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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 17, 2019 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at two... thousands of people attend vigils across new zealand to remember the victims of the mosque attacks — as the country's prime minister says her office received a message from the suspected killer minutes before the shootings. stories of heroism are emerging from the attacks —— stories of heroism are emerging from the attacks — as survivors talk of their shock that something like this, could happen in christchurch. asimple a simple quarrel is alien news over here. this is the most peaceful place on earth. theresa may calls on mps to make an ‘honourable compromise‘ and back her brexit deal — or risk never leaving the eu. police response times to the most urgent calls at two of england's biggest forces have become significantly slower in the past five years, according to figures obtained by the bbc.
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also in the next hour — new ideas to prevent childhood obesity. junk food adverts on tv and online could be banned before 9pm under ideas being put out for public consultation. and in the week in parliament we look back at the dramatic proceedings in westminster — that's in half an hour here on bbc news. good afternoon. new zealand's prime minister says her office received an email containing the far—right views of bra nton tarra nt just minutes before 50 people were shot dead in two mosques in christchurch on friday. butjacinda ardern said it contained no details of the planned attack — the worst mass shooting
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in the country's history. tarrant has been charged with murder and is due to appear in court again next month when he will probably face more charges. from christchurch, rupert wingfield—hayes sent us this report. in christchurch on sunday morning, the outpouring of grief and solidarity has continued unabated. close to the mosque where the first attack took place on friday, the flower tributes continue to grow, many people overcome with emotion. in wellington, prime ministerjacinda ardern made her own emotional tribute at the city's biggest mosque. but amid all this grief there is also anger the attacker wasn't stopped before he could carry out his deadly plan. prime minister ardern today confirmed her office did receive an email copy of the killer's political declaration just before the attacks took place. i was one of more than 30 recipients of a manifesto that was mailed
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out nine minutes before the attack took place. it did not include the location. it did not include specific details. back in christchurch, a sports team has come to lay flowers. their goalie is among the dead. his coach has this message for the australian man suspected of carrying out the attack here, and anyone who shares his racist views. we are all one people. we are all one race. we are all human beings. we love each other. we have to love each other, otherwise this sort of rubbish happens. we have to love each other. ali adeeba and his father were inside the al noor mosque when the shooting began. his badly wounded father lay bleeding beside him, imploring ali to look after the family. the last thing he says to me was, take care of your mum and your brother and sister. his father is still in critical
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condition in an induced coma. this is an act of terrorism. it has nothing to do with what race or religion you are, this is what terrorism is and it is evil and it needs to stop and we need to change within ourselves to be able to live together as a community in peace. the name of this city, christchurch, will now forever be linked to the attack on the two mosques here last friday. but the people of christchurch want to tell the world that it does not represent them and they too are victims of this horrific crime. earlier i spoke to mazharuddin syed ahmed, who survived the shootings. he described how he took cover when he saw the gunman come in through the main entrance of the linwood masjid mosque. i ran to the back
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side of the mosque. i don't know how but ijust ran towards there. there was a small storage area that has no door. ijust went in and took cover. then the shooter came into the main door and started shooting the people. people were falling down and he was shooting. i took cover and i was able to see the shooting and he was wearing those dirt bike helmets and i think it was like armour and he was shooting repeatedly. there was a woman right in front of him and she was screaming, no, no. he shot her then she fell down and he shot her again. at this moment of time, i was on his left side. he started shooting from the right.
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suddenly, at any moment he would turn left. i was trying to think, should i run ahead or take a twist or turn around? i was trying to think, what should i do. just then somebody pulled him from the back and i didn't see who'd pulled him. he fell down and i was still holding my cover. in that scuffle, he lost control of his gun. sorry to interrupt you, just to be clear what you are saying. somebody tried to tackle the gunmen and they managed to bring him to the ground? yes, there was companion — he was from afghanistan, he was a refugee. he brought him down and in that scuffle, he lost control of his gun. he got up and ran outside. this person who pulled him down, chased behind him, taking his gun.
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i believe there were no bullets. he emptied all of the bullets. at that moment, he ran behind the shooter's gun. i think he couldn't operate and nothing happened so he ran chasing him and then because he was ahead, i believe that he was going to the car to collect the other gun. just then, this person threw the gun at him. he yanked the gun at him and that landed on his windscreen. while he was picking the gun, i believe, that scared him. and then he ran. let's speak now to bertram vidgen, research associate at the alan turing institute, where he specialises in far—right extremism online. thank you very much for being with us
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thank you very much for being with us this lunchtime. let me ask you first of all, about the handling of the attack on line. we have the situation where the attacker is live streaming. what do you make of her facebook handled that?” streaming. what do you make of her facebook handled that? i think it is a difficult challenge. i think facebook tried as hard as possible to ta ke facebook tried as hard as possible to take down the content. they announced earlier today they took down one i/2—million values, more than 2 million were at source. we did not let them get online, they just banned them. they were trying to be proactive, all the big platforms have. the scale of the challenge may be getting away from them. the difficulty is, correct me ifiam them. the difficulty is, correct me if i am wrong, much of the individual lesion and monitoring on sites is through algorithms, automatic processes rather than individual people. somebody might have an image thinking someone is sitting in front of screens, we will
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press the button. it is not like that. well, oddly enough it is mixed. there is a machine learning and also content moderation. a lot of people don't realise that lots of the big tech companies have a large tea m the big tech companies have a large team of people who work tirelessly to ta ke team of people who work tirelessly to take this content down. all of the content that was removed at source. 1.2 million versions of the video never got online, that was done through machine learning. the other was a combination of machine learning and content moderation by humans after the video was flagged to facebook. there are some issues about the ethics of this when you are talking about the freedom to communicate. there are questions about what impact these kind of social media postings have. it can cause a lot of distress to people. it might also revolt people and that might bea it might also revolt people and that might be a positive thing. well, i'm not sure. that is a difficult
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question. the ethics of it certainly are very, very important here. we have to be aware that facebook is trying to balance removing terrorist content, harmful content of any form, with the right of freedom of speech. i think that is why we are going to see some videos get online, u nfortu nately. going to see some videos get online, unfortunately. the only way you can stop any of the harmful content is by banning all content. when you do that, none of the big platforms can operate. it is i was going to be a balancing act they are. in terms of the impact of those videos, i do think there are serious questions here. the met police said sharing this video is criminal, i think one of the risks as people may share it in order to counter the video because they are appalled by it. by doing so, they may share it with people who are encouraged by it and incited by the violence. thank you
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very much for that. very interesting questions for us to reflect on during the course of this afternoon. i should say the deputy leader of the labour party has called for the social media sites to freeze during terror attacks but the practicalities could be quite difficult. and the practicalities of spotting this and taking it down. police in greater manchester have made four arrests, after two separate incidents of alleged hate crime in, which the new zealand mosque attack was mentioned. officers were called to an address in rochdale, after reports of a taxi driver being abused and threatened. a man and a woman were arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated public order offences. another woman has been arrested in rochdale for a racially aggravated public order offence following comments made online about the new zealand attack. separately, a man has been arrested in the oldham area in connection
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with malicious communications relating to the attack. senior cabinet ministers — including the chancellor philip hammond — have suggested mps may not get a third chance to vote on theresa may's brexit deal — if she can't pursuade enough mps to change their minds. the warnings follow a plea from mrs may for ‘honourable compromises‘ to avoid a long extension to the brexit process, or the possibility it doesn‘t happen at all. here‘s our political correspondent jonathan blake. some things never change. theresa may went to church as normal this morning after a week when the stakes for her and her brexit deal will be higher than ever. she has given mps an ultimatum, whining in an article that if they do not back the deal, they risk a lengthy delay and no brexit at all perhaps. all this she says makes the choice facing mps clearer than it has ever been. if parliament can find a way to back the brexit deal before european council, the uk will leave the eu this spring. if not, she writes, we
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will not leave the eu for months, if ever. support from the dup, who provide theresa may with a majority is crucial. the man who holds the purse strings did not rule out for more money for northern ireland in exchange for support. this is not about money, this is about political assurance. we are coming up about money, this is about political assurance. we are coming up to a spending review. we will have to look at all budgets, including devolved grant budgets and that spending review, of course we will. it is not impossible that you are going to give extra money in return for voting? we have not begun to look at it. although some mps who are opposed now said they were back it, the chancellor said they did not yet have the support they need. a third vote on the deal me not happen this week. if it does, it could be a big test of parliament‘s support for a referendum. labour it looks like
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to back a plan to make support for idiot conditionalfor a to back a plan to make support for idiot conditional for a public vote. —— support for the deal. idiot conditional for a public vote. -- support for the deal. the key thing is actually the deal has now been rejected twice by parliament. rumour has it she is bringing it back for a third time, if that fails a fourth time after that. this is ridiculous. this has been defeated comprehensively and she has got to recognise we have to do something different. mr corbin also hinted he would vote for a vote of no confidence if the deal is rejected a third time. if defeat looks inevitable, there may not be a vote at all. leaving big questions u na nswered at all. leaving big questions unanswered about where the brexit process goes from here. let‘s speak to ian blackford — the snp‘s leader at westminster — he joins us from portree on the isle of skye. thank you very much for being with us on thank you very much for being with usona thank you very much for being with us on a sunday afternoon. i‘m not sure the weather is as good as that
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picture. it is a beautiful day. it isa picture. it is a beautiful day. it is a joy to be away from westminster, let me say. away from the hothouse. indeed. the madhouse, iam not the hothouse. indeed. the madhouse, i am not sure it is the hothouse. let me ask you about the discussions, suggesting the labour party might back this karel wilson amendment, the idea that forcing it to go back to a referendum. where do the snp stand on this? we will look at any amendments to come forward for any meaningful vote. i would simply say though, i think it is increasingly clear that brexit is going to be harmful to all our economies. we know it is going to cost jobs. economies. we know it is going to costjobs. i do not think there is a good brexit. ithink costjobs. i do not think there is a good brexit. i think we all have a responsibility to protect the interests of our constituents. as a preference, i would like to see something like the amendment we saw last week, a straightforward amendment for a peoples vote. from what we know, it is right and proper
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what we know, it is right and proper what we know, it is right and proper what we do say we should put this back to the people. sorry to interrupt, i want to clarify, what is it you would be fitting to the people? there are potentials. you could go for a straight yes or no but things have arguably moved on. we have a deal on the table which the eu is happy to sign up to. would you be putting that to people? would you be putting that to people? would you be putting that to people? would you be seeing a series of votes?|j you be seeing a series of votes?” think from our point of view, brexit is going to be harmful and remain has to be on the ballot paper. what is on the other side of that, that is on the other side of that, that is up to the brexiteers, whether they want to put forward the deal or no deal. i think on the basis that people now know it is going to hurt... when you talk about no deal as an example, in effect you have a government that is threatening the population of the united kingdom saying there is a threat to the supply of medicines, a potential threat to the supply of food, it is quite extraordinary situation to be
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in. that is why i am arguing we should apply the brake and give people the chance to reflect. people have a lot more information than they had in 2016. if the people of england vote to leave, as they did in 2016, that has to be respected. i would simply say, what is critical for us is that there was an overwhelming remain vote in scotland. my responsibility is to give voice to that. i have repeatedly said, as has the first—minister, scotland will not be dragged out of the european union without its will. we need to make sure there is respect of the administration is... if i may say so, the situation with the dup, in essence the dp and the eog are holding theresa may government ransom and they are potentially saying they will vote for this deal if they have a seat at the table. you have the scottish and welsh parliaments and governments that are being ignored in the process. just
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to clarify, this is what you say before, you will not allow scotland to be dragged out by a vote of the uk as to be dragged out by a vote of the ukasa to be dragged out by a vote of the uk as a whole, or a vote led by england to leave the european union. that effectively is saying if we have brexit, if brexit happens at the end of march are the end of june, that would be the point where the snp would demand a second referendum on scottish independence? there are two things i am saying, it is in the uk‘s interest to stay within the european union. we will work with others to reach a consensus on that. i am looking forward to meeting jeremy corbin and other party leaders tomorrow. in the light that we are dragged out against our wishes, it is only right and properfrom against our wishes, it is only right and proper from a against our wishes, it is only right and properfrom a democratic point of view that the people of scotland that were told in our own referendum in 2014 if we stayed in the uk, scotla nd in 2014 if we stayed in the uk, scotland would be staying in the european union, there has been a change of circumstances and the people of scotland have the right to determine their own future and i wa nt to
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determine their own future and i want to make sure scotland can stay in the european union. briefly, you are not worried by the previous legal advice that the then european president described in which you would be applying as a new country because you would not be permitted to be accepted as an existing member? that is different circumstance. i can tell you that myself and colleagues in the government have been meeting with european governments over the course of the last few months and i can tell you there is a strong hand of friendship has been extended to scotla nd friendship has been extended to scotland and they are appreciative of our position. i think the european union would want to have a partnership with scotland in the european union, there has been a change of circumstances and the people of scotland have the right to determine their own future and i wa nt to determine their own future and i want to make sure scotland can stay y want to make sure scotland can stay yin want to make sure scotland can stay y in the european union. briefly, you are not worried by the previous legal advice that the then european president described in which you would be applying as a new country because you would not be permitted to be accepted as an existing member? that is a different circumstance. i can tell you that myself and colleagues in the government have been meeting with european governments over the course of the last few months and i can
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tell you there is a strong hand of friendship has been extended to scotla nd friendship has been extended to scotland and they are appreciative of our position. i think the european union would want to have a partnership with scotland in scotland in police response times to the most urgent 999 calls for two of england‘s biggest forces, west midlands and greater manchester police, have got significantly worse in the past five years. that‘s according to a freedom of information request by bbc 5 live investigates. in the west midlands the average response times for the most serious calls went up from 10 minutes to 19 minutes. the home office says police funding will rise by 970—million—pounds over the next financial year. i‘m nowjoined by dr lynnette kelly, assistant police and crime commissioner for the west midlands. scenario. intriguing prospects. iam sure you are looking forward to your journey back down to the development. we are concerned about it. i have to say, if you are going to cut policing year after year and make let me ask you first of all, a near doubling of response times. that is a worrying development. we are concerned about it. i have to say, if you are going to cut policing year after remove 2000 officers, as the same time as crime is going up. the naturalthing officers, as the same time as crime is going up. the natural thing to happen is response times forces. are you saying proportionately are why
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has that not happened everywhere? it has that not happened everywhere? it has been hit far harder than the government cut than most of the police forces. are you saying amount? it does not necessarily translate into terms of the impact it can have. it can be a smaller force with a levels of. if you look at funding per head, we are funded to the same level as surrey. surrey does not have the levels of the levels the young population and also the. the demographics that alone explain this drop? the demographics haven‘t changed dramatically. i understand your than sorry. can that alone explain this drop? the demographics haven‘t changed dramatically. i point on the cuts over austerity. we have lost 175 million. we have lost 2000 officers. that is a quarter of our workforce. .we that is a quarter of our workforce. . we have lost 2000 officers. that isa . we have lost 2000 officers. that is a quarter of our workforce. lost staff lost staff and staff to a
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vital officers so they can carry out duties on the street. we have been badly affected by the cuts freeing up badly affected by the cuts freeing up officers so they can carry out duties on the street. we have been badly affected by the cuts. if you youth work, it has been decimated by the cuts. all of the preventative work that used to so we can stop the rise in crime. at the moment, we are simply has been cut back. we need funds to come into west midlands police for that preventative work so we can stop the rise in crime. at the moment, we are simply playing and we do not have enough to do the you are going to get any are you yet clear how much of this 970 million you are going to get any we note that the government have goes the amount of council tax that goes to to look at the way the fund police and make sure west midlands police is funded fairly. we cannot have one
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off amounts of money like they we are welcoming the extra funds. government need to look at the way the fund police and make sure west midlands police is funded fairly. we cannot have one off amounts of money like they for one year only. what we need up a little... sorry, your line is breaking up a in england and wales, one last brief question, there are 42 police forces in england and wales, the most sensible approach the most sensible approach forces and create more financial headroom for you there? i think that isa headroom for you there? i think that is a decision for central government to the number of police forces and create more financial headroom for you there? i think that is a decision for central government is difficult to hold junk food adverts on tv and online could be banned before 9pm, as part of government plans
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to tackle childhood obesity. ideas for the new watershed have been put out for public consultation from today, and have been backed by doctors. the department of health and social care says one—in—three children leave primary school overweight or obese. i can now talk to fiona gillison, a health psychologist at the university of bath, where she specialises in obesity prevention. what we do need is the police to be accountable to the local population. and if thank you for being with us why would the elimination of advertising before nine o‘clock in, effectively the elimination of advertising before nine o‘clock in the it would before nine o‘clock in the it would bea before nine o‘clock in the it would be a positive move. it would stop advertisers advertising anywhere at that time. if we just banned adverts on tv, there is evidence to show the advertisers changed to family programmes, which does not
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necessarily have an effect. it would be interesting to see what response we get. if they cannot advertise unhealthy foods, would they be a switch to healthy products? that is what we have seen in response to the drinks tax. they wouldn‘t have quite as strong image in the mind what they wanted, the children. we think that would help parents to do what they are aiming to do in trying to get children to eat healthier meals. pester power will know how relentless that can be if you have been around children. is there any research or correlation? we have done this before to a certain extent, we banned it on children‘s programme and all that kind of thing. is there any evidence that has had an impact? that did not have a great impact because the
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advertisers shifted when the advertised two programmes that children watch with their parents. sure that you would have expected some impact? that would make people think, does the advertising have the effect that even the advertisers think it has? it may well have done in terms of the amount children think about the products, but not the exposure. we know from the tobacco control policies, the years we worked well in reducing smoking levels, these approaches coming from every angle do work. there is evidence from other domains this hat would have an impact. you hope this is something the government will follow through with? definitely. i am sorry we did not have more time to speak but thank you for being with us.
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brexit has been at the forefront of vince cable‘s final conference speech as liberal democrat party leader. speaking to members at the spring conference in york, sir vince talked about the effect the uk‘s decision to leave the eu has had on the country over the past three years brexit is dominating parliament and government and not any good way. it is dividing families and communities, and the united kingdom, and it is sucking all of the energy out of government. last week, farcical debates have diminished even further at the standing of parliament. the really big issues that we ought to be grappling with, how we live sustainably, how we deal with ageing, how we deal with the new generation of technologies, all of these things are now being put on one side. postponed or ignored, neglected. it is not surprising that many people are now reacting with a combination of boredom and rage.
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they are bored because of the endless robotic repetition of the arguments. and their anger is because what they were told it was going to be very, very simple is now proving to be hideously complicated. now, iam proving to be hideously complicated. now, i am very proud of the role that our party has played unapologetically leading the case for remaining. applause and pursuing an exit from brexit through a people‘s vote. and against all the odds and the prevarication of the labour leader, our because it
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is very much alive. we have been clear that the 2016 referendum, let‘s remind ourselves two and a half years ago, was not a good basis for leaving. it was undertaken solely to deal with a quarrel inside the conservative party. a narrow majority of voters, 37% of the total electorate voted to leave. the facts change and they have changed and we now understand much better the scale of the cheating and the lying that went on to secure that result. applause sir vincent cable, addressing his final congress as leader. we hear it is glorious on the isle of skye. it was lovely when i came into london
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this afternoon. let‘s see what is going to be like for the next 48 hours are so. afternoon, susan. are you bringing joy to us this afternoon? we have punchy showers around. heavy rain as we speak. heavy rumbles of thunder. here is our satellite at the moment. there is the law from yesterday. still breezy out there. blobs of cloud behind me. showers are targeting wales and the midlands. some in the south—east as well and eastern scotland. yes, a lot of sunshine to be had. a fresherfeel this afternoon across the southern half of the uk. milderfor scotland. 0vernight, clear skies across central and eastern areas. a frosty start to the new week. in the west, thick cloud. for northern ireland and west of scotland, brightness is
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and west of scotland, brightness is a limited

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