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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 14, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is business live from bbc news — with me, sally bundock, at westminster and victoria fritz in the studio. no backing for no—deal. the british parliament votes against leaving the eu, without agreement good morning. on its future relations. as you can tell, this is a live welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and show! charlie stayt. live from london, that's our top morning. story on thursday, 14th march. our headlines: dramatic scenes in the house of commons, where mps voted to take no—deal off the table. but the prime minister remains defiant. the legal default in uk and eu law the pound shot up on the news that remains that the uk will leave that a no—deal brexit was less the eu without a deal unless... likely, but there will be another vote here at parliament today interjections unless something else is agreed. today mps vote on whether to delay brexit, as the government confirms it will bring theresa may's deal back to the commons for a third time. we'll ask the chancellor what's going on.
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isa is a comedy, tragedy, files or higher? we at the theatre in bradford to find out what people in the city think about the show so far in the house of commons. facebook fail. the social network giant and its whatsapp and instagram apps stop working around the world, in the most severe breakdown in their history. liverpool become the fourth english side through to the quarter—finals of the champions league. two goals from sadio mane help them to a famous victory against bayern munich. good morning. it is another wet and windy day ahead. currently, we have got some heavy been pushing southeast woods. behind it, a lot of blustery showers and some sunshine, but the winds once again today could prove to be destructive. i will have more in 15 minutes.
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good morning. it's thursday the 14th of march. our top story: it was a night of chaos and confusion in westminster, mps voted to take a no—deal brexit off the table. today they will vote on whether to delay the uk's departure from the european union. in a moment, we'll take you through what might happen next, but first, our political correspondent iain watson reflects on another extraordinary night in politics. jeering if it appeared that the protesters outside parliament last night were divided, wait until you see the politicians. more than a dozen of theresa may's ministers defied her last night to rule out leaving the eu without a deal in all circumstances. you could hear the sound of the prime minister's authority draining away, losing two crucial votes in the commons. these days, she is almost immune to defeats, so she simply set up what could happen next. it is likely there will be another vote on the
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brexit deal next week. she said if it passed, well, there could be a short delay to brexit. if it does not pass, the dilated brexit could ta ke not pass, the dilated brexit could take an awful lot longer. the house has to understand and accept that it is not willing to support a deal in the coming days and as it is not willing to support leaving without a deal on the 29th of march, that it is suggesting that them will need to bea is suggesting that them will need to be a much longer extension to article 50. but the handling of last night's vote has not endeared the prime minister to some brexiteer babbles that she needs to win over. they are angry that no action has been taken against those ministers who failed to back their own government by abstaining. one of them said he had no intention of resigning. i support the prime minister in her course of action, her course of action is to leave with a deal, in an orderly brexit, but i just am with a deal, in an orderly brexit, but ijust am very clear that i do not support the no deal brexit. and
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this has enraged some brexiteers. we have got to go. how can they not support the government's position on its single biggest policy that faces this country right now and still be in government? parliament has made clear does not want to leave the eu without a deal, the vote though is not binding and theresa may is still insisting that the best way of avoiding no deal is to vote for her deal. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. there was some confusion in the commons last night. so what happens next? today, mps will vote on whether to ask the eu for permission to delay the date for departure. theresa may is proposing to submit a request to brussels for a one—off postponement, that would be until the end ofjune. but the prime minister will warn that unless her brexit deal passes in the coming days, a much lengthier delay may be required. so, expect a third meaningful vote on her withdrawal agreement, before the eu summit on the 21st of march. of course, under current law, the uk could still leave the eu
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on the 29th of march with no deal. let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth, who's in westminster this morning. a very good morning to you, alex. we have just tried to explain to people what was, all those words, unprecedented, extraordinary, weird, ridiculous. i do not know which words your pie this morning, help us a little bit. we just have not got the vocabulary anymore to explain what is happening with brexit, but let's just say this is broadly where we are out. there were confusing and chaotic scenes in the commons last night but overall, what mps effectively said is that they do not wa nt effectively said is that they do not want the uk to leave the eu without a deal and it became clear that some will go pretty far to stop that happening. so it seems of the prime minister is now going to do is try and bring her deal back for a third time, despite the fact it has already been resoundingly defeated twice, i think the tactic number ten will try to use now is say look, if
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you do not get behind this deal, there could be really long delay to brexit. we are talking months, way beyond that, they are hoping they bring some brexiteers on board, but the amount of goodwill in the parliament towards the prime minister right now is at rock bottom. alex, we will talk again later on. thank you very much. later, we'll ask the chancellor, philip hammond, about what's going on. one of the things that has been going on, as soon as your eyes go to theresa may, your eyes go to those sitting around her. as we said before, she is remaining defiant, she is going to try to continue doing what she is doing. the chancellor has been in all those meetings, he has been in the cabinets, he voted last night. he is as close as we are going to get to the prime minister, we will talk to him later about those comments as well. it will all be very interesting, we will talk to him about that.
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prosecutors in northern ireland will announce today whether former soldiers are to be charged over the killings on bloody sunday in londonderry. 13 people were shot dead by paratroopers at a civil rights demonstration 47 years ago. our ireland correspondent chris page reports from derry. londonderry was a volatile place in 1972, but no—one on this march thought it would end in such bloodshed. gunfire soldiers from the parachute regiment killed 13 people in half an hour. pictures like these captured the trauma and the tragedy of bloody sunday. the troops said they'd been shot at first, but nine years ago, a public enquiry found none of those who died were posing a threat. john kelly lost his 17—year—old brother michael and has campaigned for prosecutions. my mother never got over michael's death until the day she died. it broke her heart, and for that alone, it certainly spurs me on, and i'm not only doing it for mike, i'm doing it for my mother and my father, and all the otherfamilies.
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the passage of time hasn't diminished the families's sense of grief, and today, almost half a century after bloody sunday, prosecutors will tell them whether any former soldiers will be charged over the killings. more than 3,500 people died during the conflict in northern ireland. some victims's groups say more should be done to prosecute pa ramilitaries. there is a focus and a resource issue, which is very much directed towards a minority of cases, which allege state wrongdoing, and in terms of the innocent victims of terrorism, from whatever background that comes, people do feel very much as second—class citizens in it. the soldiers who were here on bloody sunday are now in their 60s and 70s. the possible charges include murder. chris page, bbc news, derry. now, ee're all used to taking to social media to complain about things that are going wrong in our lives,
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but what do facebook, whatsapp and instagram users do when it's those services that go wrong? you whinge about on the other services, and that is what was so ironic. facebook also owns the messaging up, it owns what's up and instagram, yesterday afternoon they all instagram, yesterday afternoon they a ll started instagram, yesterday afternoon they all started to stop working. some people get on that they could not post, some people could not post that they could see other people's details, so this outage has started to spread around the world. you know what is ironic, people were posting that their social media was not working, as they were not even putting anything on social media that was worth seeing, except the fa ct that was worth seeing, except the fact that it was not working. they do not know yet why it happened, there was initially some worry that it was what is known as a distributed denial of service attack, which is a fancy way of saying cyber attack is overloading the website to stop working. they
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are saying that is not what happened they have not come out with a real explanation of what did go wrong. it is worth pointing out actually that this is the worst magnitude in its history. the last time something this bad happened was back in 2008, it had just, ice sayjust, 158 million users, compare that to now 2.3 billion. this is a significant outage not just because 2.3 billion. this is a significant outage notjust because we're stopping posting photos, posts, all those sorts of things, a lot of businesses are saying we could not do what we needed to do because we could not get on the website. do what we needed to do because we could not get on the websitelj do what we needed to do because we could not get on the website. i was sure it is not a hack? because that is what people are concerned about. they have not given us details, they are saying it is not a distributed denial of service attack, which is what the hack usually is. we will try and get onto them and update you. thank you.
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we'll try and spend the morning explaining extraordinary events in parliament last night. give us your thoughts as well, if you have specific thoughts for the chancellor this morning, it is always worth a try. i do not know what drama could top last night, but i tell you someone who could convince you that it was more dramatic, the lack of tea m it was more dramatic, the lack of team play in the commons. was there something going on in the house of commons? i tell you what, i do not know because i was watching something else. i do not know, you're going to tell me and i'm going to listen. you're watching brexit, weren't you? forget that, they are full english cheese going into the last date of the champions league. four english teams are in the last eight of the champions league for the first time in a decade. liverpool made it a fab four with a stunning 3—1 win at bayern munich — sadio mane scoring twice forjurgen klopp's side. tributes have been paid to one of formula 1's leading figures, the fia race director charlie whiting, who's died just
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days before the start of the new season. he was 66. altior joined the greats at the cheltenham festival. the nicky henderson—trained horse recorded a record—equalling 18th straight win in the queen mother champion chase. that is a rockstar of a horse. the two—time olympic champion james cracknell is set to become the oldest person to compete in the boat race, when the crews are announced later this morning. he is due to be racing for cambridge and at this point, i would like to tell you i am not entirely sure how old he is. i think he is 48. i think he is 46. ok. you know what, should we get that confirmed? he is significantly older than the previous elders, by a long way, here's something like eight to ten yea rs here's something like eight to ten years older. and he has been training quietly for a long old—time. 46. training quietly for a long old-time. 46. see you of ice and charlie was wrong. don't dwell on that. i would have been the most
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wrong because i threw out 38.|j that. i would have been the most wrong because i threw out 38. i was thinking is at 36 of 46? you can't still be going. thank you very much. iam still be going. thank you very much. i am getting already. that's talk to carol and find out what is happening with the weather. there is a tree down because of storm doris, there was lots of concern about it. good morning. that is right. good morning, there was lots of disruption about bounced on garth as well. today once again, in fact the next few days, we still are going to see very strong conditions gusting to gale force at times and also some rain, infact to gale force at times and also some rain, in fact that is the combination for today. —— storm gareth. you can see on our pressure chop that low pressure is dominating our weather, storm gareth is over the continent. we have all these weather funds or coming away in the next few days, so it is going to be pretty wet and also windy. the storm is also bound, we have a lot of rain abound, some of this heavy, falling
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snow. coupled up with some gusty winds as well and nasty travelling conditions. a lot of that been clear away to the course of this morning, leaving a deal of sunshine and showers. some of the being heavy and possibly with some hail mixed in there, falling again as snow in the hills. wind gusts, it is strongest this morning, looking widely at 45 to 50 miles an hour but still pretty strong as we head on into the afternoon as well. again, we could see some further disruption today. do check your transport arrangements before you head off and if there are any delays, and of course if you are ona any delays, and of course if you are on a light vehicle or bike, take extra ca re. on a light vehicle or bike, take extra care. these are our temperatures, seven to about 13. through this evening and overnight, we start off on a dry note, more cloud spills into the west, bringing in further cloud spills into the west, bringing infurther rain cloud spills into the west, bringing in further rain and strong winds and once again, we will see some snow, not just once again, we will see some snow, notjust in the hills but a little
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bit lower in those hills, notjust the mountains, should say. coming down a bit. temperatures in scotland between three and six on of the uk looking at between five to 11. we start off tomorrow on a windy note. —— and the rest of the uk. tomorrow, we will see the snow coming down a little lower in those hills but equally, there will be some sunshine but the wind will be of note once again. temperature wise, it is turning a bit colder. we have six degrees on the north. temperatures are still hanging on in the south itself, but for the weekend, there is still no respite, particularly so on saturday when it is looking quite stormy and we could also potentially see some disruptive snow. what is happening is we have a system coming in from the south—west, bringing in all this mean. on its northern edge, we are expecting some snow across northern ireland, northern england
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and southern scotland, most of the snow will be in the hills. as we push further north across northern scotland, you could see this at lower levels and this could be disruptive, and littering it with cord and if, it is if the cold air cuts in, then we could see some problems with that cold air. it is something we are keeping a very close eye on. unsettled weather, to settle conditions, we will have to wait until monday. i do not know if i can wait that long. do you know how often you get sent pictures of cats watching your weather forecast and so on? there was some animals that we re so on? there was some animals that were not watching yesterday. i do not know if you'll be able to see this in your monitor, these were some goats that had not watched your weather forecast and so they missed out. they ended up causing havoc in the town. so can you make sure you reach the goats, please? as well as the cats and dogs that all adore you. i will,
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the cats and dogs that all adore you. iwill, i the cats and dogs that all adore you. i will, i saw that yesterday. bless them. it is very sweet. you later. let's look at the front pages, once again dominated by brexit. theresa may will "attempt one final desperate roll of the dice on her brexit deal", according to the guardian. the paper says she will put it to mps again next week — hoping that tory rebels who are scared brexit may not happen, will back it. the daily mail focuses on the "chaos" of what it calls yesterday's "mass revolt", and says mrs may is threatening brexiteers with "losing brexit altogether" if they don't back her deal next week. the daily telegraph reports on a plot to delay brexit by "up to two years" after the four tory ministers pictured here, did not vote with the government, helping to rule out a no—deal brexit. and "meltdown" is the headline on the front page of the daily mirror,
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which says she has lost control of both brexit and her party — leaving her leadership "in tatters". philip hammond will be talking to us a bit later as well. let's take a look at the insides. following on, in the business pages, we will be talking about the spring statement and looking at the headlines about what difference all of that could mean. the business pages of the bbc website, land rover are saying they will recall 44,000 ca rs are saying they will recall 44,000 cars and that is related to emissions. they say ten models are affected. if you look at the website, you will be able to see if yours is included. some will need physical repairs in dealerships and some willjust need a software update. this coming on the back of the w which were forced to recall millions of cars around the world. if you are one of those 44,000, clearly, a significant change for
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you. vw, by contrast, recorded 1.2 million in the uk so this is relatively small. ——vw. we talk a lot about plastic on this programme and how much we use. an anti— waste campaign gets coca—cola to admit 3 million tons of plastic. that is 200,000 million tons of plastic. that is 200 , 000 bottles million tons of plastic. that is 200,000 bottles every minute. a staggering number. they say they are now committed to cutting how much plastic they use but really laying it in. fairytale at cheltenham. i want to show you this horse. this is paisley park. this man has been blind since birth and bought the horse for £60,000 and this horse has a really,
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really good chance of winning today. listens to the commentary, listens to radio. has someone with him who tells him what is going on and is a very, very involved owner. i love these horseracing stories. as if it couldn't get any worse, paisley park nearly died, came back from colic, thought would never race again but has come back to full fitness and has come back to full fitness and has a real chance this afternoon. certainly one to watch. great name. but it's because of prince! i know. here isa but it's because of prince! i know. here is a picture with a giant snood. in the interest of the quality, we always comment on what women wear to the races.|j
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quality, we always comment on what women wear to the races. i like it. cheltenham in march is the coldest place on earth. it doesn't seem very practical because it has a big gap here. and the whole point is that it cove rs here. and the whole point is that it covers the whole neck. just have thermals. this will be welcome for many people who hate travelling long haul. news. it has been decided that rather than forking out for a expensive business flatbed is put a mattress on the three middle seats. if you are ever on a quiet flight, you might do this anyway. they will be an extra 200 quid each way. this
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picture explains it. that is the middle seat. they just picture explains it. that is the middle seat. theyjust whacked something into feel the footrest and you have a mattress across the top. for another 400 quid return you can sleep flatbed in economy. they said there are only three of available on any flight. nonetheless, it is quite short so sally and i wouldn't fit. you must still ensure that the trolley stops for you. let's return to our top story now. another busy day lies ahead for politicians in the house of commons, as they prepare to vote on whether to delay brexit or not. but this morning we've sent our reporterjohn maguire 200 miles away from westminster, to the city of bradford, to find out what people there think about what's going on. morning, john.
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look at the magnificent setting that we are bringing you this morning. this is in the centre of the city of bradford. absolutely stunning. they had a production of matilda here last night. it's built in 1914. i was thinking that was the beginning ofa was thinking that was the beginning of a lot of turmoil in europe. what we have seen over the last couple of yea rs, we have seen over the last couple of years, what we saw last night, what we will see again tonight, really has gripped the nation and we will hear more about it in a second. what do people out and about in the city think about what has happened and what is about to happen, last night? been doing at 2.5 years. to—ing and fro—ing onjet been doing at 2.5 years. to—ing and fro—ing on jet planes. been doing at 2.5 years. to—ing and fro—ing onjet planes. we are still in the same boat, not good. kick out
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of parliament. i voted to remain so i'm not really passionate about what's going on in the moment because it's not really what i wanted to do. we haven't got a deal or no deal, we don't know what is going to happen, we don't know if it's going to be extended. they have renege on a british people vote and thatis renege on a british people vote and that is howl renege on a british people vote and that is how i see the politicians now, to me, they are not worth the salt. i voted to remain. now, to me, they are not worth the salt. ivoted to remain. i still think we should remain. i think the whole thing is a joke. i think the politicians know about as much as we do. it's gobbledygook. nobody understands, we don't understand. and they are never going to agree. referendum, it's just a joke. and they are never going to agree. referendum, it'sjust ajoke. i think we are in a major, major crisis. what better place to make a
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drama about a crisis than in a theatre. good morning to you about both. one voted leave, one voted remain. things have changed so much. you are telling me something about cheltenham, frank, the horseracing festival. what was it? i've been following horseracing for 55 years. i was so compelled by what was going on in parliament yesterday, ifound myself flicking back to the house of commons in between races. i think it is easier to pick a winner at cheltenham this week than to pick a decision of what is going on in parliament. that is how unpredictable it is. i thought you we re unpredictable it is. i thought you were going to say the other way around and! were going to say the other way around and i thought brilliant, we will find out what's going on. have you changed your mind or have circumstances colluded to make you think you might have changed your
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mind? i think it is wise to base your decision on the information at hand and recently we have seen a lack of leadership. what we need now is someone to really get a grip of the situation and take us in a direction that is going to be beneficial for the nation. whether that be a deal which can be backed by mp right now. —— i think that what is needed right now. what will ultimately happen?” what is needed right now. what will ultimately happen? i think it will go to the wire. i think ultimately we might get a short extension but there might be some sort of deal agreed. i think there will be a deal made but it has been backed into a corner. we have had, how many years
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to complete this? it feels like it is being brushed off and the deal which we will receive now which will be confirmed, will be a significant concession of what brexit should be. thank you for talking to us this morning. much more from bradford throughout the morning because i wa nt to throughout the morning because i want to say, if you do live in bradford, today and tomorrow at that broadway shopping centre as part of the bbc‘s we are bradford project, you can come and talk to the team, look at some of the latest virtual reality technology, you can even have a go at reading the weather which will give you a real insight into just how brilliant matt and carol and your regional weather presenters are at yourjob which reminds me, let's go to our regional newsrooms.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a third person has been charged with the murder of london teenager, jodie chesney. the 18—year—old was stabbed to death in a park in harold hill two weeks ago. 18—year—old svenson ong—a—kwee from romford will appear at barkingside magistrates court today. a 999 call made by a pensioner who died following a burglary at her home in north london has been released. i've just been burgled. i'vejust been burgled. two or i've just been burgled. two or three young men walked up and took my handbag. maureen whale collapsed during the call which she made seconds after thieves broke into her home in barnet. police are treating her death as manslaughter and are offering a 20,000 pound reward for information. her niece says it's tragic this happened in the one place where she felt safe. she loved this area, we all did. it
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was like our safety plays. it's where we grew up. it was her for her, it was her home. she had been there from a little girl and the fa ct there from a little girl and the fact that somebody had broken into somewhere she felt secure is tragic. more than a quarter of 5—year—olds in london suffer from tooth decay — that's according to the london assembly's health committee. it says the children with the fewest cavities are in bexley with 14%. while the most is in harrow where up to 40 per cent have tooth decay. the committee will discuss how best to tackle the problem especially in the capital's poorest areas. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes we have severe delays on the district line eastbound from earls court to barking, with minor delays on the rest of the line after overrunning engineering work. on the roads, there is traffic on the a13 building westbound from dagenham into barking. on the m25 there are southbound delays for traffic heading towards the qe2 bridge, following a collision on the approach tojunction 31. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. we had another wet and windy night and this morning, the met office has another weather warning in place once again for the high winds. gusting up to 55 mph expected. the gusts of wind will clear. they will ease a little through the afternoon. maybe one or two showers but some bright dispels, quite a bit of cloud. temperatures not too bad. overnight, a repeat performance to last night's. starting off a reasonably light and then the rain and the winds strengthening. another wet and windy started to friday. temperatures between seven and nine celsius overnight. through friday, a cloudy affair. a blustery day and the wind quite strong. temperatures getting up quite strong. temperatures getting up to 14 celsius. unsettled for the weekend, especially for saturday. another breezy day through the afternoon. could see some rain. a brighter day for sunday but could be
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called. things close but slowly start to calm down as we head into next week. —— slowly start to come down. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning. it's just after 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast today: we're going to be in bradford to find out how people are reacting to the latest brexit news. the city voted to leave in 2016, but what do locals think now? we'll have more at 07.20am. more than 150 pieces of art from george michael's private collection is to be sold in london later. we'll be live from the auction
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house, before the auction begins. and also this morning, we'll meet 10—year—old sky brown, the world's youngest professional skateboarder. she's hoping to qualify for next year's olympics, when the sport will feature for the first time. all that coming up a little later on. now, a summary of this morning's menus. —— main news. it was a night of chaos and confusion in westminster as mps voted to take a no—deal brexit off the table. today they will vote on whether to delay the uk's departure from the european union. theresa may is willing to ask brussels for a one—off postponement until the end ofjune. but she will warn that unless her deal passes in the coming days, a much lengthier delay may be required. the options before us are the same as they always have been. we could leave with the deal which this government has negotiated in the past two years, we could leave with the deal we have negotiated, that is subject to a second referendum, but
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that could risk no brexit at all. the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, welcomed last night's votes at westminster, saying: "things are looking a little brighter". the german government described the outcome as a "sign of reason". and the european commission said it was ready for any eventuality, but warned there could be no more negotiations or clarifications. prosecutors in northern ireland will announce today whether former soldiers are to be charged over the killings on bloody sunday in londonderry nearly 50 years ago. 13 people were shot dead by paratroopers at a civil rights demonstration. the subsequent 12—year inquiry, led by lord saville, concluded that the victims had posed no threat. boeing's entire global fleet of 737 max aircraft has been grounded after investigators uncovered new evidence at the scene of sunday's ethiopian airlines crash, which killed 157 people. it was the second fatal accident involving the model in five months, after one crashed over indonesia in october, claiming 189 lives.
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a third man has been charged with murdering teenager jodie chesney in an east london park almost two weeks ago. jodie, aged 17, was stabbed in the back while she played music with friends near a playground in romford on the 1st of march. svenson ongakwie, who's 18, will appear before magistrates this morning. facebook is suffering the most severe outage in its history, with many of its services inaccessible to people across the world. users have been able to load the website, but not post to it. whatsapp, instagram and mobile phone app messenger — all owned by facebook — have also been disrupted. the company says it's trying to resolve the issue. that is the news. at the moment, we have got sport as well and loads of news and drama. we thought the commons was dramatic enough. did you? did you follow it? well, i think you are going to.|j
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you? did you follow it? well, i think you are going to. i follow it, i meant think you are going to. i follow it, imeant did think you are going to. i follow it, i meant did you understand it? i tried. i actually went on twitter because i was so confused. that is what this morning is about, to try and clear it up. no confusion about liverpool last night, they were simply outstanding. you do not look convinced. no, i do not know the story. you are going to tell us. for the first time in ten years, there are four english sides through to the quarter—finals of the champions league. that's after liverpool pulled off a famous victory away at bayern munich. our sports correspondent katie gornall was watching. it has been suggested the bright lights of the champions league could be destruction for liverpool this season. this after all is a cloud in the race for the premier league title, but then the top champions ta ke title, but then the top champions take everything in their stride. europe often brings out the best in liverpool, in the first half, it also brought out the best in
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saydiyah money, whose twists and turns left the great goalkeeper stranded. joel matip made the task for bayern munich easier when you turn the ball into his own net. in the second half, bayern munich had to go for it but their frustration was building in liverpool took full advantage. first, virgil van dijk headed them firmly in the direction of the quarter—finals, before saydiyah money, who else, delivered a diving knockout blow. whether at home or in europe, this is a team intent on making their own history and who is to say they cannot go all the way? barcelona are also through to the quarterfinals. lionel messi was once again the inspiration, scoring two as they comfortably defeated french side lyon 5—1. norwich are back on top of the championship, after a 3—2 win over hull city. they go above leeds, thanks to two goals from the argentian emiliano buendia. that's five wins in
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a row now for norwich. the west ham midfielder declan rice has been named in england's squad for their euro 2020 qualifiers later this month. you might remember him because he switched international allegiance from the republic of ireland to england recently, having played three times in friendly matches for the republic. i think they are really big decisions when you are asking the player to transfer association, you have to be really clear that you feel they have a future with you. that said, there was never any guarantee is made to him because i think that was also important, that he be playing well to get in the squad, but his form has been excellent. tributes have been paid to one of formula 1's leading figures, the race director charlie whiting has died suddenly. he was 66. whiting was the official race starter and oversaw all rules matters in f1. he passed away suddenly in melbourne, where he was due to officiate this weekend's
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season—opening australian grand prix. four—time world champion sebastian vettel has called him "our man, the drivers's man". british number one kyle edmund has been beaten at indian wells by the great roger federer. the swiss, a five—time champion in california, eased past edmund 6—1, 6—4 injust over an hour. federer, currently the world number four, has yet to drop a set at the tournament. second seed rafael nadal is also through to the last eight. the cheltenham festival continues today after history was made at the course on day two. there had been fears over the weather but the wind and rain didn't stop altior achieving a record—equalling18th straight win in the queen mother champion chase. jockey nico de boinville had to dig deep, making it a 63rd festival victory for trainer nicky henderson and his sixth in the race. there was an awful lot of hype and an awful lot of buildup to this race
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and to put out of the bag the way he did, to battle up the hill shows what true champions. he is one of the best, he is a horse of generation. the way the crowd has warmed to him really showed today and you really must appreciate him while he is here. england's women beat a sri lanka emerging team by 153 runs in a warm—up game, ahead of the first one day cricket international on saturday. they go into the first of three games in great shape, having just completed a series victory in india. the two—time olympic champion james cracknell looks likely to become the oldest person to compete in the boat race, when the crews are announced later this morning. he is 46, he retired from elite rowing in 2006. he qualifies because he is studying a masters degree at cambridge. he won gold in the coxless fours at both the 2000 and 2004 olympic games. incredible. there is hope for us
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all. there is hope for a sore. apart from the fact that he is a multi— medal winning roller already. watch this, watch this penalty. my favourite thing of the day. west brom beat swansea in the championship last night but the game will be remembered for one of the most extraordinary misses. swansea were a goal down at this point, up stepped bersant celina to get them back. that could have changed everything five minutes before the break. here we go. that is that. his foot slipped and hit his other foot. we go. that is that. his foot slipped and hit his other footm was very wet and windy. swansea went on to lose 3—0. you have got to feel for him. awful. i like the fact that his teammate gave him a pat on the back, they did not kind of go youthful.”
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gave him a pat on the back, they did not kind of go youthful. i think they were all just was not them. they probably saved the youthful for later on. —— you fool. let's return to our top story now. even by recent standards, it was an extraordinary night in parliament yesterday, as mps and even cabinet ministers defied government whips to take the prospect of a no—deal brexit off the table. today, they'll be voting on whether to request an extension to push brexit back beyond the 29th of march. we're going to be talking to people who are involved in westminster beyond that, but we also want to get a view from the other side of the channel. mairead mcguinness is an irish mep and she's also vice—president of the european parliament. she joins us from strasbourg. thank you so much, delighted to have you on the programme this morning andi you on the programme this morning and i think a really valid point of view first. a would be interested to
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know what you made of the votes last night and wheezing the uk is now in terms of moving towards the exit. well, it is come here this morning that suddenly last night, we were all watching and standing up watching the votes in the house of commons, it was quite dramatic, but clearly, there is no appetite for a no—deal brexit, although the prime minister is seen very clearly to her party and indeed across the house that in order to take no deal legally off the table, you have to vote for something. so i imagine that comment i think she is going to try to put the deal again to the house of commons, perhaps closer to the exit date, people might be more likely to vote for it. but today, we're also looking at the prospect ofan we're also looking at the prospect of an extension of article 50 and some of the here relate to what will the extension before? is it a technical extension, for example? if the deal is actually ratified by the house of commons, then of course they will be flexibility around giving time to put all of the legal
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issues into place. there is also this prospect of a longer extension and that, of course, has implications because as you know, the european parliament elections ta ke the european parliament elections take place in may and there would be a need for the united kingdom, if it is still a member, to have elections. so i think there are an awful lot of issues to be teased out in the house of commons. some people would like to see elections happening in the united kingdom, others think it would be pointless if the uk is actually leaving, but the prime minister was putting all of those options forward and i think what she is trying to say to those who wish to leave the european union in time, perhaps not quite on the 29th but some few weeks after, that they need to support the deal that is on the table. so while it seems unthinkable that the withdrawal treaty which has been rejected twice by the house of commons would come up by the house of commons would come up againfora by the house of commons would come up again for a third vote, it does seem possible that that is the case and perhaps next week. and she has said that, backing the deal, which needs to be backed by march 30, she
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still expects there to be some extension, maybe a short extension. how flexible other eu leaders going to be about that extension? let's say just if that to be about that extension? let's sayjust if that deal, let's just have this one scenario first, if that deal is approved.” have this one scenario first, if that deal is approved. i think about deal is approved, and that is i wish because we have negotiated in good faith with the united kingdom, i think of it is approved, there will be flexibility giving time to put all of the leave mechanisms in place in orderfor the all of the leave mechanisms in place in order for the united all of the leave mechanisms in place in orderfor the united kingdom to leave in an orderly fashion. so i think on that issue, i imagine next week that the leaders will look very favourably at an extension because the president of the commission, jean—claude juncker, said on the president of the commission, jean—claudejuncker, said on monday evening that that is something that they would be open to doing, but there is another scenario that i am sure you would want to ask me about and that is the scenario of looking for a longer extension. and i think that we would probably have a lot of discussion about that as to what the purpose would be of a longer extension, because this is something
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thatis extension, because this is something that is not new, i have been hearing it for some weeks, that some, if you like, in the brexit camp of the debate, would like to see a longer extension to try and negotiate a future partnership without a withdrawal agreement and i think thatis withdrawal agreement and i think that is a possibility —— and i do not think that is a possibility at all. some who believe in a lengthy extension would allow for public opinion to settle and perhaps have a second referendum, but that is something that europe has no input on. we can only deal with the situation we are faced with and respecting that united kingdom has voted to leave the european union, we are trying to organise that in a way that does not damage our citizens or indeed your citizens, so we're trying to do the best thing given the result of the referendum which took place quite a long time ago. you say that the european union has no input when it comes to a change of mind, if there was this long extension. what is your feeling amongst the eu leaders? is there a feeling that actually that would be
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the best scenario from the eu's point of view, that the uk does stay? that it does drag out, that a referendum happens, and that to apathy or through just people being plain sick of this process, the uk votes to stay in? i don't think the leaders want that scenario because first of all, we have dreadful uncertainty at the moment and the idea we who would have prolongation of uncertainty is no good for anyone. i don't think this little plot in the background from the leaders of europe, let's try this and see what happens, not at all. if anything, i think there isa at all. if anything, i think there is a desire to finish the first phase of brexit so we can get on to talking about the future. that isn't a scenario that i think the leaders are working towards. i think there is an interesting twist here in the suggestion of another referendum which i'm not putting forward in case your viewers think that but let us presume or assume there
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case your viewers think that but let us presume or assume there is an extension of time so there has to be european parliament elections in the uk. i think it would be in that frame that they would be quite a debate about europe and perhaps the debate about europe and perhaps the debate might be better informed because i think lots of people have learned more about the eu, notjust in the uk, but indeed right across europe. and understand how it functions a little bit better. just to repeat the point, i don't think the leaders are looking at that prolongation in the hope of a change of mind. there is huge, if you like, respect for the outcome of the referendum. there is regret about it but we have moved onto a very different place here. we are trying to deal with many big challenges and if we can get over this first phrase of the red bowl —— first phase of the withdrawal situation, we can move the withdrawal situation, we can m ove o nto the withdrawal situation, we can move onto the next phase of how we can manage our future move onto the next phase of how we can manage ourfuture relationship and that is something we —— that will take time. if we don't have a withdrawal agreement, everything
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else that follows will have more complications. but last night's vote is that there is some indication that a no deal scenario is bad for everyone. however, the legislation is still on the statute books so u nless is still on the statute books so unless something changes, the law has to change in order for no deal to be completely off the table. so the law has to change in order for us the law has to change in order for us to get an extension either way. for you to take your current legislation which is suggesting and indicating a leaving of the uk from europe on the 29th of march. from our side, we have other side — make other things to worry about but until the law is changed in the united kingdom to reflect the vote last night then the uk is legally still going to leave on the 29th of march. of course, today might change that but we're not sure.”
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march. of course, today might change that but we're not sure. i don't think you are the only one that is entirely sure about what will happen. thank you for your candour this morning. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. array of sunshine, carol? — make a ray. we may not have that but we may have heavy rain and strong winds. that is the forecast for the next few days. they are all coming our way. it will also be windy with gales or even severe gales in places. this is the radar picture from this morning. all the rain is moving south—east followed on from showers. they will all be windy on top of the scottish mountains. we
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also have a keen north—westerly wind blowing a gale. gusts as much as 45-55 blowing a gale. gusts as much as 45—55 mph this morning. as we get into the afternoon, still gusty winds. the wind could lead to some disruption. if you are travelling, check your travel arrangements before you leave and if you are in a high sided vehicle, a light vehicle ora high sided vehicle, a light vehicle or a bicycle, take extra care. some of the heavy showers will have hail as well. through this evening, it quietened down but a repeat performance that the wind is strengthening again from the west. the rain is pushing eastwards and if anything, we will see the snow falling to lower levels in the scottish hills. temperatures three in aberdeen but 11 in plymouth and st helier. as we had on through the rest of friday, while you find we
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hang onto it some of those showers, it will be another heavy day. still some sunshine as well. some of us will have a dry day but gusty winds once again, up in scotland. still the rain coming in on the south—west. in england and wales especially, looking at temperatures, not bad, 10—13. into the weekend, saturday is looking stormy. some of us saturday is looking stormy. some of us will see snow. it is not until monday when we see a ridge of high pressure building to the uk. for saturday itself, don't forget —— don't forget, strong winds. all the rain coming in from the south—west and on its leading edge, we expect some snow. we could well see some disruptive snow across the north of
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scotland. something we are keeping a very close eye on. we will see you later on. nine minutes to seven is the time. usually we would be talking to the chancellor about one of the most important economic announcements of the year, the spring statement. not today though. he had something to do yesterday which normally we would be paying a lot of attention to. pretty easy to miss the headlines amongst the chaos of brexit. we are looking at how the economy is growing, how it is going. how much the chancellor might have to spend on all of the public services spent by the government. how much they are spending on tax revenue. let's start
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with the growth forecast, telling us how the economy was forecast to grow for this year. we were told it would grow by1.2% for this year. we were told it would grow by 1.2% this year and that's down from 1.6%. that's the slowest since the financial crisis. it means the government is on track to borrow 22.8 billion pounds this financial year. it's down but it sounds like a staggering amount. ——it sounds like. that's to cover the gap between what it earns in taxes, vs the money it spends on public services. it sounds a lot, but it's 3 billion less than forecast — partly because the government has made more than expected in taxes. it's what's called the budget deficit. but all of this could change of course — as a result of brexit.
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the chancellor warned that there was a "cloud of uncertainty hanging over our economy" but he did say a brexit deal could give the country a boost, with an extra 26.6 billion pounds to spend if mps voted to leave the eu with a deal. he's called that the ‘brexit dividend'. we don't know how that will be spent yet, but there were a few spending announcements yesterday too. he's spending three billion pounds on 30,000 new affordable homes to help with the housing crisis. there's also an additional £100m to help tackle the surge in knife crime — that's already claimed so many lives so far this year. free sanitary products will be offered in secondary schools and colleges.
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welcome news there. and in a bid to cut any border delays, it was announced that people from the usa, singapore, australia, new zealand, canada and south korea can all use e—gates — the passport checking machines at airports and ports, in a bid to speed up immigration checks. the chancellor is saying that could help. all in all, no great headlines, no great exciting news because brexit really did overshadow that yesterday. nonetheless, we have a sense of what is happening but as isaid, all of a sense of what is happening but as i said, all of these forecasts are liable to change because as i said,
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the chancellor calling it a cloud of uncertainty hanging over the economy. all bets are off, as we know, about what happens next. economy. all bets are off, as we know, about what happens nextm economy. all bets are off, as we know, about what happens next. it is worth saying, you talk about uncertainty but philip hammond has been the most forthright talking about the dangers of an ideal in relation to the economy. and yet, he voted to keep no deal on the table. he had the opportunity to vote to ta ke he had the opportunity to vote to take it off. yes and last night we already got a lot of responses from business about what they make of what's happening in westminster. they, like many of us are utterly, utterly frustrated. they say tell us what is happening, we will deal with it. all the uncertainty, no good for business. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. we'll be in bradford to find out how people are reacting to the latest brexit news — the city voted to leave in 2016, but what do locals think now? that's at 07.20.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a 999 call made by a pensioner who died — following a burglary at her home in north london has been released. i've just been burgled. you've just been burgled? yes, two—two...two young men have just entered the house and walked off with my handbag. maureen whale collapsed during the call which she made seconds after thieves broke into her home in barnet. police are treating her death as manslaughter and are offering a 20,000 pound reward for information. her niece says it's tragic this happened in the one place where she felt safe. she loved bells hill, we all did. it was like our safety place, it's where we grew up. it was herfor her, it was her home, she'd been there from a little girl and the fact that somebody had broken in to somewhere she felt secure is tragic.
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more than a quarter of 5—year—olds in london suffer from tooth decay — that's according to the london assembly's health committee. harrow has the highest rates with 40% of children having tooth decay. the committee will discuss how best to tackle the problem especially in the capital's poorest areas. city of london police are warning the public to be vigilant after a spike in thefts using distraction techniques. cctv footage shows a thief, at the bottom of the picture, covering the victim's mobile phone with a piece of paper before stealing it. police say the thieves often ask for directions, and target coffee shops and restaurants in the square mile. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes we have minor delays on the district line eastbound from earls court to barking, after overrunning engineering work. on the m25 there are southbound delays for traffic heading towards the qe2 bridge, following a collision on the approach tojunction 31. westbound traffic on the a406 nth circular is slow towards the clockhouse interchange in palmers green. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. we had another rather wet and windy night and this morning the met office has another weather warning in place once again for the high winds. gusting up to 55 mph expected. the rain will gradually clear. the gusts of wind will clear. they will ease a little through the afternoon. maybe one or two showers but some bright dispels, quite a bit of cloud. temperatures not too bad. a maximum of 14 celsius. overnight, a repeat performance to last night's. starting off a reasonably light and then the rain and the winds strengthening. another wet and windy start to friday. temperatures between seven and nine celsius overnight.
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through friday, quite a cloudy affair. a blustery day and the wind quite strong. temperatures getting up to 14 celsius. unsettled for the weekend, especially for saturday. another breezy day through the afternoon. could see some rain. a brighter day for sunday but temperatures cooler. things slowly start to calm down as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: dramatic scenes in the house of commons, where mps voted to take no—deal off the table. the prime minister, struggling with her voice, remained defiant. the legal default... interjections
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listen! the legal default in uk and eu law remains that the uk will leave the eu without a deal unless... interjections ..unless something else is agreed. today, mps vote on whether to delay brexit, as the government confirms it will bring theresa may's deal back to the commons for a third time. we'll be asking the chancellor what's going on. the long—awaited decision on whether former soldiers will be prosecuted for their part in the bloody sunday shootings in 1972 will be announced this morning. good morning. facebook fail. the social network giant, and its whatsapp and instagram apps, stop working around the world, in the most severe breakdown in their history. liverpool become the fourth english side through to the quarter—finals of the champions league. two goals from sadio mane help them to a famous victory against bayern munich. good morning. it's another wet and windy day ahead. we have got some heavy rain pushing south.
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the rain pushing south. wind will be a real feature and once the wind will be a real feature and once again could be some disruption. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 14th of march. our top story: last night, there was chaos and confusion in westminster when mps voted to take a no—deal brexit off the table. today they will vote on whether to delay the uk's departure from the european union. in a moment, we will take you through what might happen next, but first, our political correspondent iain watson reflecting on an extraordinary night in politics. jeering if it appeared that the protesters outside parliament last night were divided, well, wait until you see the politicians. more than a dozen of theresa may's ministers defied her last night, to rule out leaving the eu without a deal in all circumstances. the ayes to the right, 321... you could hear the sound of the prime minister's
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authority draining away, losing two crucial votes in the commons. these days, she's almost immune to defeats, so she simply set out what would happen next. it's likely there'll be another vote on the brexit deal next week. she said if it passed, well, it could be a short delay to brexit. if it doesn't pass, then brexit will take an awful lot longer. the house has to understand and accept that if it is not willing to support a deal in the coming days and as it is not willing to support leaving without a deal on the 29th of march, then it is suggesting that there will need to be a much longer extension to article 50. but the handling of last night's vote hasn't endeared the prime minister to some brexiteer rebels that she needs to win over. they're angry that no action has been taken against those ministers who failed to back their own government by abstaining. one of them, the scotland secretary, david mundell, said he had no intention of resigning. i support the prime minister in her course of action, her course of action
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is to leave with a deal, in an orderly brexit, but ijust am very clear that i don't support a no deal brexit. and this has enraged some brexiteers. they've got to go. how can they not support the government's position on the single biggest policy that faces this country right now and still be in the government? parliament has made clear it doesn't want to leave the eu without a deal, the vote though is non—binding, and theresa may is still insisting the best way of avoiding no deal is to vote for her deal. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. so, some confusion in the commons last night. what might happen next? today, mps will be voting on whether to ask the eu for permission to delay the date for departure. theresa may is proposing to submit a request to brussels for a one—off postponement until the end ofjune.
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the prime minister will warn, though, that unless her brexit deal passes in the coming days, a much lengthier delay may be required. so expect a third meaningful vote on her withdrawal agreement, before the eu summit, on the 21st of march. under current law, the uk could still leave the eu on the 29th of march with no deal. let's go to our political correspondent alex forsyth, who is in westminster. that is where the next stage of the voting will take place. alex, good morning to you. we could use lots of words right now, chaos, confusion. yourjob is to focus on mounds and what could happen in that place today. last night, again, mps, or the majority of them, said we do not wa nt the majority of them, said we do not want the uk to leave the eu without a deal. they cannot rule it out because currently the law says otherwise but they have made it very clear they are going to go pretty far to stop that happening, so it seems the prime minister's strategy now is to try and bring back a deal
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again, even though it has already been rejected twice, in the hope of somehow getting it through and i think part of the tactic is by saying look, if you don't back my deal, there could be a short extension to the process if you back my deal, but if you do not back my deal, that extension could be much longer. the hope is that that could cajole, persuade, for some brexiteers to get behind the deal. there is going to be a whole series of votes for the deal today, expect mps to put forward their ideas about what should happen next, and expect an element of uncertainty, well, obviously, to continue. alex, thank you very much. that is westminster. what has been the reaction across the channel? earlier we spoke to the eu parliament vice president mairead mcguinness, who said there was no appetite among eu leaders to needlessly extend the brexit process. we have dreadful uncertainty at the moment and the idea that we would
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have prolonged uncertainty is not good for anyone, so i do not think there is this little plot from the leaders of europe to say well, let's try this and see what happens, not at all. if anything, there is a desire to at least finish the first phase of brexit so that we can then move on to talking about the future. and our reporter adam fleming is outside the european parliament in strasbourg this morning. good morning, trying tojust good morning, trying to just really make some sense of what is happening at the moment and trying to get a view of how the eu leaders view the chaos and confusion, i think it is fairto chaos and confusion, i think it is fair to describe it, but what happened last night. well, the fascinating thing about this stage of the processes that those of us who have been watching on eu side are used to the eu knowing exactly what it wants, having guidelines written down, red lines that are basically carved into stone and eu being really straight, really precise and exactly what it wants. when it comes to extending article 50 and the brexit talks and delaying
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data brexit, they do not have a settled position. the ambassadors from the other 27 countries disgusted in brussels yesterday morning, they decided it is not going to be discussed by ministers, it is going to be discussed by the eu leaders themselves when they meet for their next summit, which is next thursday in brussels. and here all sorts of ideas, could the extension be one month, two months, three months, six months, nine months, a year or it is a bit like a game of bingo? but i think what will come down to is an extension of two options. it looks like a deal is going to go to westminster and i need some into uk law and get ready, or thing so confusing in the uk that the eu says we need a much longer extension, whether it is hold a referendum or an election, orjust for everyone to change their mind? yeah, we still do not really know, we? thank you very much.
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look at that face directly behind theresa may, as always the chancellor watching events unfold last night. many questions for this morning, what the big picture is, how the economy is looking, what about that no deal scenario that he said would be such bad news for our economy? we will be talking to him a little later on this morning to try some of those questions. prosecutors in northern ireland will announce today whether former soldiers are to be charged over the killings on bloody sunday in londonderry nearly 50 years ago. 13 people were shot dead by paratroopers at a civil rights demonstration. the subsequent 12—year inquiry, led by lord saville, concluded that the victims had posed no threat.
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and we will be speaking to jean hegarty just after 8am, —— 8am, whose brother kevin was killled on bloody sunday. were going to talk about facebook and instagram as well. when did this start? hello it was yesterday we started to get an idea that facebook was not working, and you might know that facebook also owns the a app and what's up, as well as facebook, so it is a family of apps that all stopped working yesterday. people in some cases could not logon, post m essa g es some cases could not logon, post messages or photos, and some could login but not see other people's content. it is the biggest lot of outages since 2008 and remember, it was a very different website back in 2008, it had just 150 million users. today, it is up to 2.3 billion and therefore those people are able to
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vent their frustration on the way that they know how, and other social media sites. on twitter, a lot of people are complaining about it not working. for facebook‘s part, they have said we do not really know what is causing this yet, they have said it is not a sophisticated cyber attack, what they call a ddos, sophisticated cyber attack where the hackers bombard the site with so many attacks that it stops working. —— requests that it stops working. they might be able to —— not be able to access a picture, but for businesses it is really annoying because some use it to market their businesses and services, some of them use it as a way of messaging between offices, so they are really struggling with that. facebook is saying we are working hard to get everything back online as soon as we can, we think it is all working now
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again but some people are still experiencing some small problems. the times calls it a "brexit meltdown". the daily mail claims that "chaos reigns". a daily telegraph front—page commentary says it's "a mess". so can the prime minister regain control of her brexit agenda, and what on earth will happen next? that is the big question that most people are asking this morning. we're joined by two westminster watchers, paul mason, a broadcaster and writer for the new statesman, and dia chakravarty is the daily telegraph's brexit editor. they are bothjoining us now. very good morning to you both. morning. paul, do you want to kick yourself? in which direction do you think events last night let us? well, i think the reason is that no form of brexit that is possible is actually a cce pta ble brexit that is possible is actually acceptable to people who want to exit either here in westminster, or wide out there in the country. i very strongly hope and think today
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parliament will take control of this brexit process, and will work through the possible options. there are not many of them. we see pictures of theresa may leaving downing street, she is in terrible trouble. four members of her cabinet refused to vote for her. this is unprecedented in recent parliamentary history. we are in danger of using terminology people really do not understand, when you say you think this is the time for parliament to take control, in practical terms, what do you mean? alone normally the government controls parliament, it sets the agenda, it has got a bill to withdraw from the european union and twice that bill has failed to get that bill because the mps do not believe it leaves us independent and capable of leaving europe in our own terms. —— normally. so it is now open to parliament where there is clearly some form of majority for a brexit to see if that can achieve, if not, i'm afraid it has got to go
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back to the people and a second referendum. what do you make of what you are watching? that quite interesting to watch paul mention a second referendum because we did not really hear the lead of the opposition say it recently, so that is quite interesting. it is really confusing because the government does not know what it wants, i suppose you could say that, because you could say that negotiations have been conducted in a way where even parts of the covenant it seems have not been voting for it. it is not clear to people from the outside what the parliament as a whole wants either because let's not forget, they are talking about votes now, that would include membership of the single market or membership of the customs union. we have had those votes in january and customs union. we have had those votes injanuary and injuly customs union. we have had those votes in january and in july and there was not a majority for those sorts of solutions either, so what is it that the parliament now wants
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the government to do? it is not entirely clear either, so while it can be said the government can be blamed for putting in the same legislation in front of parliament, which keeps getting voted down over and overagain, parliament which keeps getting voted down over and over again, parliament can be accused of doing the same thing, where they are trying to bring in the same things over and over again but that does not seem to be any majority for any of their ideas. can i ask you one thing, the chancellor alluded yesterday on the notion of reaching across to the leader of the opposition. we are talking to him later this morning, do you think may be at the heart of this, i hate to make this a personal thing, but do you think there is a problem between theresa may and jeremy corbyn? because you know the circumstances... did you pick up on that as well? do you think that personal thing that seems to exist is messing up what might have happened anyway because a lot of people watching a programme this morning thinking come on, get together a bit more. do you think there is a personal thing that is fundamentally going stop that?
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iaman i am an outsider so i can only say what it looks like from the outside but i do think you are picking it up. what the chancellor said very clearly was reaching out to some people in the backbenches is what i hear as well, rather than the frontbench of labour. i do think that mr corbin and his inner circle cosmic hatred for the tories is so deep. —— corbyn. if there is something they hate the most, it has got to be the tories. in their circles, calling a tory is horrible. pick up on that theme. it would be very difficult. we are in a parliamentary majority. in that institution, all labour mps hate all tories. it is not a personal thing. labour's mps have been very disciplined. voting on this which makes us a vassal state of europe, they are doing this on behalf of
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there remain and leave mps. —— constituents. i think they will be remembered, these young people marching for climate change will in 20 years remember those labour mps who backed theresa may's deal as the people who ruined this country. theresa may can only when there is if she convinces the dup in northern ireland that it won't leave them on the road to a united ireland and if she can be so right doesn't convince her own wing she can be so right doesn't convince herown wing in she can be so right doesn't convince her own wing in do something they simply don't believe in. i disagree with them on many things. good to them for sticking to principle and not signing up to this terrible deal. thank you both very much for your time this morning. good to speak to you. we will see what unfolds later. we mentioned it a few times. it seems the chancellor is at the centre of many things. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. it looks really blustery. the winds pending —— the trees bending in the wind. was it as bad? it has now moved away onto the near contribute —— continent but we have another wet and windy day. at the moment, winds are gusting at 50—60 mph. genuinely wind speeds between 45 and 55 mph. strong winds and rain at times will be the order of the day for the next few days. all these weather fronts you can see in the atlantic are all coming our way you can see in the atlantic are all coming ourway and you can see in the atlantic are all coming our way and bringing you can see in the atlantic are all coming ourway and bringing rain with them and coupled with strong winds. this morning it is a wet start. we have seen quite a bit of rain continuing itsjourney, moving towards the south—east and eventually, for most of us, it will
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clear away, followed by a plethora of showers. i say most of us but it won't quite clear the south—west of england. for you, a cloudy day with rain on and off and at times it could get into south wales. but it will brighten up, there will be sunshine with showers, some will have this hail, some will have sleet, and it will be windy. through the afternoon, winds coming down a notch but still pretty strong gusts. that means there is the risk of disruption and delays. temperatures today, five or seven in the north to 12 or 13 as we pushed down to the south. we get into a repeat performance with more cloud and rain coming in from the west accompanied by strong winds and the whole lot is going to be moving east. we will also see snow coming down in the mountains to the hills of scotland. three degrees in aberdeen but a mild 11 in plymouth and st helier.
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tomorrow, the rain clears away from the east, leaving showers in its wake. and again tomorrow, snow coming down. as well, as well as being noticeably windy, temperatures only six degrees in stornoway. 13 as we push down towards london. we are not done with this weather yet. especially on saturday when we are looking at stormy conditions coming our way. if it is more settled conditions you want, you will need to wait until monday. on saturday, another sister coming —— system coming in from the south—west will introduce strong winds especially across england, wales, some heavy rain and also at the moment, some rain and also at the moment, some rain in the hills. there is potential for disruptive snow even at lower levels across northern scotland. the timing and the position of this could change so if you have outdoor plants that make outdoor plans on saturday, stay
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tuned. we will keep you updated. i had outdoor plans, carol. were you going to play golf? i shouldn't laugh. everyone thinks you are so nice! it's just laugh. everyone thinks you are so nice! it'sjust you, you bring it out. she is wicked, you know. she is a wicked woman. let's return to our top story now. another busy day lies ahead for politicians in the house of commons, as they prepare to vote on whether to delay brexit or not. but this morning we've sent our reporterjohn maguire 200 miles away from westminster, to the city of bradford, to find out what people there think about what's going on. morning, john. if we are going to be talking about drama, drama, drama, you are aptly
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ina drama, drama, drama, you are aptly in a theatre. i wasjust thinking you might be better off at a matinee performance than on the golf course. the chamber, the floor of the house of commons is so often a place of high drama. sometimes of comedy, tragedy, fast. so what better place to be that a theatre. this is in the centre of bradford, it has been here since 1914 people are very engaged. we went out to find out what people have thought about this. been doing it two years, two and a half year. we're still getting no further forward. she's to—ing and fro—ing onjet planes. we're still in the same boat, not good. all not one, kick 'em out of parliament. i voted to remain so i'm not really passionate about what's really going on at the moment because it's not really what i wanted to do.
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i don't think it's going very well. we haven't got either a deal or no deal, we don't really know what's going to happen, we don't know whether it's going to be extended. i think we'rejust all in a back stand. they've reneged on a british people vote and that's all i say, the politicians now, to me, they're not worth the salt. i voted to remain, i still think we should remain. i think the whole thing's a joke, i think the politicians know about as much as we do — it's gobbledygook. nobody understands, we don't understand, and they're never going to agree, so, referendum...| think it'sjust a joke, i think we're in a major, major crisis. a major, major crisis. let's talk to what we're doing every hour in bradford. talking a leave of voter and remain voter. you voted to
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remain. i did. what have you thought about the last few days?” remain. i did. what have you thought about the last few days? i am concerned about what's going on on both sides. these other people be trusted to sort this out. i voted remain. i trusted to sort this out. i voted remain. lam trusted to sort this out. i voted remain. i am a doctor. i am looking to have a secure job. you, probably, after breakfast —— brexit as well. my main concern is about my patients. what will happen after brexit? what will happen about recruitment with the nhs? cancer drugs, a lot of the radioactive cancer drugs are time sensitive and they may not be useful enough to diagnose our cancer patients. research is so important for the nhs. clinical trials, people research is so important for the nhs. clinicaltrials, people won't be interested in clinical trials if
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they can't access the uk. i'm not project fear but i am concerned about my patients and this whole week has been a total farce. what is going to happen next? what do you wa nt to going to happen next? what do you want to happen, what do you think is going to happen? i think it is going to bea going to happen? i think it is going to be a mess up until the 29th. the extension and we won't have a reason for it. people just can't make a decision. it'sjust been for it. people just can't make a decision. it's just been a for it. people just can't make a decision. it'sjust been a mess for it. people just can't make a decision. it's just been a mess for the last couple of weeks. people wa nt the last couple of weeks. people want a resolution sooner rather than later, as we say, to get some certainty. i think the uncertainty makes it worse. nobody knows what's going on the way forward. my patients now are already asking about their medication. will it be safe after brexit? the answer is, i just don't know. to say that to patients who are taking life—saving drugs, painkillers, life—saving
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cancer drugs. it's a worry. it is a worry but the government is slowly getting around to ruling out no deal which hopefully will be fine. good to talk to you this morning. i want to talk to you this morning. i want to tell you one thing. as part of the bbc‘s we are bradford project. in the broadway shopping centre, you can have a go at even reading the weather. which reminds me, we much but must take you across it to our regional teams where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a 999 call made by a pensioner who died following a burglary at her home in north london has been released. i've just been burgled. you've just been burgled? yes, two—two...two young men have just entered the house and walked off with my handbag.
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maureen whale collapsed during the call which she made seconds after thieves broke into her home in barnet. police are treating her death as manslaughter and are offering a 20,000 pound reward for information. her niece says it's tragic this happened in the one place where she felt safe. she loved bells hill, we all did. it was like our safety place, it's where we grew up. it was herfor her, it was her home, she'd been there from a little girl and the fact that somebody had broken in to somewhere she felt secure is tragic. more than a quarter of 5—year—olds in london suffer from tooth decay — that's according to the london assembly's health committee. harrow has the highest rates with 40% of children having tooth decay. the committee will discuss how best to tackle the problem especially in the capital's poorest areas. city of london police are warning the public to be vigilant after a spike in thefts using distraction techniques. cctv footage shows a thief, at the bottom of the picture,
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covering the victim's mobile phone with a piece of paper before stealing it. police say the thieves often ask for directions, and target coffee shops and restaurants in the square mile. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes we have minor delays on the district line eastbound from earls court to barking, after overrunning engineering work. on the roads, westbound traffic on the a406 nth circular is slow towards the clockhouse interchange in palmers green. there's westbound traffic on the highway towards tower hill with delays back through wapping to the limehouse link. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. we had another rather wet and windy night and this morning the met office has a yellow weather warning in place once again for the high winds. gusts of 45—55 mph expected. the rain this morning will gradually clear, the gusts of wind will slowly start to ease a little through the afternoon. maybe one or two showers but some bright spells, quite a bit of cloud. temperatures not too bad,
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a maximum of 14 celsius. overnight, a repeat performance to last night's. the wind starts off reasonably light and then the rain moves in and the winds start to strengthen again. another wet and windy start to friday. temperatures between seven and nine celsius overnight. through friday, quite a cloudy affair. a blustery day and the wind quite strong. temperatures getting up to 14 celsius. unsettled for the weekend, especially for saturday. another breezy day through the afternoon, could see some rain. a brighter day for sunday but temperatures cooler. things slowly start to calm down as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. it was a night of chaos and confusion in westminster. mps voted to take a no—deal brexit off the table. today, they're going to vote on whether to delay the uk's departure from the european union. so what might happen next? let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth, who is in westminster. so help us with this one, alex. just see us so help us with this one, alex. just see us through the significance of last night and what might happen today. well, last night, mps once again said that for the most part they do not want the uk to leave the eu without a deal. in law, that is still what will happen unless a deal was agreed, mps have made it quite clear again that they are prepared to go pretty far to try and stop that, so it seems what is theresa may's strategy right now is to bring back her dealfor the
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may's strategy right now is to bring back her deal for the third time, despite the fact that has already been rejected by mps twice before in the hope that she can somehow get it through and part of that strategy, one of number ten's tactics is to say well, look, here are your options. you could vote for our brexit deal, we might need a short delay to this process to get all of the laws in place, but if you do not vote for my deal, that the later brexit, well, it could be a whole lot longer. that is what the mps are going to vote for today, the possibility of extending this process. there are going to be a lot more tussles in parliament because lots of mps are going to put forward what they think should happen next, it is worth seeing as well that in all of the commotion that happened last night, theresa may angered a lot of mps, who are frustrated, angered, annoyed with the way that she is handling this situation, so it is fairto she is handling this situation, so it is fair to say she does not have a lot of goodwill in parliament left. alex, thank you very much.
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prosecutors in northern ireland will announce today whether former soldiers are to be charged over the killings on bloody sunday in londonderry nearly 50 years ago. 13 people were shot dead by paratroopers at a civil rights demonstration. the subsequent 12 year inquiry, led by lord saville, concluded that the victims had posed no threat. a third man has been charged with murdering teenager jodie chesney in an east london park almost two weeks ago. jodie, 17, was stabbed in the back while she played music with friends near a playground in romford on the 1st of march. svenson ongakwie, who is 18, will appear before magistrates this morning. facebook is suffering the most severe outage in its history, with many of its services inaccessible to people across the world. users have been able to load the website, but not post to it. whatsapp, instagram and mobile phone app messenger — all owned by facebook — have also been disrupted. the company says it's trying to resolve the issue.
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one of the train companies behind last year's timetable chaos has been fined by the rail regulator. govia thameslink railway has been ordered to pay £5 million, after the office of rail and road found it failed to give passengers enough information. thousand ofjourneys were affected when both govia and northern introduced new times last may. the regulator says northern did take reasonable steps to keep people up to date and wouldn't be fined. forget the drum in westminster, forget it because there was drama in the pitch and some really good news, statistics wise, in terms of getting through to the champions league, the english teams. 50%, that is a brilliant run rate. you're quite right. fantastic picture behind you, virgilvan right. fantastic picture behind you, virgil van dijk, player of season you would say for this team, from liverpool. for the first time in ten years, there are four english sides through to the quarter—finals of the champions league. that's after liverpool pulled off a famous victory away at bayern munich. our sports correspondent katie gornall was watching. it has been suggested the bright lights of the champions league could be a distraction
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for liverpool this season. this, after all, is a club in the race for the premier league title, but then the top champions take everything in their stride. europe often brings out the best in liverpool. in the first half, it also brought the best from sadio mane, whose twists and turns left the great manuel neuer stranded. try telling him the away goal doesn't matter. bayern munich then needed to score two goals. joel matip made the task easier when he turned the ball into his own net. in the second half, bayern had to go for it, but their frustration was building and liverpool took full advantage. first, virgil van dijk headed them firmly in the direction of the quarter—finals, before sadio mane, who else?, delivered a diving knockout blow. whether at home or in europe, this is a team intent on making their own history, and who's to say they can't go all the way? katie gornall, bbc news. barcelona are also through
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to the quarter—finals. lionel messi was once again the inspiration, scoring two as they comfortably defeated french side lyon 5—1. tributes have been paid to one of formula 1's leading figures, the race director charlie whiting, who has died suddenly at the age of 66. whiting was the official race starter and oversaw all rules matters in f1. he passed away suddenly in melbourne, where he was due to officiate this weekend's season—opening australian grand prix. four—time world champion sebastian vettel has called him, "our man, the drivers's man". valteri bottas has tweeted: former formula 1 world champion damon hill tweeted a picture, simply saying "godspeed charlie". jenson button has posted a touching tribute on instagram.
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the cheltenham festival continues today after history was made at the course on day two. there had been fears over the weather but the wind and rain couldn't stop altior achieving a record—equalling18th straight win in the queen mother champion chase. jockey nico de boinville had to dig deep, making it a 63rd festival victory for trainer nicky henderson and his sixth in the race. the two—time olympic champion james cracknell looks likely to become the oldest person to compete in the boat race, when the crews are announced later this morning. cracknell, who is 46, retired from elite rowing in 2006, but qualifies because he's studying a masters degree at cambridge. he won gold in the coxless fours at both the 2000 and 2004 olympic games. so it is not confirmed yet but that is looking like it is going to happen, 46. yeah, but he is a proven winner clearly. he has some history there and he knows what he's doing. he does. we're trying to unravel what yesterday in the commons in
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parliament. let's talk to the chancellor of the exchequer, phillip hammond, who is joining chancellor of the exchequer, phillip hammond, who isjoining us knowing westminster studio. good morning to you, did you speak well —— sleep well because i can only imagine what a busy and chaotic day you had yesterday? yes, these are busy times, it is challenging as we are trying to manage an evolving situation in real time, so lots of meetings last night as you would imagine, then more meetings this morning after i had done this. we have got to ask you, we're going what happened yesterday. lots of questions coming through the mall viewers as well. you abstained from the vote, yet you have consistently told us that no deal is bad for the uk. you abstained from supporting it, all you voted against it, i should say, sorry, he voted against it. why did you do that, going against everything you've said, particularly on this programme? yellow so i voted against the so—called amendments, amendment a
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and when that amendment carried, it effectively became the substantive motion and my logic is that having voted against it wants, needed to voted against it wants, needed to vote against it again. but the substance of this is that the problem with the spelman amendment is that it does not answer the question that the prime minister has posed so many times, if you reject no deal, how are you going to deliver that? -- so i voted against. one option is to vote for a deal on the other is to withdraw the article 50 letter and have no brexit, there was clearly no appetite in the house of commons to do that, to withdraw the article 50 letter. —— there is. so the house of commons has to support a deal, it has twice rejected the prime minister's deal,
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there is no consensus on the house of commons about any other credible and negotiable proposition, so the house of commons now has to work out how it will go forward. it is no good just voting demonstratively to say we don't want no deal, the house of commons has now got to decide what it does want and i continue to think that the deal that we have negotiated is a perfectly good way forward. it is not perfect, it does not meet everybody‘s precise requirements but it is a compromise solution that will allow the nation to move forward, and i still hope that enough of my colleagues, when they think about the alternatives, will decide this is the best way forward. when you delivered your spring statement yesterday, which actually is what we would have been talking about today really, if it was not all that happened night. you made clear that prime minister
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theresa may needs to reach consensus with others to reach a deal and there were a of raised eyebrows when you made that comment. do you think it is time that theresa may bends? she has been seen as someone who has a rigid sofa. well, the prime minister believes passionately that the deal that she has negotiated is the deal that she has negotiated is the best way forward. —— so far. it was a very the best way forward. —— so far. it was a very complex negotiation and it delivers for the country, yet, without putting us into a customs union, it gives us many of the benefits of being in a customs union, yet it allows us the ability to continue to make trade deals on our own with third countries. it is a very carefully crafted compromise in itself, and it has a huge amount of merit. but the house has rejected it twice now and i think yesterday, i was merely stating the blindingly obvious, that the house has to come
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together around a proposition that a majority of the house can support because otherwise, we can't move forward. the house of commons voting night after night to tell us what it does not want to happen is simply not good enough, the house of commons has got to face the facts. it has to decide what it does want and that will mean a lot of my collea g u es and that will mean a lot of my colleagues and a lot of people in other parts of the house having to compromise and recognise that in the real world , compromise and recognise that in the real world, you have to reach a consensus, and that means everybody getting perhaps not exactly what they wanted. do you think that will happen? do you think then, or tell me, is the next thing that theresa may asks for her deal to be voted on again, before march the 20th, which is the kind of deadline she has put down to save her deal has to be supported by in orderfor down to save her deal has to be supported by in order for there to just be a short extension and for us
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to leave the eu? well, what the prime minister said yesterday and she is absolutely right is that the european union is prepared, we believe, to grant a short extension if we reached agreement on a have deal, and we need time to legislate to put that in place. but if we have not reached agreement on a deal, if we are merely looking for more time to decide what the house of commons wa nts to to decide what the house of commons wants to do, how we want to go forward , wants to do, how we want to go forward, it is not at all clear that the european union is going to be prepared to give us a short extension. they may very well insist ona extension. they may very well insist on a much longer extension, which we re on a much longer extension, which were some of my colleagues who voted against prime minister's deal, that will be an extremely challenging place for us to be on some of them to think again if the choice is between the prime minister's deal and a long extension of the article 50. . by default, what you are saying then is that there will be a third vote, there needs to be a vote
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before march 30, so am i to assume that that is going to be the case? i'm not going to set up the government's plan for the business of the house, that will be done in the proper way later on today and house of commons. so today, we will definitely know if there will be a third vote? well, we will have a business statement later today but this is a very dynamic situation. some of my colleagues who voted against prime minister's deal are now realising where this is taking us now realising where this is taking us and are reviewing their position, and this is about working with collea g u es and this is about working with colleagues in the house of commons to make sure people understand precisely what the options are here, because it is clear that the house of commons has to come to a common view around a deal. i hope that will be the prime minister's deal, but it is clear to me that the house of commons, over the next days, weeks, will come to a conclusion on this, it has to come to a conclusion on
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this because the nation has to move forward. to be fair, you've only got a week, it is not days or weeks, is it, it is one week before march the 20th? i'm confident that the house of commons is going to vote tonight to seek an extension. if you want that extension to be a short technical extension in order to approve the deal, then yes, we have in the next few days to reach agreement on that deal. otherwise, we are likely to be in a place where the extension has to be longer and, we then of course have more time to look at options for different approaches to a deal in the future. i tell you what, many, a lot of the impression about what is happening at the moment in parliament and particularly with the conservative party is that theresa may is holding on bya party is that theresa may is holding on by a thread, she has a divided cabinet, many of whom have abstained on the boat yesterday, it appears that she has lost control even though there was a whip, that party members should have towed the party
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line, so to speak, is a cabinet divided and is a prime minister who is literally clinging onto any semblance of loyalty at the moment? well, i do not think i am giving away any state secrets to say that there are different views on these issues within the cabinet, they a lwa ys issues within the cabinet, they always have been and the cabinet itself reflects the different views that there are in the party and indeed, in the country, but every single person in the cabinet is committed to the principle that we need to leave their opinion, that we need to leave their opinion, that we need to leave their opinion, that we need to do it in good order, in an orderly way, and that leaving without a deal is not the right way to leave in good order and to protect our economy, ourjobs, our businesses. so we all agreed on that, and the challenge now is to find a way through to a parliamentary majority on a deal that will allow us to leave the
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european union in good order. yet you voted to take us to a no deal.” voted against an amended motion that did not provide a solution, it said we do not like no deal, but it did not set out how we will proceed to find a way forward. the house of commons now has to focus on what it does support, not simply repeatedly asserting what it does not support. if you were a member of the public watching what is going on now, watching what is going on now, watching these people who we have elected to take control of this brexit process, what would you think? would you be proud? well, i'm very conscious of the fact that the public just wants this very conscious of the fact that the publicjust wants this done, but there are very strongly held views on both sides of this argument and there are colleagues in parliament, collea g u es there are colleagues in parliament, colleagues in my own party with whose view i profoundly disagree,
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but i respect the fact that they hold those he is very sincerely, in some cases have been professing those fees for 20, 30, 40 years. and i think people have the right to express those views clearly, but we also have a duty to ensure that the country can move forward and that will mean that we have to compromise, we all have to compromise. nobody is going to get the perfect brexit out of this. we have to have a brexit that represents a compromise, that reflects the fact that actually the nation was divided pretty much down the middle in the referendum in 2016 and we have got to provide the brexit that brings the nation back together again. chancellor phillip hammond, thank you for talking to us.
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it is time for us to go to somebody who can predict things with incredible accuracy. at the moment we have winds gusting between 45 and 55 mph. the met office has a yellow weather warning out to that end. even in the next few days, we are still looking at a strong winds with rain at times. with all these weather fronts coming in and —— coming our way. behind with all these weather fronts coming in and —— coming ourway. behind it, we see a lot of showers in its wake. some will be heavy, some will have hail, some will have sleet embedded. most of this morning's of weather will clear but it will linger across a south—west england. at times it will swing into south wales. a fair bit of sunshine around as well. a
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lot of dry weather but don't forget the strong winds. this afternoon, even though the winds will have eased a touch, it will still be gusty wherever you are and once again it could lead to delays and disruption. temperatures today between five in the north two highs of 11, 12 or13 in between five in the north two highs of 11, 12 or 13 in the south. through this evening and overnight, we go back into almost an action replay as we see more cloud coming in through the west, some heavy rain and strong winds and that will all be pushing eastwards through the night with snow coming down across the scottish hills. temperatures, three in aberdeen, 11 in plymouth and st helier. tomorrow morning, we see the rain clear off into the north sea and once again, behind it, a lot of showers. a lot of them heavy and wintry. for southern areas, again some patchy rain coming in across south—west england and also wales. temperatures ranging again at five in the north to about
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13 in the south. by the time we get to saturday, it is looking fairly stormy. rain coming in from the south—west, accompanied from strong winds especially across england and wales. hill snow but there is the chance of disruptive snow in —— even at lower levels across the north of england. the timing could all change so if we do have outdoor plans, keep in touch with the forecast. it is the type of weather today to ta ke it is the type of weather today to take a bus. what you wouldn't want to be doing is waiting for the bus stop because it will get wet and windy and silent places are getting better. what is going on on the buses, then? a p pa re ntly apparently we made 4 billion bus
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trips and that is over half of all public transport journeys. more trips and that is over half of all public transportjourneys. more than half of those journeys took place in the capital, in london. but if you add all of them together, we now add twice the amount of bus trips as train trips. a survey of nearly 50,000 bus passengers by the watchdog has found the vast majority of those making those journeys are satisfied. that's much better than for rail. linda mccord is from transport focus — the independent transport user watchdog who conducted this survey. we are happy. this is a good story in the sense that on the whole, most people taking these buses are pretty satisfied with the service they get. it is particularly great to see in
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our survey that young people, the service has increased for them because we have been campaigning to really see that grade buses are great means to young people to travel. really good news. buses are great means. also important to our lives, to the economy. they are fundamental. for people who need them, they really need them. 5096 of our survey people said they really rely on the bus. it is the main means of them to be able to travel around the place. so it is really important that buses are reliable and punctual and that is what our survey is showing. it is not the same right around the country. the range of satisfaction was from 96% -- 60%. range of satisfaction was from 96% —— 60%. people use buses.
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range of satisfaction was from 96% -- 6096. people use buses. if you are paying 50, 60, 70 quid -- 6096. people use buses. if you are paying 50, 60,70 quid for -- 6096. people use buses. if you are paying 50, 60, 70 quid for a train journey, your expectation of that will be higher. does that figure in this? no matter what you pay, you are paying for something. it should be to get an excellent service. for bus passages, there is no reason why we shouldn't be getting a great service. bus passengers should be getting —— getting that great service like rail and other things. what can the train companies learn from the buses because seemingly the buses are doing something right. one of the things we know from our passenger survey is what drives excellent satisfaction is the bus driver. it is the interaction with people. i think you get on the bus and there is somebody there. i do know this is not the same right across the country. you get a smile,
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there is a greeting. you probably get a seat. all of those things are extremely important for people and bus is getting that right. it makes a change to talk about a good story. thank you for talking to us and linda. a little bit disconcerting. it's george michael! the reason you are seeing that picture is george michael's private art collection. we are there at the oxford —— auction house. if you think of george michael, you think of the amazing singing voice, the amazing music. you probably don't think art collector but it turns out that that was an important passion of his. many works that belonged to him are being auctioned. some of things by
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damien hirst. what does this tell us about george michael? think about a journey through young british art movements. all of the artists from the college. angus fairhurst, damien hirst. if you listen to his songs, it is always a story. it is the same in this case. he really championed these artists and bought these works during the 90s? they bought these works between 2005 and 2009. what
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insight did this give into his world ? insight did this give into his world? what insight into his life do you think it gives us? one is sense of humourand you think it gives us? one is sense of humour and the other is rebellion. george michael was a rebellion. george michael was a rebel so he was like that make against the establishment. he was against the establishment. he was against the establishment writing his songs and choreographing his songs. and the money is going through good —— going to good services? that is important. few of us services? that is important. few of us know that throughout his life he was one of the most generous artists and people. all of the money goes to charity. a fascinating look around. an ongoing auction. it gives you an insight into george michael and some
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fascinating pieces. having a look around a little later. here is the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sara orchard. a third person has been charged with the murder of london teenager, jodie chesney. the 18 year old was stabbed to death in a park in harold hill two weeks ago. 18 year old svenson ong—a—kwie from romford will appear at barkingside magistrates court today. a 999 call made by a pensioner who died following a burglary at her home in north london has been released. i've just been burgled. you've just been burgled? yes, two—two...two young men have just entered the house and walked off with my handbag. maureen whale collapsed during the call which she made seconds after thieves broke into her home in barnet. police are treating her death as manslaughter and are offering a twenty thousand pound reward for information. her niece says it's tragic this happened in the one place where she felt safe.
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she loved bells hill, we all did. it was like our safety place, it's where we grew up. it was herfor her, it was her home, she'd been there from a little girl and the fact that somebody had broken in to somewhere she felt secure is tragic. more than a quarter of 5—year—olds in london suffer from tooth decay — that's according to the london assembly's health committee. harrow has the highest rates with 40% of children having tooth decay. the committee will discuss how best to tackle the problem especially in the capital's poorest areas. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes we have minor delays on the district line eastbound from earls court to barking, after overrunning engineering work. the overg round also has minor delays. there are southbound delays on the a3 heading out of new malden towards the tolworth underpass.
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there's westbound traffic on the highway towards tower hill with delays back through wapping to the limehouse link. in the city, bishopsgate is down to one lane southbound at leadenhall street for works with delays back to threadneedle st. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. we had another rather wet and windy night and this morning the met office has a yellow weather warning in place once again for the high winds. gusts of 45—55 mph expected. the rain this morning will gradually clear, the gusts of wind will slowly start to ease a little through the afternoon. maybe one or two showers but some bright spells, quite a bit of cloud. temperatures not too bad, a maximum of 14 celsius. overnight, a repeat performance to last night's. the wind starts off reasonably light and then the rain moves in and the winds start to strengthen again. another wet and windy start to friday. temperatures between seven and nine celsius overnight. through friday, quite a cloudy affair. a blustery day and the wind quite strong. temperatures getting up to 14 celsius. unsettled for the weekend, especially for saturday. another breezy day through the afternoon,
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could see some rain. a brighter day for sunday but temperatures cooler. things slowly start to calm down as we head into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: dramatic scenes in the house of commons where mps voted to take no—deal off the table. the prime minister struggling, with her voice, remained defiant. the legal default... listen! the legal default in uk and eu law remains that the uk will leave
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the eu without a deal unless... interjections. ..unless something else is agreed. today mps vote on whether to delay brexit as the government confirms it will bring theresa may's deal back to the commons. the chancellor told us he thought it might be third time lucky. some of my colleagues who voted against the prime minister's deal are now realising where this is taking us and are reviewing their position. the long—awaited decision on whether former soldiers will be prosecuted for their part in the bloody sunday shootings in 1972 will be announced this morning. back online after its biggest ever outage. social network giant facebook and its whatsapp and instagram apps stopped working around the world in the most severe breakdown in their history yesterday. liverpool become the fourth english
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side through to the quarterfinals of the champions league. two goals from sadio mane help them to a famous victory against bayern munich. good morning. another wet and windy day ahead with heavy rain pushing south eastwards at the moment. behind it, showers, some with hail and sleet, but there will be some sunshine and the wind will be a feature that could lead to some disruption again. more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday the 14th of march. it was a night of chaos and confusion in westminster as mps voted to take a no—deal brexit off the table. today they will vote on whether to delay the uk's departure from the european union. theresa may is willing to ask brussels for a one—off postponement until the end ofjune. but she will warn that unless her deal passes in the coming days, a much lengthier delay may be required. these are about the choices that this house faces.
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the legal default... the legal default in uk and eu law remains that the uk will leave the eu without a deal unless... interjections. ..unless something else is agreed. the onus is now on every one of us in this house to find out what that is. one of those who had previously warned of the dangers of no deal was chancellor philip hammond, who spoke to us a few minutes ago. it is not at all clear that the european union will be prepared to give us a short extension. they may very well insist on a much longer extension, which for some of my colleagues, who voted against the prime minister's deal, that will be an extremely challenging place for us an extremely challenging place for us to be and some of them will want to think again if the choice is between the prime minister's deal and a long extension of the article 50 period. so what happens now?
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let's speak to our political correspondent alex forsyth who is in westminster for us this morning. we got a hint from the chancellor that people might be prepared to change their minds as the deadline looms, and it was clear that we will be asking for a much longer extension request to the eu.” be asking for a much longer extension request to the eu. i think it isa extension request to the eu. i think it is a hope rather than a hint. this is part of theresa may's strategy now. parliament have made it very clear that they will go to
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extreme lengths to stop the uk leaving without a deal in place and she is going to attempt to bring her deal back for a third time, overturn the previous defeats, somehow persuade people to get behind it. and part of that is the tactic of saying that if you do not back my deal, we could be looking at a very long extension to this process, which she knows will leave some brexiteers very unhappy. we are told that there are still conversations ongoing between brexiteer mps and with the dup and members of the government about the deal, about what might be able to be changed, what might be able to be changed, what might be able to be changed, what might bring the dup and brexiteers on board. it is pretty clear that the prime minister's deal is not dead altogether. she is still pursuing that strategy. it is worth noting that what happened here at last night, with scenes of chaos and confusion, and a lot of people pretty angry about the way the government is handling this process. the government and the prime minister do not have a lot of goodwill left. all she can do is persuade brexiteers and the dup that she has got a deal that they can support but that will not be an easy task. and all of this with divisions in the conservative party and in the labour party, all around how they we re labour party, all around how they were told they could or could not vote as well. and all of that is coming through as well. it is pretty confusing stuff but to put it blu ntly, confusing stuff but to put it bluntly, this rule about whether or not the uk should leave without a deal. the government said they don't like the idea of leaving without a deal on the 29th of march but lots of mps said we should rule it out
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altogether. eventually they overruled the government. the number of ministers did not support theresa may, leading some to suggest she had lost control of the process. some said there was total confusion about what was going on, which shows that this was a government without a grip on what is happening. number 10 would dispute all of that of course. it is a sign not just dispute all of that of course. it is a sign notjust of these extraordinary times but how this wrestling between parliament, the divided mps, the government, is all just adding to the uncertainty over brexit. i think we will see another similar day today in the commons as they talk about this option of extending the process. lots of strong very different views and probably strong very different views and pro ba bly lots strong very different views and probably lots of arguments. thank you for that, alex. and adam fleming, our europe reporter, looks to be ina fleming, our europe reporter, looks to be in a very calm place beside the canal in strasbourg, in contrast to what we saw here. the vote today is about delaying brexit, which would mean requesting from the eu
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some kind of extension. if that happens, and it is a big if, pending the vote, what will they say? ok, so the vote, what will they say? ok, so the eu, and we are used to them having a really strong, detailed, precise position about everything, they don't have one on extending brag that. it is an ongoing discussion which will only be concluded when the 27 other leaders it down at their summit in brussels next thursday. but somebody watching it from the eu side, it is quite exciting to watch it unfold, if a little bit uncertain. the parameters are becoming quite clear. the eu says the deal on the table is it. no more changes. it is done and dusted. i think if it came to a short extension, a short delay of brexit, because it looked like a deal was about to go through in the uk, i think the eu would be ok with that. if things were a bit more chaotic and confusing and there was going to bea and confusing and there was going to be a long extension, then the eu would want to have a really good reason for why that was happening
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and they might insist that the uk ta kes and they might insist that the uk takes part in the european parliament elections which are due on the 23rd of may. as i said, those are some broad parameters. in terms of the settled eu position, who knows? they will wait to see what happens in the uk and what theresa may tells them and what she asks for and what they decide when they have the summit next thursday. stay tuned! will do. thank you, adam. prosecutors in northern ireland will announce today whether former soldiers are to be charged over the killings on bloody sunday in londonderry nearly 50 years ago. 13 people were shot dead by paratroopers at a civil rights demonstration. the subsequent 12—year inquiry, led by lord saville, concluded that the victims had posed no threat. we are used to taking to social media to complain about things in
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our lives, but now people are complaining about the social media! what has happened? people are complaining about the social outage on twitter, so things are going full circle. late afternoon yesterday, facebook was experiencing problems. people could not log on, post, upload pictures, those things. they also owns instagram and whatsapp, and this family of programmes all stop working. it is the biggest outage in their history. the last time this happened was in 2008, but think back 11 years, it was a very different website. it had, and i say just, 150 million users, and now it has got 2.3 billion users, so an outage of this scale is bound to have a big effect. facebook say they don't know what had caused this but they have made it clear it is not a certain type of cyber attack, a distributed denial of service, which is essentially when hackers put loads of visitors and traffic onto
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it to try and overload the website so it stops working. they say it was not that that they have not told us what it was. or denied that it was another type of hack? exactly. a lot of concern about what was behind all of concern about what was behind all of this. it could be something strange, technical, somebody with a wire somewhere, or something more sinister and we are trying to get a nswe rs. sinister and we are trying to get answers. it might be inconvenient for us not to be able to share things, but a lot of businesses say this is very disruptive for them. there is a marketplace where people sell things and people use a business version of facebook for their communication between offices. it has had a real impact. 2.3 billion monthly users, all affected by the outage, and we are told it is now back online but some people are reporting some problems. thank you. one of the train companies behind last year's timetable chaos has been fined by the rail regulator. govia thameslink railway has been ordered to pay £5 million
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after the office of rail and road found it failed to give passengers enough information. thousands ofjourneys were affected when both govia and northern introduced new schedules last may. the regulator says northern did take reasonable steps to keep people up to date and wouldn't be fined. it is 8:11am. carol will have the weather shortly. the long—awaited decision on whether former soldiers will be prosecuted for their part in the bloody sunday shootings in londonderry over half a century ago will be announced later. on that day injanuary1972 paratroopers shot dead 13 innocent civilians who were on a civil rights march. jean hegarty‘s brother kevin mcelhinney was one of those killed and she joins us from derry now. thank you very much for your time this morning. i know for you and yourfamily this morning. i know for you and your family today is a very important day. if you wouldn't mind, would you tell us a bit about what you know about what happened to
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kevin on that day? kevin was shot. the bullet entered his body between his buttocks and travelled up through his body and exited around his armpit. it was very clear from the injuries that he was shot as he was crawling away from the soldiers, trying to find safety. when did you first know about what had happened to him? at that time i lived in canada and i didn't know until canadian time, about six o'clock the following morning. in the immediate aftermath, a number of things were said, and! aftermath, a number of things were said, and i know they were deeply hurtful to you and your family, about those who had been shot and killed. just tell us. for many people, possibly hearing the story for the first time, just tell us a bit about the immediate aftermath. at six o'clock in canada on the sunday evening, i heard the news,
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andi sunday evening, i heard the news, and i thought, oh my god, that is derry. the news was they had shot gunmen and bombers. immediately your mind turns to that, i don't know any gunmen and bombers. i was concerned that it was my home town but other than that i was not really concerned. i went to bed that night unconcerned. i didn't know any gunmen and bombers. that was the impression in canada and that was the impression for a very long time. thanks to the british army's reports, they had killed gunmen and bombers, and that was the story of the world knew until saville changed that. the saville report was an important moment for you. just give us important moment for you. just give usa important moment for you. just give us a sense important moment for you. just give us a sense of what that meant for you at the time. it was a huge moment for us. it was finally the declaration of innocence that we needed to hear, and we needed to hear it from the british government. david cameron spoke in the house of
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commons and it made it all the more important. it made that statement go out to the world. jean, is it your career believe now that there should be prosecutions? is that what you and yourfamily be prosecutions? is that what you and your family believe? our family believes if there is evidence there, it should be taken to the natural conclusion as evidence, as any case should be. today is a hugely significant date on that basis because you will find out whether or not those proceedings will take place. are you prepared to accept whatever decision is made? will that be an end for you, if for example the prosecutions are not pursued? if that decision is made, will you be able to leave it? how will that sit for you? i guess a lot will depend on the prosecution service being able to convince us that if there is no evidence to prosecute, if the
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public prosecution service can convince us of that, then i don't see that we have much choice. everything will depend on the findings of the prosecution service. it is in their hands and we have no control. my apologies. you will be well aware that there are other to look at this very differently. i quote for you colonel richard kemp, who was there at the time as a serving soldier. he said very recently, "i think you have got to really question whether it is in the national interests now to prosecute these soldiers." he went on to say that they were very young men and it was maybe that there is experience of real combat. the question he is asking is whether it is in the national interest. when you hear that argument, and others have made that argument, and others have made that argument, and others have made that argument, what is the point after this time, what do you say? well, you must consider that this was a paratrooper regiment. these we re was a paratrooper regiment. these were not young, fresh soldiers, they
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we re were not young, fresh soldiers, they were experienced soldiers in the paratroop regiment, so take that into consideration. what is in the national interest? surely truth is in the national interest. you are in contact with all the other families involved and there are many people who will be touched by this personally. is there unanimity? does everybody think this is the right way to go? i mean, there are 28 families involved, well, 31 families involved in bloody sunday and of course there is a range of views, but i think the majority of families wa nt but i think the majority of families want prosecutions. the reason being for you that you still have questions that you don't think were sufficiently answered in the saville report? is that right? saville was quite clear that he named two soldiers who he thought were responsible for my brother's death. the prosecution service are
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investigating three soldiers in the case of my brother's death. it all depends on the evidence. we really need to know what evidence is there and it should be followed. we thank you for your time this morning. jean hegarty speaking to us this morning. we will find out later today whether or not those prosecutions will go ahead. 8:17am. let's talk to carol and find out what is happening with the weather. lots of people facing the weather. lots of people facing the aftermath of storm gareth. that is right and it will be wet and windy again today and actually for the next few days as well. we have had some lovely weather pictures in. you can see this double rainbow here. we have had rain moving south, and when that clear today we will be looking at lots of showers with sunshine in its wake, along with strong winds back row. for the next few days, that is the forecast. all these weather fronts in the atlantic are all coming our way, bearing
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rain, and as well as the rain, it will be windy. recent gusts of 77 mph, and in cumbria at 63 mph, and in wales, 62 mph, all fairly exposed, and if you add in the rain, difficult travelling conditions. the met office has a whether morning thatis met office has a whether morning that is yellow for winds gusting up to 55 mph. —— whether warning. showers will be blown in on the strong north—westerly wind. by the afternoon, the winds will have eased afternoon, the winds will have eased a bit but these values are the gusts, and it will still be gusty into the afternoon. that could lead to further disruption and some delays. temperatures are fairly academic that we are looking at five to 13. this evening and overnight after a brief respite, the next system after a brief respite, the next syste m co m es after a brief respite, the next system comes in from the west with all this cloud, rain and strong winds again. it is all pushing east
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across the uk with some snow over the hills of scotland. temperatures at three in aberdeen to a very mild 11 at st helier and plymouth. tomorrow morning we see the back edge of that rain pushed off into the sea. behind it, a lot of showers, and some sunshine, but the snow levels over the hills in scotla nd snow levels over the hills in scotland will be coming down. in the west today we are hanging onto cloud and rain but tomorrow it will get into parts of wales. temperatures five to 13. as we head into saturday, we are looking at some strong conditions, and some of us will see some snow. the positioning of all of this could change, so keep in touch with the forecast. we are looking at strong winds, especially england and wales, with rain coming in from the south—west and moving north. on its leading edge we will see some snow over the hills in ireland, northern england and
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southern scotland, but there is the potential for disruptive snow at lower levels in northern scotland, which we are keeping a very close eye on. so am i, keeping a very close eye on it. thank you. i am delighted to hear it!” close eye on it. thank you. i am delighted to hear it! i am paying no attention whatsoever! we are going back to our main story this morning. from the heart of westminster, what happened last night, speaking to the chancellor and others, but it is interesting to hear what people elsewhere are taking in what is going on. john maguire has managed to escape the westminster bubble and he is 200 miles away and why wouldn't you be there? the sun is shining on bradford this morning. you are embracing the dramatic nature of this story, i see. yes, you can smell it. the smell of the greasepaint and all that business. the alhambra theatre. there has been
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a theatre in bradford for more than 100 years bringing to the people of bradford in that time comedy, tragedy, drama, fast. just the type of thing we have seen in a palace of westminster 200 miles away in that bubble down south. that is still people here are very engaged and interested in what has been happening and in what is going to happen. so let's talk about that with a couple of guests in just a minute. but first, this is what people made of the events of last night's no—deal votes. been doing it two years, two and a half year. we're still getting no further forward. she's to—ing and fro—ing onjet planes. we're still in the same boat, not good. all not one, kick 'em out of parliament. i voted to remain so i'm not really
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partial about what's really going on at the moment because it's not really what i wanted to do. i don't think it's going very well. we haven't got either a deal or no deal, we don't really know what's going to happen, we don't know whether it's going to be extended. i think we're just all in a back stand. they've reneged on a british people vote and that's how i see the politicians now. to me, they're not worth the salt. i voted to remain, i still think we should remain. i think the whole things a joke. i think the politicians know about as much as we do. it's gobbledygook. nobody understands, we don't understand, and they're never going to agree. so, referendum? i think it'sjust a joke. i think we're in a major, major crisis. gobbledygook seems to sum up lots of people's sentiments. it is not a word i would have used. terry, we
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have met before. when did we last meet? the first day after the referendum, yes. and what has changed since then? optimism. it was really optimistic then. thinking we might go forward and change things i know i am feeling rather depressed at the ineptitude of our politicians. that seems to be a theme that is coming through this morning, that kind of sense of despair and despondency, if you like. you voted to remain. what have you thought of the show so far?” think whether you were pessimistic or optimistic the day after the referendum, it is clear that this government has not been able to come and resolve this issue. i have lost faith that this is ever going to be resolved in the current format and i don't know what will happen in the next couple of weeks.” don't know what will happen in the next couple of weeks. i don't suppose anybody does, really. there does need to be a resolution somehow, doesn't there? what would you like to happen now? if you were in theresa may's leopard—skin shoes with a packet of cough sweets, what
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would you be saying and trying to do? i would say first of all that i am very disappointed. we gave you our faith to sort this out and you have led us into a total mess. why don't we leave on world trade organisation rules? we keep talking about living with no deal but it wouldn't be no deal, it would be under wto rules, and that seems to be the least worst option at the moment to me. what do you want to happen now? i think the only way forward is a general election. parliament is in gridlock and it has clearly demonstrated it cannot come toa clearly demonstrated it cannot come to a consensus on this. it needs to go back to the general public and we need political parties to state very clearly what the impact will be, whether brexit is extended, whether we leave on the 29th of march, what impact it will have on local people like myself, what is going to happen going forward. and when parliament is so divided, a lot of it is along party lines but a lot of it isn't. do you think that mps can come up
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with an answer? i think the first thing that should have happened is some kind of cross—party process. there were as many labour mps and constituents who voted to leave as tory ones, so i never understood why the government insisted it was a lwa ys the government insisted it was always going to be a conservative driven process. that is interesting. there has been a bit more dialogue in recent weeks, we have been led to believe there has any way, but no real progress again. each of the vote that the opposition has put have through been defeated and the government has been defeated, and now it really rests on the general public and what is to make a decision on what happens next. you are talking about another election
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rather than a second vote, the people's vote, as people call it? if it gets to that point, i think a second referendum would need to be very practical, not something abstract like it was in 2016. every single person who voted voted with a different idea in mind of what that would entail and you will not make everybody happy based on that. something practical. notjust yes or no but this is what will happen. that is the only thing that will drive us out of the gridlock that we are in. do you think it is having an impact on people's lives yet? we haven't got there yet. people who are running businesses are tearing their hair out. they have no idea what is going to happen. even when we we re what is going to happen. even when we were not sure in terms of deals and terms that we would be leaving on, the government hadn't produced any papers or information about how things might be in terms of tariffs. it really is very difficult for people running businesses at the moment. thank you. fascinating to hear your views and all the views that we have heard from various people across bradford this morning. the we are bradford project is going on at the moment and the bbc are inviting you to come down and tell your story in the shopping centre. you can have a go at reading the weather and try out some virtual
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reality technology. now we will go to the newsrooms across the uk for news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast. good morning. storm gareth may have passed, but we have more wet and windy weather throughout this morning. we could see gusts high enough to bring some breeze down, certainly branches down, and a lot of rainfor certainly branches down, and a lot of rain for this morning clearing southwards with puddles on the roads. quite widely across the uk, wind gusts of about 35 to 50 mph but for much of england, east wales this morning him as high as 60 to 65 mph for a short time. rain clears away to the south and lingers in the south—west later this afternoon, still quite cloudy for northern ireland. otherwise, sunny spells and a few showers this afternoon. the
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wind is easing off slightly, maximum temperatures up to 8—13dc. this evening, there will be clear skies initially in the east, but more cloud, more rain spreads in from the west and almost like a repeat performance of today. that clears away to the south, lingering in southern areas with sunny spells and showers elsewhere.
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