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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 17, 2019 7:00am-8:00am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. our headlines today: the new zealand prime minister confirms her office received the killer's extremist documentjust minutes before 50 people were shot dead at two mosques in christchurch. had it provided details that could have been acted on immediately, it would have been. but there, unfortunately, were no such details in that e—mail. more than 60 flood warnings are in place across britain after some areas had a months worth of rain injust21i hours. theresa may calls for mps to unite as "democrats and patriots" and back her brexit deal when it returns to the commons this week. six nations glory for wales. they become the first country to clinch the six nations grand slam four times as victory over ireland gives them the title. better news in the forecast. after today, a story of sunshine and blustery showers.
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it's sunday 17th march. our top story: new zealand's prime minister says her office received a document containing far—right views, minutes before the shootings that killed 50 people in two mosques in christchurch on friday. at a press conference, jacinda ardern also said it will be several days before the bodies of all those killed are returned to theirfamilies. from christchurch, rupert wingfield—hayes sent us this report. in christchurch on sunday morning, the outpouring of grief and solidarity has continued, unabated. close to the mosque where the first attack took place on friday, the flower tributes continue to grow. many people overcome with emotion. in wellington, prime ministerjacinda ardern made her own emotional tribute to the city's biggest mosque. but amid all this grief, there is also anger.
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prime minister arden today confirmed her office did receive an e—mail copy of the killer's political declaration just before the attacks took place. i was one of more than 30 recipients of a manifesto that was mailed out nine minutes before the attack took place. it did not include a location. it did not include specific details. back in christchurch, a sports team has come to lay flowers. their goalie is among the dead. there will be some who say what happened here is horrific but it is nothing to do with me, it is not my religion, it is not my community. but that is absolutely not the message being sent by the people of christchurch. we're all one people, we're all one race, we're all human beings. we love each other, we have to love each other otherwise this sort of rubbish happens. we have to love each other. this city's name will now forever be linked with friday's attacks. but people here want the world to know it does not represent them, that they too are victims
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of this terrible crime. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in christchurch. more than 60 flood warnings are in place across britain, following a day of heavy rain. one area in caernarfonshire in wales saw a months worth of rain injust21i hours. and there was disruption across large parts of northern england for much of yesterday, after train lines and roads were flooded. simon clemison reports. the speed, the volume and there may be more rain to come today. in conway, the pumps are on but they are taking no chances. who would have thought you would need a wheelbarrow to one day protect your home. it's a good neighbourhood. everybody comes together in times
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like this. some parts of wales has seen the equivalence of a month rainfall in the last 2a hours. in north yorkshire, there was a challenge and a half. while in west yorkshire, the railway was wet and silent. northern said several routes we re silent. northern said several routes were suspended yesterday. the problem is as unusual as they come we re problem is as unusual as they come were caused by a lot of rain falling ina were caused by a lot of rain falling in a short space of time. while there is likely to be less rain today, showers could hit anywhere and be heavy at times. and there are ice warnings for northern ireland, parts of england and some areas of scotland. some areas will be holding on for any sign of warm and dry weather to come. and there could be a reprieve but matt has some more details coming up a bit later. theresa may has made
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a fresh appeal to mp5, to unite as "democrats and patriots" and support her brexit deal. writing in the sunday telegraph she warns the alternative is a lengthy delay to leaving the eu. let's get more on this with our political correspondent jonathan blake, who's in our london newsroom. it is another big week. and the prime minister is setting an ultimatum to her mps. that if they brad crabb exit deal but if they back her brexit deal then britain will leave the eu after only a short extension but if they don't, the prime minister says the uk could end up prime minister says the uk could end up stuck in a very lengthy delay to the brexit process after which brexit may not happen at all and she described that as a potential symbol of parliament's described that as a potential symbol of pa rliament‘s collective described that as a potential symbol of parliament's collective political failure. there are many mps who would point to what they see as her
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failure to negotiate an acceptable brexit deal. nevertheless, the prime minister is piling on the pressure and she does so except that she needs to do more to convince not only her conservative mps but the dup, the group of northern irish troubles who proper government at westminster and i really crucial to this process. they said last night there were still issues remaining with the withdrawal agreement as it stands. the government will be trying to get them onside desperately before that vote later on this week in the house of commons where theresa may will be hoping at least that for her deal, it is third time lucky. absolutely, a big week for everyone. junk food adverts on tv and online could be banned before 9pm, as part of government plans to tackle childhood obesity. ideas for the new watershed have been put out for public consultation, and have been backed by doctors. the department of health and social care says one—in—three children leave primary school overweight or obese. police response times to urgent
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calls at two of england's biggest police forces, have become significantly slower in the past five years, according to a freedom of information request by bbc 5 live investigates. in some areas, the average length of time victims have to wait has nearly doubled. presenter adrian goldberg joins us now. there is a general 15 minute time for responding to what is called grade one emergencies. this is where there is a risk to life or serious harm to health. in the west midlands, we found the average response time has gone over a five year period of from ten minutes to i9 year period of from ten minutes to 19 minutes that they are missing out on their targets. it is gone from seven to 12 minutes so they are still within the target but it has nearly doubled within that period. looking at other forces like west and south yorkshire, in other cases
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where they failed to meet that 15 minute target has significantly increased. the home office had said there is extra funding coming but also interesting, you weren't able to get the figures from the met? no, not from the metropolitan police. 0n that response, chief police councils are saying look, we have a4,000 offices since 2010 and are saying look, we have 114,000 offices since 2010 and we have significantly rising demand that echoes what many of the forces are saying. the £970 million i think will be from many of the forces, long overdue. you can hear more on this story on 5 live investigates, at 11am this morning on bbc radio 5 live. the former love island contestant mike thalassitis has been found dead in woods near his home in essex. he was 26 and appeared on the dating show in 2017. friends and co—stars have been taking to social media to pay tribute to mr thalassitis, who was also a semi—professional footballer for clubs including st albans and chelmsford.
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a state of disaster has been declared in zimbabwe, where a tropical storm has killed over 30 people. the authorities say about 70 people are still missing as a result of the cyclone, which earlier caused severe damage in mozambique. wales rugby fans have been celebrating their nation's success, after being crowned grand slam champions of the six nations, for the third time in eleven years. they beat last year's winners, ireland, by 25—7. and ahead of this autumn‘s world cup injapan, the home fans in cardiff weren't short of praise for their team and departing coach warren gatland. fantastic, amazing game. brilliant, we've done it, we've done it for wales! fantastic game, well—deserved, well done, wales! warren gatland, he's been amazing for wales, absolutely amazing. it's a shame to see him leaving but you know, we've sent him out on a good note, it's been fantastic, absolutely amazing.
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social media companies have been told to "clean up their platforms" or face the "force of the law" by the home secretary, sajid javid. it comes after a gunman, who killed 50 people at two mosques in new zealand, live—streamed the shootings on facebook. a teacher explained to us how schools in christchurch were in lockdown as police and emergency services responded. the whole school was in lockdown. i was actually on the outside because we had boys at the climate change march so we actually locked ourselves in one of the day boy houses and yeah, again it was interesting being with teenagers versus little people and just how they were processing the events of what was happening while also trying to navigate all of the communication coming from school and for me it was the hardest thing was actually keeping them off social media and
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showing them what was going on. they processed things differently to us andi processed things differently to us and i think there will be a need to talk about it in a safe way and give them ways through it. actually being kind and not behaving in this way is a means through it. let's talk about some of the issues that raises. we'rejoined now in the studio by bharath ganesh from the oxford internet institute and also from our studio in wrexham by ian lucas, who is a member of the commons digital and culture committee. if we could start with you, mr lucas. we had a statement from facebook this morning saying it removed 1.1 —— 1.5 million videos of the attack worldwide in the 2a hours after the shootings, 1.2 million of which were blocked at upload. the kind of the volume of traffic that they're dealing with is astonishing. do you have any sympathy with the social media companies that this is
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a huge challenge for them?m social media companies that this is a huge challenge for them? it is a huge challenge but a challenge they have created themselves and a challenge from which they have made billions of dollars over many years. the consequences of that challenge and the consequence of that profit they make is being borne by societies right across the globe and we saw yesterday that they have created a platform with which, which creates unprecedented challenges which they can't control fast enough and which leaves us with massive social problems that we need to face social problems that we need to face so it's good that they have taken some action. it was too late, they don't have the capacity to do it and they need to engage much better with
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governments, with society, to deal with this huge challenge which is unprecedented which we are now facing. and you are right to say that at the moment they don't have capacity to deal with it. this is one huge question as to whether they are technically capable to deal with are technically capable to deal with a situation like this. and what government interventions will encourage them to visit but behave better? for very many years, facebook and a lot of the media platforms would not risk —— accept any responsibility for what was on the platforms and because of relentless political pressure i think we are now winning the argument. what we must now convince the platforms of is the fact that they have responsibility to control themselves, the content of the platforms, and have the capacity to deal with it and if they don't, we need independent regulators from governments to have the power to go inside these organisations and to ensure that they have processes in place that mean that the social
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responsibility that they have is complied with. at the moment, what we have found from our enquiry into facebook in particular but social media platforms generally, wejust don't have the powers, the capacity, the resources, to go inside these businesses which are in virtually every home, certainly in the belt — make the developed world nowadays, to ensure they are doing what they ought to be doing to protect our societies and children. we have just heard how huge this challenge is to make sure that social media doesn't play a role in this. what do you make of what happened in new zealand as far as social media is concerned? this was one of the first events and terrorist attacks where we have seen a live stream being used, so this is quite new. in terms of how you deal with this kind of thing, facebook, twitter and google have been
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cooperating with large and small companies, and that has been quite effective in sharing information and taking down content that has been produced by islamic extremists. try to take those technologies and use that to counter right—wing extremism isa that to counter right—wing extremism is a big area we need to speak about. are these firms taking it seriously enough? there has been a long period where they have said they will try to do what they can, a lot of content is generated by users and it is not our responsibility. that has shifted and they are taking on more responsibility. that's true. you have to deal with the fact that this kind of video goes up, people download it, and then they re— upload it. that is a big issue for them to deal with. but we also should be talking about whether facebook, twitter and google and other technology companies are doing enough to limit spread of these ideologies, which in terms of the global form of right—wing extremism
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thatis global form of right—wing extremism that is being taken today, the fact that is being taken today, the fact that there is an attack in new zealand who is looking at someone like the president of the us as a symbol of identity, we need to think about the ways in which right—wing extremism, those ideologies, can be dealt with. facebook or twitter and google have been very slow to deal with that, despite many groups talking about islamophobia and anti— muslim hate and trying to get those companies to take stricter action on that. facebook new zealand have issued a statement, saying they continue to work around the clock to remove violating content, and they are removing every edited member —— copy of the footage as well. we know that this man was a lone gunman, but he was likely a member of a community of like—minded people. how much of the concerned should this be
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to us globally and in the uk? starting in terms of the global form, something we need to think about is the fact that this is a whole set of ideologies that try to often whole set of ideologies that try to ofte n cloa k whole set of ideologies that try to often cloak its language in ways that mainstream audiences can engage and even agree with it. there are a lot of tactical ways in which they code their language, such that people might be able to agree with them. but really, they are pushing out white nationalists and extremist views that are really believe in a kind of closed society, a society for example in european countries in which all of the people who are there are native residents of that country. that does not comply with the liberal western values we have been living with for centuries. what are the things we have to think about is the global spread of this. and social media is one of the key ways they are facilitating the spread of the ideas. a lot of the
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content on social media is not going to lead to violence immediately. it is about an network of people who are frequently legitimising these views, and in cases of an individual actor or a few actors in this case, that can lead to violence. it is about what justifies this worldview and how we challenge the worldview. you are looking at a white paper about how to regulate more of this extremist content online, but we hear over and over again that regulation is worth paying catch up to technology. technology allows people to do things we haven't even considered yet, and regulation will a lwa ys considered yet, and regulation will always be on the back foot. there are individuals who have used social media very effectively, and they are contributing to the febrile attitude in the uk, and as a politician involved in that, the scale and pressure that is put on members of
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parliament at the moment through social media, the aggression, the bullying, the attacks are co—ordinated, they are planned, and they are drawing people who don't have any real appreciation of what they are involved in. so, this is a challenge that reaches across issues relating to violence, the likes of which we have never seen before in new zealand, but also to the heart of our democratic society, because the threat to our liberal, democratic values are there, we are com pletely democratic values are there, we are completely playing catch up at the moment. the government is about to produce a hugely important white paper, consultation document, we have contributed already by setting out the present position in a way that hasn't been understood before. it is absolutely crucial that the government presents the white paper as fast as possible and that we set in place, first of all an increased understanding of what is happening,
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and then the reaction we need to have to ensure that the regulators that are already there but have insufficient power and understanding, have the powers to ta ke understanding, have the powers to take the necessary action. it is good to talk to you, ian lucas in our studio good to talk to you, ian lucas in ourstudio in good to talk to you, ian lucas in our studio in clearly a lot wrexham, of work to be done, and thanks to your time. we have heard a lot of news about whether warnings, and you will have heard about the lashing rain coming down. just give you a sense of scale, just up just give you a sense of scale, just up here is where we saw the river normally flowing, and just notice how much flooding has taken place during the last 2a hours. this is from yesterday afternoon, and we saw
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half a month's worth of rainfall in 24 half a month's worth of rainfall in 2a hours, 126 millimetres, which is a phenomenal amount. 0ver 2a hours, 126 millimetres, which is a phenomenal amount. over 70 flood warnings in force over england or wales at the moment. some better news is on the horizon. the rain that we do see should be nowhere near as heavy, and patches of sunshine in between. the area of low pressure has moved off towards scandinavia, with a north or north—westerly airflow pushing it away. the white patches where we see some wintry weather. mainly rain, sleet and hail to the west of wales. temperatures will start to lift a little bit. take care if you are heading out this morning, just about
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anyone can see showers coming and going, but still blustery and the hebrides. down through the eastern parts of scotland, an indication of where we will see wind gusting over 40 where we will see wind gusting over a0 mph. more showers in northern england and the west of wales, and also in southern and eastern parts of england. a lot of the day will be dry with some sunny spells in the north—west. the breeze will ease tonight, showers fading away, lasting longest of all through eastern counties. cloud increasing with further rain later in the night. this is where we will see temperatures close to if not below freezing. your monday morning commute, scotland, england and wales, for the majority view it will be steady. some rain throughout the
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day, nothing substantial as we saw yesterday. we will start to see some bursts of rain pushing in. it will rain all day long, nowhere near as bad as it has been, much of england and eastern scotland staying dry. the jet stream has and eastern scotland staying dry. thejet stream has been dipping towards the south of late, cold conditions today. that will move to the north of the rest of the week and the orange colours are an indication that the temperatures are on their way up to the next week. a little bit of frost around, with high pressure building from the south. right across the board at least until friday, and a bit more sunshine at times. the site of the jet stream is very encouraging. no doubt you will be sloshing around this morning if you are out and about. you're watching
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breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. historian dr mike finn is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to mike in a minute. first, let's look at the front pages. the sunday telegraph says theresa may is appealing to mps' "patriotism" ahead of a third vote on her brexit deal this week. writing in the paper, the prime minister has urged mps to "stand together as democrats". victims of the new zealand mosque attack are pictured on the front page of the observer. the newspaper's lead story focuses on brexit, saying that a leaked document shows the eu is preparing for the fall of theresa may's government. the sunday express leads with the headline "brexit: it's now or never". it also features an image of three—year—old mucad ibrahim, the paper says he died in his father's arms during the new zealand mosque attack. the sunday times says theresa may will warn conservative mps that leaving the eu might not happen at all if they don't back her deal.
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no getting away from brexit in the newspapers. plenty else to discuss. mike, we are now starting to get some of the stories, the horrible stories that have emerged out of christchurch, and this is one of them. " my dad is a real hero, he got shot in the back in an attempt to shield my brother". some of these stories are terrible. yes, and i think after you move past the initial shock you begin to learn the stories of real people. we heard about khaled mustafa, assyrian refugee, and he thought new zealand was a safe haven and that he had managed to escape the horrors he had seen on a daily basis, only to find himself in this situation, obviously to lose his life. sayyad milne, a
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1a—year—old aspiring football, and obviously we are geographically removed, but seeing some of these stories, we are seeing some of the best bits of human nature as well. in terms of acts of heroism there are more than a few stories about people who threw themselves on the path of bullets, i think at the second mosque one of the ways he was driven off was a credit card machine was thrown at him and he was chased away. 0n the one hand very tragic stuff that gives you a real sense of the human cost, but on the other hand, moments of darkness and real moments of hope as well. the tentacles moments of hope as well. the te nta cles of moments of hope as well. the tentacles of this form of far right extremism spread far and wide, and i wonder if we have slightly taken our eye off the ball in terms of the dangers that presents. thinking about far right extremism, there are some stories in the paper this
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morning where they have talked about the fact that if you go back 15 or 20 years, far right extremism was seen as this extremely fringe thing that was generational, older people, middle—aged people who were very much seen as on the margins, but i think what has changed is that that has massively transformed, and in terms of taking our eye off the ball think that might be something society as a whole should think about. you have other people validating your views and so it spreads. no getting away from brexit. i wonder if the eagles have royalties for this, every time a newspaper uses the hotel california reference. that was retro when i was a kid! 0ne reference. that was retro when i was a kid! one thing that tells you something about the story is the fa ct something about the story is the fact that they have had to explain the reference for a younger audience. the substantive issue, and
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we have been heavily briefed this morning, is that theresa may has thrown down the gauntlet, saying you either back the deal... this is what a lot of people suggested weeks ago, that it a lot of people suggested weeks ago, thatitis a lot of people suggested weeks ago, that it is actually about running down the clock, getting mps to the point of it being this or we don't believe. that isn't a real choice, is it? the pm several weeks believe. that isn't a real choice, is it? the pm severalweeks or months ago claimed that she wasn't pursuing a strategy like that, but whether she consciously did it not thatis whether she consciously did it not that is where we have ended up. in terms of a natural choice, one of theissues terms of a natural choice, one of the issues has really been the choices made two years ago when the red lines were set. that has given us red lines were set. that has given us little flexibility and left us kind of where we are now. we are starting to have a debate in parliament that seems unseemly, but is probably one that should have happened two years ago. are not to harry the modern daddy who will take eternity leave, and this is significant because so many fathers
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do not take their entitlement when it comes to paternity leave. absolutely, and i think harry is a modern royal, taking paternity leave signposts the fact it is there, and just going away on paternity leave, the first year that shared parental leave with their not many men took it. thank you mike, you will return a little later. stay with us, headlines coming up: hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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new zealand's prime minister says her office received a document containing far—right views, minutes before the shootings that killed 50 people in two mosques in christchurch on friday. at a press conference, jacinda ardern also said it will be several days before the bodies of the 50 people who were killed are returned to their families. a 28—year—old man has been remanded in custody and will appear in court again next month. theresa may has made a fresh appeal to mp5, to unite as "democrats and patriots" and support her brexit deal. writing in the sunday telegraph she warns the alternative would be a lengthy delay to leaving the eu that would be a "potent symbol of pa rliament‘s collective political failure". the eu withdrawal agreement is due to be put before mps in the commons again this week, after previously suffering two crushing defeats. more than 70 flood warnings are in place across britain, following a day of heavy rain. one area in can—arvonshire in wales saw half a month's worth
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of rain injust 2a hours. and there was disruption across large parts of northern england for much of yesterday, after train lines and roads were flooded. police response times to urgent calls at two of england's biggest police forces, have become significantly slower in the past five years, according to a freedom of information request by bbc 5 live investigates. in some areas, including the west midlands and greater manchester, the average length of time victims have to wait has nearly doubled since 2013. the home office says police funding will rise by 970—million—pounds over the next financial year and forces will decide how this money is spent in relation to handling 999 calls. you can hear more on this story on 5 live investigates, at 11am this morning on bbc radio 5 live. junk food adverts on tv and online
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could be banned before 9pm, as part of government plans to tackle childhood obesity. ideas for the new watershed have been put out for public consultation, and have been backed by doctors. the department of health and social care says one—in—three children leave primary school overweight or obese. the former love island contestant, mike thalassitis has been found dead in woods near his home in essex. he was 26 and appeared on the dating show in 2017. friends and co—stars have been taking to social media to pay tribute to mr thalassitis, who was also a semi—professional footballer for clubs including st albans and chelmsford. a state of disaster has been declared in zimbabwe, where a tropical storm has killed over 30 people. the authorities say about 70 people are still missing as a result of the cyclone, which earlier caused severe damage in mozambique.
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i have made my own alun wynjones mask. you are so proud of that this morning. i don't know if you should be! that is horrific! the man is a legend, no doubt about it. they played brilliantly yesterday. the welsh side was a force to be reckoned with. sadly for ireland, they couldn't break down the wall. what a day of rugby they had. but it is valtteri bottas who has won the opening race in melbourne. if anyone doesn't want to know the result, look away now! don't look! nothing to see! go and make yourself a cup of tea. the first race happened this morning. huge pressure
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on lewis hamilton to get a sixth championship this year but it wasn't to be. but it is valtteri bottas who has won the opening race in melbourne. the finn beat his mercedes team mate and world champion lewis hamilton by more than 20 seconds — he also takes the extra point for the fastest lap.. red bull's max verstappen was third with ferrari's sebastian vettel fourth. what an incredible day of rugby — rounded off with that extraorindary finish at twickenham — scotland coming back to draw 38 all with england in the calcutta cup.. and there might be a few sore heads in cardiff this morning. after a perfect campaign, their coach warren gatland becomes the first coach to win the grand slam three times. patrick gearey looks back at what really was a super saturday.
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the slam in the storm. drenched in rain and champagne, wales have conquered all — a third grand slam in 11 years and the man behind it stood quietly beside it. it's not about me, it's about those players. we spoke beforehand about them playing for themselves and their families and this crowd and wales as a whole and to be able to create a bit of history so they can never take that away from them. wales were expecting something fearsome from the west and it came via the weather, not ireland. it took little more than a minute for the welsh to work out a way through them and listen to the reaction when hadleigh parkes scored. cheering and applause. ireland never silenced the hymns and arias. last year, jacob stockdale was the star of a team that won the grand slam. this time he and they have been shackled. under pressure they made mistakes which delivered welsh penalties. slotted away by , wales steadily built a lead that ireland never threatened to come back from. in a world cup year, they're now trying to rediscover something that wales have
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well and truly found. after that world cup, warren gatland will stand down. there is just one lastjob. as there was for england and scotland, the calcutta cup still had to be rediscovered and any england frustration seemed to be channelled into a fantastic first half that saw them score four tries. henry slade and johnny may's combination, the highlight of what seemed to be a supercharged lap of honour. they led 31—0 at one point but scotland were not done. darcy graham's try sparked a second half in which their promise finally blossomed. he scored two in an amazing comeback. when finn russell was allowed to the line unaccompanied it was 31—31. befuddled english heads span, no—one could keep sam johnson from scoring. scotland were minutes away from winning at twickenham for the first time in 35 years. in the end, in overtime, george ford scored and salvaged a draw. still, not enough to take the calcutta cup back from scotland. the six nations saved its best till last. patrick geary, bbc news. england ran in 12 tries as they thrashed scotland 80—nil to seal a ninth grand slam and regain the women's six nations title. the red roses were rampant
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asjess breach scored her second and england's fourth try inside 17 minutes. england went on to score a staggering seven tries in the first half, adding another five in the second. the win gave england a 10th six nations crown after losing the title to france last year. wolves are into the semi finals of the fa cup for the first time since 1998. they beat manchester united 2—0 at molineux to join manchester city and watford in the last four. joe lynskey rounds up yesterday's quarter finals. for the first time in 21 years, wolves have roared into the cup semi finals. a club who two years ago were struggling in the sedcond tier are now trophy hunting. this was comprehensive against manchester united. wolves' second—half dominance finally brought a breakthrough from rauljimenez. he is just one of the superstars that has transformed the mood.
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soon this century—old stadium was really rocking. cheering and appluase. commentator: wembley beckon for the wolves! the wolves' piece of history came with a refereeing quirk, this was united's victor lindelof being sent off but then reprieved with a video check. yellow, not red. but the 11 men got just one goal back. it came too late to change the outlook. these are glory days at wolves again with a portuguese manager who knows the history. we know how big it was in the 50s and 60s, and there are people in the stadium who still have memories of those times. to try and achieve the same is much, much harder now. but we will go step—by—step. as long as our fans are happy, we're happy. soon manchester city could be the icons of the modern era. they're still on course to win four trophies, just.
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a free flowing first half from swansea had the championship side two up in half—an—hour but city provided one of the great upsets with a fightback and good fortune. —— prevented. first sergio aguero's penalty went in off the goal keeper and then late on, he headed in for the winner. it looked like he should have been given offside. the kind of break a team needs for a cup run. still fighting on four fronts. joining them in the semifinals will be watford. a side who bucked the trend and put the cup first by resting players in the league. a gamble with the winner against crystal palace. a goal to take watford to wembley in a competition that makes a special memories. west ham staged an astonishing comeback to beat huddersfield town a—3 in stoppage time at the london stadium. javier hernandez was brought off the bench in the second half and scored a quickfire double with his second in the 91st minute, clinching victory for the hammers.
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leicester city managed a dramatic victory of their own, beating burnley with a last—minute goal from wes morgan to win 2—1. harry maguire was sent off so they played with 10 men for most of the match. and newcastle rescued a point at bournemouth with a stunning equaliser in stoppage time from matt ritchie, a man who spent three years as a bournemouth player himself. that draw means newcastle are seven points clear of the bottom three. in the scottish premiership, rangers could only manage a 1—1 draw at home to kilmarnock. meanwhile aberdeen's poor run at home continues, they drew with livingston, niall mcginn putting the dons ahead after 30 minutes, but craig sibbald equalised for the visitors just before the break. that result extends aberdeen's winless run at home in the league to six games in a row. elsewhere there were wins for hamilton and hibs. in golf, rory mcilroy and tommy fleetwood go into the final round of the players championship at sawgrass in florida one stroke behind leaderjon rahm of spain. rahm equalled the lowest score of the week with a third round 6a and is 15 under par.
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mcilroy recovered from a shaky start. both he and fleetwood made 2—under—par 70s to move to 1a under. dame sarah storey led a procession of british victories on day 3 of the para—cycling track world championships in the netherlands. storey regained her title in the 3km individual pursuit. the 1a—time paralympic champion was dominant as she beat poland's anna harkowska in the wc5 final. she also claimed gold in the scratch race. her teammate, sophie thornhill, and pilot helen scott won the 1km time trial before james ball and pete mitchell claimed a surprise gold in the equivalent men's event, and katie toft won c1 scratch race gold.
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they're one of the most famous rock bands in the world, and pack out arenas wherever they go. but can you believe the who haven't played a gig at wembley in a0 years? thisjuly, pete townshend and roger daltrey are looking to change that with a massive concert, and there's some new music too. they've been speaking to our reporter, matt everitt. the who, one of the most famous and loudest bands of all time. now, some a0 yea rs loudest bands of all time. now, some a0 years after they last played the home of english football, they are back. well, we thought, it is july, summertime, we have never played the new wembley stadium, played the old won times, why not? when we did it, even though we had guests, it was the first time that we have done a stadium in the uk, so i had never
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been very excited about it but i don't remember anything about the gig at all. i probably will remember this one. it was very loud. since forming in 196a, the who have played some legendary concerts— woodstock, glastonbury, and the isle of wight festival in 1970. when a band starts they are proving themselves every night, no—one knows who they are and you have to let people know. now you are the who, you have to keep doing that. you can't go through the motions, if you start going through the motions the gig is up. especially with our music. as well as the wembley show, they are responsible for classic songs like my responsible for classic songs like my generation, pinball wizard, and others, have also said they will be releasing new songs for the first time in decades. it is going to be all right, it will be ok. we have
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some great songs. a new collection of songs? know, sort of a box of chocolates. i am always a bit eclectic in the way i approach music, i struggle to pick his particular style and stay with it. i enjoy having fun noodling around and doing different things. it was 1982, so it has been a long farewell. doing different things. it was 1982, so it has been a long farewellm was a farewell to touring. we said farewell to touring until 1989, and it was done for a specific reason, we had issues in the band that needed to be addressed, and the only way to do it was to stop doing tour after tour after two, we were working down a wormhole to nowhere. so, after 55 years and 12 albums, the who are showing no signs of stopping.
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legendary band! will you make it do you think? time allowing, i haven't been to wembley for years! we have had some dreadful weather, dreadful rain, which has shown the impact it has had on some areas. this is a picture from david showing flooding in conwey. it really puts it into perspective. we have seen this picture of a flooded playground in leeds, and you get a sense from the swing is how high the water has come from the playground. and, this one is from wigan. i was at our local park yesterday and they we re at our local park yesterday and they were having to run through inches deeper water.
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it has been awful! but there is a bit of respite on the way? yes, this was the conwey valley, where we saw half a month's worth of rain falling where we saw half a month's worth of rainfalling in where we saw half a month's worth of rain falling in 2a hours, at snowdonia and nearby areas. as we have hinted at, things are getting better. blustery wind will push some showers through today, and there will be sunny spells. let's have a look at what is happening. some very windy conditions yesterday, now hitting scandinavia. we are on the back edge of it, meaning we are drawing in the wind flowing around. wind coming in from the north—west, particularly prone to showers in northern ireland and the west of new
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south —— scotland. some ice here and there, showers in the west, they will be pushed away eastwards and southwards through the day and we will see showers swap from west to east across scotland through the afternoon. eastern scotland with the strongest of the wind, gusts in excess of 30—a0 mph. a few showers this afternoon in northern ireland, a few more in the north—east of england, the north—west and western parts of wales. very few will make towards east anglia and the south—east, and they should be fairly fleeting. 8—7 degrees today but it will feel a bit cooler in the wind. showers will fade away across parts of east anglia, cloud increasing in the west across northern ireland, so the coldest pa rt northern ireland, so the coldest part of the night will be purely a wrong, the foursome crane moves in.
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-- rain. wrong, the foursome crane moves in. —— rain. it will be a bit dicey for the monday morning commute. moving through scotland, england and wales, showers will be on and off through the day in northern ireland, cloudy conditions. there will be wet weather in parts of western scotland, north—west england and western scotland again, it won't be as bad as we saw yesterday. eastern scotla nd as bad as we saw yesterday. eastern scotland will stay dry and bright. the reason for the turbulent conditions is the jet stream dipping down to the south of the uk. it will now move to the north through the coming week and will drag air in from the atlantic. the mornings could still be chilly, but they will start to feel milder throughout the day. the essential picture i think is that it will be nowhere near as wet as it has been and nowhere near as windy. very relieved that things
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will we we re we were just talking about our lunch, we were paying attention, matt! it is nearly lunch in our world, because we have been up so early! we will be back with the headlines shortly, but now it is time for the travel show. hello, and welcome to the travel show with me, carmen roberts. we're only three months into 2019 and already we've covered plenty of ground, so this week we're going to take a look back at some of our favourite stories so far this year. my mask started to fill with water and i started to panic, so i was like... oh my gosh. i think i'm still recovering from the dragon dance in taiwan. anyway, more of that later on in the show, but first let's kick off by heading to paris,
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where back in february, christa got to see how the years have taken its toll on one of the city's most iconic buildings. notre dame cathedral is the city's most visited monument. 13 million people walk through its gigantic doors every year — that's twice as many as head to the eiffel tower. the cathedral was damaged in the french revolution, many of its figures were defaced, but there are sections that still remain from before the revolution and have been reconstructed since, like the last gentleman on the facade of the cathedral. although successive waves of restoration have maintained the cathedral's main features, some of which date back to the 12th century, maintaining the building is an ongoing challenge. pollution, acid rain and age are now eating up not only its fine details but also this building's actual
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structure, and it's particularly striking when you go behind the scenes here. up here at the back of the cathedral, a place that tourists don't usually get to see. notre dame looks so imposing from the street, towering down, this huge structure, but when you get up close, it's amazing to see how much the old girl kind of needs a helping hand. help is what michel is trying to provide. his charity, friends of notre dame, has launched an appeal that helps private donors to help pay for some of the most urgently needed repairs. you can see here we have parts that are at risk of falling, so we removed them and have stored them here. if we don't want the cathedral to collapse, we need to rapair, all these and all these pinnacles need to be replaced as well. but repairing and preserving
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mediaeval architecture doesn't come cheap. the french state actually owns the building and spends up to a million euros each year on the cathedral, but that's not enough and a lot more money is needed. it's estimated that it will cost at least 150 million euros to carry out all the essential structural work here, and it's a race against time. so how urgent are these reports? they are very urgent because actually, the risk here is a structural risk on the walls of the cathedral, on the building itself. within ten years, we could have the cathedral completely down if we do not do anything. that's incredible. although it's hoped the private funds might help to save notre dame, the country is full of other beautiful, historic buildings that also need help, so the french government is trying out a new way to try and save at risk churches, castles and chateaus.
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it starts with a trip to the local newsagent. 12 million of these french heritage scratch cards are on sale across france. you can win big money and save monuments in one go. at 15 euro, this is not cheap, but 10% of the money from this will go to conservation projects. in total, almost 270 historical sites, from ancient monuments to churches and castles, will hopefully benefit from the 16 million euros raised so far. nothing. at least it's for a good cause. christa visiting france back in february. as the ski season is starting to come to an end in europe, many winter sports destinations are looking at ways to keep us coming back once the snow disappears, as lucy found out when she headed to tignes
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in the french alps. i'm here to try something a little bit different. 0k. yes, that is a mask and regulator. i have been persuaded into ice diving. so once you're inside, we seal everything and you are completely protected from the water. for this, i will be wearing a dry suit. i will put some talc inside so the head can go easily into the product. comedic music. it's a girl. laughs. it's definitely a complicated process getting ready, which is just adding to my nerves. you're sealed. the good news is i can't feel how cold it is out here, so...
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the lake i'll be diving into is right in the ski village of tignes le lac, just a stone's throw from the lifts. bye bye. the more i stare at the ice, the more i think i willjust stick my foot in just to get an idea of how cold it is. so they said that i'm not going to feel the cold obviously, i do not want my body going into some sort of shock once i get into the water. i'm assured it will be fine but my mind is currently in overdrive. ijust want to get in now. you're in? perfect. dan will be staying above the ice, helping me and another instructor go under. it's not an activity can do as a group, rather one person at a time with an instructor, for safety reasons. and we rotate into the water now. my initial worries of freezing
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to death quickly melt away. but it didn't quite go to plan and i had to surface. so my mask started to fill with water... and i started to panic, so i was like out! speaking in french. after a little reminder about what to do, namely don't panic, i was mentally prepped for another go. i am ready to go back in, i was only down there for maybe a minute or so, but it is so pretty down there. just being able to kind of touch all the bubbles under the ice is really cool. 0k. this time, my mask stayed put, but we decided not to stray too far from the ice hole and my
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confidence returned. it's an otherworldly experience under the ice, cut off from the noise and distractions above, and it's surprisingly relaxing. 0nly towards the end did my toes and fingers start to tingle a little bit. otherwise, the dry suit really did keep the cold out. for the really daring, it's possible to also free dive. probably not for me though, i much prefer having the oxygen tank. well, to finish this week, you join me back in taiwan, where i'm about to take on a challenge in front of a crowd who have very high expectations. let's hope i can pull it off. so, it's the annual arts festival
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and a local dance company had invited me to take part in a performance that they're doing for today's parade. hi, you must be roger. hi, iam. let's get changed. 0k! the festival is held every year close to taipei, and teams from all over the country and further afield come to compete in a celebration of music and dance. it's a big, high—profile event, so my team are taking a real risk by letting a total novice join their ranks. 0k. i hope no—one laughs at me! and now i can hear my group approaching. i am so nervous and i don't want to make a total fool of myself in front of this big crowd. there's at least a thousand people here, it's a lot more than i thought. tell me when. now? all of a sudden, i'm on. my mind seems to go totally blank amidst all the noise and colour. luckily, roger is there to give me a push in the right direction. where, where, where?
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somehow, the team follow my lead, although i really have no idea where i'm going. nice! sorry! it's ok! and then my big dragon stick seems to develop a mind of its own. oh, sorry! i was really, really nervous. it was quite stressful. oh, my gosh! i tried to remember my moves, i think i only hit two people with the ball. but it was exciting. something tells me they won't be inviting me back any time soon. that's it for this week. coming up next week, ade heads to dubai to go behind the scenes in a hotel in the world's tallest tower where they're getting big on sustainability. this is where we actually throw any leftover food that's come off the guests' plates. it actually looks kind of gross and it smells gross. i don't want to get my hair in it! i hope you can join us for that.
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don't forget, we're also on social media, were you can tell us about your travels. but in the meantime, from all of us here on the travel show, it's goodbye.

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