot dictate what good reason to say so, but at the same time, a brand—new aeroplane is the eu's tariffs will be, we cannot instruct the port authorities in france how to order their affairs, having two major fatal accidents in the span of five months, in we cannot compel businesses to different parts of our world. all of acquire the means necessary in order us to trade in the way that they have different parts of our world. all of us who have grounded the aeroplane been doing. all of these... all of have also very good justification. so that investigation is continuing. these are curative costs that businesses would face in the event ofa no now, as well as the ethiopian businesses would face in the event of a no deal exit on march the 29th. accident investigation team leading that, experts from boeing, and also iam of a no deal exit on march the 29th. i am delighted to give way to my idea friend. i thank the secretary experts from the uk's air accident of state for giving way and he is investigation branch will be helping right that the european union does
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that enquiry, so we willjust have to wait and see. but for the moment not have border infrastructure in place to do the inspection checks there is boeing 737 max eight that he mentions but is that why aircraft are still flying right they have perhaps asked us to across north america. thank you very dynamically align our regulations for a period of nine months so that they don't have to carry out those much for that. more now on the main checks during that period? they don't have to carry out those checks during that period7m they don't have to carry out those checks during that period? it is right but dynamic alignment for those nine months would be meaning story. being a rule taken during that more on our main story, and mps will vote later period. it would allow us to be on whether or not to leave the eu without a deal on 29th march. theresa may suffered a second huge registered as a third country, but it would also be the case that they defeat on her withdrawal agreement last night — would be checks on a variety of by 149 votes. where does all this leave british products. i am very happy to give people living abroad? gavin lee has been talking way. of course. i am gratefulto to people in benidorm. products. i am very happy to give way. of course. i am grateful to the i think the government is betraying secretary for giving way. he speaks the british people. they voted to as though there is some distance between him and the tragedy that he come out, they should come out. forget these deals, no one is hasjust outlined interested in a deal, let'sjust get between him and the tragedy that he has just outlined but between him and the tragedy that he hasjust outlined but isn't it the case that he is the author, a senior out and stand on our own two feet. isa out and stand on our own two feet. is a you would be happy now with no author, of the tragedy he hasjust deal, whatever the consequences?” outlined? doesn't author, of the tragedy he hasjust outlined ? doesn't he author, of the tragedy he hasjust outlined? doesn't he feel any sense would be happy with no deal, and i of shame and any sense of live in spain. i could have to go responsibility and shouldn't he back to britain. i'm prepared to do apologise for the mess that we are
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that. they're absolutely disgusting. facing? it is the responsibility of she's tried her best, and the british people have not backed out. those who voted against the is the majority voted to leave, we withdrawal agreement last night... should be leaving, plain and simple. so you are saying regardless of your if the scottish national party had a situation, you want your situation resolved with a second house here careful scotland's industry, but you still want the british out prosperity and farmers, they would of the eu? yes. because the british have voted for the withdrawal agreement last night but i'm afraid people voted for it. i think we when it comes to bloody good should definitely be allowed to have positioning and separatist posturing another vote and then if the vote rather than serious politics, there again goes against her, then i think she should look at resigning. i'd is no equal to the ranks of the prefer she should look at resigning. i'd p refer to she should look at resigning. i'd prefer to be out. i think we are a scottish national party. i am happy strong enough country on our own. i to give way. i thank my round -- think that's it, really. i think we can stand on our own two feet, can't we? so that if you don't really see right honourable friend for giving way once again. he may not be aware itoi. we we? so that if you don't really see ito i. we don't ever we? so that if you don't really see i to i. we don't ever see eye to that authorities at calais say to me eye. if it wasn't for british people that authorities at calais say to me that they will in fact have a border who are in this restaurant, this bar inspection post open at the end of would be closed. do you not think the month and can i urge his department to work with the port in
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that europe needs us more than we need europe? dover, they want to have an inspection postjust dover, they want to have an inspection post just outside the gavin lee getting the view of people. let's catch up with the port, but the restrictive position weather, plenty more to come from means port, but the restrictive position means they have to be inside the port. can he be more flexible? my westminster, from ben rich. department has been flexible and will continue to be flexible and we will continue to be flexible and we will do everything possible to some really strong wind gusts from facilitate trade but as my right honourable friend points out, that storm gareth, 75 mph at campbeltown border inspection post that could be in the west of scotland, but further in place by the end of the month and we hope it could be in place by the south, liverpool for example saw a end of the month is not in place gust of 62 mph. this is the now. i am very happy women are happy satellite picture, showing the swirl to give way. he knows as i do just of cloud that is storm gareth, now beginning to slide away eastwards but notice out in the atlantic more how important agriculture is to this country and the jobs it creates. weather systems are gathering. so this is not the end of things. there will be further bouts of windy and would he agree with my assessment rather wet weather. through the rest that any member who reports to of this afternoon, then, storm gareth continues to slide into the understand or support farming in north sea. behind it though, still their constituencies can in no way quite a lot of white lines, isobars, support leaving the european union without a deal? obviously there are on this chart. for the end of the
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afternoon it will remain pretty a diversity of views in this house but i do agree with my honourable blustery, wind gusts in excess of 40 friend that it is in the interests mph in some places, and then notice and it is one of the reasons why i our next weather system waiting in the wins, beginning to bring rain am making the arguments at this dispatch box now. it is in the across northern ireland and western scotland. as we go through this interests of british farming and our evening and tonight, we will bring broader environment that we do not those outbreaks of rain south—eastwards, some of the rain leave on march the 29th without a will be quite heavy, and accompanied deal. now, there are... iam once again by some strong and gusty leave on march the 29th without a deal. now, there are... i am going to make a little more progress. there are also political challenges winds. temperatures overnight generally holding up between five in leaving on march the 29th without and 9 degrees. so we get on into ideal. as was pointed out, during tomorrow, and we start the day with the referendum campaign, we argued this next frontal system, pretty that we should leave with a deal. i heavy burst of rain sinking south—eastwards, though the main am also conscious that while the body of the rain will have cleared mandate we had was clear, it was from most areas by the rush hour. also the case that with a 52 — 48 then we see some spells of sunshine but also some showers, some heavy result, we do need to take account and thundery, still with some fairly of the hopes and concerns of those blustery winds, wind gusts again people who did not vote to leave the between 45 and 55 mph across some european union. and the prime parts of the uk. notice across the minister of yes deal does that. more far south—west it is likely to stay than that. there have been many pretty cloudy through the day, and rain will return here later on. people who voted remain, including temperatures between nine and 13 in this house, colleagues of mine in degrees. during thursday nights we my party and other parties, who bring outbreaks of rain
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north—eastwards across the uk, a wet accept the result and wish us to leave and to honour that mandate but start on friday morning, and the they do not want us to leave on rain tending to fizzle as it works march the 29th without ideal. it its way towards the south—east. would inevitably be the case that they would be political strains and behind that a mixture of sunny pressures consequent on leaving on march the 29th without the deal. which none of us as ministers can afford to ignore. more than that... more than that... it is also spells and showers, some will be important to stress that there are significant constitutional challenges as well. it is the case. wintry and once again it will be it is the case that a majority of windy, it could be very windy indeed voters in scotland voted to remain across the north and scotland, is this steep area of low pressure in the european union and ava pushes through. you guessed it, another one waiting in the wings, jollity —— majority of voters in another one waiting in the wings, another potentially quite deep northern ireland did but we voted as lowest winging its way into one united kingdom and we voted to saturday. that will bring some wind and rain, but for some, saturday. that will bring some wind and rain, but forsome, particularly the over high ground in the north, leave. it is striking that since it could bring some snow. that vote, support for the union in scotla nd that vote, support for the union in scotland has risen. it has risen. well, i think you only need to look at the ranks of scottish conservative mps. .. who
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at the ranks of scottish conservative mps... who turfed out the partition as part—timers of the snp. to see which way the tide was flowing. and they don't like it up them. iam more flowing. and they don't like it up them. i am more than happy... to give way to the honourable lady. thank you, mr speaker. i am grateful to the secretary of state for giving way. the secretary of state will be well aware, as will other members, that we have not had a functioning assembly in northern ireland for over two years. we have had no ministers in northern ireland for over two years. and so this house must give due weight to the warning, serious warning, that was issued la st serious warning, that was issued last week by the head of the northern irish civil service of the great consequences for northern ireland if there is a no—deal
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brexit. the honourable lady is absolutely 100% totally right. of course, it is up to this house to ta ke course, it is up to this house to take that decision but it is the case whatever the position in scotla nd case whatever the position in scotland and i do believe that if we left without ideal, it would impose additional pressures on our precious union. it is also the case that they would be particular pressures... no, tickle a pressure if we left without ideal on march the 29th in northern ireland. northern ireland has been without a devolved government for two years without a devolved government for two yea rs now without a devolved government for two years now and in the absence of the stormont institutions, we have introduced legislation and guidance which empowers northern ireland civil servants, to continue to take decisions that are in the public interest. that arrangement is sustainable at the moment but of course, it is the sincere hope of myself, my colleagues in government andi myself, my colleagues in government and i believe almost everyone across the house that we can restore the northern ireland executive. it is
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also clear the current situation with no executive would be very, very difficult to sustain in the uniquely challenging context of a no deal exit. we in the circumstances the house has voted for a no deal would have to start formal engagement with the irish government about further arrangements for providing strength and decision—making in the amount of that outcome, and that would include the very real possibility of imposing a form of direct rule. now thatis imposing a form of direct rule. now that is a grave step, and experience shows us it is very hard to return from that step, and it would be especially difficult in the context of no deal. i'm grateful to him for giving way but he will be aware of the written ministerial statement of the northern ireland secretary today, which affords frictionless trade to the republic of ireland in terms of ta riffs the republic of ireland in terms of tariffs and no checks. if that is the basis of no deal, why can't that
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be the basis of a deal? it is the case that my right honourable friend hasissued case that my right honourable friend has issued a written statement and it is the case that those provisions seek to minimise the consequences of no deal but it's a temporary arrangement. it could potentially be openin arrangement. it could potentially be open in the future to legal challenge. to put it at its highest, it isa challenge. to put it at its highest, it is a suboptimal arrangement. it's a reflection of the hard work of the northern ireland civil service and my right arm or friend the secretary of state that we will do everything we can to minimise frictions and checks at the border in order to underpin the importance of commerce and peace in ireland but it is not and peace in ireland but it is not an arrangement which any of us can look at and regard as one that is genuinely sustainable or ideal. i will be happy to give way to all of my honourable friends.” will be happy to give way to all of my honourable friends. i would like to thank my right honourable friend for giving way and he is making a very clear case for why leaving without a deal at the end of this month brings such uncertainty. could he give more clarity on how he sees
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the time could be used during an extension? if the house decide tomorrow what type of extension it believes is appropriate i think the most important thing we can do is rally behind a withdrawal agreement which ensures that we can preserve not just the strength which ensures that we can preserve notjust the strength of our economy but the gains of leaving the european union but it is also the case that civil servants are working incredibly hard to make sure we can mitigate all consequences. i will give way to her in a second, but first of all... i am grateful to the minister for giving first of all... i am grateful to the ministerfor giving way. first of all... i am grateful to the minister for giving way. the written ministerial statements bearing on ta riffs ministerial statements bearing on tariffs table this morning are very welcome and in particular the zero tariff for goods travelling north — south on the island of ireland. what discussion has he had with dublin in relation to tariffs for goods travelling south— north because he
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will appreciate, given the importance of agri— food in northern ireland, the potential grave disadvantage in the event of no deal for agriculture in northern ireland. he makes a very important point. of course i spoke to the minister responsible, michael creed, but there are additional challenges that agriculture and food processing in northern ireland would face in the event of an ideal scenario on march 20 night and i will give way to the memberfor east 20 night and i will give way to the member for east surrey and any right honourable member for pontefract and castleford. is being incredibly generous with his time. the view of business is that no deal should be taken off the table and given that those of these benches know that our pa rty‘s success those of these benches know that our party's success and country's success is based on backing thejob creators and wealth creators, how does he think the conservative party of the 19805 would look at our response to business at the moment.
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i'm fortunate enough to speak in this house after the chancellor of exchequer gave his spring statement, in which he underlined the fact that this country has had the longest period of uninterrupted growth of any g20 economy but we have a faster growing economy and predicted to have a faster growing economy than italy, germany and japan and it is also the case we have a record number of people in work and real wages are rising. so under the leadership of the chancellor and the prime minister, i think anyone nostalgic for the 19805 actually, what we have one smile is economic success delivered by the conservative government but in the national interest at first but i will give way and then make progress. he is making a very strong argument against no deal and about the damage it would cause. the purpose of having these votes today and tomorrow it was to establish the default position, that if we don't have a deal in place, and we don't have a deal in place, and we don't have a deal with a majority behind it in this house, in place, what with the default position be for on
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march the 29th? could he please clarify. it's not clear from the motion. could he please clarify his position on this, if there is no deal in place by the 29th of march, does he agree that the default position cannot be to simply leave without a deal. that's exactly what the motion today is designed to that is why i hope that people will support it. i wanted to stress that in underlining all of these challenges, and by emphasising we are doing everything we can to mitigate them, it is not the case, andi mitigate them, it is not the case, and i made this point early and i wa nt to and i made this point early and i want to underline it for the benefit of all, it's not the case we are taking no deal off the table. the only way that can be done is either to revoke article 50 and decide to stay in the european union, or to conclude an agreement. that is an inescapable fact and that is why we
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face a series of unattractive choices. many of the alternatives that have been put forward would undoubtedly be worse. no. no. it is the case that the labour party is now committed to a second referendum andindeed now committed to a second referendum and indeed there has been no more impressive advocate, no more articulate advocate of that position, than the honourable gentleman. no! no! it never. let me conduct the briefest of tutorials for the benefit of the illustrious chair of the international trade select committee of the house of commons. it is unseemly to the point of being disorderly to try to speak 1's intervention by mouthing it before permission has been given to undertake it. it is a point that is
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so blindingly obvious that, and i often observe, only an extraordinary sophisticated person, could fail to grasp it. secretary of state. thank you very much, mr speaker. and so grateful you are in the chair. the labour party are committed to a second referendum but, but, it is the case that many of their leading spokespeople had made clear what they thought of a second referendum in the past. the shadow education secretary had said that it would be a mistake and would show a disdain for democracy. indeed the shadow foreign secretary, the memberfor islington south, when asked about a second referendum said, no, we don't think that is right. if we went for a second referendum, we would be saying to people, we think you are stupid. we think you made the wrong decision. we are going to do something else. so, now that she
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embraces a second referendum, i'm afraid that the honourable lady, having sneered once at the flag of st george, now confirms that she wa nts to st george, now confirms that she wants to tell the british people that they are, in her view, wrong and stupid. that may be a view popular in islington south, it is not the view of this government, who are determined to honour the vote of the british people and will not dismiss their sovereign decision as either wrong or stupid. no.” dismiss their sovereign decision as either wrong or stupid. no. i will tell you one thing worse thanjeremy corbyn and that's the prospect of an independent scotland with... with the gaggle of part—time partition lists. there is one thing better thanjeremy lists. there is one thing better than jeremy corbyn and lists. there is one thing better thanjeremy corbyn and that is the honourable gentleman.” thanjeremy corbyn and that is the honourable gentleman. i take competence where i can find them, mr
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speaker. the secretary of state —— compliments where i can find them. the secretary of state said previously and today that the house is very good at striking down things that are on the table but very bad at putting forward alternatives. i've noticed in recent days that both of them have been doing exactly the same thing. they spend a lot of time striking down any other opera proposition mentioned across the house but the one they are sticking to has also been decisively struck down more than any other, twice in historic proportions. if we carry on doing the same thing, we are going to get the same result. is he suggesting that he is going to bring the bill back again and again and again, the deal, or is he going to suggest that he is going to show the leadership that is expected of somebody in his position and the prime minister's position, and change course, listen to other propositions and engage with people who are trying to compromise? well,
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isaid who are trying to compromise? well, i said before that the honourable gentleman was better thanjeremy corbyn and he proved by his intervention he is much, much better thanjeremy intervention he is much, much better than jeremy corbyn. i intervention he is much, much better thanjeremy corbyn. i don't agree with him on everything but i think it's right we had dialogue across this house. we are in an uncomfortable position. i was a supporter and enthusiastic support of the prime minister's deal. it commanded more votes last night than it did the first time of presentation. but it did not command a majority in this house. that is why it is our response ability, all of our responsibilities, yes, to listen, yes to reflect, but also to recognise that none of us can dodge choices and the choices in front of this house as a result of the decision not to endorse the prime minister's deal night are unattractive and i have laid out just how unattractive some of them are. there is another proposition that has been put forward.” apologise, point of order, angela
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eagle. thank you. the secretary of state has just made it clear that the government's intention is to keep putting the same deal back to the house over and over and over again, even though it has been decisively defeated twice now, possibly ad infinitum. isn't that out of order? there are historical precedents of the way in which such matters are regarded, i don't need to treat them now and no ruling is required now is not then they lay people who have an opinion about it, i'm not preoccupied with that, but i really would be made about the matter at the appropriate time and i'm grateful to her for reminding me that such a ruling might at some point in the future be required. for the benefit of the right honourable lady, i'm simply making clear that asa lady, i'm simply making clear that as a result of last night's vote, we
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face a series of unpalatable choices. the government has put forward a motion tonight, which i hope honourable members and right honourable members will support, and that would ensure we do not leave on march 20 night without a deal but this house has to decide, it has to decide what it once and that's why i agreed with the honourable gentleman. this house has been very good at saying no and insufficiently statesman—like in supporting the prime minister in her efforts. it is now make your mind up time for this house. it is critical that members on all sides respond appropriately. i will give weight to the chairman of the exiting the european union select committee. i'm grateful to the secretary of state for giving way. can he explain to the house why it is democratic to keep bringing back to the hausa proposition that has been overwhelmingly defeated on two occasions, on the one hand, but on the other hand it is somehow undemocratic to suggest that british people should be asked when they wa nt to people should be asked when they want to change their mind? i.2 macro things out. the proposition put for the house last night was
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significantly different from the proposition put before the house beforehand. laughter i think the honourable gentleman, the memberfor i think the honourable gentleman, the member for brent i think the honourable gentleman, the memberfor brent north, taxes me about stupidity and i will return to his comments in due course. the key thing is, it was different but we didn't secure support for it. the house has to decide but it is the case, and i respect the right honourable gentleman as he knows very much, but it is the case was the official position of his front bench not to endorse a second referendum. they have done what might inelegantly be called a flip—flop or a u—turn and i was pointing out to the house the nature of that flip—flop and u—turn. no, no, no. yes, absolutely. he is very kind. he keeps saying that if we
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reach march 29 we are not going to leave unless we have a deal and then he has been considering the alternatives because doing nothing means we will have to have a no deal by law to stop the one he keep suggesting is revoking. is that because we can seek an extension if this house by then had some idea of what it is seeking an extension for? but the eu might refuse it. is he prepared to contemplate, is that the government's position that if the eu refuses an extension, we will revoke it, no doubt with the intention of invoking it later, once this parliament and the govan have decided what it is we are seeking for ourfuture? —— decided what it is we are seeking for our future? —— the decided what it is we are seeking for ourfuture? —— the government had decided. what we cannot do is revoke article 50 and then invoke it later. that is why we need to come to a decision.
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no. no. i will give way to the honourable lady. if the government is serious about engaging with alternatives to the deal we voted on last night, why won't the government grant a series of indicative votes as recommended by the exiting the eu select committee, which i sit on, to determine the will of the house? the honourable lady makes an important point. depending on how the house votes today, we may have an opportunity to vote on that tomorrow, but one thing i think is important is that we as quickly as we possibly can find a consensus.” think the right honourable gentleman
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has got confused between the ruling of the court ofjustice and the preliminary opinion of the advocate general. it was the preliminary opinion of the advocate general that once article 50 was revoked, it couldn't be implemented again, whereas at the court ofjustice's opinion does not say that. given it isa opinion does not say that. given it is a judgment of the highest court in europe, how can i put the record straight as the secretary of state seems to have misunderstood the judgment? the honourable lady has made her point. legal exegesis as between a court and an advocate general is not a matter for the chairandl general is not a matter for the chair and i would go as far as to say that it is well beyond my limited capabilities. i am grateful to the honourable lady for elevating me to to the honourable lady for elevating metoa to the honourable lady for elevating me to a level of progress that i
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cannot express. they want to be in and then out in the same way they wa nt to and then out in the same way they want to be in the european union. we now know that the snp are the hokey coqui party, in, out, shake it all about. i think we have had more than enough. i think we have had more than enough from the collection of circus acts of the scottish national party. the honourable gentleman is a distinguished member and ice honourable gentleman is a distinguished memberand ice hope his point of order is authentic and genuine. as authentic as almost everybody else's. the secretary of state has just said we know what the snp are, what they believe in, what their positions are. on a point of
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order, how can the secretary of state know that if he refuses to engage in the debate, instead simply behaving like a little primary school bully refusing to take proper engagement, hiding behind the big boys you are sitting behind? the secretary of state is invested with psychic powers. i have no way of knowing. my dealings with the secretary of state, i have never regarded him in any way as a bully. he is sometimes insistent upon his point of view but i have never found him remotely pressure rising. dealing with him isn't difficult at all. thank you very much, mr speaker. i am always happy to debate the snp. what i'm not happy to do is to take
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up what i'm not happy to do is to take up time in this house when so many others want to make serious points to be absorbed by self—serving chicanery by those representatives. i wanted to turn to one other proposition that has been put forward as an alternative and that is the position of the official opposition, which isn't shaped by an amendment but is there policy, dutch we should be members of a customs union. but in that customs union, we should be able to offer businesses state aid that we are not able to offer within the eu. that would be illegal. they also say that we should have a voice in that customs union in the eu's negotiation of trade deals. no such voice for any member of the customs union that is not a member of the eu exists. they also say we should have independent trade remedy are separate from those the eu provides. i was a very
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generous to the secretary of state, we all enjoy his rhetorical flourishes and i'm not going to repeat the precise words but he used a little formulation a moment ago which was very, very borderline as far as the procedures of this house are concerned and i will gently say to him that what passes as a muster at the oxford union might not be a cce pta ble at the oxford union might not be acceptable in the chamber of the house. it very much follows on from that. this is a debate about whether this house believes we should leave with no deal and yet the secretary of state has spent now quite some time discussing anything apart from that. ijust wondered if we could get advice about when this debate is actually going to go back onto the terms of the order paper? those addressing the house from the treasury bench, they get a degree of latitude, but i do know what the right honourable lady says and i
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hope contributions will focus on what the debate is supposed to be about four if that were not to happen they would have to be another debate on the matter in order to meet the terms of the commitment that has been given. that might be inconvenient for some people but that debate on that matter will take place and about that there need be no place and about that there need be no doubt on any bench back or front. secretary of state. i hope that i was able to outline earlier some of the real difficulties in leaving without a deal on march 29. it is perfectly open for other members to ta ke perfectly open for other members to take different views on that matter. i hope people will recognise that i have tried to take as many interventions as possible but it is the case that i must now move on in order to hearfrom the principal opposition spokesman and to make sure that as many backbenchers as
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possible have their voice heard. i think it is important that all of us in this house recognise that as a result of the vote last night, there are no easy options, no attractive choices left. i hope in the debate today and inevitably in the debate that follows tomorrow, we all take the responsibilities of representing our constituents as seriously as possible. we all need to recognise that leaving on march 29 without a deal would impose economic, political and constitutional challenges and risks for this country. i therefore think it is important that all of us work across this house and across all divisions to try to seek a consensus that will unite all four nations of the united kingdom and unite all our citizens in making sure that we honour the referendum mandate and we leave the european union in a way that is economically sensible and democratically legitimate. that is why i commend this motion to the
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house. order. just before i call the shadow secretary of state, i have now to announce the results of today's deferred divisions. the ayes have it. in respect we willjust pull out of that before we hear from labour because there are some breaking news on the amendments that have been decided, they have been tabled to go before this motion on a no—deal brexit. vicki young is inside the houses of parliament. what is happening? two amendments have been selected by the speaker, changes to the main motion by the government, won by the conservative caroline spelman. what she was trying to do was to make it clearer that parliament would vote to take no deal off the table at any time,
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so her amendment said, the full text, this house rejects the united kingdom leaving the european union without a withdrawal agreement and a framework for the future relationship, as opposed to the government's one, whichjust relationship, as opposed to the government's one, which just says the house does not want to leave the eu without a deal on march 29. so it was a much bolder amendment. caroline spelman has decided she won't be pushing this to a vote, she is the main sponsor of the amendment. it is theoretically possible someone else could stand up and push it to a vote. it is not usual. normally if the person who has put down the amendment is no longer backing it, then it wouldn't make it to a vote. so it could well be that is not voted on after all. now this is extremely helpful for the government, because there would have been a problem for them, they we re have been a problem for them, they were going to tell their mps they could not vote for that amendment because it is not government policy. there would have been again lots of conservative mps including may be some ministers who would have wanted to back that, take no deal of the
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table at any time, so it would have been a massive headache. it was explained to mejust been a massive headache. it was explained to me just now by one minister saying it is much better that you end up possibly tonight with over 400 mp5 voting for the government's motion to say they don't want any without a deal at the end of march. ok, thank you very much, that breaking news there. let's return to the chamber. sir keir starmer is responding to michael gove in the house of commons, just taking a point of order tojohn barrett, commons, just taking a point of order to john barrett, who commons, just taking a point of order tojohn barrett, who is putting a question to him. of the bank of england had to publicly apologise afterwards. do not rest his case on predictions. economic reality is dictated by comparative advantage such as lower tax rates, more flexible labour markets, and that is why this economy is doing so well despite the prospect of no deal. iam i am grateful. lots of things were said by both sides in the referendum
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which should never have been said. some of them by members who have already addressed the house. one of the things that was said time after time after time, that they will be no consequences for peace on the island of ireland and we have heard today from the dispatch box that a consequence of the government not ruling out no deal is potentially direct rule. that is a major shift in the government's position. does he agree with me that those are now the actualities. . . ? he agree with me that those are now the actualities...? i am he agree with me that those are now the actualities. . . ? i am grateful for that intervention and i will come to the position in ireland because it was and it has been treated casually, as if it is all about a technical question of a line in the road. anybody who has spent any time in ireland over the past
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two years will realise the impact brexit is having on the politics of ireland, going well beyond the technicalities of customs union and single market. that doesn't mean... i was going to complete my answer because i do accept that we have got to deal with the facts as they are but one of my concerns is that because so many things were said in the referendum, there is now a license to pretend that real risks and real outcomes won't happen by simply saying other things didn't happen and that is a real cause for concern. following on from the point made earlier, we are in a situation where the european union is not going to give any deal, there are 16 days to go, and the question a lot of mps need to answer is whether they are going to go for no deal or
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revoking article 50 because that is what is going to come down to. i was in brussels last week and they are fed up of the child and —— childish antics of the uk government. everybody needs to get between no deal and revocation. brexit is a busted flush. i have spent a lot of time talking to officials in brussels and i have been discussing the question of an extension over six months because it occurred to me back then that we would be in this position and i think we will need to address that end tomorrow's debate that, for my part, i have not received the message from brussels that there is no prospect of an extension, quite the contrary. mr speaker, the prime minister used to tell us that no deal would not be the end of the world. pass brexit secretaries even talked up the
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merits of leaving on world trade organisation terms or told us how crucial it was to the negotiations, but on this side we have been steadfast in insisting no deal is not a viable option. why? here it is ha rd to not a viable option. why? here it is hard to know where to begin. first, the economy. the vast majority of businesses and the trading movement speak with one voice and that doesn't happen very often. i have been to meetings with businesses all over the country and i have spoken to trade unions in those meetings all over the country and i have taken all over the country and i have ta ke n notes all over the country and i have taken notes of what they tell me and at the end of those meetings you could almost rev out the identity of who was in the meeting and have the same and that persuades me. i will give way ina and that persuades me. i will give way in a moment. that persuades me they have a good point and a strong case. even today, it was said no
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deal would be a sledgehammer to the economy. frances o'grady from the tuc, said a no—deal brexit ba hammer blow to our communities. a no—deal brexit could be terminal to britain's manufacturing and thousands of jobs. mr speaker, britain's manufacturing and thousands ofjobs. mr speaker, as the son of a toolmaker, i remember when manufacturing was in the doldrums. but now, there has been a revival. manufacturers operate the just—in—time regime which relies on open borders and they do so successfully. no deal poses a huge risk to them. i will give way. he has been talking about what may happen. it is very obvious to me that following his honourable friend's exchanges with the
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secretary of state, the government are intent on bringing the withdrawal agreement back for yet another goal. can i make a small prediction? they will go to the european council on the 20th or the let, european council on the 20th or the 21st, they will plead for some additional concession, however small, they will come back to the uk, rerun maastricht, declared game set and match and then try and persuade the house to vote for it. for 50 quid for help for heroes, i bet the third meaningful vote will bet the third meaningful vote will be on tuesday the 26th of march. will he take my bet?” be on tuesday the 26th of march. will he take my bet? i don't gamble. mr speaker, i will give way. can i thank my honourable friend for giving way. earlier, the minister referred to the hundred and 40,000 also companies that trade
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exclusively with europe and only about 40,000 of them have registered and got their numbers necessary to do so. the business community has pointed out that there is no reason why hmrc could not give them an automatic number, if they are vat registered, and most of them are, and a very —— they are very worried that the government is trying to shift the blame for a chaotic no—deal brexit away from their own lack of support to plain business. in all my discussions in the last three to six months, i have detected that while some of the bigger businesses have had the resource to do some planning for no deal, most of the medium and small businesses say to me, we simply don't have the resources to do it and therefore, we
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haven't done it. which is among the reasons i have always said a no—deal brexit is not a viable option. my honourable friend has said he is not a gambling man but it seems the secretary of state for wales might be. and he is refusing to rule out supporting no deal. if one considers wales, it's agriculture, its manufacturing industry and so much more, that is absolute madness, in my view. does the shadow of second —— shadow secretary agree with me?” do and it is a real cause for concern. i will give way. do and it is a real cause for concern. iwill give way. my constituency voted to leave and i respect the result of the referendum. does my honourable friend agree with me that a no—deal brexit will not be in the interests of my constituents or this country? i don't think a no—deal brexit would
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be in the interests of constituents anywhere in the united kingdom. i do need to make some progress and i am aware others do want to get into this debate. i was dealing with manufacturing and the impact on manufacturing and the impact on manufacturing and the impact on manufacturing and some of the large manufacturers have told us what the impact will be on them. ford were clear it would be catastrophic for the uk auto industry. airbus used similar language. absolutely catastrophic for us, and then honda more recently, if we end up with wto tariffs, we would have something like 10% of costs in addition to products being shifted back into europe. this is not exaggeration. these are companies speaking about their businesses and this will impact on their business and real people's livelihoods will be at sta ke. people's livelihoods will be at stake. you don't even have to... i
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will give way in a moment. you don't even have to take their word, though it isa even have to take their word, though it is a powerful voice, look at the government benches. the honourable memberfor richmond, government benches. the honourable member for richmond, still government benches. the honourable memberfor richmond, still i believe a business minister in the government, said that no deal would be completely disastrous for businesses in this country. no doubt because like me, he has been talking to those businesses. we then took the novel approach by saying i am very happy to be public about the dangers of no deal and very happy if the prime minister decides i am not the prime minister decides i am not the right person to do the business industryjob. the right person to do the business industry job. you've the right person to do the business industryjob. you've course was backed up by the business secretary, who said no deal is fully acknowledged certainly by me and the industry as being ruinous for our prospects. and the government was vs own figures show that no deal would mean over 15 years between nine point —— 9% reduction and every region would be poorer. wales, 8.1%,
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scotla nd region would be poorer. wales, 8.1%, scotland 8% and the north—east of england by 10.5% and anybody who votes tonight to keep nobody on the table needs to explain to their constituents why are taking that risk with jobs and our economy.” will give way. i think he has mistaken the honourable member for richmond with the honourable member for watford. it is important to make that correction. but what businesses are saying to me as their key enemy is uncertainty. and if they don't have certainty over the future, the terms of trade, then investment decisions will be postponed. there is the certainty of those terms of trade on the 29th of march if we leave the european union on that day, either with the prime minister of vs agreement all work —— moving to world trade organisation terms.
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that is absolutely true. absolutely true. in terms of their yearning for certainty and the impact it is having on their decision—making and on investment and i think it should bea on investment and i think it should be a cause of great concern to all of us. none of the businesses i have spoken to and i have spoken to thousands in the last two years have suggested to me that the certainty they want is no deal. they all say to me that they do not want no deal and they normally point out the consequences of no deal. i will give way. he is indeed making the point that the worst deal is no deal. and in his point about manufacturing, would he also agree with me and this has been raised with me as well by the unions, the uncertainty over trade agreements and how we will be
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trading, the trade agreements that other countries have done with the eu, the uncertainty over those is already causing great problems in relation to manufacturing imports and exports and jobs in our constituencies. absolutely. they have real concerns about that and they raise them regularly. mr speaker, i will give way but then i will move on. i have great confidence in him and he is making a very good speech but can i say to him, when this all started, my manufacturing sector was saying surely intelligent people across the benches of this house could come to a relative solution. they have now changed. they are now calling me to push here for a second vote. while, iam push here for a second vote. while, i am grateful for that intervention because it takes me to a point that was repeatedly made by the secretary of state, which is that it is
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somehow somebody else's fault that the deal isn't going through. and that the government doesn't bear any responsibility for failing to bring the house with it. i want to make this point because it is an important point. the government has failed to bring the house behind its deal. and it cannot get away with simply saying that is somebody else's fault. it is not our responsibility, we have done nothing wrong. i want to make this point because it is a really important point. the prime minister and the government had a choice to years ago, they could have invited this house to express a view on the type of deal this house would accept and they refused to do so. repeatedly refused to do so. and anybody in government must have been able to foresee the divisions on their own side. they must have been able to foresee that. and in those
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circumstances, they would have been much wiser to seek the consensus, they may look for now, two years ago, but not having done it, having been blinkered, having read lines that never came, to now say to somebody else's fault, that is not to ta ke somebody else's fault, that is not to take responsibility for their own actions. as the speaker, i am going to make some progress. mr speaker, i have been concentrating on the economic issues but there are wider issues in relation to no deal. northern ireland, the secretary of state spoke about northern ireland and we all know how serious the implications are for northern ireland. it is a risk to the good friday agreement. the government paper makes that clear. i do need to make some progress. the eu exit paperfrom make some progress. the eu exit paper from the government earlier this year said wto terms would not meet the government commitment to
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ensure no ha rdboa rd meet the government commitment to ensure no hardboard between northern ireland and ireland and that cannot be allowed to happen —— hardboard. i don't think this prime minister wouldn't countenance that happening, or the governmental. as we know, intelligence passes across borders in real time every day and it saves real lives. it requires agreements that can only happen subject to agreements with the eu 27. that is the basis for passing that information intelligence but you also need agreement to decide what use you can put to that evidence and intelligence and crucially to plan joint operations. i know that because the five years i was in euro just as the director of public prosecutions, being part of that exercise. and i know how seriously the primaries to takes it because i worked with her when she was home secretary and she knows full well how that saves real lives. —— the
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prime minister. no deal puts that at risk. and no responsible government would take that risk and if they did ta ke would take that risk and if they did take that risk, they wouldn't remain in government for long. i will give way. given what he said a moment or two ago, which was absolutely right, the government's repeated failure to seek consensus the government's repeated failure to seek consensus to the government's repeated failure to seek consensus to get us out of this brexit mess, will you please reaffirm labour are possibly as firm commitment to our policy of supporting a public vote with remain being an option on the ballot paper? mr speaker, i will, being an option on the ballot paper? mr speaker, iwill, because back being an option on the ballot paper? mr speaker, i will, because back in 2017, we made it clear we would respect the outcome of the referendum and we set out in our ma nifesto referendum and we set out in our manifesto what we would seek to negotiate if we were elected into government. and that was to seek an agreement that would have the benefits of the customs union and the single market. but in that ma nifesto we the single market. but in that manifesto we also said that we would
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reject as a party the government's read lines, that we would rip up the white paper and we would reject no deal. we lost. we lost that election but because we lost, we triggered article 50, notwithstanding how we had voted in the referendum, and we allowed the prime minister to start the negotiations. consistent with our manifesto, we conditionally said what deal we would accept when it came back. we have now got to a hopeless end and it is a hopeless end, to lose by 230 votes eight weeks ago, then to lose by 140 89 votes is a hopeless end. and the government cannotjust votes is a hopeless end. and the government cannot just blame votes is a hopeless end. and the government cannotjust blame others for that. they need to look at themselves and ask why that has happened but in those circumstances, both of the things we were rolling out in our manifesto are the only things on the table and that is why
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we support a public vote. to protect against those outcomes and, mr speaker, i am against those outcomes and, mr speaker, iam proud against those outcomes and, mr speaker, i am proud that we are doing that at this stage of the exercise and it is obvious why we need to do so. i am going to... i will give way. we are all grateful for the words that he has given. if such a motion were to be more —— or amendment tabled before this house, what he and his party support now a people's vote and get it going, up and running? mr speaker, the leader of the opposition to weeks ago munday made it clear that we would support an amendment to that end up at one forward for ourselves, obviously timing depends on discussions across the house and with others. but that is the clear position that we put down. mr
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speaker, i do want to press on. i am going to make some progress. i am aware of the people want to come in andi aware of the people want to come in and i am not being rude but i really need to move on. i will, for obvious reasons. thank you, that is very gracious of the right honourable and learned gentleman and no surprise. very characteristic of him. the right honourable and learned gentleman has been a great friend to northern ireland. he has mentioned northern ireland. he has mentioned northern ireland. he has mentioned northern ireland earlier in his comments but didn't spend enough time talking about his assessment of the constitutional risk faced by northern ireland ace, hasn't surveyed, the united kingdom were to leave the european union without a deal. —— if, heaven forbid.” leave the european union without a deal. -- if, heaven forbid. i am grateful for the opportunity to do so. we faced the situation of where
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there is high anxiety in northern ireland and across ireland as a whole, across all communities, and different communities, about the prospect of no deal. because the people of northern ireland know that the open border is the manifestation of peace and there is great concern that if anything happens at that border, it will put back the good work that has happened in the last 20 years. that anxiety and this issueis 20 years. that anxiety and this issue is being debated when some of those elected to this house are not here to make their views they might make on behalf of those that they are voted here to represent and therefore that voice isn't here, i don't say one way or the other what they should do but it is not here in this debate and the executive for northern ireland is not functioning, so the constitutional circumstances that prevail in northern ireland for a variety of reasons and i am not
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casting judgment on them, there could hardly be a worse time to be having this discussion, which has turned into a discussion about the very future of the island of ireland. and that is why i am impatient with those that think that with a drone and a camera you can somehow deal with the issue that is northern ireland. i am going to press on because. . . northern ireland. i am going to press on because... i am grateful for that opportunity in relation to northern ireland. i want to press on to the impact on health. no deal would have a huge impact on our health service and put real strain on an already stretched nhs, disrupting medical supplies, access to medicines and the ability of hospitals to hire staff. nial dixon, the chief executive of the confederation said, no deal and no arrangements to protect patients is simply not acceptable and could put lives at risk. i am going to make
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some progress. farming would also badly hit comedy national you farmers has been clear, i think they set it out this morning, that the proposed tariff regime would be a disaster for proposed tariff regime would be a disasterfor uk proposed tariff regime would be a disaster for uk agriculture, going on to say everything must be done to avoid a no—deal brexit and the catastrophic impact that this could have on british farming. i am not quoting voices here of politicians. iam quoting voices here of politicians. i am quoting the voices of those in the field in each of these areas. finally under transport, and as if the transport secretary didn't struggle enough already, imagine how he would deal with a no deal scenario. but it would bring chaos to transport, hauliers would face hours of delay, new checks should be put in place at borders and family holidays could be jeopardised put in place at borders and family holidays could bejeopardised by put in place at borders and family holidays could be jeopardised by a no—deal brexit. i am going to make some progress. for all those reasons
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and more, labour will act some progress. for all those reasons and more, labourwillact tonight and more, labourwillact tonight and oppose no deal. we support amendment a tabled by my right honourable friends because we believe that is the cleanest and clearest way for the house to express its opposition to no deal. we do recognise... we do recognise that simply opposing no deal is not the end of the story. it is necessary but it is not sufficient. the house needs to have a chance to debate the steps necessary to move forward and i think there is a growing consensus that needs to happen. labour supports a close economic relationship with the eea land as i had just said, we also support a public vote —— with the eu. i will give way. support a public vote —— with the eu. iwill give way. does support a public vote —— with the eu. i will give way. does he agree with me that the difficulty with the government's motion is that it is in
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fact... we have just been government's motion is that it is in fact... we havejust been hearing from sir keir starmer, as mp5 debate whether the uk should rule out leaving the eu without a deal on the 29th of march, after theresa may's withdrawal agreement was defeated last night for a second time. the commons speakerjohn bercow has told mps he's selected two amendments to theresa may's no—deal brexit motion. they are amendment a, tabled by the former conservative minister, dame caroline spelman, which would reject a no—deal brexit at any time and under any circumstances and amendment f, tabled by theresa may's former deputy, damian green, calls for a delay to brexit day from march 29 to may 22 to give more time to prepare for no—deal. it says the government should then offer a "standstill" agreement with the eu and its member states, lasting up to the end of 2021 at the latest, during which the uk would pay into eu budgets and observe legal obligations while the future relationship is negotiated.
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all this after a warning from the chancellor in his spring statement over brexit. he warned that the uncertainty around it, and the vote to reject the eu withdrawal agreement — was casting a "cloud of uncertainty" over the british economy and his most urgent task is to lift it. he said the office for budget responsibility had slashed its growth forecast for 2019 to 1.2%, rather than the 1.6% predicted in last year's budget. here are some other key points from the statement. philip hammond promised a £26.6 billion brexit divided, if mps vote to leave the european union with a deal. police forces in england will receive an immediate £100 million to help tackle a rise in knife crime. and the chancellor also announced a £3 billion "affordable homes guarantee scheme", which will be aimed at building 30,000 affordable homes forfirst timebuyers.
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let's hear now from the chancellor, as he announced that extra funding for police forces in england to deal with knife crime. police funding is due to rise by up to £970 million from april. many police and crime commissioners have already committed to using this extra funding to recruit and train additional police officers. but that ta kes additional police officers. but that takes time. and action is needed now. the prime minister and i have decided exceptionally to make available immediately to police forces in england and additional £100 million over the course of the next year. ring fenced to pay for additional overtime, targeted specifically on knife crime and for new violent crime reduction units to deliver a wider cross agency response to this epidemic. ahead of the spending review, my right
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honourable friend the home secretary will work with the police to consider how best to prioritise resources going forward, including newly funded manpower, to ensure a lasting solution to the problem. in the last hour, our chief political correspondent vicki young has been speaking to the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. i think the proposal of spending now has gone down like a lead balloon. mps think it is just a bribe has gone down like a lead balloon. mps think it isjust a bribe or a threat and if you don't so for us, you won't get any cash spent in your constituency and nobody is going to accept that. it just constituency and nobody is going to accept that. itjust pushes people into corners. that is the first thing. on the policing issue, £80 million of new money, mps were getting up and saying, you have had 2.5 billion from the police, we have lost 20,000 jobs since this government has been in power. again, people are pretty angry that this was a small amount of money for dealing with a huge problem and the
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other issue was this was to deal with the issue around young people that are getting stabbed in the loss of life, there seems to be no understanding from philip hammond or the government, this is notjust about policing. it is in part but it is also about youth services being cut, school exclusions and also about housing as well where people are forced onto the streets. the social fabric of our country has been undermined by austerity for the last when last nine years on the government don't have a clue because they are cut off from the reality of what is going on in our society. isn't he right to say the money will only be spent later once brexit has been sorted out. he needs to leave the head in case there is no deal, he says that will be bad for the economy? of course you need to ensure you have an insurance policy in case there is a no deal but actually that was not the way in which this was posed. it was posed almost as a threat, that is what people felt and it was the same as last week when they brought through
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this money, the town is money, which was a bribe for northern mps to vote for the deal and again, that went down like a lead balloon. it would have been better simply to concentrate today on rolling out no deal and focusing on that and getting into negotiations about a compromise that parliament might be able to carry. that is interesting that philip hammond talked about that. he said that is what parliament should do. it should map a way forward. did you take that as him reaching across the divide to the labour party? i had already said to him in my speech that we should meet and talk about a way forward and we are open to do that and always have been. when he mentioned the word compromise, it seemed as if he was slapped down by number ten within minutes. again, our problem is we don't know who we are negotiating with from one day to the next, one minute to the next, because there are such splits within cabinet and the tory party itself. i welcomed at least he seemed to be looking for a compromise but as i say, the prime minister soon pro —— pulled the rug
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from underneath him. iamjoined by from underneath him. i am joined by tom stevenson. in previous years, this spring statement is a big deal but everything is overshadowed by brexit. absolutely. the chancellor himself said this was a bit of a fiscal nonevent, by which he meant they would not be much in there about tax and spending and he was right on that. he mentioned some of the measures, the £100 million for the police and £3 billion for house—building, but pretty small beer. i do think this was quite a significant spring statement actually but not for the reason that we thought. it is very significantly chancellor should stand up literally next to the prime minister and say the time has come for us to coalesce around what we really want to do. and that i think from our perspective points as towards a softer brexit and i think that is public a good thing for the markets and that is why the markets have taken this in their stride. which is
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interesting, given that more uncertainty, markets hate uncertainty, markets hate uncertainty, we certainly have a lot of that, but you think the prospect of that, but you think the prospect ofa of that, but you think the prospect of a softer brexit will actually calm nerves? i think so. investors are weighing up the properties and this has become quite binary now. the no deal has not yet been rolled out and that clearly would be very bad new for markets but i do think the weight of probably tea is leaning towards a softer brexit of the sides getting together and thrashing out what they really want to now and i think that will be good for markets. when we talk about uncertainty, the idea of going and saying we want more time, doesn't that add to the uncertainty? it does but i think we have got to the situation now where we need more time and where we get with the extension is important. if it is a short extension, i think that causes actually more uncertainty. a longer extension... a month, two months?
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two months running up to the parliamentary elections. we just don't have the time. that is not enough time. we are looking at property a year's extension but it is not in our gift any longer. it is down to the eu. what is the global picture of britain in terms of investment? many overseas investors are frankly look at what is going on and said, you know, i haven't got the bandwidth to really bother to work out what is going on because frankly, the uk is not that important in global market terms and ifi important in global market terms and if i miss out on investments in the uk, it doesn't really matter. there are bigger things going on, the trade wars between the us and china, whether the us is going to raise interest rates actually is more important. and a quick word on the tariff that will be brought in if there is a no deal. i think if you wanted an example of why no brexit would be... sorry, no deal, would be a disaster, it is
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these tariffs. they make sense, in these tariffs. they make sense, in the sense that they reduce the cost... the cost rises for individuals and they protect uk businesses. you can see why they happen. but no business has got any time to do anything about them. it isa time to do anything about them. it is a bit ofa time to do anything about them. it is a bit of a shambles really. thank you so much for waiting. the government has set out the new tariff regime which would come into effect in the case of that no brexit, tariffs are charged on goods and services as they pass between one country and another. britain would slash most tariffs under a temporary scheme, 87% of imports would be eligible for no tariffs. tariffs would be kept to protect some industries, including beef, lamb, poultry and some dairy imports. and the government says that — in the event of a no deal brexit —
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it wouldn't introduce any new checks or controls, or require customs declarations for any goods moving from across the border from ireland to northern ireland — and irish goods entering the northern ireland market would not face any tariffs. the business organisation, the cbi, has given its reaction — describing any no—deal tariff regime as a ‘sledgehammer‘ to the uk economy. the vice—president of the national farmers union, stuart roberts, joins me from his farm in harpenden in hertfordshire. what was your reaction when you saw that list? i think it was very mixed. i think there are elements of it where we are seeing a degree of protection for some sectors but for other sectors, cereals, fruit and veg, other sectors, cereals, fruit and veg, eggs, other sectors, cereals, fruit and veg, eggs, we are seeing no protection. the import tariffs are only one side of the equation, the really important issue is also what happens in terms of our exports, which are very important for some sectors, such as the sheep sector. for us, it is still as it was common no dealfor us is for us, it is still as it was common no deal for us is catastrophic for farming and that has not changed after this morning's announcement.
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there is a suggestion as where it may be bad news for some, there are others who may benefit. i'm not sure thatis others who may benefit. i'm not sure that is entirely true. if we take the sheep sector, the beef sector, we still export large amounts, particularly the sheep sector where we export 40% of our product, and 90 plus percent of that goes to europe. that will face a very large tariff war going into europe. we have also come in tariffs are one thing, we have heard nothing concrete yet, in terms of how we will protect our production standards, so actually discussions around how we import food to lower prices ignores the fa ct food to lower prices ignores the fact that we could also potentially import products to lower standards, and at the moment we have the third most affordable food in the world to some of the highest animal welfare standards, food safety standards, none of that has yet been dealt with. you mention the word affordable, what would it mean for consumers, do you think?”
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affordable, what would it mean for consumers, do you think? i don't think we will see much change, in terms of consumers, in terms of this. and i do say, they have already got the third most affordable, we in the uk, i am a consumer, third most affordable food in the world already. you know, we doa in the world already. you know, we do a greatjob at producing affordable food to some very high standards. a lot of the criticism is focused on the timing of this. here we are, facing a vote tonight on postponing or cancelling a no—deal brexit but only now are they coming forward with these tariff proposals. absolutely, and i think 16 days to go we have been very clear for a very long time now that no deal is catastrophic. none of that has changed, in terms of the announcements we got this morning, and look, the impacts are already happening. i was talking to a serial merchant this morning he was already
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telling me there are no export shipments for malt and barley for april and june —— cereal merchant. we are seeing some commodities's prices starting to drop. the uncertainties having real impacts today on farms around the uk.m uncertainties having real impacts today on farms around the uk. if you could wave that magic wand, what do you want to see happen in the next few weeks? well, what we want to see is we want to see no deal definitely not happening. that has to be a no—no for us. then we need to get a deal that gives us free and frictionless trade with our sing list biggest customer in the world. we need a deal, it needs to deliver free and frictionless trade, that is what i want with my magic one. stewart a nd what i want with my magic one. stewart and your wand, thank you so much. stuart robertsjoining us from harpenden. let's catch up with the
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weather here. ben rich. good afternoon. storm gareth has certainly made its presence felt over the last 24 hours, some really strong wind gusts, the strongest of all 75 mph at campbeltown in the west of scotland, but further south, liverpool for example, saw a gust of 62 mph. this is the satellite picture. it shows the swirl of cloud thatis picture. it shows the swirl of cloud that is storm gareth, now beginning to slide eastwards but no sticks out in the atlantic, more weather systems a re in the atlantic, more weather systems are gathering, so this is not the end of things. over the next few days, there will be further bouts of windy and rather wet weather. so through the rest of this afternoon, storm gareth continues to slide into the north sea. behind it, though, still quite a lot of white lines, isobars, on this chart. for the end of the afternoon it will remain pretty blustery, wind gusts in excess of 40 mph in some places, and then notice our next weather system waiting in the winds, beginning to bring rain. as we go through this evening and tonight, we will bring those outbreaks of rain
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south—eastwards, some of the rain will be quite heavy and accompanied once again by some strong and gusty winds. temperatures overnight generally holding up between five and 9 degrees. into tomorrow, we start the day with this next frontal system, some pretty heavy bursts of rain sinking south—eastwards, though the main body of the rain will have cleared from most areas by the rush hour. and then we see some spells of sunshine but also some showers, some heavy and thundery, still with some fairly blustery winds, wind gusts between 45 and 50 mph across some parts of the uk. notice across the far south—west, likely to stay pretty cloudy through the day and rain will return. temperatures, and during thursday night, outbreaks of rain northwards. again, a mixture of sunny spells and heavy showers, some
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of the showers will be wintry, and once again it will be windy, it could be very windy indeed actually across the north of scotland as this deep area of low pressure pushes through. that clears away but you guessed it, another one waiting in the wings, potentially quite a deep low swinging its way in for saturday first that will bring some rain and some wind but for some particularly over high ground in the north, it could bring some snow. now, let's answer some of your questions on what exactly will happen with tariffs in the event of a no—deal brexit, after the government announced that most imports into the uk would not attract a tariff in a no—deal scenario. with me are chris morris from bbc reality check and david henig — director of the uk trade policy project at the european centre for international political economy think tank. thank you both forjoining us. david, just a quick word on what you
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have made up today, the announcement this morning on tariffs. we have had the spring statement. where are we? these are the tariffs on goods entering the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit. these replace the fa ct no—deal brexit. these replace the fact that at the moment we have tariff free trade with the eu. that will go, by and large, so we have to put our own tariffs in, treat the eu just as every other country, so we have set our schedules today, said what they will be, this only affects imports into the uk, it is not exports from the uk, which the ta riffs exports from the uk, which the tariffs will be set by the eu and other countries. if there is one headline from it, it is of course the irish border. yes, it is a slightly extraordinary and possibly not sustainable solution, because what they have said is that stuff being imported from the republic of ireland into northern ireland would be tariff free but stuff coming from elsewhere, from the european union into northern ireland, would continue to attract tariffs. so the
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obvious question, what is going to stop people taking stuff into dublin, taking up the road to belfast and then after that taking it across into gb and not attracting any tariffs? what the government is saying is that there will be an intelligence led operation to make sure that people stay honest. but it isa sure that people stay honest. but it is a question when we think about the idea of ireland are being treated as a special case is compliant with the rules of the world trade organisation. there are exemptions, you can claim, but it is a fairly extraordinary situation and one a fairly extraordinary situation and one i think probably would not be sustained for very long. now some questions, joe in cheshire, and david i will put this to first will being terra free result in the usual level of imports, or will there still a risk of shortages? the risk of shortages from a no—deal brexit has been mainly because of the problems of the calais dover crossing where many of our goods come in and there is not much space
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at dover for checks, or indeed at calais at the moment. so these changes shouldn't actually make any difference to that. they shouldn't make a big difference to the level of imports, they may make a difference to where our imports come from, but the level is more determined by other factors. where does that emphasis change? at the moment, as i said, everything from the eu comes in tariff free, the rest of the world attracts tariffs. in the future under a no—deal brexit, the eu and the rest of the world would be treated equally, in terms of the tariffs we pay, and that will mean large numbers of products will be tariff free from the whole world, so you may see that instead of getting products from the eu, we may get more products from i don't know, china, or more beef from argentina, perhaps, in place of products from the eu. and chris, shortages are an issue. they're the other thing to remember about borders, we talk so much about the customs union, customs and tariffs, but a lot of what goes on is nothing
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to do with terrace, it is checks of other kinds, checks on products in particular with taking things into the european union, it is sanitary checks on foods and animals, for which the rules of taking stuff into the eu are very strict. if there is are applied in full that is where a lot of the concern lies with stuff getting stuck, in particular at the checkpoint between dover and calais. barbara in taunton, can you tell us what the norway model is and the canada model is and what they entail, how they affect our trade with the eu and tariffs? starting with the eu and tariffs? starting with the eu and tariffs? starting with the norway model, there has been a lot of talk about that. the norway model means we are part of the eu single market. that means we have the same regulations as the eu, which means all of the regulatory checks that chris just refer to, they don't apply. that makes trade a lot easier. defending exactly how thatis lot easier. defending exactly how that is implemented, it may well be that is implemented, it may well be that all tariffs are also removed under that model, and therefore you
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have continuing tariff free access between the eu and the uk. that is not certain under the norway model. what it also means is this is all about goods, for services, where there is no tariffs on services, but under the norway model there is access to the single market in services, just as there is now. under the canada model, that goes. you have a lot less access to be able to sell for example financial services across europe, and the canada model does not particularly help on that. the canada model... because we are very help on that. the canada model... because we are very reliant on services. yes, about 5096 of our exports are services, and we would be looking to grow that, and under the canada model we would struggle to maintain the same level of sales into the eu as we do now. under the norway model it would be possible to keep it pretty much as it is now, also under the canada model most trade and goods would still be tariff free between the eu and the uk, so there is no change. the eu
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then gets a special deal, we get a special deal into the eu. these are the rates that apply to everybody, the rates that apply to everybody, the tariffs that have been announced today. you can give special rates under bilateral trade agreements and that would be the case under the norway and canada models. the other thing to say about canada, it is a lot of things brexiteers talk about, cannot be plus, or canada plus plus plus, you add your pluses as appropriate. it is a basic free trade agreement but nothing like as close an economic relationship as being in the single market and the customs union. you can like it or love it but that is pretty much the closest economic relationship anyone can have in the world. this would be looser, and once it is looser it suggests there are more checks when things come in and out. when people talk about a soft brexit, they are talking about more than norway model are they? yes, and sometimes people talk about norway plus, which means the single market and the customs union, a lot of people saying part of the problem, we talk about it pretty much every day, is our old
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friend the irish border, and if you really wa nt friend the irish border, and if you really want to keep that as open as it is now you need that very close customs relationship. anonymous has written and again. will the cost of movement of parts of the uk and the eu have much of an impact on businesses? will the cost of movement of parts... this is when we get into real levels of complexity of the economy. the uk economy will change as a result of us having to pay tariffs to send to the eu, and the honest answer is, we don't know what impact they will have on the uk economy. we don't know for example, the car industry, there has been a lot of talk about that, can we sustain the car industry in the future, and a lotta parts are traded because of the car industry, we don't know what the uk... it is not just the number of parts, it is that it is where the parts are just to the minute in terms of order and arrival. that's right, so the more checks you have, tariffs you have,
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the more difficult it will be to maintain the existing model we have for the car industry, for example. so we will be looking at new models of the economy, where are we going to grow in the future, will it still be the car industry or alternative industries? there's an awful lot of manufacturing industry engineering around the country. we honestly don't know how that will be affected by today's announcement and it will probably take some time under a no—deal brexit to find out. the other thing worth pointing out, the tariffs on most bits of industrial material are pretty low and some countries might say we will pay them because it is easier than doing all the administration. most of the tariffs which have been announced today that would remain in place are on things like agricultural produce. beef and dairy and lamb, on things like agricultural produce. beefand dairy and lamb, and on things like agricultural produce. beef and dairy and lamb, and also on cars. so one thing we probably can say fairly confidently, if you wanted to import a car from the rest of the eu after a no—deal brexit, it probably would be more expensive. some of the things coming from elsewhere in the world if the tariff
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goes down to zero, those things would be cheaper, and all these things are a balance. you've got to then put tariffs in the context of then put tariffs in the context of the effect of a no—deal brexit on the effect of a no—deal brexit on the whole economy, the value of the pound and so on. so it is not a simple formula. no. this one asks people talk about establishing our own trade rules after leaving the eu but what we have to trade on a large scale, where does our potential for international trade actually live, ie, what do we actually make? our industrial economy is more than it was. don't forget, trade is a two—way thing and we are still the fifth or sixth largest economy in the world. there are a lot of people out there all around the world who wa nt out there all around the world who want access to our markets. that's why they want to do a free trade deal with us. as david has already said, one of the main thing is we offer is services, and if we are going to be doing trade deals in the future with countries like india and other countries around the world, one other countries around the world, one of the things we want to do is get access to their service markets. obviously we say to them, we want some of this, they say to us, this
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is what we want in your economy. in the case of india it is actually things like more visas for students and more visas for people to travel here. so it is notjust about the stuff you make. the tangible stuff. they're not entirely. i would add to that, services, yes, very important, food and drink products are often underestimated, obviously scotch whisky is well—known as a uk export but there are many others, processed food and drink products, it is a growth area and a huge manufacturing sector. there are various engineering products outside of the car industry. many of these things could be grown, pharmaceuticals which are less affected by tariffs than by regulatory issues, in terms of trade. and stockpiling on things like that, we hear, pharmaceuticals, people worry about. absolutely, because so much of this is traded. we make things we trade around the globe and we import things around the globe. we are in the age of really complex chains of supply
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here, where we send parts and goods we make and tablets, medical devices around the world, we import them from around the world, and that change that is coming in the event ofa change that is coming in the event of a no—deal brexit is really quite unpredictable. elizabeth has asked us if we vote no to a no—deal brexit, does this mean we only have two choices, a no—deal brexit or to revoke article 50? or indeed the existing deal on the table that the president turned down twice. at the moment all that is on the table is the deal that is on the table, no deal or no brexit. with the eu in theory offer us a different deal if we set actually we do want to be in the customs union after all, or the single market? quite possibly they would but that is not a negotiation you could have in a few days, that would need an extension. yes, it is important to remember, the prime minister said it today that no deal remains the default option until you
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have something else, and officially comes to shove, it is either doing a deal or revoking article 50 altogether, and ending the brexit process. you can extend article 50, but in effect that only delays the potential for no deal a little further. thanks for talking to us and answering those questions. susanna is here — in a moment she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live mps debate whether the uk should leave the eu without a deal on the 29th march, ahead of a vote this evening. in his spring statement, the chancellor says that brexit — and the vote to reject the eu withdrawal agreement — are casting a "cloud of uncertainty" over the british economy the government announces that most imports into the uk would not attract a tariff in the event of a no—deal brexit. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the uk economy will grow at its
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slowest pace since the financial crisis this year according to official forecasts. the office for budget response ability cut a growth forecast of 1.2%, down from the 1.6% expansion predicted by the government's economic watchdog last october. the boss of ethiopian airlines has called for the grounding of all boeing 737 max eight aircraft until it is established they are safe to fly. many countries have already suspended the plane after one of the airlines's jets crashed minutes after take—off, killing all airlines's jets crashed minutes after ta ke—off, killing all 157 people on board. the boss of morrisons has said the supermarket was stocking up on cupboard villas in preparation for a no—deal brexit, however the supermarket train —— chain would not give any details of which products are involved. what did you make of that statement? economic forecasts are usually subject to normal uncertainty is of
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course but there is a very big uncertainty overshadowing the spring statement, given that the vote in the commons on a no—deal brexit is of course this evening. the chancellor was pretty upbeat, though. tax receipts are higher than forecast, spending on debt interest is low and the government will be borrowing less than predicted. he also dangled a sweet know when it comes to brexit, pledging to spend £26.6 billion on boosting the economy if mps vote to leave the european union without a deal. however, he said these spending plans were based on a smooth brexit, and warned a disorderly brexit would deal a significant blow to economic activity in the short term. earlier, i spoke to ray newton smith, who is chief economist and asked her for her take on the spring statement.” think the chancellor made a valiant attempt to have a focus on a long—term vision for the uk economy, amidst the chaos of brexit. what i took away is firstly on growth, we
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saw that our growth forecast was revised down for this year to 1.2%. lam revised down for this year to 1.2%. i am really not surprised by that. when i talked to businesses around the country, the uncertainty around brexit is really taking a toll on growth and investment plans here in the uk. and obviously that is the backdrop of the chancellor is speaking into and that is why it is so important that we get no deal taken so important that we get no deal ta ke n off so important that we get no deal taken off the table this evening in the house of commons. it is really the house of commons. it is really the threat of no deal that is hugely damaging to our economy at the moment. but i think amidst all that, what the chancellor tried to do is set out his vision, and i think for us it was really welcome to see the focus on a move to us it was really welcome to see the focus on a move to a us it was really welcome to see the focus on a move to a low carbon economy and his clean growth package. it talks about how new— build package. it talks about how new—build homes package. it talks about how new— build homes need package. it talks about how new—build homes need to be heated sustainably by 2025. these are the sorts of road maps we need to to make it easy for the uk to move to a low carbon economy, and i think that
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was hugely welcomed. but there is still so much to do to have a focus on skills, on infrastructure, and all we need to make the uk compete on the global stage. but there is no doubt all the uncertainty around brexit makes all of that so much more challenging for government and for business. we have been hearing from the boss as well of ethiopian airlines today. the chief executive gave an interview to the bbc, following the fatal crash of one of the compa ny‘s aircraft following the fatal crash of one of the company's aircraft on sunday. he said all boeing 737 max eights should be grounded around the world. it followed a similar accident involving a lion air aircraft of the same model in october. as a precaution, regulators right across the globe including the uk's civil
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aviation authority have grounded the boeing 737 max eight, but they are still flying today across north america. told the bbc why he thought the federal aviation administration had not taken the decision to ground the jets had not taken the decision to ground thejets in the us. had not taken the decision to ground the jets in the us. the faa had not taken the decision to ground the jets in the us. the fm is also the jets in the us. the fm is also the regulator of the manufacturer, so they have gone through the regulatory process to certify the aeroplane, so they must have good reason aeroplane, so they must have good reason to say so, but at the same time a brand—new aeroplane is having two major fatal accidents in a span of five months, in different parts of five months, in different parts of our world. all of us who have grounded the aeroplane also have very good justification. what has been the impact on boeing's share place? it has certainly been a difficult time for boeing. investors seem to be losing faith to some extent on how the airline is dealing with this. yes, good afternoon. ithink
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up this. yes, good afternoon. ithink up front we need to say there is an ongoing investigation, with regard to the incident, so any talk about the possible causes at this stage is largely speculative. as we said earlier, clearly the proximity with the indonesian airline incident and the indonesian airline incident and the perils —— parallels that have been drawn means there has been a heightened level of anxiety and boeing has clearly taken a reputational hit, as noted in the news, various countries have grounded this make of the jet. and, you know, the stock price has fallen 1596. you know, the stock price has fallen 15%. but if you look from a stock perspective as well, if boeing was found to be at fault, the strength of its balance sheet means the cost, in terms of the corrective action, fixing the software bug, doing training with the pilots, compensation and associated liabilities will be a little bit higher, but given the strength of their balance sheet, it is
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manageable, it would take a hit to boeing's profitability and it will ta ke boeing's profitability and it will take some time for its credibility and reputation to recover. thank you, monique. let's move on to what was said in the spring statement. how did the city react? of course borrowing has come down lower than expected. yes, it has come down lower than expected. i think it would be fair to say the chancellor's spring statement has been overshadowed by the brexit vote is that we have had these few days. and, you know, he has taken the opportunity here, even though his hands are tied, to say look, if we get a no—deal brexit, there is going to bea get a no—deal brexit, there is going to be a potential disruption to the economy. now the uk growth forecasts we re economy. now the uk growth forecasts were downgraded today to 1.2%. i understand why have done that, but i think it is overly cautious, because if you look at the numbers, the growth number for january surprise
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to the upside, the tax take is healthy. unemployment is at an historic low. so we can see that the headroom for the chancellor, in terms of his fiscal targets, have increased from 15.5 billion to over 26 and a half billion. and he has already said in the event of an orderly brexit he will announce a series of measures in the autumn statement. so in effect what he has said is you deliver me an orderly brexit and i will deliver a bonus to the economy. we willjust have to see what happens, that crunch vote tonight, many thanks for that update on the financial markets today. let's have a check at the most recent numbers on the screen. the ftse 100 recent numbers on the screen. the ftse100 as you can see up very slightly. the pound has also been going upa slightly. the pound has also been going up a little bit today at around 1.60 against —— 1.16 against the dollar.
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now we can have a look at the weather with ben. good afternoon to you, storm gareth, which has dominated the scene over the last 24 hours is now clearing away to the east. but that is not the end of the wet and windy weather, some more turbulent days to come through the rest of this week. this is what's left of storm gareth, this area of low pressure pushing out across scandinavia, still plenty of white lines on our chart, still some pretty strong and gusty winds through the rest of the afternoon, and it stays quite windy overnight, we will also see outbreaks of rain, already arriving across northern ireland, pushing into scotland, northern england, wales, some rain reaching the south—east, temperature five to 8 degrees. a soggy start for many of us tomorrow morning, particularly across england and wales was not the rain will slide away south—eastwards quite quickly
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to leave a mixture of sunshine and showers, though things will struggle to brighten up much across the far south—west, again some strong winds, 45 to 55 wind gusts are possible, temperatures ranging from eight to 13 degrees. then it stays pretty u nsettled 13 degrees. then it stays pretty unsettled as we head towards the weekend.
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