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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 18, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. 11 days to go to brexit and britain this is bbc news. is plunged into a constitutional i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 8pm... crisis as the speaker of the house the speaker of the house of commons of commons tells theresa may she can't hold another vote on her deal. says the prime minister cannot ask mps to vote on her brexit deal again, unless there are substantial changes to it. what the government cannot legitimately do is to resubmit to what the government cannot the house the same proposition, or substantially the same proposition, legitimately do is to resubmit to as that of last week the house the same proposition, or which was rejected by 149 votes. dutch police arrest a gunman substantially the same proposition, who opened fire on a tram as that of last week which was in utrecht, killing three people and injuring five others. rejected by 149 votes. we're live at the scene. in new zealand tighter gun laws get police in the netherlands say they've arrested a man, government backing after last week's after three people were shot dead on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. new zealand's prime minister says she'll announce new gun laws within days, following the attacks on two mosques in which 50 people died.
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also coming up, mozambique‘s president says he fears up to a thousand people may have been killed by a cyclone. the city of beira has been devastated by flooding and high winds, which destroyed homes and ripped roofs from concrete buildings. and crowds gather on the streets of cardiff, to celebrate the wales team's grand slam victory at the weekend. withjust11 days until the uk is due to leave the european union, the brexit process has been thrown into confusion and disarray after the prime minister was told she can't now bring her brexit deal back before mps for a third vote — unless there've been
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substantial changes to it. in a twist that took downing street by surprise, the speaker of the house of commons, john bercow, said he was following parliamentary rules which date back centuries. our political editor laura kunessberg reports. time isn't healing, it is hurting. every day, it seems theresa may's task gets harder and harder. arriving at the back gates of number 10 today, she planned to have another go at getting her deal through, not knowing what the speaker had up the sleeves of his black gown. order. i wish to make a statement to the house. john bercow has the ultimate power in parliament and, as it stands, he says the government cannot try again. what the government cannot legitimately do is to resubmit to the house the same proposition, or substantially the same proposition, as that of last week,
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which was rejected by 149 votes. in other words, the government should forget it, he says, if they think they can just keep asking mps to vote again and again on the brexit deal because it has been lost twice before. order. point of order. point of order! yes, indeed. point of order? you can hear the surprise at his ruling and see government front benchers jumping up to try to push back. we're in a major constitutional crisis here, a political crisis that we want to try to solve for the country. the prime minister's doing everything she can to try to break that impasse. the chair‘s ruling is the chair‘s ruling and it is binding. but i simply ask the question, what can parliament now do to help end the uncertainty? the speaker's many detractors suggest he's using his power far too aggressively... march on our way. ..stopping parliament having another say on brexit.
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but his fans would argue he is doing exactly the right thing. strangely, the move has united some leavers and remainers who both want to stop the prime minister's deal. what was the point in having yet another week ploughing away on an agreement that it was not going to get through? it's the week of the council, so she can go to the council and open up some new, exciting ground. we know all these european deals, they always happen after the last minute, with 11 days to go, something really interesting could come out of this. it's clear she can'tjust keep flogging the same dead horse now, can she, and she's been doing that for ages. so let's get on a different horse. there is anger, though, too. i think that what will happen, now is, thanks to this afternoon's announcement, brexit will not occur, and the people of britain, both those who voted to leave, but also the remainers who'd like see democracy done, they will be absolutely furious that their views have not been allowed to be heard in the house of commons. those holed up in number 10, still trying to get their deal over the line, had no idea
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this was coming. the mood's turned sour. for me, treating colleagues with courtesy and respect is at the forefront of that reform. any speaker's counsel would have to have that at its heart. and i simply would not be confident that that would be the case. well, so be it. i treat the house with respect. respect? there's not much of that around. a cabinet minister told me the government willjust have to find a way around the decision. but none of this has been done before. there's no map, no easy route out. well this evening — it's been confirmed that the prime minister will write to the european council president donald tusk in the coming days seeking an extension of article 50. this was how the details were announced by the brexit minister, kwasi kwarteng, in the commons. the government will now seek to agree an extension with the european union. the extension process has
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been set out in a government paper published last thursday. while article 50 does not set out how either party should request an extension, the government believes it would be appropriate for the prime minister to write to the president of the european council. mr speaker, it is highly likely and expected that the european council will require a clear purpose for any extension, not least to determine its length. i'm the european council has to improve an extension by unanimity. with this in mind we will look to request any extension in advance of the march european council. it is the government's expectation that the european council will decide whether to agree any uk request at this meeting. as $0011 any uk request at this meeting. as 50011 as any uk request at this meeting. as soon as possible following agreement of the eu level, we will bring forward the necessary domestic
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legislation to amend the definition of exit today. live to westminster — and our political correspondent alex forsyth. extraordinary events with this intervention, this surprising intervention, this surprising intervention from the speaker which seemed to take the government by surprise, and we've heard from number ten within the last five minutes, what's been said?|j number ten within the last five minutes, what's been said? i would doa minutes, what's been said? i would do a briefing shortly afterjohn bercow made his statement with the prime minister's official spokesman and at that point all he could see was because they had been given no notice of whatjohn bercow was going to say or even the fact he was going to say or even the fact he was going to make a statement, that he did not have a response for us. but in the last few minutes one has come out, it merely says, the number ten spokesman says they note the decision byjohn bercow and this is something which requires proper consideration. it seems they will not be bounced into a quick reaction on this. john bercow is well within
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his rights to make the statement he did, he is relying on parliamentary precedent which goes back hundreds of years to do so. what he said it does not necessarily rule out the option of another go at the prime minister's brexit deal but it makes it much harder and much less likely u nless it much harder and much less likely unless there are significant changes. that's the question, what constitutes a significant change? that is the big question and one we are not that is the big question and one we a re not really that is the big question and one we are not really clear on. all the signals from this fairly prolonged session betweenjohn bercow and some mps who are trying to get to the bottom of what this might mean in practice, it seems to be thatjohn bercow would require some part of the brexit deal to be renegotiated, altered from what she's put forward and what has been rejected twice. number ten has said they were not seeking expansion changes and that is what theresa may had hoped to do was bring the deal back pretty
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quickly, hoping she might be able to persuade mps on a third go to support it rather than face a long delay to brexit. that's now been made much harder which is what you have heard from the government that they are going to be writing to the eu tomorrow to request an extension to the whole process. she will then go and meet eu leaders in brussels at the european council meeting on thursday where that will be discussed further. the big question of course, how long any extension might be and whether the eu in fact agrees. we will leave it there, thank you. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:40 and 11.30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are the former trade minister lord digbyjones and dawn foster who's a columnist at the guardian. new zealand's prime minister says she will announce detailed reforms
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to the country's gun laws within days after friday's attack on two mosques which left 50 people dead. police say the killer brenton tarrant used military—style assault weapons which had been modified to make them more deadly, which is not illegal under current legislation. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith reports hosne, shot while saving her disabled husband. mucad, a three—year—old remembered for his smile. and sayyad, a high school student at the mosque with his mother and friends. it's the stories of the victims, and not the gunman, that new zealand wants the world to hear, as it faces the question of whether they were failed. abdigani would have been at the mosque if he hadn't overslept. but his housemate, mohammed, was there, one of 20 friends he lost as the gunman kept on shooting. women and children have died, you know? a very cowardly act, i would say. we're coping the best we can. he's not succeeded. if anything, this will bring
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us a lot more closer, and we still have our faith, which he can never take away from us. within hours of friday's terror attack, new zealand's government pledged to reform gun controls. the suspect, brenton tarrant, had five weapons, two of them semiautomatics. after the 1996 port arthur massacre, australia banned semiautomatic weapons and held a national amnesty. new zealand may now follow. the prime minister says measures have been agreed in principle. when australia found itself tragically in a similar position to what we find ourselves now, they took 12 days to make their decision. we have taken 72 hours. there is still some detail that needs to be worked through. i want to do that, but still move as quickly as we can. just as in australia, just as in america, it's taken a terrifying, violent act to provoke a debate on new zealand's gun laws.
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but, just as in those of the countries, there is a powerful gun lobby here, likely to resist change. the christchurch gunman bought four firearms online within four months, from this company. its store in the city remains open, and its owner defiant. he was a new purchaser, with a brand—new licence. it was an ordinary sale. and while he was keen to go before the cameras, he wouldn't answer our questions on restricting gun sales. i totally agree there should be a gun debate. but today is not the day. please respect me on this. i am going to leave if these are the only questions you have. on wednesday, a mass funeral will take place for many of the victims. families have been desperate to arrange burials in line with islamic custom. the need to honour the dead, to cherish their memory,
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is what now sustains this place. hywel griffith, bbc news, christchurch. let's cross to our correspondent sharanjit leyl who's in christchurch. the new zealand prime minister has promised gun laws will be strengthened, but it would seem that thatis strengthened, but it would seem that that is easier said than done, why is that? indeed, as you head in the report, she is calling for those gun laws to change. she met with cabinet yesterday and they have agreed in principle for these gun laws to change but we know that actually the killer used a military assault weapons that were modified which isn't actually against the law here. you had a standard firearms licence, he was entitled to own those weapons. the reason guns are used quite widely in new zealand is for
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agricultural purposes. it's a huge economy that relies on farms which uses guns to keep pests down and control pests. that's the reason people feel they are entitled to have guns here in new zealand but again, it's never been used in this way before. the prime minister was joined by her deputy who in the past has actually opposed changing gun legislation but even he acknowledged that as of 1pm on friday, new zealand's world had changed forever and so with the laws. we can see the massive floral tributes behind you and as was said in the report, there isa and as was said in the report, there is a major, mass funeral planned for tomorrow. any more details about that? that's right. the prime minister and her government and the various organisations have been in a
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real hurry to try and get this, to get the families and loved ones to be able to move on and is in islamic tradition it's impenitent that these bodies are buried as soon as possible and the coroner is keen to assure the bodies were identified, that was the crucial thing, that they were identified and given back to the right families so they could have a dignified and spiritual burial. this was as fast as it could happen, mid week was when we are expecting these burials to take place. so that finally families can achieve some element of closure. the headlines on bbc news... the speaker of the house of commons says the prime minister cannot ask mps to vote on her brexit deal again, unless there are
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substantial changes to it. police in the netherlands say they've arrested a man, after three people were shot dead on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. new zealand's prime minister says she'll announce new gun laws within days, following the attacks on two mosques in which 50 people died. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly, huge celebrations in cardiff tonight where hundreds of rugby fans turned out tojoined where hundreds of rugby fans turned out to joined the wales national side and celebrate winning the grand slam, a very public reception was held as the squad were welcomed home following their record 14th win in a row. that was over ireland at the weekend, saw them claim the six nations title. it was a third grand slam for warren gatland who played down his importance to their
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success. it's not about me, it's about the players. the brilliant backroom team of the coaches and management and strengthen conditioners and medical staff. having the people around you makes a difference and we've got a group of players who will run through a brick wall for you and these guys did that in this campaign, the train they trained their buts off and really worked hard and thoroughly deserve what happened. he is yet to play for england under 21's but chelsea midfielder alan hudson dolly has been promoted to the full england squad ahead of the qualifiers next week. he has mainly been used in cup competitions for chelsea but joins james ward prowse as a late inclusion to gareth southgate's squad. he said he thought his manager wasjoking when squad. he said he thought his manager was joking when he told squad. he said he thought his manager wasjoking when he told him and manchester united defender luke shaw has withdrawn from the squad through injury. chelsea have confirmed he was the subject of racial abuse in their europa league
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tie with dynamo kiev last week. it happened in the final moments of their second leg, a match they won 5-0. their second leg, a match they won 5—0. having reported the incident to u efa 5—0. having reported the incident to uefa the club say they are expecting the governing body to conduct a full investigation. scotland captain andy robertson is still hoping to be fit for their euro 2020 qualifier against kazakhstan on thursday even though he missed a flight to undergo dental surgery. apparently he wanted to fly today but the operation prevented him from doing that. he was likely to be fit for san marino on sunday, but he is now being more ambitious. assistant manager peter grant says the team will miss him if he cannot recover in time. big blow. we are prepared for it before the game on sunday, we knew he was struggling but wanted to play. the way he is he still desperate to play and trying to get himself back out here as well and that's the way he is. that's why he is the captain. it's a blow for us because he's a
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fantastic player but we've always said because we always spoke about kieran tierney and andy robertson, who will play where, and i said the beauty is we've got to make fantastic players and you will never have everybody fit. saw fantastic players and you will never have everybody fit. sanim ratcliffe is expected to step in to secure the future of team sky which has enjoyed tremendous success since launching nine years ago, ever since the broadcaster announced it would be withdrawing its backing from the british cycling team at the end of the season there have been seeking a new principal partner. it expected the team will be renamed after the company owned by ratcliffe. in the meantime team sky are competing, one of the early—season stage races in italy. but it's a briton on a different team, adam yates, who continues to lead the way. the sixth stage was one for the sprinters. yates finished in the main bunch to preserve his 25 second lead ahead of
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the final time trial tomorrow. england's women have won their one—day series with sri lanka after victory in the second match to take an unassailable 2— 08. sri lanka made the final match takes place on thursday before 32020 internationals. that all the sport for now, more on sportsday at half past ten. police in the netherlands say they've arrested a man after three people were shot dead on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. five others were hurt when a man opened fire, not far from the city centre this morning.
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it sparked a man hunt as police tried to find the gunman — who has been indentified as gerkman tanis — a 37—year—old man of turkish origin. in the last hour, turkey's president erdogan said his country's security services were investigating whether today's incident was terror—related. damian grammaticas reports. sirens. late morning, a tramline at a standstill and dutch medics scrambling. the reports were of multiple casualties. armed police units responded fast, too. they moved in as well, hunting at least one attacker who it was thought was still nearby. dan molinar was in the tram. he says all of a sudden, the shooter came running, waving a pistol in the air. ithought, "i have to get out of here."
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what eyewitnesses said was that this morning on the tram, a man pulled a gun and began shooting. there was panic as people tried to escape the scene and, within minutes, police and ambulances were here but it is thought that he fled around the corner and now police have a house surrounded in one of the adjacent streets. erwen van der linden was just getting ready to catch the tram himself when it all happened. i heard a lot of screaming, i heard a lot of honks from the cars then, all of a sudden, sirens and hell broke loose. it was chaos. soon, several city blocks in utrecht had been sealed and police issued this picture, of the suspected attacker, gokmen tanis, 37 years old and originally from turkey. anti—terror teams thought it might have led just a few hundred yards around the corner. as they tried to track him, they ordered people in the area to stay indoors. 0ffices, schools and universities all in lockdown. "this has been a jolt for our country," the dutch prime minister mark rutte said, adding,
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"we are horrified and in disbelief". and late in the afternoon, the suspect gokmen tanis was detained. the police siege at an end but the sense of shock here still deep. damian grammaticus, bbc news, utrecht. you saw the dutch prime minister in that report, within the last couple of hours he's given a further update on the investigation. translation: what is clear now is that there were shots fired on a passengers in a tram in utrecht. there are injured and possibly fatalities. a terrorist motive cannot be ruled out. initial reports gave rise to a mixture of disbelief and horror. violence has hit innocent people. our thoughts are with them and their relatives whose lives today have been turned on their heads. beatrice de graaf is a security expert, and professor on the history of international relations at utrecht university. shejoins me now via webcam.
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good evening to you. the authorities have not explicitly stated that this incident was terror —related, terrorism of course is not unknown in holland. but what about in utrecht? yes, historically speaking there have been terrorist incidents in utrecht before. a long time ago during the times of the 70s and 60s when there were revolutionary activists, the reed army faction here and also the last wave of terrorism, jihadist terrorism, there has been amongst 20, 22 youngsters from utrecht who have been radicalised here and gone off to join the caliphate ofth. so that's been experienced but i've never experienced anything like this before. it would appear this man was acting alone, does that surprise you? we do not know for sure, police
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have also arrested another man, perhaps a relative of hers. and the mayor of utrecht earlier today spoke of the terrorist incident and said with this attack, it's quite a strange, obviously a very nasty attack. it might be a mixture of personal motives, of trauma, perhaps even related to revenge, but also jihadist urges have not been ruled out and the letter has been found that the perpetrator allegedly has written to his father in which he states that he does it for his religion. but the letter still has to be released by authorities. that is very interesting. speaking more broadly can you give us a sense of how many terror plots might have been foiled by the dutch security services in recent months? yes, over
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the last couple of months, the last year, major plots have been foiled. seven people who were preparing a large—scale attack and they were apprehended in time because the police have been able to infiltrate the network. this was a network of former terrorists who had been released and the authorities thought may have been integrated into society but were not, he was apprehended in time. there was attack a couple of months ago with a right—wing extremist background come on older man who tried to develop a ploy to kill left—wing politicians. and a year ago, four men had been convicted, a bit longer ago, four mac men were convicted for an attack against a mosque, the attack was carried out but there were no lethal
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consequences under mac. all in all it's not been quiet but an attack like this, it's the first time it's been put into effect. do these plots, in your view, been put into effect. do these plots, in yourview, represent been put into effect. do these plots, in your view, represent a in holland over recent years perhaps? welder has been away of radicalisation is and also increase in monitoring and surveillance from 2013 onwards, the heyday of the caliphate. it's now said that youngsters left in groups, it's not been happening to this extent for the last few years. the caliphate is no longer there any more, terrorist groups still exist and there are still people who are attracted to them so that type of radicalisation is still there. but it's not that
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dynamic as it has been between 2013 - 2016, 17. the dynamic as it has been between 2013 — 2016, 17. the latest threat report published by the dutch general intelligence and security service, the services have warned of a rise in right—wing activism, not terrorism, yet, but they have one is on the rise. we must leave it there, professor, good to get your insights, many thanks. thank you. mps will not be able to vote for a third time on theresa may's brexit deal unless there are significant changes. the announcement has been made by the speaker of the house of commonsjohn made by the speaker of the house of commons john bercow. let's take you over to westminster where we can speak to conservative mp sir bill cash, who is a member of the european scrutinity committee — a cross—party group of mps appointed to scrutinise the government on eu affairs.
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thank you so much forjoining us, is the speaker in your view right to rule in this way and because what the solicitor general has described asa the solicitor general has described as a constitutional crisis? he's thrown a massive spanner in the works. i think he is right and i said so, i am the chairman of the european scrutiny committee and have been honoured for 34 years. it's like a treadmill, they keep bringing things back and back and back, meaningful vote after meaningful vote and the reality is there are no changes. no changes in the backstop. i think people watching this programme need to take into account that under this withdrawal agreement we are going to be subjugated to the rules that would be imposed upon us by 27 other member states and they will cover the whole range of eu law and treaties including things like
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tax, defence, state aid, competitiveness and the european union has no interest in passing those laws to suit us. they will suit them selves and we will be at the mercy of our competitors. this isa the mercy of our competitors. this is a truly horrendous agreement and i don't think enough has been made of how really bad it is in the interests not only of the businesses of this country but also the workers and the businesses themselves, it's totally undemocratic. by the way, the european union has got to consider this weekend whether it's going to give an extension or not andi going to give an extension or not and i understand from one of the chairman of the european affairs constitutional committee that italy is very likely to decide not to give an extension, and the convener for
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the european parliament has so very much the same. they want to know what the purpose of this extension of time would be and just one last thing on that, the law of the land is quite clearly, as set out in the withdrawal act, that we leave the european union on the 29th of march 2019. that's an act of parliament. all these shenanigans which are going on and the attempt to extend it are going on and the attempt to extend itare simply going on and the attempt to extend it are simply an attempt to reverse ina it are simply an attempt to reverse in a very, very undemocratic way, the whole of this agreement. it's a com plete the whole of this agreement. it's a complete disgrace. quite clearly you are no fan of theresa may's deal. john barco says that for it to come back to their house of commons there needs to be substantial changes. that is not
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just changes to their wording, changes to the deal. how can that happen when the eu has said that their withdrawal agreement is closed? that is the point. we have reached the end of the line. we have only got a few days to go before the law of the land clocks in, which is the 29th of march. quite frankly, as far as the 29th of march. quite frankly, as farasi the 29th of march. quite frankly, as faras i am the 29th of march. quite frankly, as far as i am concerned, not only is ita far as i am concerned, not only is it a terrible agreement,, there is even talk of bringing the parliamentary session to an end. i do not know what they think they are doing with that. but the clock is ticking, and as far as i am concerned this is a great opportunity because remember what this was all about, we had a referendum vote, it was a significant spin on —— significant majority in favour of leaving, the act of parliament influencing that
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leaving say is we leave on 29th of march this year. parliament has voted overwhelmingly not to let no deal happen. we have had plenty of people in the business community saying no deal would be disastrous for the economy. aren't you concerned in any way to be just not ready for no deal? we have enormous opportunities outside the rest of the world. 90% of future growth in the world. 90% of future growth in the world. 90% of future growth in the world will come from the eu. the eu is undemocratic. youth unemployment is running at 40, 50% in some countries. people all over europe are voting with their feet against the institutions in the european union. it is dominated by germany. they brought in the fiscal compact. that is what is causing a lot of trouble in many countries because it is a deliberate, determined attempt to try to create austerity, as a result of which you have got riots in france, really
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massive objections in poland, hungary, sweden, austria, greece, all of europe itself. frankly, this agreement is neither good for the united kingdom, and the way the eu is going, with the central bank actually accepting the fact they are in stagnation, shows that the eu does not work properly, and the british people quite rightly decided to leave the european union. we should get on with it. as far as this present situation is concerned, if there is not another vote, and it looks as if there might not be, then, unless there are very substantial changes as you pointed out, the reality is that there will be no bill to follow it, because i do not see how you could have a bill to enact a treaty that does not exist. to these at me hasn't even signed that treaty yet. the clock is
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ticking towards the decision that was taken in their withdrawal act of 26th ofjune, to leave on 29th of march 2019. the british people, judging from what i am hearing from all over the country, even remainers are now saying they want to get on with it. the reality is that this is the law of the land and we got to respect not only devote itself. a lot of those in that you referred to, remainers, people who are trying to, remainers, people who are trying to undermine the vote of the british people, art themselves intrinsically behaving in an undemocratic manner, and in addition to that, they are even reversing their own votes that they took only a few months ago, saying that they would. for example, some conservative colleagues of mine actually voted for their withdrawal actually voted for their withdrawal act itself. they voted for the notification of withdrawal act by
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499-120, they notification of withdrawal act by 499—120, they voted for the referendum itself. there is no justification in trying to rejoin a com pletely justification in trying to rejoin a completely dysfunctional european union which simply doesn't work eitherfor us orfor the union which simply doesn't work either for us or for the other member states. we must leave it there. thank you for joining we must leave it there. thank you forjoining us tonight. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. 0ur weather is a little quieter this week. predominantly dry. through the night some clearer skies across sheltered eastern areas. here temperatures into low single figures. cloud is thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle across western coastal parts. we keep that cloud for much of the day. there will be some breaks from time to time and some glimpses of sunshine. and with a lighter breeze than we have seen of late. some drizzle to the west. by the end of the
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afternoon more persistent rain pushing into the far north of scotland. by the end of the day in the far north we could see gusts of winds in excess of 40 mph. temperatures through the afternoon, feeling pleasant, particularly in brea ks feeling pleasant, particularly in breaks of sunshine. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the speaker of the house of commons says the prime minister cannot ask mps to vote on her brexit deal again — unless there are substantial changes to it. what the government cannot legitimately do is to resubmit to their house the same proposition, or substantially the same proposition, as that of last week, which was rejected by 149 votes.
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police in the netherlands say they've arrested a man, after three people were shot dead on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. new zealand's prime minister says she'll announce new gun laws within days — following the attacks on two mosques in which 50 people died. police in northern ireland are investigating the deaths of three teenagers at a st patrick day's party last night. a 17—year—old girl and two boys aged 16 and 17 are thought to have been crushed in a large crowd at the entrance of the hotel in cookstown in country tyrone. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy has the latest. this was the scene outside the hotel's nightclub as the crowd waited to get in. people began to scream that they couldn't breathe. there was confusion and disbelief as one teenager died at the scene and two died later in hospital. terrible. terrible, just chaos.
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young ones, hysterical. a 17—year—old girl who was killed has been named as lauren bullock. her school described her as a shining light. we're deeply saddened at the tragic death of lauren, our year 13 student. she was a beautiful girl, a young person with much talent and much capability. one of the two boys who died has been named locally as connor currie. today, local youth clubs offered young people support. 17—year—old kyra says she watched as people tried to resuscitate her friend on the floor. i just was with my friends and ijust started crying, just having to see everybody there depressed and having to see him laying on the ground and that. why do you think it became such a crush? i don't know, i think everybodyjust wanted to get inside and drink, it is what everybody wants to do. police have appealed for people not to post pictures
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of the incident on social media, but to get in touch to help piece together what happened. there was a crush towards the front door and in that crush, people seem to have fallen. we are examining now to see if the people who had fallen are the deceased. there was a little bit of struggling going on to get people up off the ground and that might explain also why there was a report of some fighting. emergency services have described what happened here is a truly appalling incident and, today, there are questions about how the event was advertised and how the crowd was being managed outside. staff at the greenvale hotel are assisting police with their inquiries. there are calls to look at what lessons can be learned from the st patrick's day which turned to tragedy. emma vardy, bbc news, cookstown. the war in afghanistan is now america's longest war — but in recent months us officials have been engaged in
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talks with the taliban. president trump has also asked the pentagon to look at options for a potential us military withdrawall — that's despite a record number of afghan soldiers and civilians being killed. so what's been the reaction in afghanistan — and is the country ready to look after its own security? 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. we are out on patrol with afghan special forces. this, we are out on patrol with afghan specialforces. this, the first we are out on patrol with afghan special forces. this, the first time the country's elite troops have allowed western media to join them without us support. we have travelled into a province that is taliban territory. 0ur escort says this area has recently been cleared of the enemy but that is not what these locals say. this man says it is not safe. he said, if he had the money he would leave this area
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today. another says, there is constant fighting. the taliban, they say, are just 50 metres away. no shots though are fired under their watch. special forces conduct most of the afg ha ns offensive special forces conduct most of the afghans offensive operations. this video is from a recent night raids targeting insurgents. but they are still relatively few in number and they still depend on us support. president trump though has made clear he wants to end america's longest war. the afghans wants to show they can look after their own security but in reality they are still heavily reliant on us military assistance, american money and american
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airpower. after years of american help they still only control about half the country. it begs the question, what would happen if the us leaves? if it is bya us leaves? if it is by a morning tweet, sudden, it will have one type of impact, but if it is a negotiated withdrawal, it will have very little impact. they are having to contemplate life on their own, and they are training more special forces. 45,000 afghan soldiers and police have been killed over the last four years. yet america is now talking to the taliban, leading some to question the sacrifices made. stepping over the blood of the american soldiers and the victims of
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9/11. it is a disgrace to enter into reconciliation. these guys have blood on their hands. the afghan people have already endured decades of suffering and violence. many want nothing more than peace. but not at any price. parts of southern africa have been hit by a devastating cyclone with fears that thousands of people may have lost their lives. cyclone idai has reached speeds of up to 120 miles an hour and brought with it torrential rain. the countries worst affected have been mozambique and zimbabwe. tonight the uk government says it will provide up to £6 million of aid to help the affected areas.
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shops with their fronts torn off, windows shattered in the street. the roofs rendered useless, ripped from theirjoists. this is beira, where it is thought there has been the greatest loss of life. while the damage on the ground is bad enough, it is from the air that you can see the scale of what has happened here. beira is the major port on mozambique's coast. now it's largely underwater after the cyclone tore through it, bringing the sea in its wake. the city's tightly packed suburbs are submerged. no one knows yet the true loss of life here. translation: flying sheets of metal decapitated people. some people are in hospitals. it's really bad. we don't eat properly, we don't sleep properly. we have no home.
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from the suburbs, cyclone idai's destructive force spread inland, no respecter of borders, it crossed into neighbouring zimbabwe. landslides, rock falls and raging waters have marooned hundreds. as you can see, the devastation of cyclone idai, there is a major crater here. now this is one of the main access roads between the city of mutare, where the support teams and the supplies are, and the villages of chimanimani, which have been cut off. we met an elderly couple who were trying to check on family members on the other side. he tells us he's been trying to call his family, trapped in chimanimani, to find out if they survived the storm but he hasn't been able to reach them. his wife miriam makes the sounds that the wind and water made as the storm approached. she says the rains have been relentless. five million people were in need of food aid before the floods. this makes matters so much worse.
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shingai nyoka, bbc news, chimanimani, eastern zimbabwe. we are nowjoined by matthew cochrane — a spokesperson for the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies. we were hearing about the situation in zimbabwe. i want to talk about the situation in mozambique. how bad is that they are? it is very bad. roads have been cut off. 90% of buildings in beira were damaged or destroyed. it was much worse than had been anticipated. earlier today we started hearing reports of communitiesjust we started hearing reports of communities just outside the city that have been potentially washed
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away or totally submerged in flood water. i think we may have lost matthew. thank you very much for your time. the headlines on bbc news. the speaker of the house of commons says the prime minister cannot ask mps to vote on her brexit deal again — unless there are substantial changes to it. police in the netherlands say they've arrested a man, after three people were shot dead on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. this new zealand's prime minister says she'll announce new gun laws within days — following the attacks on two mosques in which 50 people died. scientists in yorkshire have come
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up with a creative way to tackle problems with water quality in the humber estuary. the yorkshire wildlife trust has relocated hundreds of oysters from a loch in scotland in the hope that it will introduce more marine life into the area. paul murphy has this report. at the mouth of the humber, conservationists are building what they hope will be a des res for oysters. the shellfish were plentiful here until the 1950s, but demand for the dining delicacy led to overfishing and near extinction. now they're being sought for their environmental benefits. it's one of those species where it creates habitats and it can be the first species in there to colonise and establish an area. and it's the oysters from loch ryan in southwest scotland that yorkshire scientists have got their eye on. they've been given special permission to relocate several hundred. there's nothing more natural than an oyster that lives in the sea.
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and they do pick up the qualities of where they're grown. the team from yorkshire need to get these creatures down to the humber as quickly as possible. loch ryan is one of the last places in the uk where you can actually get native natural oysters and there are enough of them that we can take some and bring them back to the site on the humber to re—establish them. six hours and 200 miles later, they've arrived on the humber and are ready for their new home. i think it's fantastic. it's really innovative and has not been done before. 0ysters are amazing and they improve water quality. it'll create an ecosystem that we do not have. placed in sacks and attached to metal frames, they'll be covered by the tide in a few hours and begin to feed again. over the last 100 years or so, the humber estuary has become heavily industrialised. and although that's brought with it economic benefits, there's also been an environmental impact. this scheme is part of a bigger plan to give nature in this
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area more of a chance. this underwater robotic camera will eventually be used to monitor the sea bed in the hope that the oysters have encouraged other marine life into the area. a single adult oyster will filter 100 litres of water a day. so if you have a big oyster reef somewhere like the humber, it will have an impact on the clarity of water which would be fantastic. it would be lovely to see the humber go back to being something like it was 200 years ago, before industrialisation. it'll be many months before scientists can assess the full impact of this project on the surrounding environment, buit it's hoped that a creature that once existed in huge numbers here has now begun its comeback. parts of southern africa have been
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hit by a devastating cyclone with fears that thousands of people may have lost their lives. we are nowjoined by matthew cochrane — a spokesperson for the international federation of red cross and red crescent societies. before we had problems with that line you are telling us about the damage and devastation that has been caused in one particular town in mozambique, beira. iam caused in one particular town in mozambique, beira. i am also presuming there has been loss of life there as well. yes. at the beginning of the day the government was talking about a death toll in the dozens. by early this afternoon the dozens. by early this afternoon the president of mozambique announced that he thought the death toll could climb to 1000 or perhaps even higher, which is a shocking figure and it gives you an indication of the severity of this disaster. unfortunately it seems to reconcile with the situation that our teams have seen and have been reporting. this is it possible to
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have any sense of how prepared people were? is it possible to prepare for a cyclone of this magnitude? a lot of people —— a lot of work has gone into improving preparedness in the last decade or two. a lot of work was being done on the ground including by red cross volu nteers the ground including by red cross volunteers to try and make sure that people were aware of the impending storm and encourage them to evacuate. it is not clear what happens. there will be time for postmortems, so to speak, in the weeks ahead. 0ne postmortems, so to speak, in the weeks ahead. one factor seems to be at one of the major aggravating factors of the cyclone was the fact there was huge flooding already in there was huge flooding already in the area. there was a huge flooding in zimbabwe and malawi to the west, and that water naturally moves east into mozambique before going back into mozambique before going back into the ocean. it seems that some communities were caught between the
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cyclone and the storm surge, the wind and rain that that brought, then the flood water rushing from then the flood water rushing from the west. some of those communities had nowhere to go. you said you have collea g u es had nowhere to go. you said you have colleagues and teams on the ground, what are they doing? we have got some relief supplies in beira. we release money last week ahead of the storm to try and make sure that we had basic supplies there. those are relief items being released throughout the day. there are major shelter needs and needs around water and sanitation. we are bringing in a shelter supply kits from a regional hub, they will come in by boat later this week. the road into beira is still flooded. we will be launching a major international appeal, looking at the region of 10 million swiss francs as a start. we know that the british government this
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evening has announced £6 million in aid to help that worst affected areas. what is really needed most? is it cash? yes, absolutely. it is cash that organisations like the red cross or other organisations on the ground can quickly turn into goods and services for the people who have lost their homes, people who no longer have access to clean water and basic sanitation, people who no longer have access to food or basic medical care. that is what we are looking for, for our partners to provide us with the cash that we need so that we can quickly respond to the needs that are clearly there. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather. the weather story across the uk is
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certainly much quieter than we had this time last week. severe gales, snow and some flooding across the uk. but the story is that things will quieten down. but we have had it confirmed by the met office that already, it is only matched the 18th, northern ireland has seen its wettest march on record. but things will quieten down for the remainder of this week and it looks as though high pressure will stay with us as we go through the night as well. it is quite a cloudy high and it is a wea k is quite a cloudy high and it is a weak weather front, outbreaks of drizzly rain, that will continue through the night. further east there will be some breaks the cloud. temperatures into single figures. further west it is a cloudy story. we are optimistic that the cloud will break in places. the only exception is further north and west with clouds, wind and rain
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strengthening through the later stages of the day. as we moved out of tuesday into wednesday it is likely that milder air will win through and it gets warmer still with a slight milder air through the country. the only exception is the extreme north of scotland. potential for stronger winds here. as we go through wednesday the emphasis is a cloudier story for many that hopefully the cloud again will break up hopefully the cloud again will break up and we will see some sunshine coming through. temperatures should peak at 17 degrees, it may winds will strengthen to the north—west. gusts of 40 mph, 50 mph. this weather front will be a nuisance. there may be a significant area of low pressure by the end of the week. high pressure stays with england, wales and northern ireland. good
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deal of dry weather towards the end of that week as well. potential for week reign in the far north of scotland. in comparison to the site last week it is a much improved story. i will be back in half an hour.
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