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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  March 14, 2019 2:00pm-4:46pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at a: in just over an hour's time, mps will vote on extending the brexit process — if they say "yes" then it's hello — you're watching afternoon live. up to the eu to agree. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: mps prepare to vote on extending the brexit process — with the government confirming there will a third attempt to get if they say "yes" then it's up to the eu to agree. theresa may's withdrawal agreement through — the dup says with the government confirming it's still considering there will a third attempt to get whether or not to back her. we want to get a deal, but, it has theresa may's withdrawal agreement through — the dup says to be the right deal for it's still considering northern ireland. whether or not to back her. it has to be the right deal for the whole of the united kingdom. we want to get a deal, but, it has a former soldier is to be to be the right deal for prosecuted over the bloody sunday northern ireland. shootings in londonderry. it has to be the right deal the paratrooper will be charged with the murders of james wray for the whole of the united kingdom. and william mckinney, as well as the attempted murder of four others. a former soldier is to be prosecuted over the bloody sunday a decision has been taken shootings in londonderry. the paratrooper will be charged to prosecute one former with the murders of james wray and william mckinney — as well as the attempted soldier, soldier f, murder of four others. for the murder ofjames wray, and for the murder of william mckinney. a decision has been taken 13 people were shot to prosecute one former soldier, soldier f, dead at a civil rights march on 30 january 1972. their relatives insist their for the murder ofjames wray,
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campaign "is not finished yet". and for the murder justice forjim is one thing, of william mckinney. but my heart is broke. it's been a very black day 13 people were shot dead at a civil for the rest of the family. rights march on 30th january, 1972. their relatives insist their campaign "is not finished yet." riding high, as paisely park, justice forjim is one thing, the horse that nearly died — but my heart is broke. wins the stayers' hurdle, it's been a very black day to the delight of his owner for the rest of the family. three at cheltenham. coming up on afternoon coming up on afternoon live, live, all the sport. that with ollie. we'll have the all the sport with 0lly. we have had some terrific stories at latest from mathilde herman of the cheltenham today, not just we have had some terrific stories at cheltenham today, notjust that one. racing already on dave lee. with the history was made with briony frost, final six nations we can fast she became the first female jockey to wina approaching, there are some she became the first female jockey to win a grade one race at the surprising chimneys from the england festival. away from racing, some camp. more details to come. let's go very important team news ahead of to darren bett for the details of the final six nations weekend. details coming up. the weather. it is notjust hot air, thanks, 0lly. we have some chilly air across the and darren has all the weather. uk, sunshine and showers today. to it is like deja vu all over again. be windy tomorrow and into saturday, tomorrow because mac weather much by then, some heavy reading and like today, early rain clearing and possibly some snow around as well. then sunshine and showers but trouble is brewing for saturday.
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also coming up: limbering up — paisley park what am i talking about? join me is the horse who nearly died. can he, and his owner, deliver later to find out. a cheltenham fairy tale? hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. in the next hour, mps will begin voting once again on brexit — i'm simon mccoy. welcome to afternoon this time on the issue live from westminster. in three hours‘ time mps will begin of whether there should be a delay to the process, voting once again on brexit — this time, on the issue until the end ofjune, subject to approval from the eu. of whether there should be a delay to the process until the end ofjune, that may not be as simple subject to approval from the eu. as it sounds. after parliament's vote last night and, that may not be as simple to rule out a no—deal, as it sounds. the prime minister will try after parliament's vote last night to rule out a no—deal — for a third time to get her the prime minister will try for a third time to get her withdrawal deal through, but with the clock ticking withdrawal deal through. but with the clock until march 29th, ticking until march 29th, which at the moment which at the moment is still brexit day,she's is still brexit day, running out of time. she's running out of time. 0ur political correspondent our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. things looked pretty bleak alex forsyth reports. in westminster this morning. what is happening with things looked pretty bleak brexit is still unclear. revoke article 50. in westminster this morning.
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what is happening with and, for many, brexit is still unclear. frustration is growing. last night, there were dramatic and, for many, scenes in parliament, frustration is growing. as mps rejected the idea of leaving last night there were dramatic the eu without a deal. scenes in parliament, as mps rejected the idea of leaving some ministers didn't the eu without a deal. support theresa may, but they are still in theirjobs. some ministers didn't did you expect to be support theresa may, but they are still in theirjobs. in the cabinet having not backed the prime minister last night? that has caused some anger and many are turning their minds did you expect to be to what happens now. in the cabinet having not backed by no means is any the prime minister last night? that has caused some anger and many are turning their minds option off the table. to what happens now. today, mps are discussing whether brexit should be delayed, given there is no deal in place and most don't want by by no means is any option of the to leave without one. the government suggested a short table. today mps are discussing extension could happen whether brexit should be delayed, but only if there is given there is no deal in place a deal in sight. and most don't want otherwise, a delay could be lengthy. to leave without one. the government suggested a short extension could happen but only if there is a deal in sight. otherwise, a delay could be lengthy. we basically have two options. first, if the house has approved a meaningful vote and agreed a timetable for the withdrawal bill,
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we can expect at the european union we have two options. if the house to agree to a short technical has agreed a timetable for the extension, to allow the necessary withdrawal bill, we can expect at the european union to agree to a legislation to be carried through. short technical extension to allow the necessary legislation to be if that proves, for whatever reason, carried through. if that proves, for not to be possible, we would be faced with the prospect whatever reason not to be possible, of choosing only a long extension, we will be faced with the prospect during which the house will need to face up to the choices in front of choosing only a long extension, of it and the consequences during which the house will need to of the decisions that it has taken. face up to the choices in front of it and the consequences of the labour has said it is decisions that it has taken. labour likely to support a delay in the process but not theresa may's plan. we couldn't allow theresa may's plan to go through, are saying it is likely to support so we must find another route. an extension in the process but not if we can, that is fine. theresa may's plan. we couldn't there might be a number of mps allow theresa may bus plan to go who support a compromise, unless it goes back to the people. through, so we must find another and that will have to be one
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of the options to consider. route. there might be a number of will you get the deal through? mps who support a compromise, unless it goes back to the people. and that the cabinet was summoned to downing street this afternoon, will have to be one of the options no doubt, to talk strategy. the government is still trying to consider. the cabinet was to salvage the prime minster‘s troubled brexit deal. summoned to downing street this there are conversations afternoon, no doubt, to talk still taking place between the government and some strategy. the government is still of those who oppose trying to salvage the primates that brexit deal. theresa may's brexit plans so far. crucially the dup. the prime minister is expected to bring her deal back there are conversations to parliament next week, are still taking place despite the fact it has between the government and some been rejected twice, of those who oppose theresa may's plans so far. hoping to win the support of some crucially the dup. the prime minister is expected brexiteers if the alternative to bring her deal back is a long delay. to parliament next week, the dup has confirmed it is still despite the fact it has been rejected twice, talking to the government. hoping to win the support of some brexiteers if the alternative when you come to the end is a long delay. the dup has confirmed it is still of a negotiation, that's when you really start to see talking to the government. the whites of peoples eyes, if you like. you get down to the point when you come to the end of a where you make a deal. negotiation, that's when you really we want to see a deal, we want a start to see the whites of peoples deal that is good for the whole eyes, if you like. we want to see a of the united kingdom and that is what we are focusing on.
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deal, a deal that is good for the but some brexiteers are clear — even if it means a delay, whole of the united kingdom and that is what we are focusing on. they won't back the prime minister's current deal. no, it's a very bad agreement and it but some brexiteers are clear, would put the united kingdom even if it means a delay, they won't back the prime minister's in some sub—colonial status current deal. from which we cannot no, it's a very bad agreement and it decide to leave. would put the united kingdom why on earth would we want in some sub—colonial status from which we cannot to be in that position? decide to leave. so, expect further turmoil why on earth would we want in parliament this afternoon, as divided mps try to shape to be in that position? what happens next. so, expect further turmoil in parliament this afternoon, one thing we will know — as divided mps try to shape what happens next. whether the chance of brexit being delayed look ever more likely. one thing we will know, alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. whether the chance of brexit 0ur europe correspondent damian being delayed look ever more likely. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. grammaticas is in brussels. if they decide tonight for an extension, can they take a unified our chief political correspondent, eu response for granted? no, not at vicki young, is here. the minute at all. it will very we do know that theresa may is largely, i think, the minute at all. it will very largely, ithink, depend the minute at all. it will very largely, i think, depend on what the determined to bring it withdrawal uk asks for and that also will bill agreement back here next week. depend on the eu's eyes on what else
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that is the indication, presuming happens in the coming days, in terms that something changes, that they will try again on monday or tuesday of what are the indications about to get it through. they are laying what the uk thinks is the way out what would happen if it does not forward from here. i think the eu is get through by next wednesday. they open to different ideas. we are we re get through by next wednesday. they were saying that the government will hearing today possibilities of thinking about the irish and donald now ask for a delay. either way, if tusk saying that they are open, if a deal will go through next week, the uk wants it, to the idea they are saying will need a short possibly of looking at a long technical delay to get the legislation through, then there will bea legislation through, then there will be a delay in that case. they say if extension of this current the deal has not been approved, they negotiating period. so up to a year, are still going to ask for a job maybe even until the end of 2020, like an extension, but a much longer during which time the irish prime one which would involve the european minister has said the uk could come in his words, have a long refraction elections. a bit of anger in the period about what the kind of brexit chamber when john burke out at once. that is the heart of the elections. a bit of anger in the chamber whenjohn burke out and out the amendments to two nights vote. problem that the eu sees, the lack yes, i think there were about 11 put of any clear consensus, any idea out. he is to choose which ones. he from parliament about what the uk does want. they have seen lots of votes about what the uk doesn't didn't choose one put forward by want. they are seeing a deal that brexiteers, ruling out a referendum the eu have negotiated over 18 so brexiteers, ruling out a referendum so there has been a big barney about months with the government, voted that. i think everyone is looking down twice. from the eu's side there
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out of the hilary benn and edmund. is deep frustration, open to ideas if that goes through, it would allow about the extension but absolutely it will depend on what the uk, how mps next wednesday to try and debate brexit in order to have so—called the uk plots a path forward. so some indicative votes. that means mps tough questions will be asked and will get the chance to look at all need to be answered by the uk to the different options, boot on them to finally decide what they might secure that extension. a lot of talk actually be in favour of, rather about the european elections and than what they are against. the whether that is beyond which this government are saying, after the process cannot go or a suggestion european council, we would offer you that this could go until the end of two weeks to do that. but i think next year? the thing that donald there is not enough trust there. i tuskis next year? the thing that donald tusk is floating today as he will be touring european capitals in the next few days. he says appealing to think that hilary benn amendment has a pretty good chance of getting the eu 27 leaders to be open to a through. how long to get that would long extension, beyond the european elections, over into next year. the issue there is that if the uk wants to stay that long, the fundamental the extension be? it depends on watch one, the short one, without —— fundamentally the uk continuing to bea —— fundamentally the uk continuing to be a member of the eu would continue to need to have the european elections. the longer
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representation in the european extension is completely unknown, parliament, so how do you achieve they are not saying because they don't know what they are extending that? the simple ways to hold the european elections this year, but out from. they are saying what is the point of extending for no thatis european elections this year, but that is potentially politically reason? it is still the point about problematic. there are ideas about other fixes that at the eu, the parliament eventually has to make a commission has been saying the uk decision about what it wants. i would have to hold those elections. think they are trying to cast a very some other ideas being floated that stark choice for those brexiteers the uk might be able to actually who have, so far, refused to back a deal by saying, it's either my deal, have nominated mps sitting in salzburg for a temporary period, or oi’ deal by saying, it's either my deal, or we are looking at a long even the current meps elected at the extension and we cannot know what that might lead to. it might lead to minute continuing to hold their no brexit. there are now brexiteers seats in this ongoing period. but i think the view is that is a question who are feeling that, they are that could be fixed, if the realising that anything could political will was there. the much happen, i think it is interesting bigger question is for the uk side, that david davies has decided to extending the transition that long swing behind it, that could be means prolonging the uk's membership pretty significant. what we're from of the eu or the rules, the courts, arlene foster is fascinating. they the payments, all those things that could still back theresa may. lee supposedly brexit and brexiteers, brexit is there to bring to an end, talks are still ongoing, i think it
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would continue, potentially up until will revolve around some kind of the end of next year while the uk tried to find a new path forward. legal advice or change. this idea of that's a more difficult question for withdrawing from a treaty, could the the uk side to have to face. as ever, thank you. uk do that? we could see a scenario 0ur chief political next week where the legality of correspondent vicki young is in the houses of parliament. everything is question, the comeback for mayfield out on monday or we are all talking about an tuesday, you just never know. there extension. i am sorry to do this could be enough brexiteers looking too, the amendments are rather at what is due to happen later in important so perhaps we should go the week thinking, we have lost all through those. first of all, it is worth saying the control of this could be out with government's preferred option i ten days to go, or we are risking it think is still to try next week to not at all. we could be back here come back with the same deal, maybe with some slight changes to it and next monday or tuesday. do you know put it to the house of commons again what the weather forecast is?|j on monday or tuesday. that was the don't what the weather forecast is?” clear indication that we have been don't care because i'll be inside. getting today for sub theresa may our europe correspondent, has not given up on that and the key they feel is getting the dup on damian grammaticas, is in brussels. side, so everyone will be looking very carefully to see if there is any more legal advice from the attorney general on all of that. but the european election is one issue, then there is that on one side and a sort of twin track approach because i wouldn't say it's the biggest the government has come forward and issue by far. there was an opinion put forward what it thinks might
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put up by the british advocate general at the european court of happen if it still goes through, and if it doesn't go through. they are justice saying it is not a an saying of the deal goes through next insurmountable issue, there are ways week, they would ask for their short extension to get the legislation around it. the uk could continue by that needs to get through, through nominating members of the european parliament, so they would do that. parliament, or the current ones could continue to sit if there was but if it doesn't, they are then saying they would be asking for this an extension period. people are thinking of possible fixes to that. long extension. clearly, they are the much bigger issue for the eu is trying to focus the mind is a little bit of brexiteers, trying to win the what is this extension for? how is round and say, if you don't back it going to help? i think the this next week, we are heading into crucial issue is the two different com plete this next week, we are heading into complete confusion, really, no one knows where that will end. as you say, there are other mps who have extensions, a shorter extension might work if a deal is agreed and different ideas, so sarah wollaston goes through parliament in london for example, recently defected from and they just need goes through parliament in london and theyjust need time to pass all the conservative party. she has an the legislation, perhaps up to the amendment down about a second end ofjune at the latest. beyond referendum. intriguingly, peoples vote, the campaign group behind that, have urged mps not to back it, that, the question is, what the eu to abstain on it because they don't sees as the fundamental problem— think the time is right. i think there is still no consensus in thatis think the time is right. i think that is a clear indication that the numbers still are not there in the parliament in london, what mps do house of commons to get that support, what sort of brexit they through. all eyes are on hilary benn. an
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wa nt support, what sort of brexit they amendment that forward, a want and would vote for? what path cross— party amendment that forward, a cross—party one, by him and some forward they would all unite around? conservatives as well. it talks about an extension although it is a that is when you come into the idea bit more vague about at an extension or delayed to brexit. but it also of and talks about something much more that is when you come into the idea ofand a that is when you come into the idea of and a longer extension. donald tusk floated it today, saying, he controversial, which would be, effectively, mps taking charge of will appeal to the eu 27 to be open this process and deciding what should happen next. so next toa will appeal to the eu 27 to be open wednesday there would be a debate, to a long extension if the uk finds whereby they look at how they can sort that out, the procedure if you it necessary to rethink its brexit like, of how they could do that. strategy. the irish foreign minister thenin like, of how they could do that. then in the week after, probably, a saying similarly that a long series of votes looking all the extension, by this they mean a year options people want and trying to to almost two years, would give a trying to eliminate the ones that don't have backing this up so they are get to a point where parliament long reflection period to the uk is voting against everything but about the kind of brexit it wants. voting against everything but saying we have to some conclusion some the appeals for the eu is for the conclusion here, we have to make a chance for the uk to go back to choice, we need to rally around something and they will try and come square chance for the uk to go back to square one, chance for the uk to go back to square one, rethink, and come up up something and they will try and come up with a way of working their way with a path forward that has real through that. there are a couple of other consensus. the concern of the eu is that even if a deal exclusively in the next few days, how stable is amendments, one from a labour mp that as a basis for a future
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chris bryant who says that the relationship? so, there are some government shouldn't bring back at the same deal they have put the appeal in the idea of a longer vote. not sure that as much chance of success. all terribly clear and extension. lets talk about the we could have one vote or five. likelihood of all members agreeing, theresa may has just left downing street. i think we have pictures of because each of those 27 has to say her departure. she is on her way to yes. they absolutely do. whatever the houses of parliament. she is under the spotlight and there are sort of extension it is, the process many people saying that her to be followed is a request from the authority after that free vote last uk, first of all, then, it is night is severely diminished. that she is in office but not in power. discussed by the eu's 27 leaders and her critics would say that she has they have to agree unanimously. handled the whole thing badly. it anyone can block it. i think, was her choices, her red lines, the way she went about it by triggering really, what you have to imagine is who is going to stand in the way article 50 some would say too quickly, before her own cabinet had and, if there is one country, and decided what kind of brexit they wanted. 0thers decided what kind of brexit they wanted. others would say any prime minister in this circumstance would stop the extension, to be seen to have found it very difficult, pushed the uk out if it is after an particularly after the ill—fated election that she called, in which extension. i think the key thing was she lost her majority of the stop going to be at the end of next week, that really is why we are here today, because she is trying to get the summit when eu leaders gathered through an incredibly divisive,
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here on thursday and friday, they will sit down and gather their thoughts and try to make a decision controversial piece of legislation and she is doing it without a solid about what sort of views, what are majority in the house of commons. it their agreements, what sort of is incredibly difficult to govern in those circumstances, even if you extension they are prepared to give. we re those circumstances, even if you were dealing with something which is that slots into the timetable you proving so difficult to get people to rally around. she is not giving we re that slots into the timetable you up to rally around. she is not giving up on this, even though it feels were hearing from vicky. monday, tuesday, another attempt by theresa that many people are. i think there may, if it fails on wednesday, you are signs that some brexiteers are get votes in parliament about what very keen to try and vote her deal object they want. thursday, friday, through, but they need still more the eu can indicate if it will changes, more clarification on that accept or what sort of extension it backstop. the idea that the uk can will accept. unilaterally say to the eu, we are leaving this arrangement because we don't want to be tied in this custom joining me now is conservative union any longer and so people will mp, anne marie morris. be trying to look to see if there is anne voted against last night's amendment motion, ruling out a no—deal brexit. any change in legal advice which you're not a fan of theresa may's would allow the majority of that group of mps, 80 or so conservative deal? she will try again on monday mps, to say, ok, if the dup are oi’ deal? she will try again on monday or tuesday. she will. how many happy with this, we are happy with this and then she could get very people do you think will switch?” close to getting her deal through. think next time round, she will vicki young, thank you very much. still use but the margin will be
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lessened. i think there are a lot of i'm joined now by the political author sir anthony seldon. people are very concerned that we welcome. i use that phrase in office might end up with no brexit at all. my own view is that if you do not fight for something you believe in, but not in power. that is not the which has brexit, then, it seems to first time that phrase has been used me that you have given up the fight far too early and shouldn't be in for a british prime minister. that politics. for me, it's critical we is right. norman lamont used to of keep going. i do not believe will john major, who had a really difficult time from 1990—97. again, get this extension from the french in particular. you think the french it was europe. again, it was the will actually oppose it?” right wing of the conservative in particular. you think the french will actually oppose it? i think when you tried to get the 27 to party. they were called eurosceptics. there was another word ee, when you tried to get the 27 to agree, because of the upcoming for them john major used! he did, it elections, there is absolutely no way they will extend beyond july. began with a b. it wasn't beautiful! realpolitik, but is time enough for teresa to try and get her deal so, it was a different time. but through again, but not time enough this is much worse. he had two to do other things. this you have time to try a fourth attempt? she does, but i don't think by that different things and both under 25, stage... the result is a bit of a so completely different to 230 and
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wrinkle in terms of parliamentary procedure. as i understand it, there 150 as theresa may has had. the are only so many times you can bring are only so many times you can bring a motion for first. on the timetable first and the fourth worst defeats for a government in the whole you're suggesting, we come out on history, parliamentary history of much the 29th without a deal? this building here. so, very indeed. and who are happy with that? different in scale and yet, you say that, simon, she... every time we very happy. i would love for us to have a deal. our love for us to have think about her, her power seems to which we've been talking for a long be less and less and yet she is time. to negotiate that deal that still there. she is driving in, she everyone wants on the other side of is the figure from number ten, she the 29th. do you accept the commonly is the figure from number ten, she is the figure from number ten, she is the only prime minister. this is held view that a no—deal exit will, key, there is no obvious successor in the short term, hurt a lot of waiting to take over, apart from people in this country?” this woman down there who keep sounding like a cockerel, could do a in the short term, hurt a lot of people in this country? i accept it very good job, we don't know! there will be bumpy. i do not accept... is no obvious successor. it shows she is the only show in town and she politicians say things are bumpy. we are talking about peoples has a plan. livelihoods, theirjobs. right now, 0ne has a plan. one of the reasons no one is stepping forward to take over is, people are trying to make the who would want to? it is seen as a decisions ahead of d—day. that pump poison chalice. when she took the
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job, many people said, be careful has already happened, people are choosing where they border, where what you wish for! yes. well, you they will work. this is a decision know, everyone is battering her and about investment, business will battering mps and the government but happen. will there be a about investment, business will happen. willthere be a bump about investment, business will whoever took over from david happen. will there be a bump on the 30th, now? have preparations been battering mps and the government but whoever took overfrom david cameron was going to have a really, really put in place? absolutely. you only have to see supports put out by the difficultjob. this is the most national of it obvious which say divided, difficult time in peace time that this building has had, members of committees have scrutinised to see that preparations are there, this will not be the that our government has had, since great cliff edge jump that people the 1910s, when the house of lords fear. yet, we saw the list of refused to pass the government's ta riffs fear. yet, we saw the list of tariffs published yesterday. there budget. there were two elections in are many people in country scene, 1910. this is the most traumatic this will be a disaster for us.” time since then. and, yes, they all think you must look at both sides of wa nt time since then. and, yes, they all want it. they all want to be prime the coin. clearly, it means change. minister, they think they can do a but for the average consumer, things betterjob, but minister, they think they can do a better job, but the minister, they think they can do a betterjob, but the point is, nobody will be better. the farming is standing up now. so she is the communities will need to be protected. what we need to do, i'm only prime minister. she has a plan and she is sticking day after day sure death to have it in mind, —— after day to it.
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has any other prime minister that you have written about ever faced such a huge mountain, with so little defra. we can help our own people, support, no majority in parliament, we can help our own industry. this and yet so doggedlyjust kept going like this? is on the basis that there is no no, the idea is —— not the answer is extension. then there is any form of it isn't just i extension, will you think that you no, the idea is —— not the answer is it isn'tjust i haven't written about them, there is no prime have lost brexit? now, because at minister. we have had 5a prime the end of day, if there is an extension, not only do we have to ministers. it's hard to recall a look at terms, if it is on terms single one that has had such a which don't tie as infielder, provided that extension is short and difficult time. ramsay macdonald, clear, there is still everything to fight for. we can still get out with labour's first prime minister, 192a, a no—deal. three very significant defeats in the house of commons. but he had his fight for. we can still get out with a no-deal. what about theresa may's own party with him. she doesn't have future, authority? everybody is saying she is in office but not her parliamentary party. she doesn't necessarily in power following that vote last night. what you want her even have her cabinets. there are to do? you know the answer to that. only two or perhaps three cabinet ministers who are deeply loyal to i was to do? you know the answer to that. iwasa to do? you know the answer to that. i was a signatory of a letter asking for her to resign, i haven't changed her. and yet, she carries on,
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my mind. there is nothing in the battering, taking the battering. she vatican do, there are no mechanisms. is like a boxer who is going into the only way is a bout of no the 15th round and beyond, the 68th confidence in the house byjeremy corbyn, i don't think it will do that, i do think we will support it. round and she is still taking the i don't think that is a way of battering and everyone expects her removing her. as a brexiter, who to crumble but she gets up when the would be your favoured bell goes and she's still at it, removing her. as a brexiter, who would be yourfavoured choice if removing her. as a brexiter, who would be your favoured choice if she does decide that she has had enough? with her plan. so, this is really key. we have never, ever been here who would you see cutting through that brexit agenda you're before in british political history. describing? dominic barb, i don't sir anthony, always a pleasure to talk to you. thank you. think it could be anyone else. they're all been there, we can get and at a:a5 this afternoon, join us for a brexit vote special with huw edwards. that will be here on the bbc oi'i news and bbc two. they're all been there, we can get on with it frankly from a more you can also hear the votes on radio 5live. re ce nt on with it frankly from a more recent generation. —— dominic raab. well, as brexit continues to dominate here and across the irish sea, that is the brexit view, we are the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, is in washington, where he's been meeting the us waking... orthe arrival of president donald trump. the two leaders were asked about brexit by reporters, and mr trump said he was "surprised that is the brexit view, we are waking... or the arrival of about 150 members of ukip. they are coming to see how badly it has all gone". to the left of where i am standing let's have a listen: in the next hour, nigel faraj will
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be meeting them. they willjoin the throng here, so, things may be a bit iam i am surprised at how badly it has all gone, from the standpoint of the more lively, even more noisy than we negotiation, but i gave the prime have been getting used to over the last few days. minister and my ideas on how to our reality check correspondent, negotiate it and i think it would chris morris, is here. remind us what article 50 is? have been successful. she didn't listen to that and that's fine, she's got to do what she's got to do before it gets more noisy, let's go but i think it could have been back to basics. is the one bit of negotiated in a different manner, frankly. i hate to see everything jargon will use everyday. it is being ripped apart right now. i article 50 of the eu's lisbon don't think another vote would be possible because it would be very treaty, the bit which sets out how a unfairto possible because it would be very unfair to the people that won, what country treaty, the bit which sets out how a cou ntry leaves treaty, the bit which sets out how a country leaves the eu. article 50 is you mean you're taking another vote? that would be tough. but i thought quite vague, deliberately so, one thing it does make clear is that you it would happen, it did happen and have a two—year period to negotiate both sides are very, very... they your departure, have a withdrawal are cemented in. it is a tough agreement, a. for us, that two—year situation. it's a shame, frankly, period runs out on the 29th of it's a shame. there was no reason march. at the moment, the default for that to happen. they could have position is or no—deal. that is how had the vote and it could have gone we leave. so, how do you change it? smoothly, unfortunately i didn't. a very complicated issue. the issue on you could revoke it. you can get rid the border of ireland is one of the of article 50 all over. uk would not most complex points.
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let's speak to our washington need to consult any other country, correspondent, gary 0'donoghue. that would mean brexit would be i don't really know where to start. cancelled. what has been discussed perhaps i do. it's the idea that if in parliament today is the idea of she had listened to him, we wouldn't be where we are. extending article 50. it does not remove them altogether, that is yes, and it's an interesting one. if different because the uk would have to make a request and the other 27 you recall, he said that at a joint press co nfe re nce countries would have to agree. so, you recall, he said that at a joint press conference with theresa may in the middle of last year, that he had all 28 countries would have to come to the same conclusion. you would given her some brutal advice, as he also need to change the uk law put it. it transpired that because the 29th of march is in law afterwards that advice, according to as brexit day. once you have done theresa may herself, was she should be suing the european union. that is that, how will that happen? the eu what she should have done. she will want to know why do you want an should have sued the eu. that was extension and how long they want it for? that is the crucial one. the his advice. it was very clear at the period of time to stop there are time, certainly unclear now, on what lots of issues here, but plenty over basis britain could have sued the eu, over what and there well. it is the one in each basis britain could have sued the eu, overwhatand in basis britain could have sued the eu, over what and in terms of what was the negotiation. i'm not sure issue the eu is not united on at the moment. we have a graphic which what other advice, if he's talking shows some of the potential about any other particular advice he timelines. if we had an extension to says it has gone pretty badly. that the middle of may, maybe get a is true. he is right about that. it is true. he is right about that. it last—minute deal over the line, no isa is true. he is right about that. it is a sad situation. i think a lot of
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people will think that is true. the problem. but, in the middle of the interesting intervention here is graphic, the crucial thing, a saying no second referendum. that is european parliament election towards the end of may. both the government incredibly unhelpful to those in and european commission say that if britain, obviously, who do want a we are still a member state at that referendum, a second referendum, but stage, we have to take part in those i'm not sure a lot of people will be elections. some people say, now, because the new parliament does not listening to the president, in terms of advice on what we do next with meet until the 2nd ofjuly when the brexit inside the uk. he says, i think it could have been meps get sworn in. now, donald tusk has brought up this suggestion in a negotiated in a different manner. frankly, i hate to see everything tweet today, a much longer being ripped apart now. not for the extension. to the end of what would first time, having started a press conference by saying i'm not going to comment on brexit, he then ripped be the transition period of brexit. some people say you must how those into it. yes, he can't resist, we know that. european elections in the uk if you we re european elections in the uk if you were to do that. legal opinion on the president cannot resist. 0f thatis course, he referred to that, to the were to do that. legal opinion on that is divided, we have had the most senior british lawyer at the referendum day, he weighs gets this european court of justice most senior british lawyer at the european court ofjustice saying that if the political... a legal wrong. he says, i was in turnberry, the day before the referendum and mechanism can be spam. i've spoken predicted out would go. he wasn't,
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to professor of law at the it was a morning after the university of cambridge think that referendum. i can tell you that article 50 has been used to set up a because i was standing in front of him on the golf course and it was transition period, i think you can the morning after the referendum. he argue illegally allowing existing uk a lwa ys the morning after the referendum. he always gets this one wrong. but, to meps to stay on for a period of time be fair, in previous months he had can also be seen as a transition said he thought it would go that way arrangement. that is the possibility of legal challenges, but there are and he thought it was a good thing. those saying that if you want to do it, it can be done. they can't be he has sorta fluctuated, though, on the substantive issue about the trade deal. he said it would be an easy thing to do in the past. then popular wandering the corridors of he said it's a difficult thing to do. there is one thing that has gone brussels. the british meps, yes. as under the radar slightly which is you mentioned nigel farage is going worth knowing, which is government departments here have been seeking industry input as to what they would to roll up soon. and, at lizlispm this afternoon — wa nt industry input as to what they would want from a deal between the us and join us for a brexit vote the uk. i looked at this document special with huw edwards. that will be here on the bbc news and bbc two. the uk. i looked at this document the other day and there is a whole you can also hear the raft of things that america is going votes on radio 5 live. to push for, in terms of a uk — us plenty trade deal, that london will find votes on radio 5 live. more to come on brexit incredibly difficult to agree to, through plenty more to come on brexit through the afternoon, don't switch
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off. let's move on to other news particularly in the areas of here. a former paratrooper, agriculture. chlorine —soa ked known only as soldier f, is to face two charges of murder chicken, hormone grown beef, americans want access to uk markets, and four charges of attempted murder — in connection all this sort of stuff, and all of with the events of one of the most that will be huge sticking points, notorious days of northern ireland's troubles in 1972. that will be huge sticking points, thatis that will be huge sticking points, 13 civil rights demonstrators that is before you get into any were shot dead in londonderry on what came to be known as bloody other sector. gary, thank you very sunday. 16 other former soldiers, and two much. gary 0'donoghue joining alleged official ira members, will not face prosecution. other sector. gary, thank you very much. gary o'donoghuejoining us from washington. you are watching bloody sunday relatives were visibly upset after learning afternoon live, when the important of the prosecution decisions. vote about extending brexit takes they've insisted their campaign place after five other news... "is not finished yet." our ireland correspondent, chris page, reports from londonderry. a former paratrooper, known only as soldier f, is to face two charges of murder and four charges of attempted 47 years after the march murder, in connection which ended in bloodshed — with the events of one of the most the families of those who died took notorious days of northern to the streets. ireland's troubles in 1972. thirteen civil rights demonstrators a show of unity and purpose were shot dead in londonderry to remember those who were on what came to be known as bloody killed on bloody sunday. sunday. 16 other former soldiers and two alleged official ira members will not face prosecution. 0n the 30th of january 1972, bloody sunday relatives were visibly 15,000 people took part in a civil upset after learning of the prosecution decisions. rights march in londonderry. they've insisted their campaign "is not finished yet". 0ur ireland correspondent chris page reports from londonderry.
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just after four o'clock in the afternoon, soldiers opened fire in the nationalist a7 years after the march bogside area. which ended in bloodshed, the families of those who died took half an hour later — to the streets again. 13 people were dead, seven of them teenagers. a show of unity and purpose, pictures like these captured to remember those who were killed on bloody sunday. the trauma and the tragedy. the paratroopers said 0n the 30th january 1972, they had been shot at first, 15,000 people took part in a civil but, nine years ago, a public inquiry found no one who was killed had rights march in londonderry. been posing a threat. prosecutors have been deciding just after four o'clock whether to bring charges. in the afternoon, soldiers opened fire in the nationalist a decision has been taken bogside area. to prosecute one former soldier, half an hour later, soldier f, for the murder 13 people were dead, seven of them teenagers. ofjames wray and for the murder of william mckinney. pictures like these captured the trauma and the tragedy. it's been a tense morning the paratroopers said for the dozens of relatives who were waiting for the news. they'd been shot at first, the families have just met but, nine years ago, prosecutors and been told of the decision. a public inquiry found that no one who was killed had been posing a threat. it's almost half a century since prosecutors have been deciding bloody sunday and after the long whether to bring charges. campaign they now know that one former soldier will be a decision has been taken to prosecute one former soldier — brought before the courts. soldier f — for the murder he will be charged with
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murdering these men. ofjames wray, and for the murder james wray was 22, william mckinney 27. james wray‘s brother of william mckinney. said his feelings were mixed. it's been a tense morning justice forjim is one thing, for the dozens of relatives but my heart is broke. who were waiting for the news. it's been a very black day the families have just met prosecutors and been told of the decision. for the rest of the family. it's almost half a century since bloody sunday, the families who didn't get and after the long campaign they now the decision they wanted included that of william nash — know that one former soldier will be brought before the courts. who he was 17 when he was killed. he'll be charged with murdering the only thing we can these men — james wray was 22, do is keep going on, william mckinney 27. keep doing what we're doing. james wray‘s brother i don't know, legally, within the law, what we can do said his feelings were mixed. but we will pursue it justice forjim, which i think and keep going. this is, is one thing — but my heart is broke, there is another perspective and the rest of the families' is. on the justice process. it's been a very black day for them. some army veterans have claimed investigators are putting an unfair the families who didn't get focus on what the military did the decision they wanted included during the northern that of william nash — ireland conflict. who was 17 when he was killed. the only thing we can this week — the officer do is keep going on, who commanded the soldiers keep doing what we're doing. on bloody sunday maintained his troops had acted in self—defence. i don't know, legally, we thought, in fact, within the law, what we can do, we were under attack and we actually but we will pursue it,
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will remain convinced of that we will keep going. there is another perspective until the end of our days. on the justice process. some army veterans have claimed investigators are putting an unfair focus on what the military did all the paratroopers during the northern who were here on bloody sunday are now ireland conflict. in their 60s and 70s. this week, the officer who commanded prosecution lawyers say court proceedings against soldier f will begin soon. the soldiers on bloody sunday maintained his troops had acted in self—defence. this 0ur correspondent, karen allen, we thought, in fact, is in londonderry this afternoon. that we were under attack, isa is a very mixed reaction to this? and we will actually remain convinced of that until the end of our days. 0utright, an overwhelming sense of all the paratroopers who were here on bloody sunday are now in their 60s and 70s. disappointment from the families. but, also, a tinge of relief. that prosecution lawyers say court proceedings against soldier f will begin soon. is at least one soldier being chris page, bbc news, derry. prosecuted. a couple of hours ago, 0ur correspondent karen allen just behind me, it was absolutely is in londonderry this afternoon. packed, some family members carrying yes, the soldier is going to be photographs of their loved ones. they say that it is not the end of prosecuted for the murder of two the road, this is an important men, james wray and william process , the road, this is an important process, but there is still more to mckinney. the brother of william
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come. we do not know exactly what mckinney, who wasjust they mean by that, whether there mckinney. the brother of william mckinney, who was just 27 at the time, is mickey. hejoins me now. will be further legal avenues, now could you give me your reaction? i'm not linked to soldier f. they may be pleased that we are getting the person who was responsible for the able to follow those other legal murder of my brother, william. but i avenues. sadly, a very mixed reaction. a mixed reaction from the do share the overall disappointment of all the families who didn't get army and british government as well. as we heard any the report, the anything. i think that is a serious commanding officer at the time still situation. there are 28 people or maintains that they believe that they were under threat. although the more shot, murdered that day, and saville enquiry showed that the only one soldier they found responsible for two murders. that is protesters posed no threat at all. the government in london, the very disappointing. some of the families have said this is not the defence minister, gavin williamson, has said that the mod will pay for end of the story. what more is the legal costs for the soldier who possible for them to do? well, i think what will happen, they'll is still remains anonymous, soldier probably speak to their lawyers, ta ke f.a probably speak to their lawyers, take advice from them. they will is still remains anonymous, soldier f. a low ranking soldier who is the probably go through the files and only power rip... parish about being charge with this iconic event, see if there is any room for bloody sunday. this has taken nine challenge. many in the british army
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said it is not helpful to go back yea rs, and to seek prosecutions against bloody sunday. this has taken nine years, hundreds of statements, nobody is criticising the tpp there soldiers. at what point do you think for a lack of foreigners? not at there has to be a line in the sand? well... i wonder why they say something like that. i don't hear all. a lot of families had the expectations raised by the very those comments being said when it robust conclusions of the saville comes to the likes of paedophile enquiry. they did not have the right cases. nobody has shown concern to be able to press for charges. what it did say is that the soldiers about the people responsible for had lost their self—control and that interfering with children some years the protesters posed no threat, that ago. there's nobody coming out was very important for the families making the same comment on their to show that their loved ones who behalf. a legacy unit is looking at died were innocent. many had hoped these legacy crimes. would you that the next step would be expect to see more prosecutions prosecutions. 17 soldiers were following? oh, absolutely, ithink facing the prospect of prosecutions that should happen. i know there has today, just one of them, a low beena that should happen. i know there has been a lot that has happened here in northern ireland over the last 40 ranking soldiers, soldier f, was the years. but something must happen. one who was going to face two people are entitled tojustice.
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charges of murder, four of micky mckinney, thank you very much indeed. it is not at all clear when the cases will actually begin, but the cases will actually begin, but the ministry of defence have issued dennis murrayjoins me now from a a statement to say they will be belfast newsroom. there are reports funding the legal costs of soldier that are never going to please f. the only soldier out of the 17 anybody and this was always going to be one of those. very much so and who is to face prosecution. thank you very much. the disappointment is compounded by the disappointment is compounded by the idea that there would be more prosecutions. i don't think anybody thought that all the soldiers names lets get an update on all the sport in the saville report that chris and with 0llie forster. lets get an update on all the sport with ollie forster. some fantastic racing at cheltenham today and some the others have been talking about, brilliant stories. the feature race i don't think anybody expected all the soldiers to be prosecuted but i think there was an expectation that was the stayers hurdle, and the favourite was paisley park priced at more soldiers would be prosecuted. 11-8. favourite was paisley park priced at 11—8. aidan coleman brought him home in fact the director of public prosecutors in northern ireland is a couple of wins clear of the referred to that. he said there was a level of expectation. it is the outsider. now his owner is andrew same old thing. , knowing something gemmill, who has been blind since to be the case is very different to birth but that has not hampered his having hard evidence to prove it.
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participation in the sport. it was a hugely popular victory in the the saville inquiry and several winners enclosure. so was this one insta nces the saville inquiry and several instances lord saville and his in the previous race. collea g u es instances lord saville and his colleagues said they were sure that a group of soldiers fired on a group of protesters but being sure about it is nothing resembling beyond all reasonable doubt in the court of law. i think you've said it exactly the ryanair chase saw history right, i don't see how anyone can being made in the last half an hour with bryony frost becoming the first possibly complain about the rigour female jockey to ride a grade one winner at the festival. that has been brought to this by the she was quite overcome with emotion when she got past the post. 0n—board the paul nicholls trained frodon. dpp. the police have been working on more than one winner this year but that was the biggest win of her career. the final weekend of the six nations this since the saville inquiry. that championship is coming up, is nine years. there is hundred and three teams can still win it. scotland can't but have made six 25,000 pages in the book of evidence changes for the trip to twickenham. england have made fourfor what that they have. i don't think anyone might be a must—win match for them. they have surprisingly left is criticising them on that basis. joe cokanasiga out altogether. the winger was man of the match at the same time the army and the against italy last weekend but ministry of defence, individual he's replaced in the starting xv and doesn't make the bench either. jack nowell is back in the side after recovering from injury.
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soldiers that serve there would be centre henry slade also returns with two further very unhappy that any soldier has changes in the pack. eddiejones says cokanasiga is still very much part of his plans. he's a good young player been prosecuted at all. part of the and we will bring him through. for all young players you have good friday agreement was that a lot of those who were known to have been to make sure you look after them. sometimes they need to be exposed involved in killings on the other side were effectively told that they and sometimes pulled back. are free to go. somewhere post-good it's important, particularly in england, because i've seen so many good young players friday agreement... those aren't applying across the board. 0ne since i've been involved in top level rugby start with this boom friday agreement... those aren't applying across the board. one of them was being tried for the hyde park bombing and that trial had two and then they play three or four tests. i want him to play 100 ends because he had basically a tests for england. wales might have already won the grand slam by the time england play. pardon, his extradition hasjust they will be unchanged for the match been granted from the republic of against ireland in cardiff. full back liam williams was a doubt but is fit to play. ireland to northern ireland and that is currently under appeal. itjust if wales lose then england would win shows you the authorities here are the title with victory, still pursuing people that went but if they lose as well then soldiers. yes, part of the good friday agreement were that all the ireland will retain the title. the irish have made three changes. prisoners got out. only five soldiers up to today had ever faced rob kearney returns at full back charges of murder. hundreds and in place ofjordan larmour.
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while tadhg beirne will make his hundreds of both republican and six nations debut in the second row for the injured iain henderson. flanker sean o'brien loyalist paramilitary prisoners were is also back in. pursued and convicted and spent tributes have been paid to one yea rs, pursued and convicted and spent years, many years in some cases, of formula 1's leading figures, inside prison. so people who say the race director charlie whiting, who has died suddenly. he wasjust 66. this is one sided are being unfair. he was the official race starter, but was perhaps more there is 1800 cases being importantly a pioneer investigated at the moment and about of improved safety regulations a third of them are military cases. in the sport over a number of years. pa rt a third of them are military cases. part of the problem is this. there is nojudicial or moral reason not he passed away in melbourne, where he was due to officiate this to prosecute if somebody broke the weekend's season—opening australian grand prix. law. there is a political reason and incredibly shocked this morning a military reason. it's very to hear the sad news. difficult, if the army takes young my thoughts and prayers men and women and trains them to be are with his family. soldiers, they are trained to do two what he did for the sport things, to obey orders and to kill. and his commitment... if you send them into danger and at he really was a pillar. the back of their heads there is, "i might end up going to jailfor doing as toto said. my duty." then that is a problem. such an iconic figure within the sporting world the second problem is that all and he contributed so much to us. may he rest in peace.
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governments have to defend their military and their police because the two—time olympic champion the police and the military are two james cracknell will become the oldest person ever to compete of the load bearing... so you have in the boat race. cracknell, who is a6, that conflicts of the military on qualifies for next month's race because he is studying a masters the one hand and the judicial degree at cambridge. that conflicts of the military on the one hand and thejudicial on that conflicts of the military on the one hand and the judicial on the he won gold in the coxless fours other. the importance of bloody at both the 2000 and 200a games. the previous oldest boat race sunday, it cannot be overstated it competitor was a 38—year—old cox changed the whole sense of what were back in 1992. before the troubles, afterwards it was a war, i heard you to say if i can make it onto the start line it will be earlier. i was quoting someone well the proudest thing i've done. it's not like i've come out of the olympics and two years later i am here. known in northern ireland, he was a i stopped rowing in 200a. young priest in derry at the time. and i haven't rowed since. what has changed is the recovery. he is no longer a priest but i saw i have to take longer him being quoted as saying that up to recover between sessions. to bloody sunday northern ireland had trouble is, after bloody sunday your best doesn't change but you it had a war. it vastly increased can't burn the candle at both ends. that's all the sport for now. the size of the provisional ira. martin mcguinness giving evidence to
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the saville enquiry described the back to samantha simmonds in the bbc ira like the boy scouts. i must say i was highly sceptical about that newsroom. and they are still experienced derry journalist it was in derry at the time of bloody sunday if he accepted that characterisation and he said mps will be voting later on brexit, yes. if that is right then the boy this time on whether there should be scouts became the largest, most a delay to the process. let's have a ruthless and in their terms of the look at what is going on in the house of commons right now. a pretty most effective terrorist group in the whole of europe for the next 20 sparse gathering at the moment, but yea rs. the whole of europe for the next 20 years. i was very struck that when there are some mps in the chamber people in derry, the relatives say waiting until five o'clock when it was notjust people in derry, the relatives say it was not just for the people in derry, the relatives say it was notjust for the people on another debate begins and yet more bloody sunday that died, it is also voting over the next round. we will for the people who died because the have that brexit special with hugh troubles went on for so long and pa rt troubles went on for so long and part of the reason for that is without doubt bloody sunday. what edwards at a:a5pm, but lets join our i've got you here, forgive me for doing this, but we are very rarely chief political correspondent vicky john hughes inside the houses of parliament, as you can see. take us get the chance to speak to you. we through exactly what mps will be are in the middle of a heated brexit debate with the northern ireland discussing and voting on in the next few hours. the government has got border so crucial to all of that. for those of us that don't live in its own plan which is the gate its northern ireland is there a sense
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deal through. but they are accepting that the whole sense of sectarianism that if the deal were to go through and the troubles which many are too young to remember, is there a sense they would need a delay, short delay that we could get ourselves back into that sort of my. i wouldn't say to brexit to legislate, but they have other ideas about what they would like to see happening. 0ne it's a strong sense but i would say have other ideas about what they would like to see happening. one of there is an apprehension about it. them is the member of the you had last week letter bombs sent independent group, sarah wollaston, whojoins me now. you want another bya group you had last week letter bombs sent by a group calling itself the ira, a referendum and you're going to push republican splinter group, that vote today. we do not expect to obviously, who are clearly taking win because we have not got the advantage. brexit is a virus that labour party supporting us and has infected every bit of politics. unless they come round to fulfil their promise to back a people's vote, it will not pass, but we feel people are deeply concerned about this is part of building that it. the chief constable has warned that there could be attacks on fixed pressure so this is part of building that pressure so by the end hopefully of this week they will eventually come round to doing that. the people border posts were there to be fixed border posts were there to be fixed spoke behind this campaign for border posts. i think people are another referendum and they have concerned about it. they are also said to mps not to vote for it concerned about it. they are also concerned in the short term about what is going to do to the place tonight. that is extraordinary, because all the time, they are being told by the labour front now is not economically. everything i've read the time, it is like marquetry, and seems to suggest that the ordinary citizen is going to be more or less
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we have ten working days before worse off, either very badly worse before off the cliff and if now is off or slightly worse off, after not the time then goodness me, when the time? we can see there will be a brexit. all the predictions are that northern ireland is going to be in a government motion calling for a terrible situation post brexit. if delay of some kind and promising two you had a really bad brexit and a ha rd you had a really bad brexit and a weeks when mps can have their say in hard border i could see the rise of the indicative votes on the way through all of this, there might be republican paramilitary —— an amendment going through along those lines. what do you see happening in that scenario? is that when you think you might get what paramilitaries. so there is an you want? ultimately, i hope so. i apprehension that awful spiral could start again. it's great to talk to don't expect our amendments will you after all these years. dennis pass the night but i will be murray therejoining us in belfast. supporting the hilary benn i meant meant for these indicative votes, sport now on afternoon thenl meant for these indicative votes, then i very much hope that when this live with 0lly. comes back the labour party will finally be in a position to fulfil their promise, but i don't think we the final weekend of the six nations championship is coming up, will get there without some more three teams can still win it. pressure on them. how do you do scotland have made six changes that? jeremy corbett has said it is on the table, it is part of labour for the trip to twickenham, party policy to keep it in the mix, england have made fourfor what but how do you force him to back might be a must—win match for them. something like that? —— jeremy
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they have surprisingly left joe cokanasiga out altogether. the winger was man of the match against italy last weekend but he's replaced in the starting 15 corbyn. there would have been no pressure on him to change his and doesn't make the bench either. position and we could have got to jack nowell is back in the side after recovering from injury. the end of this without anyone ever centre henry slade also returns with two further having the opportunity to vote for a changes in the pack. eddiejones says cokanasiga is still people's vote. i very much hope the labour mps will ignore the party very much part of his plans. whip, and support of a people's vote if that is what they genuinely want he's a good young player and we will to do, because they might not get bring him through. full young players you have to make sure you another opportunity, and they might bitterly regret that. whether you look after them. sometimes they need to be exposed and sometimes pulled think we might end up next week, if it sounds like theresa may might back. it's important, especially in wa nt to england, because i've seen so many it sounds like theresa may might want to bring back her deal and give it another go? if the prime minister good young players since i've been wants to get her deal through, she involved in top level rugby start with this boom and then they play could get it thrifty subjected it to three orfour with this boom and then they play a people's vote because then there three or four tests. i want him to would be a huge groundswell of play 100 tests for england. support on both sides of the house, wales might have already won the grand slam by if she put it through a public vote. the time england play. we keep hearing that this is the they will be unchanged for the match against ireland in cardiff. will of the people, but it is not full back liam williams the will of the a8% and the majority was a doubt but is fit to play. if wales lose then england would win the title with victory, of brexiteers who write to me, so but if they lose as well then there is no consensus. three years ireland will retain the title.
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ago people voted in the referendum. at least now, we know what brexit day three of the cheltenham looks like. it is nothing like the festival is under way... the feature race sunlit uplands that were promised in the campaign, so for goodness' sake, the stayers hurdle is at 3.30pm, let's give them the chance to have we've had two races so far a great their vote, they should have the start forjockey barry geraghty right to vote, not just mps who has been on board both winners, this was sire de berlais their vote, they should have the right to vote, notjust mps in their vote, they should have the right to vote, not just mps in this place. what do you make of what was with a late surge to take the 3 mile handicap hurdle. going on last night, from your view both winners are outside of the conservative party? owned byjp mcmanus. you can listen to the feature race on 5 live this we had the chancellor coming to the dispatch box and other members of afternoon from 3:15pm. the conservative front bench talking about what a disaster no—deal with the rest of the day's coverage the, then going onto whip their mps is on 5 live sports extra right now. tributes have been paid to one to vote for a disaster. the of formula 1's leading figures, conservative party used to be the the race director charlie whiting, party that was trusted on the who has died suddenly. he was 66. whiting was the official race economy, whipping their mps to destroy the economy. it quite starter, but was a pioneer extraordinary. we will get back now of improved safety regulations to the chamber, thank you very much in the sport over a number of years. indeed. all of those votes due to he passed away in melbourne, where he was due to officiate this weekend's season—opening start at five o'clock. vicky young and the houses of parliament, thank australian grand prix. you. that debate about to get under
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way in 20 minutes' time. what do voters make of these extraordinary incredibly shocked to hear the sad events taking place in westminster? news. my thoughts and prayers are with his family. what he did for the correspond that has been to find out sport and his commitment... he if there is more clarity there, than really was a pillar. such an iconic from the politicians about the best way forward. the alhambra theatre figure within the sporting world has put comedy, tragedy and farce to anti—contributed so much to us. may he rest in peace. charlie whiting, a the people of bradford for more than a century. now they are gripped by great formula 1 who has died at the the drama of brexit being played out 200 miles away. we have watched two age of 66. the two—time olympic champion james cracknell will become the oldest person ever to compete in the boat race. and a half years of, instead of a cracknell, who is a6, government working together to get a retired from elite rowing in 2006 but qualifies for next month's race because he is studying a master united deal with the european union, degree at cambridge. we have basically watched a parliament fight amongst itself. bradford voted to leave the european the previous oldest boat race union in 2016 with a 5a% share, competitor was a 38—year—old cox back in 1992. above the level of the uk wide vote. ifi if i can make it onto the start line but some here are concerned about
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it will be the proudest thing i've the effect on local communities. done. it's not like i've come out of i've seen in bradford a lot of the the olympics and two years later i kinds of rhetoric around the am here. istopped running in 200a. divisions, leave, remain, some of the unleashing of really racist and what has changed is the recovery. i far right abuse that came out of it, have to take longer to recover that we saw surfacing during the between sessions. your best doesn't referendum, and it hasn't really change but you can't burn the candle been dealt with. doctor amir khan, a at both ends. british number one kyle edmund gp, is worried about the potential impact of no—deal on the nhs. has been knocked out gp, is worried about the potential of the indian wells masters by roger impact of no-deal on the nhs. no brexit, staying in the eu is the federer. the swiss, a five—time champion in california, made light work of edmund 6—16—4 in just over an hour best thing for medicines, clinical to reach the quarterfinals. trials, access to medication, cancer federer, currently the world number four, has yet to drop treatment, and recruitment, there is a set at the tournament. second seed rafael nadal a recruitment crisis already in the nhs. despite the sense of pantomime, is also through. this woman, terry king, argues that he is scheduled to face roger no—deal will not mean no more trade federer in the semis if they win their next matches. that's all the sport for now. with the eu. i would like it how it was when he first entered, and economic trading community without as 0lly mentioned, today's any of the public —— politics around action is well under way at the cheltenham festival. one of the favourites there, that is what i would prefer,
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for today's big race — seven—year—old paisley park — has had a remarkable journey — but i would prefer to leave on wto as has his owner, andrew gemmel. kate grey has more. rules. the uncertainty and a racehorse is often a thing of beauty, bright eyes, shiny coat, and paisley park is no exception. unpredictability as ingredients in any drama remain despite calls from but his owner andrew gemmel sees none of that. all quarters were some sense of blind from birth, he relies certainty, some idea of what happens on those around him, next. as for a happy ending, again, no one really knows whether that is particularly his racing trainer, emma lavelle, who in 2015, he tasked achievable, and when or if it will come along. the nhs in england has with finding him a champion horse. i said to emma, she's got a certain amount of money to spend, and she really liked this horse, missed its cancer target for more than 1000 days. and brought him back to the yard, and the rest is history! hospitals are meant to start treatment within 62 andrew's absolutely brilliant, days of a gp referral — and will never let his blindness hinder his enjoyment of life. and have been set a target of achieving that for 85% of patients. he has a great bond with the horses. but the last time it was actually achieved was december 2015. scotland, wales and northern ireland have also been missing he comes down, armed with polos, their cancer targets. 0ur health correspondent and wants to go and feed them all. paisley park has been unbeaten john 0wen has more. in his last four races, which means the quicker a cancer diagnosis can be treated, he goes into the cheltenham festival the better a patient‘s in the stayers hurdle as the favourite. chances of survival. after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year,
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an incredible feat, considering two years previous, he had a health scare that almost liz 0akley was quickly on the road ended his career forever. to treatment, and she knows only too emma rang up to tell me well how vital early that he was really ill, intervention can be. and he had colic, and he was touch i was told that if i had left it two and go whether he survived, to three weeks later, in fact, but luckily he did, and he won his novice hurdle there was nothing they could have done for me. at the end of that year. that fast treatment, fast diagnosis, a miraculous recovery, fast surgery and also having paisley park continue to improve, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, i wouldn't be here today. and won his first grade 1 race just before christmas. but fast treatment after a cancer diagnosis is not commentator: paisley park is driven the experience for everyone. out from west approach, and paisley park wins the jlt the nhs in england is falling short hurdles! on the length of time patients and andrew, despite his lack of sight, has found his own way are left waiting for treatment, with figures published today showing to enjoy the action. well, i'll be listening waiting times at their worst level since comparable records on the tannoy, on the course, began in 2009. mainly, at least with racing you can follow the commentary without having any need for additional earphone. 85% of cancer patients are supposed i think it must be nearly 50 years to start treatment within 62 days since i went to my first cheltenham, of an urgent referralfrom a gp, i've always loved it, but that target hasn't been met and you always think of having a winner, you never really since december of 2015. think it's possible, but my goodness, who knows? so with final preparations complete, that means that 86,000 patients have the dream of a cheltenham winner waited longer than they should have has never been closer. for life—saving treatment. kate grey, bbc news, marlborough. we've got more patients coming through for tests,
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and that's a really good thing, because the more people you test, the more early stage you will start to diagnose cancers at, we are not supposed to express a which is great, because it gives people the best chance of a cure. the problem is, although staff view but wouldn't it be great. your are working harder than ever before, there simply aren't enough people to do the tests that we need. watching afternoon live. meanwhile, scotland, wales and northern ireland at 5pm — mps will begin voting all have a more ambitious target once again on brexit.. than england, but it hasn't this time on whether to ask the eu been met in any of those for a delay to brexit. countries for seven years. after parliament's vote last night nhs england say they are investing to rule out a no—deal — the prime minister will try an additional £10 million this year for a third time to get her withdrawal deal through — to treat extra people, but with the clock ticking and the nhs long—term plan until march 29th — includes measures to catch which at the moment more cancers earlier. is still brexit day — john 0wen, bbc news. she's running out of time. joining me now is the deputy leader of the snp group at westminster — kirsty blackman. there are a number of amendments to let's ta ke let's take you back to what is the votes tonight and you are happening inside the commons as mps backing them. yellow they are all asking for various ways in which to prepare to vote yet again on brexit, have an extension to article 50. with a vote today on whether or not the uk should seek permission from that is very important. another one is asking for the meaningful vote the uk should seek permission from the eu to delay brexit beyond march not come back again because nothing the eu to delay brexit beyond march the 29th. has changed and you can't have the same has changed and you can't have the sa m e vote has changed and you can't have the we're nowjoining huw edwards same vote again if nothing has down at westminster
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changed. the biggest concern for me for a bbc special on today's brexit developments. last night was after the house of commons voted to say that we reject no deal, theresa may stood up and seemed to carry on as if nothing happened. she actually needs to take that into account and give effect to welcome to westminster, for live coverage of today's events in the house of commons, as members of parliament vote parliament's voice. a bit of deja vu on whether to request a delay in the troubled brexit process. about this. apparently she is going a warm welcome to viewers to come back on monday or tuesday and try again. she is banking on the on bbc two, the bbc news channel and around the globe on bbc world fa ct and try again. she is banking on the fact that more people will switch news. next time. i don't understand how she can justify bringing the same stay with us as we follow the latest meaningful votes to the house multiple times but is unwilling to developments in the brexit story, and the latest votes, ta ke multiple times but is unwilling to take the proposition to the country. which start in around we know the argument to that. she 15 minutes' time. says she is carrying out the will of last night, mps rejected the people. if you can't get it the prospect of leaving the european union without a deal, through the house, her proposition, but theresa may has warned mps that she says there is no other option, unless they approve a deal, then a no—deal brexit surely the only sensible option at this point then is to have a second eu referendum and ask the eu for an extension for that to happen and have an eu referendum between remain
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and her position. at the moment is much the 29th is a stilt departure date and at the moment we would be leaving without a deal. 0n date and at the moment we would be leaving without a deal. on that basis wouldn't you rather see her deal go through? i wouldn't rather see her deal go through. i don't think her deal is good. her deal will see people lose theirjobs, living standards are being reduced. i cannot living standards are being reduced. icannot in living standards are being reduced. i cannot in good conscience walk through a lobby supporting something that will damage the lives of my constituents. do you accept there is no majority for another referendum in this place? we haven't tested it. if labour get behind it then we are looking at getting towards that majority. i think a second eu referendum is the only sensible option. it certainly isn't a sensible option to leave on the 29th of march because we don't have time to get everything sorted out. you can sense just walking down here of the country. people are getting fractious, worried, what makes you think another referendum would resolve anything? would it notjust
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make things worse? if you look at what is happening in parliament and what is happening in parliament and what the brexiteers in parliament... there is such a wide range of views among stem and at least that would crystallise the proposal and it would mean this is the brexit being offered or this is the remain you are being offered. it would be to clear propositions. like last time? it wasn't to clear propositions. if you ask people from the leave campaign what they expected and you get a massive range of views. that has been theresa may's problem. she is trying to... we will talk about this again. well, what do voters make of these ever—more extraordinary events taking place in westminster? bradford voted leave in the referendum and our correspondentjohn maguire has been along to find out if there's more clarity there — than from the politicans — about the best way forward.
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we've watched years of the government not working together, we basically watched a parliament fight amongst itself. bradford voted to leave the european union in 2016 with a 54% share. above the level of the uk wide vote. some here are concerned about the effects on local communities. we have seen the unleashing of lots of far right views that haven't been dealt with. this doctor, a gp, is
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worried about the impact no deal could have on the nhs. staying in the eu was the best thing both for research into medicines and clinical trials, access to medication, cancer treatments and recruitment. there is a recruitment crisis already in the nhs. despite the sense of pantomime, as an instrument terry king says no deal won't mean no more trade with the eu. i would prefer something along the lines of how it was when we first entered, and economic trading community without the politics around it. without any integration, that's what i would prefer. the uncertainty and unpredictability, essential ingredients for any drama remain despite calls from all quarters. as
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for a happy ending, despite calls from all quarters. as fora happy ending, no despite calls from all quarters. as for a happy ending, no one really knows whether that is achievable and when or if it will come along. susannah streeter is here with the latest business news. susannah — over to you. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the us plane maker boeing has now grounded its entire global fleet of 737 max aircraft. investigators have uncovered new evidence at the scene of the fatal ethiopian airlines crash which killed all 157 people on board. facebook is yet to explain what has been causing global disruption to all of its services. the outage which lasted at least 1a hours has affected the main paltform as well as messaging services including whatsapp and instagram. more on that shortly. govia thameslink railway has been fined a record £5 million by the rail regulator over its chaotic introduction of a new timetable in may last year. the independent watchdog transport focus said the fine should be a wake—up call to train companies
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that accurate passenger information really matters. the chief executive of volkswagen has apologised for evoking a nazi slogan to describe the importance of boosting the group's profits. herbert diess used the line "ebit macht frei" at a company event on tuesday. the phrase echoes the maxim "arbeit macht frei" — meaning "work sets you free" — which was written in wrought—iron on the gates of the auschwitz concentration camp. ebit is a commonly used acronym for "earnings before interest and taxes". in a statement, mr diess said he was sorry for what he described as "definitely an unfortunate choice of words". he explained that he was referring to the freedom afforded to vw brands in strong financial health, in other news... facebook appears to be recovering
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from a more than 14—hour disruption to all of its products that left them mostly inaccessible across the world. the company's main social network, its two messaging apps and image—sharing site instagram were all affected. facebook has yet to offer an explanation for the outage. the last time facebook had a disruption of this magnitude was in 2008, when the site had 150 million users — compared with around 2.3 billion monthly users today. let's talk to dr stephanie hare, independent technology researcher. this has caused major disruption, hasn't it? not just for this has caused major disruption, hasn't it? notjust for individual users but for businesses as well. that is one of the things that facebook has raised, they might reinvest advertisers. we could see a class action suit as well. they haven't been given an explanation as to why this happened or how long it would go on or if it could happen again. we are hearing that there are
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some minor outages in certain parts of the world even though the site on the whole appears to be recovering from all of this. is it clear what has caused this yet? they have not come out with a public statement saying what it is but what they have said is what it isn't. that is a distributed denial of service, which isa distributed denial of service, which is a cyber attack. it is possible and one of the things we do know is that facebook announced they would be integrating facebook, instagram, messenger and whatsapp. possibly they are doing some sort of work on they are doing some sort of work on the back end of that but that is just speculation at this stage. will this lead to renewed calls in the united states for facebook to be split up because they have so much power and so many people depend on this one group? facebook is under a lot of pressure at the moment is not just for this outage but also for
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allegations of criminal data sharing and several other lawsuits as well and several other lawsuits as well and that is just in the united states alone. already they are under pressure. this will just states alone. already they are under pressure. this willjust make any calls for them to be broken up get greater attention. i think the wider point is that maybe users will start to go, "this is really dangerous to have all of my eggs in one basket. if facebook, whatsapp and instagram go down i need to other ways to get my messages out, work with my teams and connect with customers." so what will the reaction be from investors because facebook has seen huge growth in its share price, it has been a bit more turbulence of late but certainly if these outages of this kind continue and they can't sort out this one there will be questions raised about facebook
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spreading itself too thinly.“ questions raised about facebook spreading itself too thinly. if this isa spreading itself too thinly. if this is a one off ora spreading itself too thinly. if this is a one off or a blip then people can take it. but it's whether or not facebook has built an architecture thatis facebook has built an architecture that is more vulnerable to risk. putting your eggs in one basket does increase the risk if something were to happen, especially if it were a cyber attack. it might require them to rejig their engineering. but it is not just facebook‘s to rejig their engineering. but it is notjust facebook‘s response but the people who use it and depend on it, to see it could be out 1a hours, thatis it, to see it could be out 1a hours, that is a long time to not be able to talk to customers. let's check in with the financial markets now and london's blue cchip index the ftse100 is slightly higher today. debenhams shares are higher after the high street chain said it will give careful consideration
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to sports direct s proposed £150 million loan this morning, after receiving the offer last night. sports direct has a 30% stake in debenhams — it's owner mike ashley yesterday complained to the financial conduct authority, accusing the board of deliberately misleading the markets. in return for the loan he wants to be made chief executive — plus wants a seat on the board — and another 5% of the company. watch this space as the retail saga continues. finally sterling — is still inching higher off its morning high but staying above 1.17 against the euro. that's all the business news. thank you, susanna. we are looking ahead to that vote scheduled at five o'clock in westminster. here in westminster, as you have seen over the last few days, you can gauge very much the mood of the place from the crowds that gather outside. pretty much split 50—50 of remainers
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and those who are pro—brexit. they are getting louder and louder have the —— as the voter gets louder and louder. the clouds are gathering too and darren bett can now tell us what will happen with the weather. more wet and windy weather to come. this cloud will bring some rain overnight as it did last night and early this morning. that is moving southwards and sunshine and showers are behind it. blustery winds as we head towards the end of the day but not quite as strong as it was this morning. we saw the cloud earlier on bringing rain quickly into northern ireland and then rain will push its way eastwards over most parts of the country. almost a repeat of what we had last night. the showers in scotla nd had last night. the showers in scotland will turn wintry over the hills, three degrees here compared to around ten or 11 across south
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wales in south—west england. the same sort of weather front moving in ona similarway same sort of weather front moving in on a similar way on friday to what we have seen today. that weather front is moving southwards with cooler westerly winds behind with sunshine and showers. a bit of deja vu sunshine and showers. a bit of deja vu then. rain lingering in southern parts of england and south wales. 0therwise sunny spells, a peppering of showers, most of those in scotland, again they will be wintry with temperatures around five to 7 degrees. 1a in the south east as it rises through the day. we look to the atlantic to see the next weather system coming in, a bit different, develops a deep area of low pressure in the northern parts of the uk so we will find some snow over the hills. most of it will be across scotla nd hills. most of it will be across scotland but we will see this heavy rain pushing into england and wales. 0ne rain pushing into england and wales. one and ahead of that we could well find gusts of 50 or 60 miles an
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hour. so a lot going on on saturday. the air is colder in northern areas, 5 degrees through the central belt, you may get 12 or 13 in east anglia and the south—east. heavy rain will sweep through during the saturday evening and low pressure takes away the rain and snow from northern areas and then we get a north—westerly breeze, perhaps a northerly wind in scotland. not particularly one. a mixture of sunshine and showers and some of the showers will be of a wintry flavour. temperatures back to where they should be at this time of year, eight to 10 celsius.
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hello — you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm: mps prepare to vote on extending the brexit process — if they say "yes" then it's up to the eu to agree. with the government confirming there will a third attempt to get theresa may's withdrawal agreement through — the dup says it's still considering whether or not to back her. we want to get a deal, but, it has to be the right deal for northern ireland. it has to be the right deal for the whole of the united kingdom. a former soldier is to be prosecuted over the bloody sunday shootings in londonderry. the paratrooper will be charged with the murders of james wray and william mckinney — as well as the attempted murder of four others. a decision has been taken to prosecute one former soldier, soldier f, for the murder ofjames wray, and for the murder of william mckinney.
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13 people were shot dead at a civil rights march on 30th january, 1972. their relatives insist their campaign "is not finished yet." justice forjim is one thing, but my heart is broke. it's been a very black day for the rest of the family. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with 0lly. we have just had a fantastic win for jockey briony frost at the cheltenham festival. with the six nations final weekend approaching, some very nations final weekend approaching, some very important to know is coming out today, including a surprising omission from england. thanks, 0lly. and, we'll be joining you for a full update just after 3:30pm. darren bett has all the weather. we are not finished with the wet and windy weather just yet. there we are not finished with the wet and windy weatherjust yet. there is more to come for the rest of this weekend, genia laterfor all the
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details. also still to come — limbering up in the next hour we'll find out whether paisley park — the horse who nearly died — can deliver a cheltenham fairytale. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy in westminister. in two hours' time mps will begin voting once again on brexit — this time, on the issue of whether there should be a delay to the process until the end ofjune, subject to approval from the eu. and, that may not be as simple as it sounds. after parliament's vote last night to rule out a no—deal — the prime minister will try for a third time to get her withdrawal deal through. but with the clock ticking until march 29th, which at the moment is still brexit day, she's running out of time. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth reports. things looked pretty bleak
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in westminster this morning. what is happening with brexit is still unclear. revoke article 50. and, for many, frustration is growing. last night there were dramatic scenes in parliament, as mps rejected the idea of leaving the eu without a deal. some ministers didn't support theresa may, but they are still in theirjobs. did you expect to be in the cabinet having not backed the prime minister last night? that has caused some anger and many are turning their minds to what happens now. by no means is any option off the table. today mps are discussing whether brexit should be delayed, given there is no deal in place and most don't want to leave without one. the government suggested a short extension could happen but only if there is a deal in sight. otherwise, a delay could be lengthy. we have two options.
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a timetable for the withdrawal bill, we can expect at the european union to agree to a short technical extension to allow the necessary legislation to be carried through. if that proves, for whatever reason not to be possible, we will be faced with the prospect of choosing only a long extension, during which the house will need to face up to the choices in front of it and the consequences of the decisions that it has taken. labour are saying it is likely to support a delay in the process but not theresa may's plan. we couldn't allow theresa may's plan to go through,
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so we must find another route. there might be a number of mps who support a compromise, unless it goes back to the people. and that will have to be one of the options to consider. the cabinet was summoned to downing street this afternoon, no doubt, to talk strategy. the government is still trying to salvage the prime minster‘s troubled brexit deal. there are conversations are still taking place between the government and some of those who oppose theresa may's plans so far. crucially the dup. the prime minister is expected to bring her deal back to parliament next week, despite the fact it has been rejected twice, hoping to win the support of some brexiteers if the alternative is a long delay. the dup has confirmed it is still talking to the government. when you come to the end of a negotiation, that's when you really start to see the whites of peoples eyes, if you like. you get down to the point where you
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make a deal. we want to see a deal, a deal that is good for the whole of the united kingdom and that is what we are focusing on. but some brexiteers are clear — even if it means a delay, they won't back the prime minister's current deal. no, it's a very bad agreement and it would put the united kingdom in some sub—colonial status from which we cannot decide to leave. why on earth would we want to be in that position? so, expect further turmoil in parliament this afternoon, as divided mps try to shape what happens next. one thing we will know, whether the chance of brexit being delayed look ever more likely. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. 0ur europe correspondent, damian grammaticas, is in brussels. they are going to be just watching just as closely there as we are here this evening. absolutely. they have watched every vote in the last few days. this one, meanwhile, the eu
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side debating what their response would be if the uk does come forward and ask for would be if the uk does come forward and askforan would be if the uk does come forward and ask for an extension. so, we have seen this aired publicly today, a suggestion from donald tusk speaking for the other 27 countries, he is going to set off around european capitals, berlin, paris, dublin, in the next few days. who says he will be urgently does little to consider the possibility of a long extension, if the uk thinks thatis long extension, if the uk thinks that is necessary. he says, in order to rethink the uk's brexit strategy and build a consensus around it. similar messages coming from dublin. by similar messages coming from dublin. by long, they mean a year to 21 months, which will take us to the end of 2020. that is one idea, is not clear what the leaders would do. we do know that they will be here in brussels on thursday of next week. they will sit around the table, and
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decide what they will accept. a short extension to sort out some details? 0rare short extension to sort out some details? or are they prepared to accept a longer one? the question will be, for the uk, one wide as it wanted, what it achieve? there is an assumption there is unity in the eu? is that a danger, perhaps france, among other countries, may not be disposed to helping the uk out. this, i think, disposed to helping the uk out. this, ithink, is disposed to helping the uk out. this, i think, is the one issue the eu has not lined up all its ducks in a row. it has not sorted out all its thinking in advance. throughout this process , thinking in advance. throughout this process, the eu have proved very prepared at every stage. here, suddenly, they are going to face a tough decision, and much more political decision than most of what has happened so far. that is why it will vault a daily dose next week on
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that single occasion to study and look at it. i think there are differing opinions, some thinking a longer timescale gives the uk more time to rethink and sort things out. 0thers, time to rethink and sort things out. others, not so keen. i think we are likely to see at the eu coalescing around and opinion. i think it's unlikely that if the uk asked for something, the eu would seek to block it. a long extension might be another question. you mention the end of next year as a possibility. will that fill the hearts of people that with as much dread as it properly does here? there are many here that would like to see this process wrapped up. i think a large number on the eu site and off the huge amount of time and energy has been expended trying to come together with a deal that they have agreed with theresa may, it has taken 18 months of negotiation. it
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does address getting the uk to get through brexit, exit the eu with an orderly process— they would like to see that happen. 0n the other hand, a long extension has the possibility of extending all this uncertainty, but also, the uk could be considered a different outcome. for the eu side, that could mean possibly a closer relationship with the eu that some might favour. that would open the possibility but it's a difficult balance and something nearly that will have to consider very carefully. they must also decide unanimously, that is the key point. yeah thanks chris! 0ur reality check correspondent, chris morris, is here. remind us what article 50 is? it is the lisbon treaty, the eu's bigotry day. article 50 is the section which sets out how a country
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can leave this up before brexit, it had never been used. there is quite a lot of deliberately vague language in it. one thing made very clear is that you have a two—year period to negotiate a booth at while taking account of the future. the government eventually did, but i get it through parliament at the moment. once ina it through parliament at the moment. once in a two—year period is over, you leave, unless anything else changes. at the moment, little happened on the 29th of march— deal or no—deal. happened on the 29th of march— deal or no-deal. how do you change it? the table the option not on the table at the moment is to revoke article 50. the uk does not have to discuss that with anyone else, they canjust say, discuss that with anyone else, they can just say, we discuss that with anyone else, they canjust say, we have change our mind. that means brexit will be cancelled. you can also extend article 50, push the deadline back about. the uk cannot do it on its own, it is needs of the agreement of all 28 countries, itself and the other 27. the uk law would also have
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to be changed because the match 20 knife date is in law at moment, that can be done relatively easily. the big question comes from the eu side— how long do you want to extend for, and why? it is becoming the crucial point. it is politically sensitive. this graph shows some of the options. if you want to very short extensionjust to options. if you want to very short extension just to get this deal over the line in it into law in the middle of may, i don't think there will be a problem with that. in the middle of the graphic, european elections are a big bump in the road. both the government and european commission say that if the uk is still a member of the european commission say that if the uk is stilla member of the eu european commission say that if the uk is still a member of the eu at that stage, it will have to take pa rt that stage, it will have to take part in those elections. others say, thatis part in those elections. others say, that is a bit more will room, perhaps to the end ofjune because the new parliament isn't sworn in until the 2nd of july. the new parliament isn't sworn in until the 2nd ofjuly. legally and politically, much more tricky is what you are talking about with damien. a much longer extension, the sort of thing hinted by donald tusk,
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perhaps even by december 2020. i think the concern would be, if that we re think the concern would be, if that were to happen and the uk had not taken were to happen and the uk had not ta ken part were to happen and the uk had not taken part in the elections, there would be legal challenges from people saying, we are still in the eu and i'm not being represented. that is legal division in opinion. the most senior british lawyer on the european court ofjustice says, if the political will is there, illegal fix can be found, perhaps extending existing meps for a while. possibly, even sending national mps from westminster to act as meps, other countries other than that when theyjoined the other countries other than that when they joined the eu. other countries other than that when theyjoined the eu. we are living, so theyjoined the eu. we are living, so it is rather different. quite an atmosphere, throughout the corridors, for that period of time. it has it been done before, this is all uncharted legal territory. i think for everybody it is getting politically awkward. on your brexit
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the but sad debate, the thinking is that a 21 month extension gives an awful lot of time for people who would like the exact opposite, a second referendum, possibly no brexit at all, it gives much more time for them. it sounds a long time, years, thus far, we have not achieved anything tangible yet. we have had a long time, but it's not two weeks, which we have left at the moment. time has virtually run out on the first article 50 period, the now has to be a sustained discussion. it has to happen politically, if the house of commons says it does want to explore the possibility of extending article 50, then, the key moment, end of next week, eu summit in brussels. we presume there will be some sort of request, some sort of short extension from the government, but, what will be 27 countryside? —— 27
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countries say? a former paratrooper, known only as soldier f, is to face two charges of murder and four charges of attempted murder — in connection with the events of one of the most notorious days of northern ireland's troubles in 1972. 13 civil rights demonstrators were shot dead in londonderry on what came to be known as bloody sunday. 16 other former soldiers, and two alleged official ira members, will not face prosecution. bloody sunday relatives were visibly upset after learning they've insisted their campaign "is not finished yet." 0ur ireland correspondent, chris page, reports from londonderry. 47 years after the march which ended in bloodshed — the families of those who died took to the streets again. a show of unity and purpose to remember those who were killed on bloody sunday. 0n the 30th of january 1972, 15,000 people took part in a civil rights march in londonderry.
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just after four o'clock in the afternoon, soldiers opened fire in the nationalist bogside area. half an hour later — 13 people were dead, seven of them teenagers. pictures like these captured the trauma and the tragedy. the paratroopers said they had been shot at first, but, nine years ago, a public inquiry found that no one who was killed had been posing a threat. prosecutors have been deciding whether to bring charges. a decision has been taken to prosecute one former soldier, soldier f — for the murder ofjames wray, and for the murder of william mckinney. it's been a tense morning for the dozens of relatives who were waiting for the news. the families have just met prosecutors and been told of the decision. it's almost half a century since bloody sunday and after the long campaign they now know that one
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former soldier will be brought before the courts. he will be charged with murdering these men — james wray was 22, william mckinney 27. james wray‘s brother said his feelings were mixed. justice forjim, which i think this is, is one thing — but my heart is broke. it's been a very black day for the rest of the family. the families who didn't get the decision they wanted included that of william nash — who was 17 when he was killed. the only thing we can do is keep going on, keep doing what we're doing. i don't know, legally, within the law, what we can do but we will pursue it and keep going. there is another perspective on the justice process. some army veterans have claimed investigators are putting an unfair focus on what the military did during the northern ireland conflict. this week — the officer who commanded the soldiers on bloody sunday maintained his troops had acted in self—defence. we thought, in fact, we were under
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attack, and we actually will remain convinced of that until the end of our days. all the paratroopers who were here on bloody sunday are now in their 60s and 70s. prosecution lawyers say court proceedings against soldier f will begin soon. chris page, bbc news, derry. 0ur correspondent, karen allen, is in londonderry this afternoon. still a lot of anger after this decision? there is definitely a very subdued mood here in derry, many families extremely disappointed by the fact that just one low families extremely disappointed by the fact thatjust one low ranking soldier is going to face prosecution. i spoke to one or two families, some of them were pretty sanguine and said, it is better that we have one prosecution than none at all. i think expectations had really been raised, particularly in the
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wa ke been raised, particularly in the wake of the saville enquiry, although there had no way meant to be able to charge. it was fairly robust in its conclusions that the soldiers had lost self—control and the people that work matching on the bogside had presented no threat whatsoever. i think the family is hoping that there will be more charges. someone said a victory for one as a victory for all, this is an exporting step in the process. many are looking for a possible legal avenues to pursue this in the future possibly. there is a sense that the battle is not yet won, yet today is an extremely important milestone. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is in the houses of parliament. a lot of complications about what votes they might be or might not be. i think the big picture is that mps are coming here today and are going
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to be routine, potentially, to delay brexit. that is quite a momentous moment, given that we are almost three years from the referendum, after two years of negotiations, that could be where we are heading. there are still lots of different ideas about where we're next. 0ne there are still lots of different ideas about where we're next. one of just explain what you would like to see happening, the amendment, the change that you are proposing. all along, i've been rooting for the prime minister? deal and along, i've been rooting for the prime minister? dealand i along, i've been rooting for the prime minister? deal and i will continue to do that. it is evident that she has found it difficult to get a majority. under those circumstances, we need to make sure that we use in extension to try and establish a cross—party majority for an alternative, if the prime minister cannot get a majority for her deal. i think we ought to leave the eu in an orderly way with the deal, to protect the security and
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prosperity in this country. how quickly could that happen, given that we are very close to the deadline? and, in what way could mps show what they are in favour walls, as opposed to what they are against? that is exactly what we need more people talk about what they are in favour of, not what they are against. the truth is, we don't know exactly how long it will take to get a cross—party majority for some proposition. i don't think it may ta ke very proposition. i don't think it may take very long. the whole reason why it would be appropriate to seek an extension for sale, freemans, it would be appropriate to seek an extension forsale, freemans, i think that will be plenty of time for mps to get to majority view across the parties. and then for that to be encoded in changing what is called a political declaration. i think that can be done very quick. some people say it is a controversial idea that you are proposing. because it is really backbenchers taking control of the agenda, in order to get this kind of
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result. i don't think it matters who controls what. what matters is, are we going to leave with a deal so that we fulfil the mandate of the referendum and get an orderly process and preserve our prosperity? 0r, process and preserve our prosperity? or, are we going to vow to do that in either crash out with no—deal, or not have brexit at all, in contradiction to the referendum? if you want no sensible brexit that preserves prosperity with the deal, if the government cannot get its proposal through, surely it sensible for the rest of us try to find across party majority that will get through on some bases. what do you make of the situation that threes may find yourself in, the difficulty, with a hung parliament a very difficult subject to try and get through? —— theresa may.” very difficult subject to try and get through? -- theresa may. i think anybody would find it difficult. i
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think of anybody who has watched over the past four years is bound to admire the dignity she has shown. we have come close to the point where it is demonstrated that she cannot get a majority for her deal. we do need an alternative. so, next monday or tuesday, she comes forward with her deal. even with the prospect that the change goes through tonight, on the wednesday, you start heading toward something that you might prefer, you're still willing to back her? yes, i do not want to be dogmatic about my preference. the prime minister? deal is perfectly sensible, i'm happy to back it all the way along. i will back any sensible compromise while we are at it. i really do not believe this is the time for our country for people to decide the only like green suites. any kind of sweet is better than no meal at all. thank you for joining us. we may find that in the
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next few days or weeks how many people like 0liver agrees. brexit has been discussed by the vernacular, the irish tee shot, he has been visiting the white house and talking to donald trump. no fan of the brexit process, of course. the cameras were there, let's listen in. it's a great honour to have you, fantastic country. i'm not going to comment on brexit. i can tell you it's a very complex thing going on, tearing a country apart, actually telling a lot of countries apart. it's a shame it has to be that way, but, i think we will stay right in our line. we but, i think we will stay right in ourline. we are but, i think we will stay right in our line. we are doing fantastically asa our line. we are doing fantastically as a country, a worker economy is booming, we are the envy of the world. we are doing record business while other countries are not doing
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so well, we are really happy about that. it's great to have the prime minister of ireland with us. i think he has got a lot of hand movement, i've never seen so many hand movement. i've never seen hand movement, i watch them a little while this morning doing some kind ofa while this morning doing some kind of a news conference and i've actually never seen anything quite like it. study it, i'm sure you'll agree. whoever it is, i'll take them all, him or her. whoever it is, i would take him or her on. i think with the economy doing so well with all of the things that we have done the tax cuts the biggest in the history of our country. tax cuts meaning people have a lot more money in their pockets, 401(k) is hitting record numbers. they have never been considered a great investors by
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their wives or husbands, now they are considered great investments. the market is hitting almost new highs, i have every single record for the stock market. i think it will be very tough to beat, if you look at african—american, hispanic, asian unemployment— we have the best record in the history of unemployment. i think it will be tough for somebody, but whoever it is, it makes no difference to me whatsoever. i will be coming at some point during the year. i missed it last time i would have loved to been there, it is a special place and i had a very warm spot for doing that. it's just a really great place. had a very warm spot for doing that. it'sjust a really great place. how long do you think boeing planes will be grounded? i hope it will be a short period of time. they have to find out what it is. i'm not sure
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that they now. i thought we had to do, we had to take a cautionary rout, the grounding of the plane yesterday was a big thing. we done the same, yes. it's a great company, a truly great company. hopefully, they will figure it out very quickly. it is also one of our largest exporters, one of our our truly great companies of the word. they have to figure it out fast, they know that, they are under great pressure. it wasn't that i was a supporter, i predicted it would happen people laughed when i predicted it and they won by about two points. i was standing out on turnberry, we had a press conference and people were screaming, that was the day before if you remember. people were screaming and i said, now, i think it is going to have it.
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people were surprised i made the prediction because president 0bama made the opposite production, and i was right. i will tell you, made the opposite production, and i was right. iwill tell you, i'm surprised at how badly it all gone from the standpoint of a negotiation. i gave the prime minister at my ideas on how to negotiate it. she didn't listen to that, and that's fine. she's got to do what she's got to do. but, i think it could be negotiated in a different manner. i hate to see everything being ripped apart right now. i do not think another bout would be possible because it be very unfairto would be possible because it be very unfair to the people that one. —— another bout. another vote. unfair to the people that one. —— another vote. those eyes are very cemented in, it's a tough situation, frankly, it's a shame. there is no reason for that to have happened. it should have gone smoothly,
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u nfortu nately, should have gone smoothly, unfortunately, it didn't, very complicated issue. the issue on the border of ireland is one of the most complex points. do you think it should be extended?” complex points. do you think it should be extended? i think they will have to do something, but now, they're in the midst of a very short period of time. they will not be able to do that. i would like to see that whole situation with brexit work out. we are talking to them about trade, we can do a very big trade deal with the uk. we are also renegotiating our trade deal with the european groups, literally, individual nations. i'd also come up with the whole. but, it's very sad to see what's happening there, and i'm sure there was no region, leo, do you agree? would you like to express your feelings on brexit?
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i regret to brexit is happening because the uk was a really important part of the european union. they are going now and that is their decision but the most important thing for us in ireland is that the decision to leave shouldn't cause any problem for the people in northern ireland and that we shouldn't have a hard border or anything to disrupt the peace process. we also want to make sure we have frictionless trade between britain and ireland because i believe in free trade and i think it will be a few years before the united kingdom sorts itself out. but in the meantime the european union is able to talk trade with the us. we have talked to the european union and they have been very tough. they we re and they have been very tough. they were unwilling to talk to the obama administration and before that. i'm notjust blaming administration and before that. i'm not just blaming president administration and before that. i'm notjust blaming president obama. but if they don't talk to us we will do something that is pretty severe economically. the european union treats us very unfairly, i have to
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say that. they treat the united states and they have done for very year —— for many years. they treat us year —— for many years. they treat us very unfairly. they are negotiating. mr president, . .. us very unfairly. they are negotiating. mr president,... i don't know what the vote will be. the legal scholars also it is totally constitutional. it is very important, a border security votes, . .. well, that was donald trump, the united states president who began that clip saying he wasn't going to comment on brexit and then commented on it. he said it would tear this country apart and a lot of countries apart. he said it is not how it would —— he would have negotiated it but it is something he predicted. we will get more response to what he had to say later on but as you saw that sitting next to the
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irish taoiseach inside the white house. just want to bring you some news from france. france says it does not support a short extension to article 50 if it is merely for britain to reopen negotiations to open divorce terms with the european union. plenty more to come from westminster but now the sport with 0lly foster. the feature race on day three at the cheltenham festival, the stayers hurdle, isjust getting under way, but this will take some beating. i will probably be able to give you the results of that race before the end of the bulletin. but this is some story... the ryanair chase saw history being made in the last half an hour with bryony frost becoming the first female jockey to ride a grade one winner at the festival. she was quite overcome with emotion
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when she got past the post. 0n—board the paul nicholls trained frodon. they have made a formidable partnership won at cheltenham earlier this year. priced at 9—2. you can listen to the closing stages of the stayers hurdle. i will bring you the result in a few minutes. that's on 5 live and the rest of the days races on 5 live sports extra. the final weekend of the six nations championship is coming up, three teams can still win it. scotland can't but have made six changes for the trip to twickenham. england have made fourfor what might be a must—win match for them. they have surprisingly left joe cokanasiga out altogether. the winger was man of the match against italy last weekend but he's replaced in the starting 15 and doesn't make the bench either. jack nowell is back in the side after recovering from injury. centre henry slade also returns with two further changes in the pack. eddiejones says cokanasiga is still very much part of his plans.
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he's a good young player and we will bring him through. for all young players you have to make sure you look after them. sometimes they need to be exposed and sometimes pulled back. it's important, particularly in england, because i've seen so many good young players since i've been involved in top level rugby start with this boom and then they play three or four tests. i want him to play 100 tests for england. wales might have already won the grand slam by the time england play. they will be unchanged for the match against ireland in cardiff. full back liam williams was a doubt but is fit to play. if wales lose then england would win the title with victory, but if they lose as well then ireland will retain the title. the irish have made three changes. rob kearney returns at full back in place ofjordan larmour. while tadhg beirne will make his six nations debut in the second row for the injured iain henderson. flanker sean o'brien is also back in.
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tributes have been paid to one of formula 1's leading figures, the race director charlie whiting, who has died suddenly. he wasjust 66. he was the official race starter, but was perhaps more importantly a pioneer of improved safety regulations in the sport over a number of years. he passed away in melbourne, where he was due to officiate this weekend's season—opening australian grand prix. incredibly shocked this morning to hear the sad news. my thoughts and prayers are with his family. what he did for the sport and his commitment... he really was a pillar. such an iconic figure within the sporting world and he contributed so much to us. may he rest in peace. the two—time olympic champion james cracknell will become the oldest person ever to compete in the boat race. cracknell, who is a6, retired from elite rowing in 2006 but qualifies for next month's race
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because he is studying a master degree at cambridge. he won gold in the coxless fours at both the 2000 and 2004 games. the previous oldest boat race competitor was a 38—year—old cox back in 1992. if i can make it onto the start line it will be the proudest thing i've done. it's not like i've come out of the olympics and two years later i am here. i stopped rowing in 200a. and i haven't rode since. what has changed is the recovery. i have to take longer to recover between sessions. your best doesn't change but you can't burn the candle at both ends. i can't bring you the results in stayers hurdle because they still have two to jump. the favourite is well placed as they are just approaching the last. go to the bbc sport website for that result in the
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next 30 seconds or so. just give us a commentary for the last bit.” can't give you commentary. i don't think that is allowed because of rights obligations but the favourite is still in it. that is paisley park. i remember doing some lawn bowls commentary for you and nobly wa nts bowls commentary for you and nobly wants that again. paisley park is coming through the field right now. it will be a tight finish. paisley park, we featured it because his owner has been blind all his life. and paisley park has won it. very popular winner there. winning the stayers hurdle at the cheltenham festival. sorry to do that to you
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but it was worth it. after parliament's vote last night to rule out a no—deal — the prime minister will try for a third time to get her withdrawal deal through — but with the clock ticking until march 29th — which at the moment is still "brexit day" — she's running out of time. joining me now is the shadow health secretaryjon ashworth. thank you forjoining us. i know you are backing the lumbar back amendments but you are not backing the amendment is looking at another referendum. yet, ithought the amendment is looking at another referendum. yet, i thought that was your policy? it is our policy to support a public vote at the right moment. we think today is about getting an agreement on extending article 50 and we have to extend this process because theresa may has made an utter shambles of this
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brexit negotiation. we need more time. it is dominating everything here. the government is completely paralysed. today we have had the worst a&e waiting times that in history. we have a crisis in a&e and we are not even debating that in the house of commons. brexit is paralysing everything. we need an extension of the process to get a better deal for the country. extension of the process to get a better deal for the countrym extension of the process to get a better deal for the country. it is clear from the eu there is better deal for the country. it is clearfrom the eu there is no renegotiation. we all know it is theresa may's deal, it is extending article 50, for us in this country to decide what we want to do. it is no brexit at all which is a possibility, another referendum, none of these have a sense of majority in this building. you are buying time for what's? theresa may says it is her deal or no deal but parliament has rejected her deal and has rejected no deal. so because of her incompetence we have to do
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something and i think what seems obvious to me that the most appropriate thing to do is to try and extend the process. people who voted brexit will be very angry about that but they should direct that anger at theresa may for making such a hash of it. why are you not saying we are going to go hell for leather? we have said we will support another public vote if parliament cannot agree a deal or if we need to block a disastrous deal. that is a position of the labour party. there is a technical point which is if the referendum amendment passed today it would knock out another importance amendments which is about parliament being given the opportunity to try and shape the deal in the coming days. i think we have got to give parliament that chance in the coming days. that would undermine hilary benn's amendment. we have to get the sequencing rights today. amendment. we have to get the sequencing rights todaym amendment. we have to get the sequencing rights today. it has taken us two years to get to this point. what makes you think two
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months or another six months would allow that process to work in that sort of timeframe? we have got to try. mps have got to try and get a better deal. theresa may has trickled article 50 without having a clue what her negotiating position was. then she decided to have a general election in the process. you voted to trigger article 50 as well? she has wasted months with a general election and look where that left us. election and look where that left us. we need more time. she is not going to get her deal through parliament. we need more time to try and geta parliament. we need more time to try and get a better arrangement. what isa and get a better arrangement. what is a better arrangement? we need a single market arrangement and a —— agreements. we think the set of proposals the labour party is proposing would get support with collea g u es proposing would get support with colleagues in the european union and we think they are in the national
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interest in the economic interest. theresa may dismisses them and she has got herself in a corner by doing that. how long do you want this extension to be? we have got to be a principle of an extension but it has got to be as short as possible but as long as necessary. we need a sensible extension. the public will wa nt to sensible extension. the public will want to know how long this is dragging on. if we can get an amendment today we can go back to the european union and get clarity. the first in the european union will say is how long do you once? that is in the government's corner. it is very easy to criticise the government is when you're not telling me what it is required. he was telling me labour will come up with another proposal. new must have an idea what is in the proposal and how long it will take you to get back together and when you will put
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that to your european union. with respect i am not negotiating on behalf of the government. that is a copout. if you are saying there is an alternative, where is it, what is it? we are saying to the government we are giving you permission to extend negotiations. they will then explain how long they think they need. theresa may will come back on monday and tuesday and say here's my deal and we need to vote on this again. it has been rejected twice now. is she really going to humiliate herself a third time? she may well do that because it is her style but, my god, people really are starting to feel sorry for her in that place. when the mood of the country is really frustrated, angry that they are in a position where on march 29 at the moment we are facing the respect of leaving the european union without a deal whatsoever and
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yet everyone is saying, "theresa may has marks this up and our party all sorted out." people want answers. people want to know what the alternatives are as you haven't come up alternatives are as you haven't come up with one. we have come with alternatives, a customs union. if there was a labour government that is what we would be supporting now. i think we would get support for that position. it would be within the country's interest. i understand why people are angry that the government has made such a hash of these negotiations that they have pushed us up to the wire with no agreement whatsoever. we have no choice now to extend article 50 and try and negotiate a better deal. if people are angry about that they should be angry with theresa may who gave them all kind of promises and has utterly failed to deliver on any of them. when you go back to your constituency don't people express some anger at politics in general?
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not necessarily at individuals or individual parties but at this political system that has got us to there. unquestionably people are fed up there. unquestionably people are fed up with this. my first answer to you is that we should be debating a&e waiting times, the worst crisis in history. but there is nothing about that in the news or in the house of commons. people are fed up and they wa nt commons. people are fed up and they want us to be talking about other issues. i entirely get people's angen issues. i entirely get people's anger. the constituency are represented in leicester is a remain constituency so i get people with the european flags getting angry with me rather than the people with the new kit flags. i don't want to live in a divided country like this do you? we are one nation after all and we have got to do something. thank you forjoining us. it has started to rain during all of that so you better get out of the rain.
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well, what do voters make of these ever—more extraordinary events taking place in westminster? bradford voted leave in the referendum and our correspondentjohn maguire has been along to find out if there's more clarity there — than from the politicans — about the best way forward. the alhambra theatre has brought comedy, tragedy and farce to the people of bradford for more than a century. now they're gripped by the drama of brexit being played out 200 miles away. we have watched two and half years now of, instead of a government working together to get a united deal with the european union, we've basically watched a parliament fight amongst itself. bradford voted to leave the european union in 2016 with a 54% share, above the level of the uk—wide vote. some here are concerned about the effect on local communities. i have seen in bradford a lot of the kinds of rhetoric around the divisions — you know, leave, remain,
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some of the unleashing of really, really racist and far—out views that and ——far—right views that came out, that we saw surface during the referendum that haven't really been dealt with. dr amir khan, a gp, is worried about the impact no deal could have on the nhs. i really think no brexit, staying in the eu is the best thing, both for research into medicines and into clinical trials, access to medication for patients, cancer treatments and recruitment. there is a recruitment crisis already in the nhs. but despite the sense of pantomime, businesswoman terry king argues no deal won't mean no more trade with the eu. i would really prefer something along the lines of how it was when we first entered, you know, more around an economic trading community without any of the politics around there, about none of the integration, that's what i would prefer. but as the absolute bottom line, iwould prefer to leave on wto rules. so the uncertainty and unpredictability essential
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ingredients for any drama remain, despite calls from all quarters for some sense of certainty, some idea of what happens next. as for a happy ending, again no one really knows whether that is achievable and when or if it will come along. john maguire reporting there. susannah streeter is here now with the latest business news. here's your business headlines on afternoon live the us plane maker boeing has now grounded its entire global fleet of 737 max 8 aircraft. investigators have uncovered new evidence at the scene of the fatal ethiopian airlines crash which killed all 157 people on board. facebook is yet to explain what has been causing global disruption to all of its services. the outage which lasted at least 1a hours has affected the main paltform as well as messaging services including whatsapp and instagram. govia thameslink railway has been
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fined a record £5 million by the rail regulator over its chaotic introduction of a new timetable in may last year. the independent watchdog transport focus said the fine should be a wake—up call to train companies that accurate passenger information really matters. with just 15 days until the uk is due to leave the european union there is still little certainty for businesses or anyone else about the way ahead. ahead of the vote this evening on delaying brexit, london's blue chip index the ftse 100 is slightly higher today, though investors stay pretty cautious. sterling has given up some of its early gains, when it briefly hit a nine month high. debenhams has been one to watch — its shares were up more than 4% earlier — but have since dropped a little. that's after the high street chain said it will give careful consideration to sports direct s proposed £150 million loan this morning, after receiving the offer last night. sports direct has a 30% stake in debenhams —
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and its owner mike ashley wants more shares — a seat on the board and the top job. will he get it? let's talk to jeremy thomson—cook, chief economist at the international currency experts, world first. you have been watching what is going on at debenhams. it seems that mike ashley on at debenhams. it seems that mike as hley wa nts on at debenhams. it seems that mike ashley wants to take control of the company. he really does. he took control of house of fraser earlier this year as well. this is an hundred and £50 million that he would put into the company. a0 of which would be paying off creditors and the rest moving into working capital. as you said that would make him being the ceo as well. the cfo would stay on. but it would be him and his sports direct brand taking over debenhams. whether they go with that or with paying off creditors
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from other lines, will have to wait and see. you are in the currency business and the pound has been pretty volatile today, hasn't it? it has come off its highs earlier. why is that? there is a bit of pessimism about why there was a couple of votes last night in parliament to politically get rid of no deal. legally we would either need a revocation, extension of article 50 ora revocation, extension of article 50 or a deal before the 29th. so it is a tempering of that optimism but obviously if we do get an extension today or vote on an extension today we may see other fun and games today or vote on an extension today we may see otherfun and games in parliament next week, another meaningful vote, indicative votes or unelectable real risk as well. investors are little bit optimistic on the pound but nothing to get carried away with. still very
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cautious then. are any other factors coming into play? poor chinese data overnight will have damaged the risk atmosphere a little bit. but when you are looking at the pound, brexit really is the only story at the moment. you can't look at industrial production data without thinking what it will means without going back to westminster. inflation and the pound, what they mean in a no—deal brexit scenario. everything links back to what is happening in the house of commons. it governs everything and until we have clarity it will remain very choppy. let's check in with the financial markets. the ftse100 is slightly higher today. the pound is still inching higher off its morning high but staying above 1.17 against the euro. that's all the business news.
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a former paratrooper — known only as soldier f — is to face two charges of murder and four charges of attempted murder, in connection with the events of one of the most notorious days of northern ireland's troubles in 1972. thirteen civil rights demonstrators were shot dead in londonderry on what came to be known as bloody sunday. sixteen other former soldiers and two alleged official ira members will not face prosecution. denis murray is the bbc‘s former ireland correspondent, he's been giving me his reaction to today's events, and why it's been met with disappointment from the victims' families. i think the disappointment is compounded by the idea that there would be more prosecutions. i don't think anybody thought that all the soldiers named in the south will report —— saddle report saville inquiry. i think there was an expectation that more soldiers would
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be prosecuted. the director of public prosecutions in northern ireland referred to that and said there was a level of expectation. it is the same old thing. you will hear police officers saying that knowing something to be the case is very different to having hard evidence to prove it. the saville inquiry in several instances, lord saddle and his colleagues said they were sure they were —— that a group of soldiers fired on a group of protesters. i don't think that anyone can possibly complain about not just thorough but anyone can possibly complain about notjust thorough but rigour. the rigour that has been brought to this by the dpp. the police historical enquiries unit have been working on this for nine years. there is
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125,000 pages in the book of evidence that the dpp have. i don't think anyone is criticising them on that basis. at the same time the army and i'm sure the ministry of defence as well, individual soldiers who served here, will be very unhappy that any soldier has been prosecuted at all. particularly because they will point out the part of the good friday agreement is that a lot of those who are known to have been involved in killings on the other side were effectively told they are free to go. somewhere oppose the good friday agreement... those are not applying across the board. 0ne those are not applying across the board. one of them was being tried for the hyde park bombings and that had to end because he had a pardon. his extradition has just been granted from the republic of ireland to northern ireland to face trial for two other murders committed in
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northern ireland. that is currently under appeal. but it shows you that authorities here are still pursuing people who weren't soldiers. part of the good friday agreement was that all prisoners got out but think about this, only five soldiers up to today have ever faced charges of murder, and hundreds and hundreds of both republican and loyalist paramilitary prisoners were convicted and spent many years inside prison full stop so people who say this is one—sided i think are being unfair. there is about 1800 cases being investigated at the moment and about a third of them are military cases. part of the problem is this, there is nojudicial or moral reason not to prosecute if somebody broke the law. there is a political reason and a military reason. it is very difficult if the army takes young men and women and trains them to be soldiers, they are
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trying to do two things, to obey orders and to kill, if you send them into danger and orders and to kill, if you send them into dangerand in orders and to kill, if you send them into danger and in the back of their heads there is, "i might end up going to jailfor doing my duty." the latter is a problem. a second problem is that all governments have to defend their military and their police because. to defend their military and their police because... inteference that was dennis murray. here in westminster more crowds are arriving. there is a large uk per contingent scheduled to arrive for that vote at 5pm. in the meantime it is getting a bit more vocal. every time there is a major vote here we get to see more people with louder
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voices and stranger voices one lady singing ina voices and stranger voices one lady singing in a particularly high voice which is quite frightening, frankly. but there we go. that is what is happening at westminster. all the headlines and the latest sports coming up as well. now let's catch up coming up as well. now let's catch up with the weather. sunshine and showers in most of the country full stop really quite windy. strong to gale force winds. not quite as windy as it was. the wind will pick up again overnight as we see more rain coming in from the atla ntic to we see more rain coming in from the atlantic to many parts of the country. more showers and colder in northern scotland. double figure is likely in south—west england and south wales. some cloud and rain first thing on friday but elsewhere it will brighten up. the peppering
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of showers mostly in scotland later on, mostly over the hills. it will feel chillier as well. particularly when the to the east of the pennines. into the weekend we have got some snow over northern hills, heavy rain, gales and that is just on saturday.
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