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tv   Inside Out  BBC News  March 17, 2019 4:30pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 5.00: thousands attend vigils across new zealand to remember the victims of the mosque attacks as the country's prime minister says her office received a message from the suspected killer minutes before the shootings. stories of heroism are emerging from the attacks as survivors talk of their shock that something like this could happen in christchurch. forget gunshots, you know even a simple quarrel is in the news over here. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. this is the most peaceful place on earth. thousands of people attend vigils the chancellor, philip hammond, across new zealand to remember says a significant number the victims of the mosque attacks, of conservative mps have as the country's prime minister says her office received a message changed their minds and are prepared from the suspected killer minutes before the shootings. to back theresa may's brexit deal if it went back to the commons stories of heroism are for another vote. also in the next hour — new ideas to prevent emerging from the attacks, childhood obesity. junk food adverts on tv and online as survivors talk of their shock could be banned before 9pm, that something like this could happen in their city. forget gunshots, even, you know, a simple quarrel is in the news over
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here — this is the most peaceful place on earth. theresa may calls on mps to make an "honourable compromise" and back her brexit deal or risk never leaving the eu. police response times to the most urgent calls at two of england's biggest forces have become significantly slower in the past five years, according to figures obtained by the bbc. junk food adverts on tv and online could be banned before 9pm, as part of government plans to tackle childhood obesity. now on bbc news, its time for inside out, here 5 natalie graham. what do bereaved parents say to the hospital that treated their sun? we will miss his noise, his laughter and his passion for life. the anger about a cult leader in the west country. i think he is a cruel man
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with cruel intentions and that is all i have to say, i genuinely think he isa all i have to say, i genuinely think he is a monster. and we try out the dna app which gives you a red or green light when you are food shopping. going on my results, i didn't think i would be able to have a pie or blt but actually, i can. this is inside out. hello and welcome to the program a year ago, a 21—year—old man from tunbridge wells died after developing sepsis. had the hospital screened him soonerfor the hospital screened him soonerfor the condition, he may have survived now his parents have been invited back to the same hospital to find out watched changed. gavin and fiona
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mason are about to address the board at the maidstone and tunbridge wells nhs trust about the death of their sun tim. we will miss his noise, his laughter and his passion life. in every way, our lives diminished and poorer now. it all began in the early hours of 16 march 2018. tim had a high temperature, raised heart rate and was vomiting violently, he was driven to tunbridge wells hospital by his mother. we thought he was dying when he was in the hospital and he said to me, mummy, i'm not going to get through this. at about half past seven in the morning, he was still very poorly but a young doctor came to see us and said that the initial bloods
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they had ta ken and said that the initial bloods they had taken seemed fine and although he was unwell, they thought it was just a virus and they were going to discharge him. tim was discharged to trim on the same day he started to feel worse and was taken back to tunbridge wells hospital. he couldn't walk, stand or sit up. gavin received a text message from his wife. to get that text, get here fast, i knew what that meant. doctor after doctor started appearing, surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses, out of nowhere. we promised him he would be waking up and that we would all four of us be gathered at his bedside. the last words that we exchanged with him were a lie and we couldn't say goodbye. and then at 21.116, with him were a lie and we couldn't say goodbye. and then at 21.16, the decision was made to turn off the
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machines, because they had been unable to get a response for more than half an hour. and then we were allowed to stay with our boy quietly for as long as we wanted. sorry, i... tim had for as long as we wanted. sorry, i...tim hada for as long as we wanted. sorry, i... tim had a virulent strain of meningitis and in trying to fight off the infection, he developed sepsis, which lead to organ failure. so, sepsis is the is the way the body responds to an infection so it is always triggered by an infection, it might be something as simple as a urinary infection, a chest infection 01’ even a urinary infection, a chest infection or even a cut or a sting but in sepsis the immune system goes into overdrive and if we don't stop it, that causes damage to the organs. sepsis kills an estimated 52,000 people every year in the uk. more than bowel cancer, breast—cancer and prostate cancer combined. john mccarthy survived sepsis but lost a leg to the condition. there is so
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much proof and anecdotal evidence where people are going in such as myself, being sent away then going back a day or two later, suffering life altering injuries or even losing their lives. meanwhile gavin and fiona wanted to know exactly what happened to tim, but it was only last october, seven months after his death, when the answers we re after his death, when the answers were made public. a young man who died after being sent home from a kent hospital despite telling doctors that he felt that he was dying would have survived if he had been properly assessed, a coroner has ruled. it was only five or so yea rs has ruled. it was only five or so years ago that i was working as a doctor at medway hospital and back then, we knew what sepsis was but awareness was nowhere near as good as it is now. so it leaves me wondering, how could this have happened and what is the trust doing to stop it happening again? questions i put to doctorjames mcdonald of the maidstone and
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tunbridge wells nhs trust. he arrived in a&e, he went to triage, he had some subtle signs of infection, he had a temperature and a mildly raised heart rate and slightly low blood pressure. as such, we failed to screen him for sepsis. had a team been screened, would he have been treated sooner? most likely, yes. he would have triggered as potentially having sepsis and had re—followed our own pathways, he would have had intravenous antibiotics within an hour and intravenous fluids and it may have changed the outcome. since tim's death, the trust says it has vastly improved its screening rates for patients with possible signs of sepsis and is now using a revised checklist to help it identify the condition earlier. if they look sick or they have got a high temperature or they have got a high temperature or their physiological parameters are abnormal, then they go into the screening... before addressing the board of the trust, the family are
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back at tunbridge wells hospital to see a sepsis training session in action. a few things like that, if thatis action. a few things like that, if that is ok... action. a few things like that, if that is ok. .. today's patient is a mannequin whose blood pressure, heart rate and voice can be controlled from the observation room. i am not feeling very well at all... says she feels unwell... progressing into the sepsis pathway now. . . we progressing into the sepsis pathway now... we are a bit worried about your chest at the moment, jessica. is it feeling any better or any worse...? i is it feeling any better or any worse...? lam is it feeling any better or any worse...? iamjust is it feeling any better or any worse...? i am just going to lay you down a bit flatter. you can see the stress levels in the room are ramping upa stress levels in the room are ramping up a bit. i amjust going stress levels in the room are ramping up a bit. i am just going to p0p ramping up a bit. i am just going to 13013 a ramping up a bit. i am just going to pop a needle in the other side and give you lots of fluid... pop a needle in the other side and give you lots of fluid. .. the guys in there are getting quite now. the event itself was obviously very difficult to watch, but i get comfort from knowing that they are
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escalating their training on sepsis and it did feel very real in there. something crackles on your chest so i think we have got some infection just here... here in maidstone for it's nearly time for the masons to address the board, those overseeing the work of the trust of. has it done enough to prevent a repeat of what happened to tim last year and what happened to tim last year and what more does it need to do. gavin and fiona are about to make their views known. gavin mason tells the board that initially the trust didn't admit its failings, following an early investigation into what happened to tim. after numerous excuses the report was finally e—mailed 111 days after tim had died. it was as we head feared a distressing whitewash, missing statements from key staff and supposedly an independent conclusion that the hospital bore no responsibility for tim's death. gavin says he was later informed
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that the trust had accepted liability. our solicitor received a letter from this trust solicitors, in it the medicaljargon, legal jargon... there were three headings that said it all. admission of liability. breach of duty admitted. causation, admitted. fiona mason wa nts causation, admitted. fiona mason wants changes to how patients are assessed and how the trust communicates with them and their families. throughout this statement, we have tried to remain as composed as possible, trusting that the transparency and change is genuinely desired by the trust as you have told us. even while it has not a lwa ys told us. even while it has not always been evident. thank you. for
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listening to us. thank you for that, i think listening to us. thank you for that, ithinkl listening to us. thank you for that, i think i speak for the board in saying that there is a lot of shocking stuff in there and i was aware of some of it but not all of it. and please be assured that myself and the other members of the board will pick up all the points you've made, give them serious consideration, the board has discussed tim's death before, but it isa discussed tim's death before, but it is a chance to say publicly how sorry we are. the board assures the family that changes have already been made to how patients are assessed and treated in a&e, afterwards i caught up with gavin and fiona and tim's brother. do you think it is enough or does more need to be done? it is not enough, it is more than halfway and it is a very
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positive step in the right direction. it does need further work but they do seem to that. the trust and the masons say they will continue to work together to help otherfamilies. now, some families have told us that they've lost loved ones to a bizarre cult called universal medicine. it began in australia but it has its european headquarters in a village in the west countryjust. to durrington, somerset, population 268. a quiet hamlet near from durrington, somerset, population 268. a quiet hamlet nearfrom — or is it? in the last ten years it has become home to a cult, its leader is a former bankrupt tennis coaching lives in australia and is now a
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millionaire. we've been told his cult split, families. he teaches that people are sexually abused because of what they did in a past life. you have been sexually abused, that means you have been an abuser. he says those with autism are former dictators. he teaches that alien —like creatures and seek out our vulnerabilities by smelling us. and that happens anywhere, you can be in a train, in a bus, you are being smelt all the time. welcome to the weird and dangerous world of universal some. she was 12 when she says her mum moved to somerset to follow universal medicine. what was your earliest memory of your mum's involvement with universal medicine? 0ne involvement with universal medicine? one of the main things i can rememberwas one of the main things i can remember was turning everything anticlockwise, because if you didn't, then you would let entities
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in and so it was like cooking food had to be done anticlockwise, things like that, turning doorknobs and handles, also like taking your shoes off when you go into a house because otherwise you are walking in entities. i was sitting here, otherwise you are walking in entities. iwas sitting here, my otherwise you are walking in entities. i was sitting here, my dad was over there, my mum came up the stairs and she started burping ridiculously and my dad was like, what are you doing? and she said, i am burping up bad spirits. and it is just, how could you say that, how could anyone believe that, it is just ridiculous?! surge benhayon hit the headlines in october when he sued this former patient in australia for defamation and lost. she claimed he indecently touched her during an ovarian reading. the jury her during an ovarian reading. the jury found her during an ovarian reading. the juryfound in her during an ovarian reading. the jury found in her favour, her during an ovarian reading. the jury found in herfavour, saying it was true, calling universal medicine a socially harmful cult that makes false claims about healing. the jury also found he engaged in bizarre sexual manipulation, exploited cancer patients to leave him money
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in their wills and persuaded followers to shun loved ones who won'tjoin his culture followers to shun loved ones who won't join his culture john followers to shun loved ones who won'tjoin his culturejohn says universal medicine took both his wife and his adult daughter away from him. my daughterjust changed overnight, she didn't want to acknowledge father's day, she told me that she could celebrate my birthday any day of the year. so how did you feel all of a sudden, as her dad, when she wanted to change the way she was towards you? heartbroken, i really miss my daughter, i really do. anybody that contradicts what they say, they're basically told to shun away and not to mix with them. and no—one questions serge benhayon, he is a guru, a god, whatever you want to call him. we've discovered who comes
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to somerset twice a year to teach workshops to his followers here at the lighthouse, where universal medicine's european headquarters is based. it is a ll—star bed—and—brea kfast with conference facilities, a cafe and an indoor swimming pull, or thriving businesses in their own right but visitors wouldn't know they were connected to universal medicine. and they're open to the public and set ona they're open to the public and set on a beautiful 3a acre site. this is simon williams, the managing director of the lighthouse, and he is also the president of the chamber of commerce in. he didn't want to be interviewed but we had a chat off—camera just i pushed him on his involvement in universal medicine, at first he would not tell me exactly what was going on... the police say the lighthouse had called them and after a short conversation, we continue with our filming. i
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spoke to simon, he told me he feels that this has been a media witchhunt against him and jack when i asked him if he was involved in universal medicine, he didn't answer the question and tell me, so i pushed him further and eventually he did admit that he has a follower of universal medicine, that serge benhayon is a great friend of his, whom he loves very much and that the court ruling in australia is totally untrue, none of it is true, when i started to question him on some of serge benhayon's beliefs around disabled children and victims of sexual assault, he refused to answer that and at that point he asked me to leave and said the conversation was finished. serge benhayon has a lwa ys was finished. serge benhayon has always denied running a cult and any wrongdoing. for the families who have not seen their loved ones for yea rs, have not seen their loved ones for years, it is clear what they. have not seen their loved ones for years, it is clear what theylj think years, it is clear what they.” think serge is a cruel man with
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cruel intentions, that is what i have to say, i genuinely think he is a monster. and since we made that film, simon williams has resigned from frome chamber of commerce object now, the nhs may have a new tool up its sleeve to help us lead healthier lives researchers at imperial college london have been trialling a new app for patients with type 2 diabetes. it uses their dna samples to help them choose what foods to eat. inside out has been following one family as they put the new technology through its paces. meet the crown spencer family.” new technology through its paces. meet the crown spencer family. i am andrew, a8, i am and expire five to andi andrew, a8, i am and expire five to and i now run a security company. when i was in the fire service 21 yea rs when i was in the fire service 21 years ago, i underwent quite a
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traumatic experience, we were trying to extra ct traumatic experience, we were trying to extract someone from a car and whilst i was lifting it, i tour my aorta. andrew underwent life-saving surgery and was given an artificial heart valve. it important to stay healthy. i'm charlotte, i'm 19 and i'm at bristol university studying science from the when i was about five or six i was diagnosed with a hole in the heart and then it got quite big and i had to have an operation to fix it i always try and stick to foods that are healthier because i don't want any other strain on my heart, i am aa, almost a5 years of strain on my heart, i am aa, almost as years of age, i am a mum and a wife and i'm behind—the—scenes keeping everything running smoothly. ido keeping everything running smoothly. i do try to keep active but i have always struggled losing weight. health is important to the family and they have agreed to trial a new app which uses your own dna results
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to select the best food choices. charlotte and andrew have quite serious health issues, you want to make sure that you give them the best chance at preventing anything further from happening and this gives us that option. today, sam, andrew and charlotte have come to imperial college to meet the man behind the app. the app is a way of people being able to make very small changes to their nutritional choices, not changing their behaviour dramatically, but giving people more choices within their natural behaviour, so it's not saying eat a banana instead of a biscuit, you can still eat a biscuit, you can still eat a biscuit, but this is the better biscuit, but this is the better biscuit for you, based upon your dna. the first step for the family is to take a dna test. so once i've taken your swaps, insert your swab into this dna cartridge, which
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extracts from that swab purified dna and then your dna is spread over these wells, there are 96 wells on this chip, we are not looking at your full genome, this chip, we are not looking at yourfull genome, we're this chip, we are not looking at your full genome, we're just looking at particular propensities to various medical conditions, which we feel that nutrition would have high impact on. and after ten, 15 minutes, your dna gets transported to that capsule. the work of all those people in your laboratories and you can do it in that one little machine problem pretty amazing! so, how can these dna results help us so, how can these dna results help us make better food so, how can these dna results help us make betterfood choices? this geneticist is the scientist behind the app. with your genetics and your dna, you can't change them but you can adjust your environment and you
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can adjust your environment and you can adjust your environment and you can adjust for your health by making the right choices and this is what the right choices and this is what the app is aiming to do, help people make sustainable choices, they are small changes, switching from this chocolate to that chocolate, but in the long run it can have a significant impact. 0nce the long run it can have a significant impact. once the capsule is loaded with the results, it is worn on a bracelet that syncs with an app on your phone. now for the moment of truth, it is results to. got lots of greens, that's pretty good. these are almost perfectjeans chilly you've got no reds at all, you've got a couple of mediums, salt sensitivity, it is not high, it is actually medium. so basically, you should be as fit as a fiddle, your genes pretty good. made my day! , charlotte, more greens, fantastic, you're identical to your dad. the
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only one that you're very high on is salt sensitivity, itjust means you've got to be very careful of salty products. but will sam be pleased with her results? 0k, interesting! so, you seem to have a lot of reds, a lot of reds, all reds, the only green is caffeine... well, when i got my results i opened up well, when i got my results i opened up the well, when i got my results i opened app well, when i got my results i opened up the app and basically i saw red, i've got a high sensitivity to sugar, which means i've got a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, salt fat, carbohydrates, obesity — but it is actually better to know. with the app loaded, the family is ready to shop. that's too much salt... each barcode gives the product a green or red light, depending on your own dna. i'm fine with that. if it is red, you get an
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alternative which is better for you. it's a better option. what we like about this app is that it is ever so easy, it is red or green, it tells you at the point that you're making that decision, based on your own dna, which of those choices is better or worse for you. but can you really predict that accurately which foods are good for you? we showed the app to a consultant geneticist. these apps, at this stage, are would say too early, too early to individually predict risk for a particular individual. the science behind it has been based on populations and it's difficult to move from science that's been generated in populations down to a single individual. more research needs to be done, but trials using this app are already underway with
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the nhs using pre—type 2d beauties and mental health patients.“ the nhs using pre—type 2d beauties and mental health patients. if you have a serious mental illness in this country, you are likely to die, 15 years earlier, quite often, the reasons for that premature mortality is because of cardiovascular problems, hypertension, diabetes.“ patients at risk of these chronic diseases are shown to benefit from this app now underway could see gps prescribing the technology. you could imagine a world where the gp says, why don't you where one of these? that one is fine for you but not me... another feature of the app is that families can link there dna results, i love the fact that when i go shopping i can make sure that i'm making the right choices for all three of us. so, what choices did the family make based on the app? things like pizzas and prepacked curries i can eat, whereas sam, she
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can't eat anything like that at all. going on my results, i didn't think i would be able to have time or blt, but actually, i can the important thing is, it is the nudging which comes in again, so for example with the pie that she was allowed to have, saturated fat was slightly lower than the other pie that she couldn't have. it is actuallyjust making these small changes, but you can eat the junk. as long as long as you use it with a degree of scepticism, you consider your other risk factors, i would regard it as a bit offun, risk factors, i would regard it as a bit of fun, to be honest.” risk factors, i would regard it as a bit of fun, to be honest. i can have a little bit of that but not too much... it makes you more determined because you know that actually it is your dna, it's are unique to you sample at first i thought it would just be a gimmick but every time you get a packet you're tempted to scan it with the app and see exactly what is in it. it's something that my
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generation will use especially on the go, i think it is going to motivate me more to stick to soft that's healthy. that's it for this episode of inside out. thank you for watching. after the very turbulent weather we have seen across the uk in the week just gone, finally, we have a breather ahead, much lighter winds, a much drier story, too, there positively springlike temperatures i think for the south by midweek. here
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goes the low pressure which brought the wet and windy weather on saturday, still some showers are showing up at the back of that low—pressure, which will bring a few downpours through the evening across parts of england and wales. into the small hours of monday, the skies clearing and quite frosty first thing on monday across the northern half of the uk, especially in the east. down to —a in parts of scotland. towards the west, milder, more cloud around, that's why towards the end of the night the cloud will continue to filter eastwards through monday, bringing some quite persistent rain to the hills and the coasts in the west and generally the best of the brightness in the east.
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