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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 18, 2019 10:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's monday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. gun laws in new zealand are to be tightened after last week's mosque attacks by a far right terrorist. 50 people have so far died, dozens more still in hospital, some with serious injuries. farid ahmed lost his wife in the killings. he says he forgives the gunman. we do not hate a person, but we hate if they do anything wrong. so from that perspective, i don't have any grudge against him. i have forgiven him. and i'm praying for him, that god will guide him. meanwhile, we will hear from these two experts in counter terror and community cohesion about fears that far right radicalism
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is on the rise here in the uk, and that even some primary age children are showing signs of extremism. also, three teenagers have died after a st patrick's day party in county tyrone. two were 17, the other 16. police believe they were killed in a crush just outside the front door of this hotel. this programme has found that the number of victims of modern slavery victims reported to the authorities has risen by over a third in year. we've had exclusive access to west mercia police raid into a strip club where the authorities expected to find victims of trafficking. we'll show you what happened later. and on brexit, 75 is the magic number that theresa may needs to get her deal through this week. 75 tories voted against the deal last week and she needs 75 mps to change their minds this week. we've spoken to one tory waverer,
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one who's changed his mind and one who is holding firm. you've got people saying they will hold their noses against the stench of this deal to vote against it. how can this be a path to the future of our great country? hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. in the next half hour we're going to talk about mike thalasittis, former love island contestant, former footballer who was found dead at the weekend aged just 26. the police say there are no suspicious circumstances. in the next half hour we're going to talk to a friend of his, who last spoke to mike a couple of weeks ago. one love island contestant says "contesta nts are chewed up and spat out. nothing's changed. there's zero care, and now now something terrible has happened again." we'll get reaction after the news
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with carrie gracie. three teenagers have died in what appears to have been a crush at a hotel hosting a st patrick's day party in northern ireland. police say two boys, aged 16 and 17, and a 17 year—old girl died in a major incident in the greenvale hotel in cookstown in county tyrone. a number of other teenagers have also been treated in hospital. new zealand's prime minister says her cabinet has reached a decision in principle on changing the country's gun laws. jacinda ardern pledged to reform regulations following shootings at two christchurch mosques on friday, which left 50 people dead. hundreds of students have come together to pay tribute to those who lost their lives. the number of potential trafficking and modern slavery victims reported to authorities has risen by a third in a year, according to national crime agency figures. an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme found an increase in reports
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of suspected trafficking. one organisation has told the programme the system is failing victims because of long and unecessary delays. police in surrey are continuing to question a 50—year—old man about the stabbing of a teenager in stanwell on saturday night. officers said the attack had the hallmarks of a terrorist attack inspired by the far right. the victim suffered non—fatal injuries after being struck by a man armed with a baseball bat and knife. theresa may is hoping to persuade conservative rebels and the dup to back her brexit deal before holding a third vote in the house of commons. the prime minister will only do so if she's confident of a win, but writing in the daily telegraph, the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson said it would be "absurd" to hold a vote before further negotiations with eu leaders on thursday. companies such as facebook, twitter and instagram should fund research into the impact of social media on young peoples‘ mental health, according to mps.
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the cross party group says they've been operating in a lawless online wild west and are also calling for a levy on the profits of social media firms. eurostar passengers have been told only to travel from paris to london "if absolutely necessary." services have been hit by delays with long queues due to industrial action by french customs officers. the company says tickets can be changed or refunded. the american musician, dick dale, who was known as ‘the king of the surf guitar‘, has died aged 81. his composition, misirlou, was made famous after it was featured in quentin taratino‘s film pulp fiction. he's also credited with creating a new sound with the electric guitar, influencing musicians from the beach boys tojimi hendrix.
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that is the news, back to victoria. this programme has been told that some primary school children in the uk are showing signs of extremism. it comes as new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern confirmed that her cabinet will back tighter gun control laws after friday's mass shooting at two mosques in the city of christchurch. today, vigils have been held in honour of the dead. hundreds of students from across the city gathered in a park opposite the al noor mosque where the first attack took place. the death toll has risen to 50. the youngest was just three years old. one man, farid ahmed, who lost his wife in the killings and was in the mosque at the time has says he forgives the killer. we do not hate a person, but we hate if they do anything wrong. so from that perspective, i don't have any grudge against him. i have forgiven him. and i'm praying for him,
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that god will guide him. brendan tarrant, a 28—year—old australian, was a self confessed white supremacist. he posted a document online before the attacks where he mentioned having brief contact with the far right terrorist anders breivik. he also had neo—nazi symbols on his armoured vest that he wore during both attacks. questions are now being asked aboutjust how much of a threat far right ideology is becoming, notjust in new zealand but here in the uk. in surrey, police are questioning a 50—year—old man about the stabbing of a teenager on saturday night. officers said it had the hallmarks of a terrorist attack inspired by the far right. let's talk to dame louise casey who is the former government social cohesion or integration tsar, and sara khan who leads the commission for countering extremism. welcome, thank you for coming onto the programme. tell our audience
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about the last year, you have been visiting towns and cities across the country, you have talked to so many people, inducted polling and reviewed academic work and spoken to primary school teachers who say that some of their pupils are showing signs of extremist ideology. that's right. i've spent the last year visiting 1a towns and cities across england and wales and some of the things i have heard is exactly that. teachers, youth workers and others, telling me that children as young as primary a chart sharing and spouting extreme racist, xenophobic and far right views. how young. five and six. what kind of things are being said? i don't want to go into detail but there is far right rhetoric and islamist extremist rhetoric as well, racist and xenophobic views. some of it is coming from the parents, teachers tell me. but also youth
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worker telling me about the scale of online extremist content and young people consuming that through smartphones and online. how shocked are you by the fact that there are five and six—year—olds are showing signs of this, coming from the mouths of babes? it is shocking, but i'm not too surprised. before i took oi'i i'm not too surprised. before i took on this role, i came across teachers sharing those concerns with me. this has been a growing problem over the la st has been a growing problem over the last couple of years, of rising extremes in our country. we are not just talking about primary school age kids, also men in their 405 attending far age kid5, also men in their 405 attending far right demonstrations in our country. it's across the board. louise casey, you did a big report on social cohesion for the government a couple of years ago. how do you react to what sarath has just told the audience? it doesn't
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shock me, but it is shocking. one of the things which is very difficult is that we cannot carry on like this. we can't carry on. as far as i'm concerned, we've got mainstream politicians using language like borisjohnson did politicians using language like boris johnson did last politicians using language like borisjohnson did last week about the historic child sex abuse inquiry, where he essentially used incredibly rude language on national radio, ruud is an understatement. i'm getting very tired with politicians using foul language, i have used some of their —— i have just used some foul language because i want to make a point. we have got anti—semitism not being dealt with with the labour party, and islamophobia are not being dealt with in the tory party. these are the mainstream parties and that is the mainstream parties and that is the backdrop that we have a five—year—olds growing up in environments where if it is open
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sesame for parliament to treat each other so badly, how can theyjudge five—year—old? you other so badly, how can theyjudge five—year—old ? you have other so badly, how can theyjudge five—year—old? you have to see the rise of the far right is one of the most terrifying things in post—war britain and europe, we have to see that in the light that the extreme far rightand that in the light that the extreme far right and islamic extremists feed off each other, point to each other and blame each other. unless some people in the middle back people like sara and the event programme, the teacher trying to deal with these issues, where is it going to lead? why is this happening, that is the question. there's lots of different reasons, you cannot pin it down to one issue. there is mainstream tolerance of extreme extremist idea5, social media has transformed our society, i 5ee media has transformed our society, i see how extremi5t5 u5e media has transformed our society, i see how extremi5t5 use social media to spread propaganda, disinformation
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campaigns ata to spread propaganda, disinformation campaigns at a scale we have never 5een previously. there are issues around disengaged communities being left behind, the disconnect between politicians and local authorities and ordinary people who feel their voice5 and ordinary people who feel their voices are not being heard. a whole range of different factors. that'5 why tackling this is so difficult. you cannot take a narrow len5, you have to look at this through a wide len5, from an integration and equalities perspective to grapple with this in a new and important manner. what would you say is the reason behind it? brexit has entirely and dominated the political and domestic agenda for too long. i'm crying out for whichever way it goes to be over, so we can heal the divisions within the country. out of those divisions, the rich, poor, working and not working, they kept behind who are people who are called left behind, as well as looking at
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the liberal elite in london, something has to give here. i published that report two years ago. has enough been done? not enough, there are some good officials trying to push ahead. all credit to them. if the government trying to heal britain in every single way or are we giving way to extremists? i think we giving way to extremists? i think we are giving way to extremists. you would point to money being invested in poorer and deprived communities, is that one of the issues? domestic violence is up, poverty is up, child poverty is up, these other things that sound out anybody who is running a government. knife crime is up. everything is not ok at the moment and those other things that austerity have cut too far, too much into the glue of the country that holds us together and it needs to be changed. what about your own suggestions, to try and heal this country? i'm trying to work on a
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study collecting evidence to help us understand better what extremism looks in our country right now, putting forward forward recommendations to the home secretary about what we need to do and alongside that a two—year work programme. we need to develop a whole society response to this issue, we cannot look at this through a terrorism lens solely, that will not heal this problem. we need to look at this from a range of perspectives. the government has an incredibly important rule —— role to play, so do faith leaders, teachers... internet joints. but we also need to mainstream counter extremist work. so many people who, when they are prepared to challenge extremists, to champion integration and cohesion, and the values of equality and human rights, the amount of abuse they receive for pushing back against extremism is remarkable. we don't support these
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people enough, we don't fund these people enough, we don't fund these people enough, we don't fund these people enough and they are unsung heroes in our country. thank you, no doubt we will talk again. your views are welcome, of course. still to come. as the numbers of sex trafficking and modern slavery cases increase, we speak to one victim who says she was failed by the system that was set up to help her. and labour say a whole generation of schoolchildren have been let down by because sex education guidelines haven't been updated for two decades. the party's education spokeswoman angela rayner tells us about the changes she's calling for. more details are emerging about three teenagers who died at a st patrick's day party at a hotel in county tyrone last night. our ireland correspondent chris page is there. people here in cookstown still
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trying to come to terms with the news last night, nobody expected it, particularly on a day which really should have been all about celebration. it was at a st patrick's night disco at this hotel, on the outskirts of town, the greedale, three young people lost their lives. —— the greendale. police believe there was some kind of crush as people were queueing to get into the front door of the building. let's hearfrom the assista nt building. let's hearfrom the assistant chief constable mark hamilton. at about half past nine last night, the emergency services in this area were called to the area of reports of children and young people being crushed. and also some reports that there might have been some fighting. we have responded in large numbers, over 13 police crews arrived, over 21 fire service personnel arrived, supported by ambulance colleagues. and three people were taken from the scene in critical condition. two have unfortunately died in hospital and one died at the scene.
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police are now looking in particular at the cctv footage which was captured, they believe several hundred people were queueing to get into the venue at the time. they say it was not billed as a teenagers' disco, they're trying to get to the bottom of how the crush occurred. pa rents a re bottom of how the crush occurred. parents are being encouraged to talk to their young children to get them to their young children to get them to talk to the police, anyone who took any videos or photos on their phone should not post them on social media, instead they should give them to officers. the paramedics who were here last night, doctors and police officers, have all said, no matter how much you are trained for something like this, coming across a scene as distressing as this one last night, there is a limit as to how much you can be prepared for that. there's a real sense of a sombre mood in the town today.
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shocking, thank you so much. contestants are "chewed up and spat out", there is "zero care" and "now something terrible has happened again". that's what former love island contestant has told the sun today after the death of reality television star mike thalassitis who was found dead over the weekend. he was 26 years of age, his body was discovered in woods in north london on saturday. the police say his death is not being treated as suspicous. he found fame on the 2017 series of the itv‘s love island. last year, a contestant on the 2016 series of love island, why are you here? why are you here? the same reason, we are all here to have a laugh. some people want more. everyone wants a bit more. mike is very, very, very attractive. how do you feel about someone new coming in? i really love it. you are
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coupled. this afternoon, you will be spending one—on—one time with some of the girls away from the villa. you will be leaving shortly, please ask out one girl now. last year, a contestant on the 2016 series of love island, sophie gradon, died aged 32. an inquest into her death has been postponed. former love island stars have urged the hit tv show to provide more su pport to co ntesta nts after the programme ends. fellow reality tv star megan mckenna went out with mike thalissitis last year. when she came on this programme back injuly, she told me about their relationship. he's such an amazing person. do you know what ijust love about mike? it's just the fact that, like, my world is crazy and his world is crazy but we can just come together at the end of the day, we have our little cooking nights, we like to do really chilled out things together. that's what i love about it, it's the little things that i love.
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eden blackman worked with mike thalassitis on the show celebs go dating, became friends with him and spoke to him just a couple of wks ago. good morning, thank you for talking to us. how was he when you spoke to him? he was in good form, it was a couple of weeks ago. he was looking at opportunities for his new business, maybe some tv stuff. he was going out, he seemed to be enjoying the life that reality stars have. is it true that he had moved in with his gran to look after her? yes, i understood he was being a full—time carerfor his yes, i understood he was being a full—time carer for his man who passed away last week. that is mike, the version you saw on greendale ——
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micro or macro to three is not what use saw “— micro or macro to three is not what use saw —— the version when you saw on love island was different. he was just great fun, all the girls were knocked back when he walked into a room. he was very charming. how do you react to what zara holland has said this morning, contestants are chewed up and spat out, nothing has changed, zero k and now something has happened again.|j changed, zero k and now something has happened again. i think it's a wider issue. my understanding of the ca re wider issue. my understanding of the care during, after and before these shows is that it is there. that is what itv say, they say they take the welfare of the contestants very seriously and psychological help is available. i left my programme a year ago and produces checked in with me yesterday. it depends on the company and the tea the show. it's a wider issue particularly guys, it's not impossible to say to somebody,
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i'm struggling. we have an issue with this alpha male, being tough and resilient, ithink with this alpha male, being tough and resilient, i think it's a stronger person who says to someone, i'm really, there's something going on, i'm really struggling and heading, having thoughts that aren't safe. —— i'm really struggling and hurting. the severities say -- the samaritans say there are many and complex reasons why people might ta ke complex reasons why people might take their own lives. we know that suicide is the biggest killer of young men. yes, organisations like calm, they have focused on male mental health. i said it yesterday, if we are struggling, it should be as natural to call the samaritans as it is if you have a fire in your house and do phone at 999. at least have someone house and do phone at 999. at least have someone you can house and do phone at 999. at least have someone you can talk to, a family friend, a manager, agent, former contestant. it saddens me
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that at some point over the weekend mike thought he had no one in his phone to speak to. that is the key, talk to someone, anyone. it can be very hard, though. of course, we have all been in those moments where you need to speak to someone and you go through your head, mum, dad, girlfriend, boyfriend, you think, i don't want to bother them. the one thing you would want is an individual, someone to say, can i just talk? if everyone is struggling, if you don't want to speak to friends and family, there are organisations that you can pick up are organisations that you can pick up the phone and they are there to listen. that is the whole point of their existence. thank you for coming on the programme. if you have been affected by any of these things, contact the bbc action line. 75, that's the key number for the pm this week,
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she's expected to try perhaps as early as tomorrow for a third time to get her brexit deal through parliament. remember we're just 11 days from the date when we're supposed to leave the eu. mrs may's deal was defeated in jan by 230 votes, it was defeated last week by 149. 75 conservative mps voted against mrs may's deal last week. coincidentally, 75 is also the magic number of mp5 from all sides that she needs to win over to her to get a majority in parliament. if she brings the ten northern irish mp5 from the dup on board, that will help. because if the dup do swing behind mrs may, a of lot conservatives from the pro—brexit erg group may follow them. but there are still a handful of tory mps who it's thought will hold out against the deal in all circumstances, leaving mrs may reliant on labour mp5 or mp5 from smaller parties to come over if she's going to stand a chance
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of getting her deal over the line. so who's changed their mind? who's wavering? who definitely isn't wavering? borisjohnson says he's still not going to vote for her deal. is it going to be third time lucky for mrs may? i've been speaking to three conservative mps who all have different views on the vote. thank you for talking to us. let me begin with you, you hate the deal and voted it down twice but their time of asking, you will vote for it, what has changed? parliament last week took no deal of the table which was a very important decision. i think that was a mistake, i voted against it but they have taken no deal of the table. i have been lobbied in an unprecedented way by senior members of my association in shrewsbury, counsellors, nearly every one of my councillors now wa nts every one of my councillors now wants me to back the deal. then
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local nfu and the local business chamber. the mood in my constituency is changing quickly. they voted for brexit, they worry that if the issue is protracted and there is a major extension to article 50, we could lose brexit. so she can count on you. you have voted against it twice and you hate the deal but you might vote for it this time? i haven't decided yet because we don't really know what is going to be on the table. if it is going to be on the table. if it is going to be on the table over the weekend. there is talk it could be postponed. if it is an amendable vote, we have to decide at the time, if it has been amended, whether we will vote for it or not because we do not know what the amendment might mean. sam, you are a remainer, you will vote against it a third, fourth time. certainly a third, fourth time. certainly a third time. the reason is, the deal is not in the national interest. this deal has united leavers and
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remain as against it because what it essentially does is turns ass, as a lot of into —— it turns us into a vassal state. we will be under a lot of rules. if anybody thinks that if this deal goes through at the end of march, that is brexit done, that is not true. a deal that makes us poorer and leaves is weaker in handing the negotiation whip hand to the other side is not in the national interest so i cannot vote for it. you will know that mrs may needs 75 people to switch to get the deal over the line. if the ten northern ireland dup mps come on board because of reassurances all, say, another billion pounds, how many more mp5 do think that will convert? i think the dup is critical. i attend the erg meetings
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every week... is the eurosceptic group of backbench conservative mps. yes, and many of my colleagues who are still holding out are waiting to see what the dup do before deciding how to vote. they are at the coalfa ce that how to vote. they are at the coalface that this situation, representing northern ireland seats and that's why many of my colleagues wa nt to and that's why many of my colleagues want to see what the dup say. you will wait to see what the motion is, whether it will be mended or changed or tweaked, but it has been reported as you will probably know, that around 40 conservative mps as you will probably know, that around 40 conservative mp5 on both the remain and leave side have told theresa may and her aides over the weekend that she has to publicly commit to standing down as pm to get a vote for her deal. she has to say she will clear off in april orjune. would that be enough for you to vote for her deal? not at this point in time. iagree for her deal? not at this point in time. i agree with sam, it is a very
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bad deal for the country. i'm really unhappy about it. whether she stays or goes, i knowa unhappy about it. whether she stays or goes, i know a lot of people are very unhappy at the moment, i think we need to get this deal or no deal over the line before anything can be decided. does who the prime minister is or whether mrs may publicly commits to sandown, —— stand down, does it have an impact on you? no, it does not change the dynamic of the deal. it is frustrating, people are saying, let's get a deal over the line, it doesn't matter what it is. this is the only deal which will ta ke is. this is the only deal which will take the uk out of the eu and that is what people voted for, they argue. it is the only deal that the pm has put on the table. the eu has said, they're not going to negotiate another one. they have indicated that there are other versions of brexit that they could look at. not now, not now. if we were able to extend, we could look at it. we have
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a deal that is not popular in the country. we have got a deal that has gone down to two heavy defeats. it is rammed through parliament at the la st is rammed through parliament at the last minute, everyone will have buyers remorse, people say they will hold their noses against the stench of this deal to vote against it. how can this deal be the path for the future of our great country when mp5 say that? how do you answer that? we spent the last two and a half years looking at all the alternatives, the different alternatives which have been constantly floated on the house of commons floor, the norway model, thejeremy of commons floor, the norway model, the jeremy corbyn of commons floor, the norway model, thejeremy corbyn model of of commons floor, the norway model, the jeremy corbyn model of the customs union, each time it has been proved that none of the alternatives can get through the house of commons. that's not true. we don't know if there is a majority for any of the other options. there is only ever been this option put to parliament. mr corbyn put forward his version of what sort of brexit should happen on the floor of the house last week and it was around ——
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resoundingly defeated. a motion which indicated a clear move or shadowing of the customs union. i don't see any other option getting through the house of commons. the prime minister has said, vote for this deal or there will be potentially no brexit. we have been going round the wrekin, as we go in shropshire, for the last three yea rs, shropshire, for the last three yea rs , we shropshire, for the last three years, we don't want any more uncertainty. our businesses don't wa nt uncertainty. our businesses don't want the uncertainty. they wanted to get on with it. the mood has changed, get on with it, sort out the deal and move on to the more important issue which is how we build the relationship with the european union from the point of view of defence, security and trade. mrs may says to you, vote for this deal or there is no brexit, and you vote for it, but you say hooray, no brexit, i am vote for it, but you say hooray, no brexit, iam not vote for it, but you say hooray, no brexit, i am not voting for it. that
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is not it at all. she is giving us artificial choices. vote for this deal or there is no deal and when no deal or there is no deal and when no deal is taken off the table, she says vote for this deal or there is a long extension. throughout she has tried to engineer it so that her deal is the only deal on the table, the only choice we have. it is like saying to mp5 that you have got to stay in the firing pan or go into the fire and that is an artificial choice. —— the frying pan. the fire and that is an artificial choice. -- the frying pan. and we will talk to a labour representative, angela rayner, before 11 o'clock. now this breaking news. several people have been injured ina news. several people have been injured in a shooting of the central dutch city of utrecht this morning according to police. utrecht police say a square at a tram station outside the city centre has been cordoned off as emergency services we re cordoned off as emergency services were at the scene. several people have been injured in the dutch city of utrecht, according to police. it happened this morning at a square outside a tram station just outside
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the city centre, which has been cordoned off because emergency services are at the scene. we will bring you more details on that as soon as we bring you more details on that as soon as we have them. figures from the national crime agency seen by this programme show the number of potential trafficking and modern slavery victims reported to the authorities has risen by over a third in year. by over a third in a year. but one organisation has told us the system is failing victims because of long and unnecessary delays. we've spoken to one woman who had to wait two years and six months for a decision on whether she would be classed as a victim of slavery, rather than the specified 45—day wait. our reporter claire jones got exclusive access to a raid with west mercia police where officers believed a group of women had been trafficked to the uk. the aim was to encourage these women to sign up to the system which deals with victims. let's see what happened. and just to let you know, this report contains flashing images. the intelligence that we have
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suggests that the club owners are providing sexual services at the club and using romanian females. these girls are having to give up 60% of their earnings to the club. you really might be the best thing they've seen for a long time coming through that door. it's a faulty system and there's a real chance that very vulnerable people will fall through the gaps. we've heard of people trying to commit suicide. the longer it's delayed, the more desperate a lot of people become. it's like someone stabbing in your heart slowly. since 2009 the national referral mechanism, or nrm, has been the government's system for identifying victims of modern slavery. the potential victim has to consent to be referred by an anti—slavery organisation like the salvation army, the police or a government agency,
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and then they can be assessed. it's a system that's being used up and down the country and aims to help victims of trafficking and modern slavery. on a friday night in the west midlands, we've gained exclusive access to a police raid where officers believe a group of women have been trafficked to the uk. this is a briefing and it's under the operational name of operation hansa. it's a modern slavery and drugs warrant that's going to be executed at a gentlemen's club. the intelligence says these girls are having to give up 60% of their earnings to the club. they are given cocaine so they can work through the night. and they're also branded with a tattoo of the owner's name in arabic. the police are aiming to locate the women and refer them into the national referral mechanism. once the premises are secure,
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the aim for us will be to come in and to start to build a rapport with the potential victims but they are vulnerable, they might be frightened, they might be being threatened. so if we can be as sensitive as possible in the circumstances, that would be great. we've got exclusive access to the two raids police are carrying out simultaneously, one at this club and one at the flat across the road. it's an hour into the raid. police have managed to get seven of the nine women to talk further about their situation. but two of the nine women have already decided they don't need further support. the club owners were also found during the raid and have now been arrested. so this is the flat where the police had the second warrant to search the property based on intelligence that women were also being exploited here.
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this is going to be a search and a half. officers have to bag everything that could be used for evidence. they've come across sex toys, magazines and lots of cash. this is the reception centre and inside right now support agencies are working with the women to understand more about that story, what brought them here and how they can help. food, drinks and support have been offered to the women. they've also been asked about entering the national referral mechanism. even though police had intelligence that these women had been trafficked, not one of the women say they've been exploited. we weren't able to film with women while authorities were speaking with them, so we've stepped outside. once they've left this premises, what will happen to them?
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we've made sure that none of the girls are in a situation that is dangerous for them and they understand that they've got somewhere to go if they do suffer any exploitation. police intelligence can turn out to be wrong and the women here say they're not victims but helen tells us that in some circumstances women can be hesitant to take up support. sometimes they don't see themselves as victims. they're accepting of what's happening to them. sometimes they're frightened because they are subject to threats and violence. they may be distrustful of authorities. they may be in debt bondage. so there's many reasons why victims may not come forward. and it's important that we understand and recognise that but we are always going to be there when they are ready. police say no charges have currently been made. officers say investigations are ongoing. but even when victims do decide to enter the national referral mechanism, they're still faced with problems.
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once a victim has signed the form and entered the nrm the home office and the uk human trafficking centre must decide whether to class a person a victim of slavery within 45 days. if they are found to be a victim of trafficking the home office can grant leave to remain in the country for a discretionary 12 months or longer. once a victim is in the system they can access legal advice, accommodation, protection and support. but the nrm has been criticised by charities for the long delays victims of trafficking can face. a huge problem. i think that the delay is happening largely with non european survivors and it's a period of real trauma for a lot of survivors. what we've heard are people trying to commit suicide in worst case scenarios. it is often very traumatic times and during this period or in the interim it's actually the longer it's delayed the more uncertain, the more desperate a lot of people become. as of november last year more than 2,200 victims of modern slavery have been
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awaiting a decision for at least a year with 100 victims waiting over three years. we've spoken to one woman who rather than waiting the specified 45 days had to wait more than 900 days to find out if the government recognised her as a victim of slavery. she's still scared of her traffickers so to protect her identity we've called her abigail. i was counting every day. i didn't hear anything from them. i was a bit upset and i was the depressed. i had to take sleeping tablets. it was not a good experience. abigail was brought to the uk from nigeria when she was 15 years old on the promise of going to school and living a better life. but her abusers had other ideas. i wake up in the morning around 7:00. dress the kids, get them breakfast and i drop one of them to school. so after that i'll come back
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home, tidy up the house. i need to go pick them from school. so literally i was treated like a mum but i was a teenager so i lost my teenager. eventually it was too much for abigail. her husband came to the house and he says live with me so ijust decided you know i can't take this anymore. so ijust decided to run away. abigail was arrested for walking out of a shop wearing a jacket she hadn't paid for. police called the home office and she was referred into the nrm. the number of referrals into the nrm of people like abigail has more than doubled in the past few years. i think partly the numbers have risen vastly over the last few years so i think probably the home office
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hasn't been able to catch up in terms of the number of people actually reviewing the referral forms. the home office said every year the national referral mechanism ensures victims receive specialist support. they said they are reforming the national referral mechanism and have doubled the number of caseworkers to reduce the number of people waiting for a decision. the number of victims entering the national referral mechanism has risen which should be a good thing as it should allow more victims to access the help they need. but based on what we've been told, victims of trafficking can be put off signing up to the system, and when they do agree they're a victim of trafficking there can be a long wait before the government recognises them as such. meanwhile people like abigail get more desperate as they wait to find out their fate. i think they should change the dates or the 45 days because people's hope is high when they say 45 days. i think they should change it.
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we will talk to somebody more about that film shortly but first we want to bring you more information about what is happening in utrecht. several people have been wounded in a shooting on a tram. counterterrorism police are at the scene, according to utrecht police. it isa scene, according to utrecht police. it is a shooting incident. several injured people reported. assistance has begun. it is a shooting in a tram and several helicopters have been deployed to provide help. we will keep you updated on that through the rest of the programme and on bbc news throughout the day of course. with me this morning is tamara barnett from the human trafficking foundation and emilie martin is also here from the salvation army. we can talk to them about some of theissues we can talk to them about some of the issues raised in that film about modern slavery. first of all, your reaction to the fact that all the women that were in that strip club, and the police wanted to try and help, and none of them wanted to go into the formal system to help them. how do you respond to that? i'm
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afraid that is quite typical. when you identify potential victims of trafficking, there is a lot of fear and risk to themselves, and we can't offer them very much at the moment. if you say to someone, do you want to enter the government's system of the pot, you are telling them they won't be able to work for a period of time, and a lot of these women might be in debt and they might have children at home they need to support. can they take that chance? second they might be disbursed for support. they might have a community in london, but they might be given short term support, 45 days, and then a big question is, yes, we have identified 7000 in the last year but nobody knows what happened to the victims when they exit government support. is there no work going on to monitor them and see what happens? we have no idea what has happened to these women when they enter the government's support system. yes, they can be guaranteed short—term support but long term nothing can be guaranteed and they might end up being destitute or
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worse. as tamara said, there is no statutory provision for people who exit our service, unfortunately, the salvation army and a number of our subcontractors and partners have developed their own services and systems whereby individuals who are identified as positive victims of modern slavery will have that support within the community to integrate, or if they want to return home, that will be provided. with regards to the concerns about individuals coming into the nrm, it is one of those situations where you have a situation of a raid, it can be very stressful and given what traffickers have fed the victims, police arrive and they are in fear of being deported or removed. we are very welcoming of the statutory changes where there will be a three—day safe place so that individuals can come into a safe place and have three days to really think about coming into the service and what that means. so they don't feel put on the spot than a police
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officer who is trying to help says we are here to help and they say what you mean? there is no problem. because that is what the traffickers have told them to say. that is right. the benefit of a reflection period so they can have some space to understand what has happened and also to make an informed decision about what they want in their future. this is the beginning of their future lives. well, potentially. or not. because after 45 days, that is it, zero support. that is a misconception. it is a minimum of 45 days. although the convention clearly indicates 30 days and the government has ratified 45 days, the salvation army and our partners will support victims until a decision is made, so we will always engage with victims who come into the service and we will say it isa minimum into the service and we will say it is a minimum of 40 —— 45 days and we will support you throughout that. we
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had about abigail waiting 900 days. what impact does that have on anybody? it is called a reflection period but it is not that because their lives are in limbo and they can't earn any money and they might be dispersed from the communities they know, and they have no idea what the long—term future looks like. most victims who leave the support system are not from the uk and many of them will be potentially departed at the end of that, which can be terrifying if the reason they ended up in the uk is because there we re ended up in the uk is because there were traffic from that country. sorry to interrupt. if you could change one thing about the system right now, and you could do that today, what would it be? that it is a need the system supports individual until the support not needed. —— that it is needs led. some people might need 45 days and others might need three years.|j agree. it needs to be a people
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centred and the individual needs to be at the heart. the individuals getting our support will get that kind of assistance but it can't be one size fits all. they need to be led by the needs of that individual. thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you for your time. the shadow education secretary angela rayner has exclusively told this programme that she believes a whole generation of kids have been let down by sex and relationship education because guidelines haven't been updated since the advent of smartphones. on wednesday proposed new relationship and sex education guidelines will be debated in parliament. if they are passed then they will become compulsory in all secondary schools in england from september 2020. the proposals keep the parental right of withdrawing their child from sex education, but also have new rights for children to opt—in
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as they approach 16. let's talk to angela rayner. good morning. thank you for coming on the programme. why do you say festival that a whole generation of kids have been let down by sex education? the sex and relationship education? the sex and relationship education has not been updated for nearly two decades and since then we have had the equalities act. family life as we know it is changing and our society is and we should welcome those changes and build resilience infor our those changes and build resilience inforouryoung those changes and build resilience in for our young people. over half of young people who have acquired a mental health problem by the age of 14, which is devastating. stonewall says that half of lgbt young people face bullying in school. we have a duty and obligation to make sure we uphold the laws of the land and also teach our children about love, respect and tolerance and being happy and healthy and resilient. respect and tolerance and being happy and healthy and resilientm terms of love, respect and tolerance, you will know what is happening in birmingham right now at one particular school. they
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protesting at one primary school, where up to 600 children stopped going to lessons where lgbtq plus inclusive sex education is taught, and we met with two mps inclusive sex education is taught, and we met with two mp5 on friday with parents in that constituency involved in those protests. how will you convince those parents? we have to make it clear that you can't opt out of equalities legislation and lg bt out of equalities legislation and lgbt is one of those protected characteristics. we have got to take pa rents characteristics. we have got to take parents with us. making sure that resources a re parents with us. making sure that resources are there for teachers, support for teachers and working with parents, and most parents would agree that we need to make sure that our young people are resilient and understand different cultures and faiths, different orientations, disability, and awareness is of different people around them. we can celebrate those differences. those pa rents were celebrate those differences. those parents were not interested in that. they did not want their kids and those lessons. i do not believe the
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pa rents were those lessons. i do not believe the parents were not interested. the frustration is making sure that pa rents a re frustration is making sure that parents are taken with us. so they don't believe some of the about what this is. sex in primary schools? that is not the case. it is about relationships and tolerance and most pa rents relationships and tolerance and most parents will be with us on that. we cannot have it where young people feel they are not accepted. a lot of your programme today has been about mental health had people feeling not good enough. i want our young people to feel celebrated, welcomed, part ofa to feel celebrated, welcomed, part of a community, and all young people should feel that and this is what relationship education is about in our schools. that is why it is important for it to be compulsory and that we take parents with us. presumably you believe social media and the pressures of social media influencing young people should be pa rt influencing young people should be part of the compulsory sex education lessons ? part of the compulsory sex education lessons? absolutely. social media is a big issue. we have had the report out today from the all—party group on social media and they have got to do more about resilience for our young people. what about parents?
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pa rents try young people. what about parents? parents try as well but if it has not got a filter on these days, people think that is the way that people think that is the way that people look in real life and that is not the case. we have got to get social media companies to do their fairshare in social media companies to do their fair share in resilience for young people. there are so many things online that can do our young people harm. we have got to wake up to that and social media companies have the responsibility for that, as well as pa rents responsibility for that, as well as parents and politicians. you said as pa rt parents and politicians. you said as part of these reforms, labour would like to see an on—site counsel at every secondary school, a bit like guidance counsellors and —— in america. how would you find that? we would put extra money in the court school budget. we think it is crucial that we have counsellors in every secondary school and that the funding should be there for our schools at the moment. the incidents in birmingham at the moment, most schools are facing significant cuts, over 8% since 2010, and teachers are
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being made redundant. we have got to give them the skills and the money and resources to do theirjob effectively and we don't have that at the moment. we have reports of headteachers cleaning the toilets because they don't have support staff. 6 million for a support package to cover training and resources when it comes to sex education. we are rolling out significant additional resources to schools to improve mental health education. at an earlier stage, through the green paper process, teams of trained mental health staff to work with and in schools and colleges. you must work on that? from 2020 will not help birmingham and the pupils today and the 8% real terms cuts since 2010 will not help our schools at the moment. they need to put those resources are now and support teachers in delivering the curriculum which we set is compulsory and is law, so we need to make sure that schools have got that funding. a quick final question about brexit. is this the week when
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labour back a further public vote? who knows what will happen this week? what is labour going to do. i can't predict what will happen. we wa nt to can't predict what will happen. we want to avoid an od or brexit and i think the whole of parliament has said that. —— avoid no—deal brexit. we wa nt said that. —— avoid no—deal brexit. we want to respect the referendum and we want a deal. theresa may has got to climb down from her red lines and work with the whole of parliament. and if that doesn't happen, will you back butting theresa may's deal to a public vote in what is known as a confirmation referendum with mrs may's deal and remain on the ballot paper? jeremy corbyn has been in discussion with parliamentarians, the people who put down the wilson and kyle amendments down. i don't know what the whip arrangement would beat. things are changing so rapidly. we want to find a deal and changing so rapidly. we want to find a dealandi changing so rapidly. we want to find a deal and i am hopeful that we can but theresa may has got to work across the house. she is not trying to bring anyone to get at the moment
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and that is really frustrating. you said a few days ago that having a second referendum would be disastrous. that was your word. so ifjeremy corbyn does go for that confirmation recommend and he instructed mps like yourself to vote in favour of it, but you defend it? ! confirmation referendum. who knows what the question would be on the ballot paper? we have got to concentrate on getting a deal and we have to respect the result of the referendum and bring the country together. we have been talking about theissues together. we have been talking about the issues that we face in our schools and public services and i wa nt to schools and public services and i want to get onto those issues again. people are sick to death about hearing of delays and stalling. you are saying you could negotiate a whole new deal and that is fantasy politics. we have spoken to the european union and we think we could get a customs union and a deal across the house of commons. not swiftly. i think we can. how long would it take. how long would it
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ta ke would it take. how long would it take you ? would it take. how long would it take you? we are in the situation of running down the clock because theresa may has not moved on her red lines. isn't labour running down the clock? this is notjust labour, this her own mps that is not even bringing together, and you can't even bring her own cabinet together. my even bring her own cabinet together. my confidence in her ability to do thatis my confidence in her ability to do that is waning because she is not working with us. it is frustrating asa working with us. it is frustrating as a member of parliament who wants to respect the results of the referendum. she should be reaching out and working with us on that. thank you for coming on the programme, angela rayner, shadow education secretary. we will bring you the latest on that shooting on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. anna holligan is in the hague. what can you tell the audience? still limited information coming from police in utrecht the moment. as we understand it, the shooting happened on board a tram at 10:45am local time, 9:45am gmt. a number of people
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have been injured and a number of trauma helicopters have been sent to the scene which has obviously been cordoned off and police are urging people not to go down there to allow them to get on with their work. an counterterrorism police are there as well? we are seeing reports that there are counterterrorism police deployed, indeed. police say they have confirmed that a number of people have been injured and the surrounding area has been cordoned off. there are reports that there are anti—terror police at the scene and there are pictures on social media. they just show the tram stationery. and our understanding at the moment is that the gunman or gunman has not yet been apprehended. thank you. anna holligan reporting from the hague. the latest from writers is that several people have been injured in that shooting which
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took place in a tram in the central city of utrecht. —— reuters. no details at the moment and we cannot say how bad the entries are. police say how bad the entries are. police say several shots were fired inside the tram and several people have been injured. helicopters are at the scene. no arrests have yet to be made. more on bbc news throughout the day. thank you for your company. we are back tomorrow at ten o'clock. have a good day. good morning. we have an east — west split across the uk at the moment. across many western areas it is quite cloudy with outbreaks of rain but in the east, still some sunshine. that is in lincolnshire at
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the moment. we continue to see sunny spells across eastern england and the east of scotland this afternoon, and we could catch the odd shower here, but further west to cloud and outbreaks of showery rain in western scotland, northern ireland, england and wales. temperatures nine to 11 degrees today. overnight the cloud moves further east with clear spells across the east, making it quite chilly, with temperatures down to two or three. elsewhere for most of us two or three. elsewhere for most of us with the cloud around, not as cold as last night, with temperatures typically four to 7 degrees. it will remain quite cloudy over the next few days with largely dry weather, but temperatures starting to rise, so by wednesday in the capital they will be up to 17 degrees.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live ? it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. police confirm three teenagers have died following a crush at a st patrick's day party in county tyrone. it appears at the minute to be a crush, people have fallen and been fatally injured. police say ‘multiple' people have been injured in a shooting on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht . the gunman is still on the loose. new zealand's prime minister says her government will move quickly to toughen the country's gun laws following the deadly attack on mosques in christchurch. theresa may will make fresh attempts to win over conservative and dup mps to her brexit deal — jeremy hunt says the government hopes a vote
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will take place tomorrow. we

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