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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 16, 2019 6:00am-7:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: a man accused of carrying out the worst mass shooting in new zealand history appears in court, so far charged with one count of murder. the people of christchurch mourn the 49 worshippers who were killed at two mosques. the country's prime minister vows to take action. ican i can tell you one thing right now. ourgun i can tell you one thing right now. our gun laws will change. staying in while trying to leave. more confusion over brexit — a leaked eu document shows that the uk has to take part in european parliament elections if we delay leaving.
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viewers pledge more than 63 million pounds in donations for comic relief during last night's fundraiser show. and it's all set for a big finish on super saturday in the the six nations. but can england or ireland snatch the title from grand slam—chasing wales on a delicately poised final day? heavy rain, hill snow and strong wind feature in the forecast today. join me forfull details in wind feature in the forecast today. join me for full details in the wind feature in the forecast today. join me forfull details in the next 20 minutes. it's saturday 16th march. our top story. a 28—year—old australian man has appeared in court in christchurch charged with murder, in connection with a mass shooting at two mosques which killed 49 people. this is brenton tarrant coming into court — the pictures are blurred for legal reasons. he did not make a plea during the brief appearance, which was closed to the public
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because of safety concerns. the shootings were live—streamed on facebook and shared widely on other social media platforms. 39 people are still being treated in hospital including a two—year—old boy. shara njit leyl reports from christchurch. a memorialfor the a memorial for the victims of the shooting. christchurch residents have been bringing flowers and leaving notes here all day. messages of caird. new zealand may be struggling to comprehend the tragic adverts in christchurch but people we re adverts in christchurch but people were determined to come together to pay their respect. here, my friend, i tried to ring him yesterday that could not reach an. memorial site does one have been springing up all over the city. people have been coming here to the botanical gardens all day, leaving their messages and flowers. there is a real sense of shock and horror at how something so awful could strike the heart of this
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community. we are very laid-back. perhaps too laid—back. in the world have gotte n perhaps too laid—back. in the world have gotten a bit small and now. we need to secure things to those precious to us. those lives who have been lost, it's all in vain. the zealand prime minister have raised the efforts of police but has called free review of the country ‘s gun laws after it revealed that the suspect legally obtained his weapon. she has also met with community leaders. new zealand is united in its grief and we are united. and so i convey that message of love and support on behalf of new zealanders. an australian man has appeared in court. the 28—year—old was not on any security watchlist. he did not enter a plea and is due to appear in court next on april five. it is
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understood that national is of bangladesh, india and indonesia are among the dead. christchurch has seen tragedy like this before and is still rebuilding from the devastating earthquake eight years ago. nothing quite like this. then, as now, the rallying cry in many m essa 9 es as now, the rallying cry in many m essa g es of as now, the rallying cry in many messages of support is a maori phrase that means stay strong. our correspondent phil mercer is in christchurch for us now. good morning to you and we concede the tributes behind you and i know you are near one of the mosques where the incidents happened. that's correct. the algebra mosque is about 400 metres up this road. the —— the al noor mosque is about 400 metres up this road. we know that about 30 people are still in hospital receiving treatment and
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today, as we heard earlier, the australian man, 28 years old, brenton tarrant, he appeared in court. it was a brief hearing about three minutes in total. it was not required to enter a plea and he a p pa re ntly required to enter a plea and he apparently seemed quite calm and relaxed wearing prison roads. he is due back in court in early april and during this time, today, we have seen the floral tributes you can see behind me growing, notjust here in christchurch but around the entire country as well. this is a nation thatis country as well. this is a nation that is still coming to terms with the terrible events that unfolded just up the road here near the centre of christchurch and a little bit further away at a second mosque as well. 49 people died and many others were injured as well. the thoughts of the people of new zealand really surrounding the family members of those people still in hospital as new zealand comes to
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terms with this awful, awful event that unfolded here in the city of christchurch. thank you. in the next hour, we'll speak to the mayor of christchurch, lianne dalziel. we will try and get a sense to how they are reacting to what has happened. a leaked eu document appears to confirm that the uk will have to take part in european parliament elections in may if brexit is extended beyond the start ofjuly. a memo has been circulated to eu ambassadors in advance of theresa may's visit to brussels on thursday, when she will ask eu leaders to move the current brexit deadline beyond march 29th. the department for transport may be forced to pay tens of millions of pounds to keep its emergency "no—deal" ferry contracts in place if brexit is delayed. one of the firms involved, brittany ferries, said it had already incurred large fuel and staffing costs, for which it would have to be compensated. a whitehall source said the contingency plans had to be in place for the original brexit
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date of march 29th. sir philip green's arcadia retail group, which includes top shop and miss selfridge, has said thatjob cuts and store closures are likely because of challenging retail conditions. ina in a statement, the company said that anyjob in a statement, the company said that any job losses in a statement, the company said that anyjob losses would not be significant. arcadia currently employs 19,000 people and has already closed a reported 200 stores in the past two years for the first time since taking office, donald trump has used his presidential veto in order to protect his plans to build a border wall with mexico. many democrats have criticised the president's decision to declare the national emergency last month, to enable the redirection of billions of dollars to building the wall. but mr trump said americans have been put in grave danger. congress's cong ress's vote congress's vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote
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against reality. it is against reality. it is a tremendous national emergency, it is a tremendous crisis. last month, more than 76,000 illegal migrants arrived at our border. we are on track fori million illegal aliens to rush hour borders. people hate the word invasion but that is what it is. it is an invasion of drugs and criminals and people. almost a fifth of syrian refugees who have come to the uk as part of a resettlement scheme have ended up in scotland, according to figures released by the snp. the party has accused the uk government of neglecting its moral obligations. in a statement the home office said it was working closely with nearly 300 local authorities across the uk to convert offers of help into resettlement. last night's big comic relief show has raised more than 63 million pounds. highlights included a special reunion by the cast of ‘four weddings and a funeral‘. more than 1.3 billion pounds has now been raised by comic relief since it began in 1985.
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our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba reports. it is the night when some of entertainment ‘s biggest stars come together and use comedy to raise money for comic relief. perhaps the most anticipated part of the evening was the short follow—up to four weddings and a funeral. it featured the original cast of reuniting 25 yea rs the original cast of reuniting 25 years later. my money also got the comic relief treatment. # can you hear the drums fernando? and there was an appearance from the stars of tv ‘s biggest drama for years, bodyguard. are we there yet, sweetie? there were celebrity performances in the studio and a musical number from the heat new west end version of only fools and horses. as well as appearances from
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comedy favourite like alan partridge. everyone coming together like cameron ‘s big society. partridge. everyone coming together like cameron 's big society. before the night even began, huge amounts had already been raised. but dan walker was one of a team of celebrities who climbed kilimanjaro for comic release last month. not to mention the 24—hour dancer font. would you do it again,? the money goes towards helping people here in the uk and abroad. since comic relief began over £1.25 billion has been raised. they are denied —— delighted that tonight added significantly to that total. a good night had by all. did you see the second part? it was an. that four
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weddings and a funeral get—together. .. if you weddings and a funeral get—together... if you were a fan of the film back in the day there were all these tiny little references. and it is one of those films were a few love that you seen it many times. we will look at more of those stories later ron. the time hours 11 minutes past so let's look at their front pages of the newspapers. let's take a look at the front pages. the new zealand mosque shootings dominate today's papers. the times reports that m15 is investigating the main suspect‘s links to right—wing extremists in britain. it says the gunman had been inspired by islamophobic attacks in britain. the daily mirror carries a picture of the main suspect as a child alongside his dad. the daily express focuses on the response from the home secretary who called it an ‘attack on the freedom and values that unite us all‘. the guardian reports the gunman displayed white
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supremacist symbols during the attack. the attacks on two new zealand mosques yesterday were streamed live on social media. home secretary sajid javid has urged people to stop viewing and sharing the material. mrjavid said "online platforms have a responsibility not to do the terrorists' work for them" and tech companies "must do more" to stop this message being broadcast. social media firms insist they act quickly to remove inappropriate content. we're joined now from texas by journalist, robert evans. robert, thank you for talking to us this morning. one of the reasons we are talking to you this morning is that you have some interesting thought on how social media has been used in this context and what the social media platforms are doing in terms of removing this type of content that encourages people to
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have live streams like this. content that encourages people to have live streams like thislj content that encourages people to have live streams like this. i think it isa have live streams like this. i think it is a mistake to focus on trying to remove the manifesto that he posted an things he posted immediately preceding the attack. i think what social media companies need to fill a t4 and focus more on is avenging the spread of content that radicalised this person and other people like him. and that is that thing that has not been discussed enough because a big part of this problem, the problem that we see in the united states and has now spread to new zealand and is spreading across the western world starts with sources like youtube. if you look at the person like a right wing media personality like ben shapiro or any of those named in the manifesto itself, with an a couple of clicks of their videos youtube's
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algorithms will take you to explicit neo—nazi propaganda. this has been going on for years. i am not the only journalist going on for years. i am not the onlyjournalist warning about this. it has been happening for over two years. people have been radicalised by this content. there is not the effort on behalf of sites like youtube and social media companies like twitter and facebook to change this or fix this because part of why there algorithms work the way they do is because it drives more traffic to the site is. the stuff that drive the most traffic is the stuff that is most controversial and that tends to be the stuff the radicalised as people. sorry to interrupt you, i just want to understand this and people will be listing and trying to understand. the basic theory is that a friend exchanges a in off—colour joke you like thatjoke, you watch
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the video on, for example, youtube. alien algorithm will then put similar content which can be more extreme and draw you in that way? 0k. extreme and draw you in that way? ok. so what are the laws around this in terms of is there any law enforcement possible to say to a social media company you are allowing unsavoury, an pc or dangerous videos online. there is a lot of law enforcement possible. nothing is happening right now. you work for the bbc. if you publish things that were verifiably false about an individual or were to publish lies about a person you, as a journalist, personally, would be responsible. the bbc would suffer consequences. responsible. the bbc would suffer consequences. if youtube sense 10 million people to holocaust denial began to documentaries they make money. they do not suffer consequences. and that is the problem. that is a big part of what is happening. it does not explain
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everything of what is happening in christchurch recently but it is part of that. there is currently no real political will to stop the problem and that is something that i think many people in the nt extremist community believe these an issue. —— anti— extremist community. community believe these an issue. —— anti- extremist community. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. let's ta ke let's take a first look at the weekend weather. good morning. good morning, both of you. good morning to you as well. not a good morning if you are on the move, i am afraid to say. a number of whether issues could cause issues, we have heavy rain, it heals no particular across the north of scotland and some strong winds. if you are on the move, bbc news will have the latest weather details as you are moving.
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air streaming all the way from the caribbean, underneath it are developing area of low pressure is getting stronger and stronger as it passes new to oui’ getting stronger and stronger as it passes new to our shores. here it is, centred towards northern ireland at the moment, that will push over scotland, very mild air to the south. we've got some snow in the forecast, it has been snowing on the top of the pennines and the irish isles as well, that will turn back to venus temperatures rise but there's lots of snow across the higher ground of scotland, as much as ten centimetres in one or two places, turning back to bain as temperatures rise across the southern uplands to the north of scotland. for england and wales however, once we see that snow, turns back to persistent rain, persistent rain to the north—west of england, that could cause some minor flooding for wales. a lot of dry
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weather, lots of cloud and a strong breeze and the breeze could be crucial, 40, 50, maybe 60 miles an hour or more across england and wales. that is going to cause problems with the ferries, bridges and certainly for high sided vehicles throughout the day. barely above freezing the parts of scotland, maybe four or five for northern ireland. we finished the day with the wind is picking up, scattering of showers here, some of those heavy with a scattering of thunder. after a spell of strong winds and rain this evening because england and wales, clear spells and showers through the night into my morning and there will be enforced aboundin morning and there will be enforced abound ina morning and there will be enforced abound in a few spots sheltered from the breeze, but to many, the bees we re the breeze, but to many, the bees were just about keep temperatures up. into tomorrow, we still have a fairly picture, low pressure gradually moving away as it moves into northeast norway. sunshine and showers of the name of the game, some of you seeing more of one and the other, the showers will be a mix of rain, hail, sleet and the other, the showers will be a mix of rain, hail, sleetand hill the other, the showers will be a mix of rain, hail, sleet and hill snow. the strongest of the winds the
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eastern parts of scotland and temperatures lower than today and around six to 10 degrees. probably not as cold as today feels in scotland. we'll have the headlines at 6:30am. now it's time for the film review with mark kermode and ben brown. hello there, welcome to the film review here on bbc news. and taking through this week's cinema releases, we have mr mark kermode. so mark, what do you have for us this week? interesting. we have ben is back, which is the story of addiction and recovery. we have the prodigy, which is a very much nuts and bolts horror movie. and fisherman's friends, the kind of a true story
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of the cornish singing sensations. kind of a true story. we will get to that in a minute. let's start with ben is back. this starsjulia roberts. this is a teenage drug addict who shows up unexpectedly at the family home at christmas eve. what could go wrong? well, crucially, he is a recovering addict. do you remember when that film beautiful boy came out? yeah. that was the story of a parent and child torn apart by addiction, based on memories by the son. this is similar story, directed by peter hedges and shot by his son, lucas. julia roberts plays his mother and she lets him back in the house just for the christmas period, on the condition that he does everything that she says, that she takes the drug test she sets for him, and that he does not leave the house under any circumstances. here's a clip. these will both complement your complexion, which is a gift
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from your mother — you're welcome. coat, please. ok, nice. i'm good. come on. pockets. this is humiliating. no. this is love. all right. you're free to go. you didn't check my shoes. that's not funny. it was a joke, mom. ben, it's not funny. mom, it was a joke. excuse me. can i get a key to this door, please? unlock the door, ben, right now. so what i like that the scene is all ok and he says is that is that it was a joke. and then it is not a joke, she didn't check his shoes. the film manages a balance between she loves him,
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but he has told her never to trust an addict, and he is a recovering addict. it is to do with the balance of how much she trusts him and how much she has to offer tough love. he says it's humiliating and she says it's tough love. later onm the family dog goes missing and she has to go off on a road trip with him, into his world. and she sees for the first time the environment in which he was moving when he was taking drugs. that is a contrivance, no question about it. julia roberts's performance is good enough that you buy it. you think i know this is a device, but i'm so convinced by her performance that i will let him get away with it. i don't think it is doing anything shocking. there are comparisons definitely to beautiful boy, a slightly more beautified portrait of all of this. i do thinkjulia roberts, when she is great, she is really great. and it is a gritty role
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for her, isn't it? people think of rom coms and so on. yes, but think about erin brockovich, which is probably the role for which she is most well—known and most well respected. when she is good, she is really, really great. i think this is a fine role for her, in a solid film. solid. all right. onto the prodigy. you've already told us this is a nuts and bolts horror. this is a story about a mother who comes to believe that her young child is possessed of the reincarnated spirit of a serial killer. one dies at the same time as the other was born. it's hugely derivative. there is stuff from the element and good night mummy, village of the damned, and there's even a moment in which the kid actually says "mother, what's wrong with me?", which is a line from the exorcist. i let it get away with it because it knows that that is what it is doing. there's a large number of movies about bad seeds, kids being scared of kids and how much it is to do with the projection of the children. you think of a movie like babadook,
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which is a very good movie, a much better movie, but a similar idea. i think it did not do it quite wrong. it hasn't got very good reviews. but it seems to go from a, b, c, d in a perfectly functional fashion. there were a couple of moments where it gave me a little bit of a chill, a shiver. in a row too much most of these horror movies are just going quiet, quiet, boom, ithought there was something else. not much else, but it doesn't make it many things and there are many laugh out loud moments in it. i thought it was creepy and fun. i've seen a lot worse. how many shivers do you think it needs to give it a good horror film? three, minimum. that's not many! what is the scariest film you've ever seen? i don't know. the correct answer to that is the exorcist. that's the correct answer. that's shivers all the way through. nonstop. no shivers i suspect in fisherman's friends. except for the weather. laughter this is a fancifully sentimental version of the true story of fisherman's friends, a singing group from cornwall who achieved extraordinary success.
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this is i think for the tone of local hero. it ends up being close to a film which i quite like. his boss sees this group of fishermen singing and says ok, you have to sign them up. he says it as a jokem but daniel macey‘s character takes it seriously. the next thing is exactly what he's trying to do. here's a clip. i manage bands and i'm interested in representing you. you'd better come and talk to the boys. for your information, my son is the roger daughtry of the group. well, i'll bear that in mind. you'll never guess what. my boy's just been talent spotted. by who? youradmirer. apparently, he's some kind of big shot in the music industry. watching you sing was one of those rare moments in the music business when you realise you are witnessing something truly original. the bottom line is —
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you've got a unique sound. and we believe we can help you get it released by a major label. laughter! it's a nice scene, isn't it? it is. it feels like one of those very british sort of films. a very kind of full monty type film. it has a very tourist eye view of cornwall. the story is that the character goes down there and falls in with it. why wouldn't he? it's an exciting place, a place like no other and proud and beautiful and wonderful. what you see in the film is definitely a touristy view of it. if you wanted to tell them apart, you could because it is creaky and sentimental. i wonder why anybody would want to. it is charming. i like the music. daniel mays does an awfully long way
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to making it all hang together. i think he has a great screen presence, he has worked with mike lee, he can do very serious, tough gritty comedy. but he manages this light comedy with a really lovely light touch. i smiled and laughed pretty much all the way through. i know all the things that are wrong with it, i know the things that don't make sense and are sentimental and fanciful. honestly, i don't care. i like it, it's charming. charming, ok. what's best out at the moment? there is this film called the kindergarten teacher, which stars maggie gyllenhaal. it's about a candidate teacher who becomes advanced that a five—year—old in her class is the new mozart. she's the only person that sees his talent. everybody else is neglecting the fact that he's a genius. she starts to inveigle her way into his life. the film is really about how
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much of this is to do with her own disappointment at her lot. she is somebody who wanted to be an academic, a poet, it didn't work out. it locks a really thin line between being on the one hand this strange sentimental story, and on the other hand being something that comes very close to being a psychological chiller. i thought it was brilliantly done. maggie gyllenhaal is terrific in it. my only reservation is it is quite close to the original film. but the originalfilm is really good as well. i thought it was interesting and i thought maggie perfectly pitched our character between somebody who wants to see the creative best in this child, but all the time the implication is you are projecting onto him. and without giving too much away, is the five—year—old the next mozart? i couldn't possibly tell you that. you have to see the film. it sounds good. i like the premise. it's like, without giving anything away, what is at the end of citizen kane! what's the dvd at the moment? i like this film. i thought it was a hard sell in the cinema. i think mike lee's recreating leading up to the massacre.
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an ensemble cast. one of my mates is in it. i think one of everybody‘s mates was in it. what this film does is, as it builds up towards these terrible event, it really doesn't show you from every side, everybody gets to have their say. perhaps to a fault. when you finally get to that climactic scene, it's horrifying and you've invested in all the characters. i think it's very powerful and it demonstrates that mike lee really can orchestrate a great big period,. it's a very powerful film. he does have a very unique style of film making. yet, no one else makes it sounds like mike lee. no one else has a process like his, and no one else's films look like a film by mike lee. heading out there are enough directors around who would love to make films like mike lee. lots of it from my station?
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that is his hallmark. it begins with work shopping. by the time you get to the set, it is not improvised. then it has been written at a script, but the script is device from improvised action with a unique technique that i meet mike lee and his past properly understand. right. much like yourself. thank you very much. you understand what they're talking about. we all understand. that is it for this week. thank you so much for watching. goodbye from both of us. this is hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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a 28—year—old australian man has appeared in court in christchurch charged with murder, in connection with a mass shooting at two mosques, which killed 49 people. this is brenton tarrant coming into court — the pictures are blurred for legal reasons. he did not make a plea and the hearing was closed to the public because of safety concerns. the shootings were live—streamed on facebook and shared widely on other social media platforms. 39 people are still being treated in hospital including a two—year—old boy. in the next hour, we'll speak to the mayor of christchurch, lianne dalziel. that's at 10 past 7. a leaked eu document appears to confirm that the uk will have to take part in european parliament elections in may, if brexit is extended beyond the start ofjuly. a memo has been circulated to eu ambassadors in advance of theresa may's visit to brussels on thursday, when she will ask eu leaders to move the current brexit deadline beyond march 29th.
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the department for transport may be forced to pay tens of millions of pounds to keep its emergency "no—deal" ferry contracts in place if brexit is delayed. one of the firms involved, brittany ferries, said it had already incurred large fuel and staffing costs, for which it would have to be compensated. a whitehall source said the contingency plans had to be in place for the original brexit date of march 29th. sir philip green's arcadia retail group, which includes top shop and miss selfridge, has said thatjob cuts and store closures are likely because of challenging retail conditions. in a statement, the company said anyjob losses would not be significant. arcadia currently employs 19,000 people and has already closed a reported 200 stores in the past two years for the first time since taking office, donald trump has used his presidential veto — he has done so to to protect his plans to build a border wall with mexico. many democrats have already criticised the president's decision to declare a national emergency last month — that was to enable the redirection of billions of dollars
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to building the wall. mr trump defended the move saying that americans have been put in grave danger. congress's vote to deny the crisis on the southern border is a vote against reality. it is against reality. it is a tremendous national emergency, it is a tremendous crisis. last month, more than 76,000 illegal migrants arrived at our border. we are on track for1 million illegal aliens to rush our borders. people hate the word invasion but that is what it is. it is an invasion of drugs and criminals and people. last night's big comic relief show has raised more than 63 million pounds. highlights included a special reunion by the cast of ‘four weddings and a funeral‘, and actor richard madden reprising his role from the body guard. more than 1.3 billion pounds has now been raised by comic relief since it began in 1985.
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goats are known to be curious. they can clamber along narrow mountain ledges inaccessible to humans. did you know that? but that is not the story. i won‘t stop there. that this goat seems to be moving via a different form of transport. look at the go and do you know where he is? he is ata the go and do you know where he is? he is at a tram stop. this is ‘belle‘ the pygmy goat. she had been missing from her ownerjulie for more than a week, when she was spotted 25 miles from home at a tram stop in sale near manchester. the question is did you go to get on the tram ? the question is did you go to get on the tram? why did the goat cross the
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road? why? that is more the question, really, isn't it? was she unhappy? did she need to wander? settling back apparently now to farm life. i was concerned but everything is fine. now in sporting terms, goat means that greatest of all time. is the sporting phrase? yes. serena williams is often referred to as a goat in tennis. sorry. i didn't know that. if that‘s what it means that it‘s fine. anyway, if you are going to watch six nations at any point, todayis to watch six nations at any point, today is the day. it‘s six nations super saturday —
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and this year provides us with the kind of grand finale the fixture schedulers could only have dreamt of. we still have three teams who could potentially win the title. but can ireland or england snatch the title from grand slam—chasing wales? scotla nd scotland could still have a crucial role to play although they are not in the running. wales have one for from four games but they do need to defeat ireland. if they can‘t do that then it comes down to the game between england and scotland. if scotla nd between england and scotland. if scotland defeat between england and scotland. if scotla nd defeat scotla nd between england and scotland. if scotland defeat scotland then goes to ireland is not a ghost to wales. gamers are. wales is one... it‘s confusing but it is exciting. and this is the kind of thing that schedulers dream of. three teams up
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for the title that can ireland or england snatch the title? joe lynskey looks ahead. among the voices from the valleys, the welsh choir has its kiwi conductor. warren has spent 12 years learning the words and shaping a tea m learning the words and shaping a team that is breaking records. in this, its final year in church, his side on a 13 match winning streak to get one more against ireland will steal six nations and the grand slam. we feel emotional afterwards. despite people ‘s perceptions, i do cry at sad movies and i am an emotional person. but hopefully we can secure the grand slam there will be celebrations all over wales. this is his 10th and final six nations as coach of wales. he wants to finish
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how it started. wales won the grand slam in his first full season and the second one followed four years later. one more perfect campaign would make tournament history. no modern coach has done the grand slam three times. but to get there, he must outsmart another coach from new zealand. this is joe must outsmart another coach from new zealand. this isjoe schmidt‘s last six nations with ireland. a win for them in cardiff would see them push wales off the top and into second. but that result opens the door for england. eddie jones ‘s but that result opens the door for england. eddiejones ‘s side could have a clear route to the title and they have not lost to scotland at twickenham since the 1980s. the wales tea m, twickenham since the 1980s. the wales team, the second—best team in the world, they need to battle through and we have an opportunity to salvage something. we started well and had a mishap against wales and now we are back in contention. this is the weekend rugby reaches its crescendo. beyond that it could
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shape the mood for september‘s world cup. the three coaches in three adopted nations, this year the super saturday has even more at stake. after finishing runner—up six times in the cheltenham gold cup, all—time leading trainer willie mullins finally has his first win. al boum photo, ridden by jockey paul townend was a12—1winner. he had some anxious moments with his jumping but raced away to win by two—and—a—half lengths. fellow irish challenger anibale fly was second with the grey bristol de mai back in third. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer believes his side "can go all the way" in the champions league after drawing barcelona in the quarter—final. the draw sees solskjaer return to the nou camp 20 years on from scoring an injury—time winner there in the 1999 champions league final against bayern munich. the draw for the quarter—finals and semi—finals of the champions league
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has been made. liverpool will face porto in the last eight, and if they get past the portugese side they will face the winners of barcelona or manchester united. the two other english sides left in the competition will face each other with tottenham taking on quadruple chasing manchester city. manchester united are also in sixth round fa cup action today. they‘re away to wolves. seventh position. still trusting their own way of playing. they are playing fantastically well against chelsea last week. and again they are home, they take the game to a new position with great passing ability. that game between wolves and manchester united is live on bbc one with kick—off at 7:55. there are also five games taking place in the scottish premiership today. it‘s second against fourth as rangers take on kilmarnock, leaders celtic play tomorrow. rory mcilroyjoined tommy fleetwood at the top of the leaderboard after the second round of the players championship at sawgrass. after fleetwood posted
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a round of 67 which included this brilliant eagle from the bunker on the second hole to move to 12 under par. that looked to be good enough for the outright lead until mcilroy surged through late on — finishing in style with an eagle on the 16th and this birdie on the 17th to sign for a 65. should we explain what birdies and eagles? because charlie was wondering. you do forget when you talk in sporting terms. and eagle is when you make the whole two shots better than our. so if it is past three and you get a hole in one you are two shots better so that is an equal. for par—4, you do it in two. a birdie is one less. eagle, birdie, goat... it is an animal kingdom. roger federer and rafael nadal will face each other for the first time since 2017
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in the semi—finals at indian wells after winning their respective quarter—finals. the two greats last played in the final of the shanghai masters. fourth seed federer eased past poland‘s hubert hurkacz 6—4, 6—4. the swiss is chasing a record sixth indian wells title. while nadal is looking for his fourth victory in california after a hard fought win over russia‘s karen khachanov, during which he needed treatment on his knee. now, the top teams in the country are gearing up for the start of the new horse vaulting season this month, and the world cup later this year. it‘s essentially gymnastics on horseback, so we sent mike bushell to have a go. it is the sport in which you mount your horse into a canter and then
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once on board it is time to start your gymnastic routine. 100 years ago it was a niche sport. this year it is one of the biggest of the world equestrian sports if it is also regarded one of the safest. children are not riding. they are doing gymnastics on horseback so the girl in the middle is in control of a horse and the horse is well—trained. we have always performed on a soft surface. riders don‘t wear helmets. that would restrict spatial awareness. don‘t wear helmets. that would restrict spatial awarenesslj don‘t wear helmets. that would restrict spatial awareness. i always have that on the back of my mind that this is ridiculous why am i doing it? i started when i was three. you do get scared, i do it least. and you have so many things to think about. the rhythm of the
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horse you need to be in tune with it always. routines begin on a mechanical horse when training. you don‘t need writing experience at all to get involved in vaulting. it is of more about gymnastics. that's it. that‘s... novel. of more about gymnastics. that's it. that's. .. novel. yes... you do feel the movement of the horse. right through your body. unita were com pletely through your body. unita were completely with the horse. i am ready for the real thing. this is harry. he does look a lot to get. that‘s it. well done. harry. he does look a lot to get. that's it. well done. i'm an. despite needing a lot of help. even at walking pace i felt so far off the ground my heart was in my mouth. look at this. here we are. i‘m sorry
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about that, i was not steady.” look at this. here we are. i‘m sorry about that, i was not steady. i had to drop to my knees ready for the office because i felt i would fall with every step. itjust office because i felt i would fall with every step. it just to illustrate how difficult the skills of the british team are. best not to ca nter of the british team are. best not to canter too much of the british team are. best not to ca nter too much before of the british team are. best not to canter too much before you can walk. big part of the routine is a spectacular dismount. hold with both hands and down you get. and you have to keep going with the horse. no—one saw that, did they? sorry, harry. harry loves it. is so fond of his children. he genuinely thinks the world of these kids. i tried to make it up to him because the routine a lwa ys it up to him because the routine always ends with a big thank you and some love.
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what a good—natu red what a good—natured horse. what a good-natured horse. to put up with mike. yes, there have been incidents in the past. my was very worried that he did brilliantly. he did, buti worried that he did brilliantly. he did, but i was very impressed with that. we will see you later on, thank you very much. i do not know if matt can top that, he is going to try. i do not think anyone can top that. my favourite comment was that‘s novel. anyway, not is so novel this morning as the weather. —— what is not. a combination of heavy rain and hill snow, strong winds across the country. keep up—to—date with the latest weather on bbc radio across the country. it is all linked into the zone of cloud which stretches all the way to the caribbean but underneath that,
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developing area of low pressure is going to track across the northern half of the uk today. to the south of it, very mild, very windy conditions. let‘s that the country into and take you through the day. as the snow moves across the northern hills of england, that will fade back to bain but it is in scotla nd fade back to bain but it is in scotland in one or two levels, covering to rain in some places. always a bit bright in the far north of scotla nd always a bit bright in the far north of scotland throughout. not quite as windy in the far south of the uk. windy in north—west england and western wales throughout the day, that could cause some minor flooding. strengthening these across the rest of england and wales, cloudy day overall and the winds a big feature, could top 40, 50, maybe 60 miles an hour in some places. that is going to cause problems in ferries, bridges and also for high sided vehicles on the move. the mildest of the weather here today, ten to 12 degrees. barely above freezing the some across scotland on a chilly feel in northern ireland, especially as the breeze picks up
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later. snow is away from scotland overnight, then quickly spreads across england and wales with some gusty winds were time then it is a story of clear skies and showers to tomorrow morning, temperatures just a few degrees above freezing for many. chilly sunday, area of low pressure clearing away, still deepening as it goes into norway but would be no airfor all of deepening as it goes into norway but would be no air for all of us down from the north and north—west, so in some areas it will be a chilly day, maybe not quite as cold in the north ata maybe not quite as cold in the north at a windy day across scotland tomorrow, especially in eastern areas. the showers that we do see across the country, rain, sleet, hill snow, some thunder mixed in as well be quite a bit of sunshine between some of the showers. some of you saying something rather than wetter but as i said, noticeable windchill to come to come tomorrow but if it has been all bit too much view of late, there is some good news in the forecast that next week there is high—pressure building in there is high—pressure building in the forecast, much drier and less windy too,. do you know what? it has
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been a bit too much for me. i need the weather to come down. —— calmed down. —— calm down. we‘ll be back with the headlines at 7am. time now for click. it‘s amazing to think that next year, this place will play host to the greatest show on earth. by the time 2020 rolls around, it‘ll have been 56 years since japan last hosted the olympic games. back in 1964, they used the event to signal the rebirth of the nation, following the disruption of the second world war. then, the focus was japan‘s economic
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and technological explosion. now, japan once again wants to show the world that it‘s still leading the way in innovation. but with the country‘s explosive growth spurt now in the past and an ageing population on the horizon, the story this time might not be so simple. it‘s playing heavily on its image as the land of the robots, but finds itself as just one of many countries researching all of the other big tech areas, including 5g, 8k broadcasting, and self driving cars. and transport is the subject of this project by mobile operator, ntt docomo. it‘s trying to predict traffic
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congestion, by tracking phone users‘s movements throughout the day. docomo knows the age, demographics and home address of each of its 76 million subscribers, and also knows pretty accurately where their phones are at any time. it‘s used in artificial intelligence to watch how and where they travel —— it‘s used an artificial intelligence to watch how and where they travel throughout the day, and also how and when they return home at night. it can now predict where traffic congestion will occur in the evening, based on where everyone is during the day, and it‘s hoped that the ai may also be able to cope with the different traffic flows that will be associated with the olympics. now with so many visitors flooding into japan, safety is paramount, and for the first time, the olympics will be using facial recognition to ensure speedy identification. paul carter has been
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to find out more. at next year‘s olympic and paralympic games, tokyo is expecting millions of spectators to pack into the city for its festivals of sports. among that number will be over 300,000 accredited people, including athletes, volunteers, media and other staff — all needing access to restricted areas. developed byjapanese firm nec and based on their ai engine, called neoface, they claim the system is 99% accurate and almost immediate. but how well does it work in practice? i‘ve come for a demo to find out. in orderfor a facial recognition system to work, it needs a record of your face. so unfortunately for this system, it‘s now going to have to get a record of this ugly mug. translation: the system recognises your eyes, face, size of your face and other features, using hundreds and hundreds of points, and then matches that
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with the photos that are registered on the cards. now that the system has a record of my face, all i need is this card. i‘ll see if it works. good to go. but you can‘t talk facial recognition without concerns about privacy. i asked the spokesman for the organisers what they‘ll do with all those faces. the personal data collected through the application process will be securely guarded and will be destroyed in the most appropriate way, once the games is over. now, when anyone tells you things are going to be more efficient, and in this case near instantaneous, i‘m always a little bit suspicious, but i have to say the thing that‘s most impressive about the system is that in the dozen or so times i‘ve tried it, it‘s recognised me pretty much instantly every single time, and it‘s seen my face
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from a wide variety of angles and it still seems to work, so i think in this case, those claims actually hold up. but of course, controlled demos are very different from real—world applications. the proof will ultimately be in the queueing. one of the memories that will always stay with me is our visit to the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant that was devastated by the great 2011 tsunami. today i have come to waseda university to meet a machine that was inspired by the fu kushima disaster. warec—1 is a big beast weighing more than 150 kilograms. each of its limbs stretches to more than one metre in length. the need to move across uneven terrain has caused roboticists to investigate many kinds of designs. and although robots with wheels
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or with snakelike bodies can handle tricky terrain, they‘re not so good when you need to get hands—on. after we reach the destination, the robot has to perform, tasks, like turning a valve or manipulation of switches or opening doors, something like this. it requires big power. in order to actually manipulate things, warec—1 would need additional hands or fingers of some kind. for now, the team are just investigating the best way to move. crawling low and slow over the rubble. i notice that it‘s notjust using its four legs, it‘s also using its belly. yes. this is a new locomotion style proposed by us. it‘s quite difficult, even for a human to along this place.
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but if a robot moves with a crawling motion, that will be very stable because its belly is almost on the ground. so it has a very low centre of mass. spikes on the belly help to stop it slipping on the rubble and also help it grip onto corners as it hoists itself up and down. and although it‘s not strictly a self—balancing robot, it doesn‘t really matter if it takes a tumble because it‘s symmetrical. so it can still work back to front and upside down. japan is one of the few places where robots are starting to leave the laboratory and entering society more widely. where other places might have reservations about robots taking jobs, japan desperately wants this to happen. welcome. in the run—up to the 2020 olympics, japan is looking for more ways than ever to have bots do the hard work. here‘s kate russell. these self—driving electric wheelchairs made by panasonic have already been rolled out for testing at tokyo‘s haneda international airport.
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but what‘s new is my luggage buddy here. you can pop your suitcases in there and it‘s going to follow the wheelchair wherever it goes, slowing down and speeding up as necessary when it goes up and down sloping surfaces. perfect for the airport. if a roaming traveller walks in front of the chair, it‘ll stop, along with the luggage caddy. although in a crowded airport, i can see wandering people getting in between the luggage and its chair, which might lead to some frustration. panasonic hopes to have the chairs available in airports and public spaces across japan in time for 2020. with 40 million visitors expected to come for the olympics and paralympics, organisers have pledged to use this as an opportunity to fix these problems and make tokyo a more inclusive and accessible city. disabled passengers in need
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of assistance will be able to summon a wheelchair through an app. it‘ll then take them where they need to be without stress or hassle. something i‘m sure able—bodied travellers could appreciate after a long journey too. for many visitors coming to the olympics next year, the japanese languages will be challenging to say the least. now, we‘ve looked at several translation tools on click before but the one that paul carter‘s found looks like it‘s straight out of a comic book. perhaps the olympics‘s and pa ralympics‘s greatest achievement is their ability to bring people from all over the world together. but as well as being a positive, it can also bring challenges, notably around language. one japanese graduate student, supported by an accelerator, alongside tech firm panasonic, has created a special project to try and get the world talking. fukidashi is the japanese word for speech bubble.
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it‘s a system with a screen on each side linked by bluetooth. words spoken by a person on one side will be translated on the opposite screen, and vice versa. we investigated whether people use, actually, a phone to communicate with foreigners, but nobody uses that. i think it is because a phone is more like, it‘s a way to ask some concrete specific issue, like "where is the station?" or something like that. the technology behind it is not necessarily anything new. however, it‘s the application of the technology that‘s really interesting. although only a prototype at this stage, it‘s hoped the system can be rolled out at points across the games. and beyond, the creator hopes to take the system much further.
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at the next stage, maybe people can have small devices like fukidashi to use everywhere, anywhere, any time. it would be great. at present, the system can work between four languages — japanese, english, chinese and korean, though there are plans to extend the language range much further. the prototype also currently requires access to a data signal to function. amazingly clear. i almost want to take this with me for the rest of my time injapan and carry it with me. can i keep this one? and that is it for the shortcut of our olympic special. don‘t forget that we live on facebook and twitter. thank you very much for watching and we will see you soon.

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