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tv   Breakfast BBC News Channel  BBC News  March 19, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and ben thompson. the speaker of the house of commons has blocked a possible third vote on the uk prime minister theresa may's brexit deal. live from london, that's our top good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin story on tuesday 19th march. and dan walker. our headlines today: what next for theresa may's brexit plan as a third vote on her deal is blocked? she'll chair a cabinet meeting this morning. mrs may meets her cabinet later as she considers her next steps on brexit — one of the set is wondering what it we find out what this means will mean to them is the hospitality for businesses already plagued by uncertainty. also in the programme... industry. iron out hotel in york as pa rt industry. iron out hotel in york as part of my brexit road trip to look at the impact. boeing promises a new software a race against time to help communities devastated update for its troubled 737 max by cyclone idai in south—east africa. aircraft by the end of the month — thousands are homeless, many hundreds feared dead. england could run short of clean water within 25 years without urgent action. a stark warning from the head
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of the environment agency. in sport, warren gatland backs his wales side to bring the world cup "home" on a night of six nations celebrations in cardiff. good morning, a cloudy and misty start today, but for many it is dry. in the west, patchy sun and some brightness. more details on 15 minutes. it's tuesday march 19th. our top story: theresa may will chair a meeting of the cabinet this morning, as she considers her next steps in the brexit process. a senior government official said it was significantly more complicated after the speaker, john bercow, announced he would prevent a third vote on the prime minister's brexit deal unless there were substantial changes. let's speak to our political correspondent, iain watson, who's at westminster for us this morning.
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constitutional crisis? certainly, if it is not a crisis, it is a piece of constitutional history in the making. john bercow had to go back to the 1600, saying you can't simply go back to parliament with the same proposal over and over again in the same parliament. she is off to brussels to meet european leaders at the end of the week, and he has taken it off the table. that is the crisis at the moment, but i think from what may happen in the future, it is nonetheless an additional barrierfor it is nonetheless an additional barrier for theresa may to try to get her brexit deal through. always worried about asking this question, but what do we expect to happen next? it is a very febrile atmosphere at westminster, john bercow has been standing up for the
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rights of parliament, some say, others saying that he has tried to sabotage brexit itself. effectively, theresa may has to go to brussels at the end of this week, talk to european leaders, and ask them for essentially the same things. a short extension to article 50, delaying the departure until the summer, to try to get a deal through parliament, off along the extension. that choice still faces mps. there are ways of getting around john bercow‘s rules, that has been written about online if you want to see what the options are. if they do pass a deal, then they can do that, but if not they will face a longer delay. the issue is getting a majority for her deal, for theresa may, so far she hasn't done that.
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new zealand's prime minister has said she will never say the name of the man accused of killing fifty people at mosques in christchurch. jacinda ardern has been talking in the country's parliament where she urged her fellow citizens to do the same. he sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. that is why you will never hear me mention his name. he is a terrorist, he isa mention his name. he is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when i speak, be nameless. two others, i implore you, speak their names of those who are lost, rather than a name who took them. our correspondent, phil mercer, is in christchurch. you were there yesterday, and it is extraordinary, so many people still coming to pay tribute. good morning.
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good morning, it is seven o'clock here in the evening and still people are coming in their hundreds. throughout the course of the last few days, thousands of people have come here to lay floral tributes and pay tribute to the 50 people who died in the 50 people who were injured. in parliament, another poignant address by the pm, jacinda ardern, who has said that facebook should have done more to remove the graphic video of the attacks on friday from the social media platform. facebook, in response, is saying it is using special tools to try to identify and remove offensive content, but the new zealand government says it is still there, still online, and they have a responsibility to remove it. new zealand's chief censor has ruled that these images are objectionable under the law and that makes it illegal for anyone to watch, share
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01’ possess illegal for anyone to watch, share or possess it. certainly the impact of social media very much in the spotlight here. in a few minutes we'll be speaking to ronan naicker, who lost his friend in friday's attacks. the former england captain, david beckham, could receive points on his licence after police said he'd admitted driving while using a mobile phone. his case will be considered in court today after he was reported to officers by a member of the public. the magistrate has the power to impose six penalty points and a £200 fine at the hearing, which the ex—footballer does not have to attend. the uk has pledged up to six million pounds in aid to help rescue efforts in several african countries after cyclone idai. more than 1000 people are feared dead in mozambique alone, with many more in need of food, shelter and medical supplies across large parts of malawi and zimbabwe, from where the bbc‘s shingai nyoka sent this report.
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overnight, rescuers were saving those trapped by rising waters in eastern mozambique. the military is repairing damaged roads to reach those trapped by landslides, rockfalls and floods. the country is already struggling under an economic crisis, and even before the floods 5 million zimbabweans were in need of food aid. these floods will only exacerbate the situation. but as the day comes to another and, hundreds of zimbabweans are in desperate need of zimbabweans are in desperate need of food and water who are trapped with the dead and injured. addressing the nation, president emmerson mnangagwa raised concerns over the disaster prepare a list of the country. his government has pledged over $100 million to the disaster. while it has been declared that the cyclone is over, it's deadly effects remain.
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a man's been arrested after three people were killed on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. he's been identified as gokmen tanis, who's 37 and from turkey. officers say the motive for the shooting isn't clear. let's speak now to anna holligan, who is in utrecht. good morning, what more can you tell us good morning, what more can you tell us about this investigation? you can see here the trams are running again this morning, it is almost up to normal. schools and universities have reopened, and really the only indication of what happened here yesterday are these roses laid behind us by people on their way to work. more detail has been emerging today about the suspect, about his criminal past. he was actually released from custodyjust criminal past. he was actually released from custody just two weeks ago. he is still facing very serious sexual assault charges, and we have also been hearing more about the vic is. they have been named in local
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media, identified as a 19—year—old girl, who according to multiple eyewitnesses may have been the intended target. another one of the three victims shot dead on this tram yesterday was a father of three and the local football coach, who yesterday was a father of three and the localfootball coach, who his clu b the localfootball coach, who his club have been paying tribute to on their website. here in the netherlands, the investigation is ongoing. they haven't ruled out a terrorist motive, and the pm said that today, flags on government buildings right across the country will be flying at half mast in memory and tribute to the victims. nhs patients may not benefit from improvements in cancer treatment because of a shortage of senior doctors, according to the royal college of radiologists. a survey has found that 70 consultant clinical oncologist posts are currently vacant in the uk — more than half of which have remained unfilled
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for at least a year. there may not be enough clean water to supply england's needs within 25 years. that's the warning from the chief executive of the environment agency. sirjames bevin will tell a water industry conference later today that climate change and a growing population means unless we have a different attitude to water, in a few decades there may not be enough to go round. keith doyle reports. our summers oursummers are our summers are getting hotter and drier, which means there will be less water available, with some rivers having 80% less during these months. a growing population, particularly in the south—east, means there will be significant water shortages by 2050. this stark warning comes from the chief executive of england's environment agency, so james bevan, who says we are facing what he calls the jaws of death, the point on a graph where
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water supply falls below demand. and this could change if we change our attitude to water. the shortage can be prevented. he says cutting personal consumption from 140 to 100 litres, and reducing leakages, would give enough clean water for an extra 20 million people. dilling desalination plants, new reservoirs, and moving water across the country from where there is a surplus is another solution. water companies say they are committed to cutting lea ks and helping say they are committed to cutting leaks and helping people cut consumption. the government, water companies and the public will have a role to play, according to the head of the environment agency, who says wastage of water needs to become as socially unacceptable as throwing plastic bags into the sea. a pigeon that has been described as the lewis hamilton of the skies
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has sold for more than a million pounds. the champion racer is called armando and is described as the most successful racing bird of all time. he's already retired and is now living the life of riley in china, breeding more champion chicks. apparently, the chinese person who has bought said peiyun chien, armando, has also got a very expensive hen. i didn't realise they can expensive hen. i didn't realise they ca n fly expensive hen. i didn't realise they can fly at about 50 mph. i'm quite excited, because we have a champion peiyun —— peiyun —— pigeon as well.
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right, what is going on in sport! for 13 minutes past six, i hope i haven't peaked too soon! some are saying that wales might have peaked too soon. a lot of talk will be turning to the world cup after their six nations success over the weekend, and they had a homecoming in cardiff last night to celebrate their success. and why not? and possibly the captain could be the first minister of wales after his success. it wouldn't be the first time we have seen a great sportsman step into politics. it was a night of celebration for wales' grand slam winning heroes. thousands of fans lined the streets of cardiff to toast their six nations win
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with eyes now turning to a possible world cup triumph later this year. he may not have started a premier league game for chelsea this season but callum hudson odoi has been called up to the england squad for the first time. he says he thought it was a wind up when he was told he was moving to the senior set—up britain's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, is stepping in to secure the future of team sky. the broadcaster's pulling its funding at the end of the season. and australian legend shane warne says that england are the favourites to win this summer's cricket world cup on home soil. what they do have that favourites tag so we will wait to see whether 01’ tag so we will wait to see whether or not they can live up to the expectation and that dilling. plenty to discuss today, john will be with us throughout the programme. preparations are under way for the funerals of victims of the mosque
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attack in new zealand. one of the people that lost their lives was atta elayyan, the goalkeeper for the country's futsal team. he left behind his wife and baby daughter. ronan naicker was his friend and joins us now from christchurch. sorry to be talking to you under the circumstances. tell us a little bit about atta elayyan. he was a generous soul, a generous human being, well loved amongst the community. he was willing to give his time. he is loss is quite significant and so are the number of other people that have passed away. he was really passionate about futsal? yes. we are a small country and futsal is even a smaller sport but he dedicated his time to pursue
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goals and his achievements. they we re goals and his achievements. they were preparing to qualify for the world cup in september. he was geared up and ready to do that and obviously he was taken to soon. he was helping young children as well ta ke was helping young children as well take the sport up? he was always willing to give his time. he is currently coaching the team, the senior boys team that would be competing in the national youth champs. it has been really hard for those boys as well. he did it for nothing, just for the love of the sport and the game, the beautiful game he enjoyed. it must be hard for them and for you at this time?m has been very hard, to be honest. on
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sunday we were able to get together asa sunday we were able to get together as a united family, the futsal team, both men and women and we went down to the deans avenue memorial side and he was a time for us to mourn together, a time to cleanse because we had been holding on not being sure what had happened to him. ever since then, for me personally, there isa since then, for me personally, there is a numbness. we still do not know what is happening with the funeral. it is going day to day, trying to get through until we have more information. we know some of the funerals are planned. was he a regular visitor to the mosque? he was a devout muslim. he transferred across cultures and religions. that
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is why it is so sad, so sad that someone so good can get taken away just like that. it is such a waste ofa just like that. it is such a waste of a good person and that is why a lot of us are feeling it. people say they take the best of you to early and he was truly one of the best of us. he was a genuinely good human being, regardless of religion or culture, he was a good human being. he was a dad and a really talented. he was a dad and a really talented. he worked in technology, didn't he? he worked in technology, didn't he? he was generous in all aspects of his life, he was hard—working. he started his business. he was respected amongst the community. the amount of time he put into his work,
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his family, his futsal, i wondered how he did it. i saw him on thursday just to drop off some gear to the coaches and teams at the high school. we just had a chat and i said to him, you allowed yourself to leave at three o'clock and he said that when you commit to something you need to commit. we had a chat and did not think anything of it, little did i know it was the last timei little did i know it was the last time i would see him. thank you very much for talking to us. he sounds like he was a lovely man, thank you. thank you very much. he was, he was. let's find out what is happening with the we saw huge rainfall totals over the weekend. northern ireland had its
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wettest month on record since 1992. today, a lot of cloud around, dry for most of us and mild. some rain in the forecast. this front making slope progress in the west, introducing patchy light rain and drizzle, slowly moving east. but we start with a lot of cloud once again with mist and healfog start with a lot of cloud once again with mist and heal fog around and coastal fog as well. cloud breaking overnight to parts of the east, temperatures hovering close to freezing. two band of rain across scotland. wendy especially in the north—west. parts of north—east scotla nd north—west. parts of north—east scotland and the high ground into the east, temperatures 11—13 so feeling mild for the time of year. we hang onto a fair bit of cloud.
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the front continuing south. patchy rang to scotland, northern ireland and perhaps as south as northern england. some holes in the cloud further south but we're anticipating any problems with frost with temperatures like this. the jetstrea m temperatures like this. the jetstream allowing high to dominate the weather. most springlike conditions coming our way. tomorrow actually is the spring equinox. perhaps a little bit more tomorrow across eastern scotland, as we further south. weather front across the north still producing rain and still pretty windy. gusts of 50 miles per hour across north—west scotland. temperature wise, miles per hour across north—west scotland. temperature wise, 1! in the north to 16, possibly 17 in the south. the high pressure i was
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telling you about, in charge of the weather. keeping things essential. breezy but whether front making a bit of progress, bringing rain across parts of scotland, just fringing into the north of northern ireland later in the day and once againafair ireland later in the day and once again a fair bit of cloud. sunny spells otherwise. temperatures above average for the time of year. into the weekend, friday we have a weather front sinking south, still fairly mild. saturday is looking like a brighter day. see you later. let's look at the front pages, once again dominated by brexit. the speaker of the house of commons, is on the front of most of the papers. the daily telegraph says john bercow, a remain voter, has faced repeated accusations of anti—brexit bias. the guardian also leads on mr bercow‘s announcement,
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which it says has brought "constitutional chaos". the other story on its front page is a warning from the head of the environment agency about the uk running out of water in 25 years because of a rising population and climate change. "the brexit destroyer" is headline in the daily express. the paper describes the speaker's decision as extraordinary and says it has enraged ministers. the daily mirror however has a different front page which focuses on claims that women receiving universal credit are being forced into prostitution to survive. john is here, stefan is out and about. britain's richest man, stepping into save team sky. he could be looking to increase his sporting portfolio. he has a stake in ben ainslie's sailing team. all
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different spots then. ibrahimovic, the owner of chelsea, coming a distant figure, some of the visa issue he has had, perhaps he will ta ke issue he has had, perhaps he will take over chelsea. that is quite interesting. did you get married la st interesting. did you get married last year) 2017. well done for knowing the answer! apiece detailing how much various famous people have spent on their engagement ring. you do not have to reveal anything. j lo just got engaged $1.5 million. katy perry 3.8 million. kamke dashon a measly 3 million. mariah carey, top of the tree, {7.6 million. sorry.
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you would not want to wear it doing the washing up. you just would not wear it! i would trade it for eight houses. this is a sweet story. stephen was mystified because he would be putting various peace and pieces out and about in the shed and he has come back and it would be tidied up and he thought he was dreaming things. eventually he set up dreaming things. eventually he set upa dreaming things. eventually he set up a camera. dreaming things. eventually he set up a camera. it was a mouse, genuinely a mouse, going around, picking everything up and, look, putting it back into the ice cream tub. that isjust an extraordinary story. the length people will go to.
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i would like a little mouse to come and clean up my house every day. thank you john. football clubs from across the english football league will today come together to highlight the important role sport can play in tackling some of societies biggest issues. on the agenda is everything from homelessness to the battle against plastic pollution. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at derby county's pride park stadium for us this morning, what are they doing there today? it is already packed, virtually! well, i wouldn't say packed but yes, some fans and they are in fine voice. come on! cheering and applause. # there is nowhere to hide the darling of the derby! derby! #
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we are here to talk about the power of football. increasingly, it is not just about what is happening on the pitch but what is happening in the community. i want to introduce into a young man who is a perfect example. take me back, you're 16 yea rs example. take me back, you're 16 years old, what path are you on?” made bad choices, in the wrong crowd, start taking drugs. i was looking at my life through a prison cell. asking how has it happened, addicted to heroin. the club reached out to you, how? what happened? i was in derby, at a local rehab. they came in and took football sessions and that reignited my passion for
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football. it was always there... they put their faith in you and today you are clean? yes. you are working for the club and changing people ‘s life. working for the club and changing people 's life. an exciting news ahead? yes i have a pregnant girlfriend at home, hi, sam. john is the chair of the community trust. give me an idea of the scale?m the chair of the community trust. give me an idea of the scale? it is fantastic. 72 clubs. and they are all connected with their communities. it is notjust about the people turning up but it is about the power and the magnet of the club bringing the community in and today is a chance to showcase that. we're looking at in aston villa they are looking at homelessness, doing things to help the local community. getting 15—25
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—year—olds involved. all sorts of things happening all over the country and it is the power of the tentacles stretching into communities. we will hear loads more about it all morning. more from us later but now the news and whether wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. mp's have come to the defence of grime music artists, saying they're the victims of prejudice and discrimination. a committee of mp's argue that the genre of music, which has made stars of people like south london's stormzy, is at risk, as many venues turn down requests for live performances. london artist, shadow, told mp's how a venue once cancelled on the day of his performance when they realised what kind of music he was playing. there are calls for the government to offer guidelines to venues
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and local authorities. well the same committee of mp's have taken the unusual step of warning music fans against using the ticket resale site, viagogo. it comes as hundreds of customers who use the site have complained of being overcharged. mps say viagogo, which was started in london just over a decade ago, has a history of flouting customer law and has yet to prove itself trustworthy. londoners know what an expensive city this is to live in, but it may come as a surprise that we're nowhere near the most expensive. although london has climbed up the global rankings, to the 22nd most expensive, you don't have to go far to be in the world's joint most expensive. it's paris where, for example, the average cost of a woman's haircut is £90. that sounds like a lot of money to me. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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tfl rail has minor delays between paddington and heathrow at the moment. on the roads, in the west end of london: 10 bus routes are on diversion as regent street is closed southbound at oxford circus. that's for emergency water works. in hounslow, hanworth road is closed for gas works. while the a1 northbound has a lane closed for roadworks — just before mill hill circus. now the weather with elizabeth. good morning, another quite day of weather today. just a few spots of drizzle from the cloud. a lot of cloud around with maybe a few brighter spots here and there. temperatures generally between five and seven celsius. missed patches not lusting too long. maybe something a bit brighter developing
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through the middle part of the day for many areas. temperatures up to 14 celsius with just a light breeze as we headed through the afternoon. cloud think at times. we will keep the layers of cloud. a milder start to the day tomorrow than we are seeing at the moment. between seven and eight celsius. no big changes for the next few days. dry and u nsettled. for the next few days. dry and unsettled. a few spells of sunshine tomorrow. cooler at the weekend. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london from 7:00 with her breakfast show until 10:00. i'll be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the latest stop on our brexit road—trip takes us to york, where steph assesses
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the impact on tourism. stop the pigeon! because this one's worth a fortune. we'll hear about the champion racer that's just sold for a million pounds. we meet the former soldier who's spent 60 days on the streets to get a close—up look at britain's homeless crisis. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: theresa may will chair a meeting of the cabinet this morning, as she considers her next steps in the brexit process. they'll discuss their response to the commons speakerjohn bercow‘s refusal to allow a third vote on the prime minister's brexit deal. mr bercow said mps couldn't keep voting on the same question. a senior government official has said the process of leaving the european union will now be "significa ntly more complicated". new zealand's prime minister has said she will never say the name
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of the man accused of killing 50 people at mosques in christchurch. jacinda ardern has been talking in the country's parliament where she urged her fellow citizens to do the same he sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. that is why you will never hear me mention his name. he is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when i speak, be nameless. to others, i implore you, speak their names of those who are lost, rather than a name who took them. the uk has pledged to donate up to six million pounds in aid to assist rescue efforts across several african nations after they were hit by cyclone idai. more than 1000 people are feared dead in mozambique alone with many more in need of food, shelter and medical supplies across large parts of
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malawi and zimbabwe. a man's been arrested after three people were killed on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. he's been identified as gokmen tanis, who's 37 and from turkey. officers say the motive for the shooting isn't clear. the incident led to a city—wide manhunt and the closure of schools. nhs patients may not benefit from improvements in cancer treatment because of a shortage of senior doctors, according to the royal college of radiologists. a survey has found 70 consultant clinical oncologist posts are currently vacant in the uk, more than half of which have remained unfilled for at least a year. co nsulta nt consultant clinical oncologist is a senior doctors who often take charge of the cancer patient‘s nonsurgical treatment, like chemotherapy and radiotherapy. but they say these
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services are being undermined by a lack of services. a survey has found that more than 7% of consultant posts are vacant, compared with 5% five years ago. the college said services were often only kept going with large amounts of overtime. it but it is the situation will get worse in the future, putting the rollout of innovative treatments at risk. the nhs said extra money was being dedicated. there may not be enough clean water to supply england's needs within 25 years, the chief executive of the environment agency will warn today. sirjames bevin will tell a conference that climate change and a growing population will threaten supplies — unless we take "ambitious action". the water companies say they are committed to cutting leaks and helping people cut useage. the harlem globetrotters are known around the world for their tricks and ball skills
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but look what happened when they asked members of the audience if they wanted to give it a go. an enthusiastic fan gets his hands on the ball. talk about stealing the limelight! turns out of course he isn'tjust anybody, but the basketball freestyle world champion! he isa he is a bit handy, isn't he? it is mesmerising. no way! the globetrotters might as welljust go home. i could watch that for ages. a bit of a let's just get this random quy bit of a let's just get this random guy out of the crowd! good morning to you both. are we talking about wales? yes, we are.
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they had a little celebration when they arrived home yesterday. more fa ns they arrived home yesterday. more fans turned out to welcome them back after their success, and warren gatland has said that the main target now is the world cup. they are going to go for it later this summer. you wouldn't rule it out. warren gatland says wales can bring the world cup home after celebrating their grand slam success in cardiff last night. a public reception was held at the senedd in cardiff bay as the squad were welcomed home following their record 14th win in a row over ireland at the weekend that saw them claim the title. we enjoy each other‘s company, we challenge each other on a lot of things, we don't always agree that wa nt to things, we don't always agree that want to make a decision without each other 100% and that is the way things work for us really well. i promise you these guys will give 100% in every game in the world cup,
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and if we play as well as we played for the last year and in this tournament then we can bring home the world cup. what a moment for chelsea youngster callum hudson odoi, he's been called up to the england squad for the first time. at 18 he's yet to start a game for chelsea in the premier league this season, and hasn't featured in england's u21s either. but he joins james ward prowse as late inclusions into gareth southgate's squad for the games against the czech republic and montenegro. he admitted he thought his manager wasjoking when he was told the news. so what do we know about callum hudson—odoi. well he's just 18 years old, and was part of that brilliant england under—17's side that won the world cup a couple of years ago. he's only made 19 appearances for chelsea so far, mainly as a substitute and away from the premier league. but that didn't stop the german giants bayern munich making a huge bid for him injanuary, a move that he wanted to make before chelsea said no.
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keen to keep hold of a potential future star. britain's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, is expected to step in to secure the future of the team sky cycling team. the british team lead by sir dave brailsford has won the tour de france six times since it was formed nine years ago. sky sponsored them from the start, but will withdraw its backing from the end of this season. it's expected the team will be renamed team ineos after the chemical company that ratcliffe owns. dame kelly holmes, paula radcliffe and sharron davies are writing to the international olympic committee to ask for more research on the "residual benefits" of being a transgender athlete. the former athletes are worried about sport being manipulated, and have questioned — in their words — whether it's "fair for a biological man to compete alongside women". athletes who've transitioned and want to compete have to keep their testosterone levels below a certain level for at least a year. but radcliffe says more research is needed to keep competition fair.
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australian cricket legend shane warne reckons that england are one of the favourites to win this summer's cricket world cup. they're on a decent run in the shorter form of the game, and with the tournament being played in england warne says that home advantage will be key. england and india, i think. england and india, ithink. i england and india, i think. i think they go in as favourites. i love the style england are playing, i think they are very well led by eoin morgan, he has instilled confidence in theirteam morgan, he has instilled confidence in their team were theyjust go out and play. and they are super aggressive, which i love. after the world cup it's the ashes, and england and australia could become the first countries to wear numbers on their backs in a test match. at the moment teams have to wear all white or cream kit. but the guardian says changes are being considered as part of a revamp of test cricket.
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there was a lot of discussion about that when it came about initially. why would they do that? it isjust a bit of a revamp, they are going to have a new kind of lead, as part of the changes they think it will reva m p the changes they think it will revamp the game, and it will be easier to identify the players were now the pitch. the purists probably won't be for it. i like a bit of purism and that, but there you go. now, what lengths would you go to in order to break a world record? skiing in your pants? surely that is a step too far. it is not pants, it is swimming trunks. are they not the same? when it is that cold, i think they are the same. why are they doing that? organisers say the rain
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and fog put people off, not the chance of frostbite. you would be livid if everyone assured you they would turn up and make the record, and you realise you have to come back the next year to make the record! it is the sort of thing where, you know, sometimes people are busy in the morning, and if you are busy in the morning, and if you are quietly watching the tv you would be wondering what on earth is going on! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. isn't foggy here as well, carol? we have some patchy fog across parts of lincolnshire, yorkshire, hill fog in the west and coastal fog as well. for the rest of us, a cloudy start. some mist around, but mostly dry day and it will feel a bit milder. this
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isa and it will feel a bit milder. this is a fairly weak affair, producing patchy light rain and drizzle at the moment in some western areas. one or two shower was coming out of this cloud ahead of it. there are some holes in this cloud in eastern parts of england and scotland. temperatures in these areas are close to freezing, but for most of us close to freezing, but for most of us above freezing in mid single figures, there is a lot of cloud around, and we have our first weather front coming around, and we have our first weatherfront coming in. the around, and we have our first weather front coming in. the second one coming in later on will bring heavy rain across there. as we head through the evening and overnight, we hang on to a fair bit of cloud. here is the weather front moving steadily south eastwards as a weakening feature, but bringing some rain across scotland into northern ireland, and possibly into northern england. behind it, clearskies in the north and some clearer skies in
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the north and some clearer skies in the south. nonetheless, we are not anticipating problems with frost, certainly not with temperatures between six and nine degrees. tomorrow, thejet between six and nine degrees. tomorrow, the jet stream between six and nine degrees. tomorrow, thejet stream is between six and nine degrees. tomorrow, the jet stream is to the north of us, high—pressure building in and settling things down. if you have a look at the colours, that is also telling you it will turn that bit milder again. springlike weather for the spring equinox, which is tomorrow. we will be chasing holes in that cloud for sunny spells, north—east scotland. the shelter of the welsh hills in the east, and in the welsh hills in the east, and in the south—east, temperatures of 16 or 17 degrees. where there is rain across the north—west of scotland, also strong winds, to about 50 mph. wednesday and thursday, high—pressure in charge. a little bit more progress across the north
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of scotland, some more rain, but still holes in the cloud for some sunshine. a lighter day of whether perhaps, wind will be lighter and temperatures milder. as we head into friday, a weather front sinking south, still fairly mild as it clears away. brighter skies on saturday but not quite as mild. more than four million people work in hospitality in the uk, 700,000 of them are from the eu. steph is at a hotel in york this morning, the latest stop on our brexit roadtrip to find out how different parts of the economy are getting ready. what dinosaur are you wearing today? that is a good question, i cannot
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remember, i have suddenly forgotten all my dinosaurs. that is because i am too busy thinking about hospitality. we are looking at lots of different sectors and what impact this is having on them. this is the third largest private sector employer in the country. we have the chief executive of best western. however you been preparing? without knowing exactly what is going to happen it is difficult to put tangible actions together. we have been helping people with passport applications but it is difficult to ta ke applications but it is difficult to take a position at this point in time. one of the concerns for an industry like yours is the fact you have a lot of people who are eu nationals working in this sector. are you worried? it is concerning
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that they could be an uncertain future but in terms of taking action and what we could do about it right now, there is not a lot we can do so carry on with business as usual. it is mostly at this point it is technical questions about how to apply for a particular passport, where we go to find out about a particular visa. without knowing what is going to happen there is not much more we could do. given we are ina much more we could do. given we are in a state where no—one is going on, how do you feel? it is a little bit disconcerting but we need to leave the politicians to get their head around their situation and come to a conclusion. for us it is a business as usual. thanks very much. we have brea kfast as usual. thanks very much. we have breakfast and kept and tony. you are from uk hospitality. sorry to
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interrupt... you are halfway through, i can see if thinking, this is bad timing! i will get you another one. what do you think about the concern for the eu nationals working in the sector? the reality is that enough has been done they ought to feel at ease. the right to remain has largely been sorted out that it remain has largely been sorted out thatitis remain has largely been sorted out that it is different when you tried to relate that to people, to make them feel like they are welcome and that they have a future and stay and progress their career in hospitality. there are diverse roles... excuse me, a bit of croissant. as a recruiter. it is yourjob to help fill these roles.
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there is still movement. businesses are growing. casual dining, that was affected but it created movement and businesses are growing and there is always a lack of chefs and we need to start growing our own apprenticeships and skills in the uk but there is still movement, surprisingly a lot of opportunity. is it surprisingly a lot of opportunity. isita surprisingly a lot of opportunity. is it a good time to be a chef? could you ask for a pay rise? you probably could, don't kill me all those employees out there. it is also about skills and developing. there are different types of chefs, restaurants, businesses and there is so restaurants, businesses and there is so much progression for a chef. you can go and get a mission and start
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—— mechelen star or remain in the casual sector. do you know which dinosaur this is? stager cyrus, they we are! you missed my joke, i said stef—asaurus. we are! you missed my joke, i said stef-asaurus. i'm sorry, it is too early. some of us concentrate on our jobs. chefs across the uk are now going to be asking for a pay rise because of you, stef! you're watching breakfast. the british government as offered millions of pounds in aid to the country hit by a major cyclone.
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pension has been sold for more than £1 million. he is called armando and has been described as the most successful bird. what makes him so valuable? described as the lewis hamilton of pigeon racing, armando has created quite a coup. exceptionally strong winds and a fantastic sense of direction making one of the best competitors of all time. but despite spending his life in the fast lane, the on line auction initially crawled by. fuelled by the growing popularity of pigeon racing in china, it is it is thought to chinese financiers were fighting over it. eventually, he
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sold for more than £1 million. 500 times more than the going rate of his fellow feathery champions. translation: a very special day. we had hoped for a little more as we had hoped for a little more as we had already broken the record but it has more than doubled. it was hectic, incredible. he could live until he is 20. he will now stop beating his wings for breeding. he now m oves beating his wings for breeding. he now moves to his new home, a chinese stud farm. and we will have a racing pigeon in the studio at 820. the speaker of the comments, john bercow made a surprised announcement yesterday. let's get more reaction. faiza shaheen is director
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at the centre for labour and social studies, a left—leaning think tank. and henry newman is the director for open europe, which examines the relationship of the uk and the eu after brexit do you think that what happened yesterday, do you think a delay to accept is now inevitable?” yesterday, do you think a delay to accept is now inevitable? i think it was inevitable anyway from last week. —— bee mac. ——it is frustrating for the public. it do you think the prime minister is in a wea ker you think the prime minister is in a weaker position yes. the speaker grandstanding you cannot reintroduce the same motion several times in the
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same parliamentary session. but to introduce amendments as well. we saw an amendment on a second referendum failed, on a softer brexit fail and the country, whatever the view, most people want their mps to come to a decision now. bercow blocking that. some people saying bercow and is position and using it to upset mps. when you look at the law... you can be persuaded to think that but there isa be persuaded to think that but there is a blame game going on ultimately it looks like this week at least it
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would not pass. and even if it did, it will require more money. what we are seeing right now is a failed process in any case. we have had... man shouting loudly i think we have seen the biggerfailures in man shouting loudly i think we have seen the bigger failures in the man shouting loudly i think we have seen the biggerfailures in the past two years. man shouting loudly would a third vote make any different? they have said there is no negotiation room? i think that could be because the government could win it and we could have clarity. what we have seen was a lot of conservative figures, lord howe former leaders, former chancellors,
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all coming out and backing of the deal so the momentum was swinging towards the government what we're seeing now is precisely what theresa may has been warning which is that ifa may has been warning which is that if a deal was not passed, we would end up in some sort of mess and that is now where we. we are seeing celebrations of the last 24 hours from second referendum campaign is an hardline brexiteers. they both cannot be right. theresa may's brexit deal was the only deal negotiated with guerra. man shouting loudly. 80% of mps voted to trigger article 50... i am not an mp. but we have people behind us saying they do not want to deliver brexit but, sorry, this is the only deal being negotiated... man shouting loudly.
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people need to compromise. this is not compromised, this is denial. what is it that you want to coalesce around? is it a customs union, a permanent one... . this is about timing and people have expressed... man shouting loudly. .. timing and people have expressed... man shouting loudly... again and again, this is the definition of insanity. one final point... you cannot reintroduce this motion but wa nt cannot reintroduce this motion but want to have the same vote both of which have been ruled out. actually a second referendum has not been ruled out. we will be able to get around this motion... man shouting
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loudly. thank you to the both of you and the third voice in the background as well! it is time for the news and weather wherever you. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. mp's have come to the defence of grime music artists, saying they're the victims of prejudice and discrimination. a committee of mp's argue that the genre of music, which has made stars of people like south london's stormzy, is at risk, as many venues turn down requests for live performances. london artist, shadow, told mp's how a venue once cancelled on the day of his performance, when they realised what kind of music he was playing. there are calls for the government to offer guidelines to venues and local authorities. well the same committee of mp's have ta ken the unusual step of warning music fans, against using the ticket resale site, viagogo.
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it comes as hundreds of customers who use the site have complained of being overcharged. mps say viagogo, which was started in london just over a decade ago, has a history of flouting customer law and has yet to prove itself trustworthy. viagogo insists it's made improvements. londoners know what an expensive city this is to live in, but it may come as a surprise that we're nowhere near the most expensive. although london has climbed up the global rankings, to the 22nd most expensive, you don't have to go far to be in the world's joint most expensive. it's paris where, for example, the average cost of a woman's haircut is £90. let's take a look at the travel situation now. tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow at the moment. on the roads, in the west end of london: 10 bus routes are on diversion as regent street is closed
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southbound at oxford circus. that's for emergency water works. in hounslow, hanworth road is closed for gas works. while the a1 northbound has a lane closed for roadworks — just before mill hill circus. now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. it's another very quite day of weather today. it will stay dry or mostly dry. perphaps just a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud, at times. an aweful lot of cloud around today, with maybe a few brighter spells here and there. and it's a reasonably mild start to the day as well. temperatures generally between 5 and 7 degrees celsius. a few early mist patches aruond, they shouldn't last too long. we'll keep that low cloud through the morning. maybe something a bit brighter developing through the middle part of the day for many areas. temperatures all the wya to 12 to 14 degrees celsius with just a light breeze. as we head through the afternoon the cloud will thicken at times. overnight tonight, we will keep
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those layers of cloud. again, a little bit of mist, some hill fog around. and a milder start to the day tomorrow than we are seeing at the moment, between 7 and 8 degrees celsius. no big changes for the next few days. it's going to stay dry and settled. perhaps a few more spells of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures generally between 15 and 16 degrees celsius and then cooler at the weekend. shortly, vanessa feltz will have more on the attacks that happened in the netherlands today. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: what next for theresa may's brexit plan as a third vote on her deal is blocked?
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she'll chair a cabinet meeting this morning. the latest stop on our roadtrip around the country finding out how one of the sectors wondering what it will mean for them is tourism and hospitality. i am outside a hotel here to find out what impact it is having on them. a race against time to help communities devastated by cyclone idai in south—east africa — thousands are homeless, many hundreds feared dead. england could run short of clean water within 25 years without urgent action — a stark warning from the head of the environment agency. in sport, warren gatland backs his wales side to bring the world cup "home" on a night of six nations celebrations in cardiff. a cloudy and misty start, with some saying some patchy fog. through the day, some brightness around and some patchy rain and drizzle in the west. it's tuesday march 19th. our top story: theresa may will chair a meeting
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of the cabinet this morning, as she considers her next steps in the brexit process. a senior government official said it was significantly more complicated after the speaker, john bercow, announced he would prevent a third vote on the prime minister's brexit deal unless there were substantial changes. in a moment, we'll get reaction from brussels with our reporter, adam fleming. first let's speak to our political correspondent, iain watson who's at westminster for us this morning. it is the front page of many of the papers this morning, good morning to you. constitutional crisis is the question many people are asking, is it? well, one of the senior law officers in the country has said it isa officers in the country has said it is a constitutional crisis. who am i to disagree? i think you can imagine the government were not expecting this and are not welcoming it. this week, theresa may wanted to put the deal back to mps before going to a
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summit with european leaders. if she didn't get backing, she would ask for a longer delay. this is the front page of many papers, lots of sound and fury, but fundamentally things haven't changed as dramatically as some people might think. in effect, she will still go back to the meeting in brussels, she will still ask for a delay, and i would expect to see that if she comes back here to west the next week and tries to ask mps then if they will back her deal. john bercow has put up another big complication, but it is not insurmountable. there are ways to bypass this, we have gone into some detail online if you wa nt to gone into some detail online if you want to read that. the fundamental choice is to you want a short or long delay to brexit? in addition to that, the bigger challenge for theresa may is whether she can build a majority between now and then for her deal. taking john bercow out of
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the equation altogether, she still wasn't in a position today to have a majority for the deal, and she still needs to get the dup and many others on side. that is what she will be concentrating on rather than this additional constitutional barrier thatjohn bercow additional constitutional barrier that john bercow found additional constitutional barrier thatjohn bercow found in the rules going all the way back to 1604. our reporter adam fleming is in brussels for us this morning. ican imagine i can imagine what you might say, but what did they make of this latest problem, i suppose you can putit? latest problem, i suppose you can put it? it depends who you ask. some people think this is a huge spanner in the works, making theresa may's life much more difficult, with other people saying it is a minor speed bump on the road and doesn't really change anything, and she will still come to the summit of eu leaders on thursday and ask for some sort of extension to the process, which the eu will either had to agree to, reject or accept, with some
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conditions attached. there is a meeting of eu affairs ministers from the other 27 eu countries, which will then prepare the ground work for that decision. they willjust be talking about the political and legal implications for the eu of what the various options are. we have seen a note prepared for someone going to that meeting by an eu member state, it is interesting to see what the eu is worried about. if it is a long extension, they are concerned the uk will use that as an opportunity to start negotiating a permanent future relationship, which is not supposed to start until brexit date itself. this current phaseis brexit date itself. this current phase is meant to be about divorce terms. they are also worried about the uk doing what they call arm—twisting on big eu issues, such as the next eu budget that will run from 2021-2027,
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as the next eu budget that will run from 2021—2027, but the decisions about that will be made in 2020. it is not just a about that will be made in 2020. it is notjust a simple fact of the eu saying yes or no, when theresa may comes on tuesday, even if she has a slightly more difficult job comes on tuesday, even if she has a slightly more difficultjob herself. new zealand's prime minister has said she will never say the name of the man accused of killing fifty people at mosques in christchurch. jacinda ardern has been talking in the country's parliament where she urged her fellow citizens to do the same. he sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. that is why you will never hear me mention his name. he is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when i speak, be nameless. to others, i implore you, speak their names of those who are lost, rather than a name who took them. our correspondent phil mercer is in christchurch. what else did the prime minister
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say in parliament? orto or to talk to you once again, i know you have been there for most of the day, and people are paying tribute behind you. what else do the pm had to say today? she said that the forla n to say today? she said that the forlan will have justice, and she has also criticised facebook for not doing enough to remove what she said was the graphic vision of the attack. remember that the gunman live streamed his attack on one of the mosques live on facebook. facebook says it is using special tools to identify and remove offensive content, but the pm here says the video of the attack was still available online and facebook had to take responsibility. we are seeing some new zealand companies considering taking advertising away from social media in response. it is worth noting too that the chief censor has listed that video as
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objectionable, so it will come illegal for anyone objectionable, so it will come illegalfor anyone in objectionable, so it will come illegal for anyone in new objectionable, so it will come illegalfor anyone in new zealand to watch, share or distribute that particular video. as far as the survivors are concerned, 30 people remain in hospital, nine of them are critically ill. the uk has pledged up to six million pounds in aid to help rescue efforts in several african countries after cyclone idai. more than 1000 people are feared dead in mozambique alone, elsewhere many more people across large parts of malawi and zimbabwe are in need of food, shelter and medical supplies. overnight, rescuers were saving those trapped by rising waters in eastern mozambique. in mountainous eastern zimbabwe, the military is repairing damaged roads to reach those trapped by landslides, rockfalls and floods. the country is already struggling under an economic crisis, and even before the floods 5
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million zimbabweans were in need of food aid. these floods will only exacerbate the situation. but as another day comes to an end, hundreds of zimbabweans are in desperate need of food and water who are trapped with the dead and injured. addressing the nation, president emmerson mnangagwa raised concerns over the disaster preparedness of the country. his government has pledged over $100 million to the disaster. while it has been declared that the cyclone is over, it's deadly affects remain. nhs patients may not benefit from improvements in cancer treatment because of a shortage of senior doctors, according to the royal college of radiologists. a survey has found 70 consultant clinical oncologist posts are currently vacant in the uk — more than half of which have remained unfilled
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for at least a year. there may not be enough clean water to supply england's needs within 25 years. that's the warning from the chief executive of the environment agency. sirjames bevin will tell a water industry conference later today that climate change and a growing population means unless we have a different attitude to water, in a few decades there may not be enough to go round. keith doyle reports. so, it looks like mps won't be getting a much—anticipated third chance to vote on theresa may's brexit plans this week. the speaker of the commons, john bercow, made the surprise announcement yesterday. 15 mps who'd previously voted against the deal say they've now changed their mind, and have accused the speaker of blocking brexit. one of those mps is the conservative james gray, who joins us now from westminster. before i talk to you, ijust want before i talk to you, i just want to show people at home some of the front pages of the newspapers, and i'm sure you will have seen this.
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the brexit destroyer, they are talking about the speaker, john bercow. the front page of the times, john bercow is sabotaging the brexit deal. is this a constitutional crisis? senior lawyer has called it a constitutional crisis, and who am ito disagree with him? i voted strongly against this deal, but my view is that we have the get this deal in order to achieve brexit at all. i told the government i was going to vote for it, and suddenly that was taken from me. i am a member of parliament, i want to vote ina member of parliament, i want to vote in a particular way, and because of a 1604 convention that hasn't been used for 120 years, i have been prevented from speaking for my constituents. i think that is wrong. what has changed? has the deal
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changed or your point of view? the main thing that changed after last week's second vote is there was a vote against no deal. and we voted to extend article 50. that means there will be no brexit unless we get the deal through, and i think whatjohn bercow did yesterday will result in the deal being destroyed. explore that, what do you mean by destroyed ? explore that, what do you mean by destroyed? apparently unless he gets a big change from the eu on thursday, the pm will not be allowed to bring her deal back to the commons. we will bring in a statutory instrument to extend article 50 and take no deal of the table, and then we will be looking at another two years, five years maybe, discussion about brexit.
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there is at least a chance that what john bercow did yesterday is destroyed except for all time. 17.4 million people who voted for brexit will be absolutely furious this morning. would it have got through if the pm had got the chance to bring this back into their house of commons? there were strong momentum moving in our favour. commons? there were strong momentum moving in ourfavour. the dup were talking to the government, and the drg had already decided to support the government. the momentum was moving in favour of the pm, whether we quite have the numbers i do not know, but we were definitely hoping to get it through. i think that had the rest of the drg realise that that was the case, that we were nearly there, i think a large number would have fallen behind us. people wa nt to would have fallen behind us. people want to leave the european union, and john bercow in my estimation has prevented it. we know that the pm is
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having a cabinet meeting today. what can she do? i presume she will go back to brussels on thursday and she will say, i can't get it through parliament, i can't get it through the eu either, so you must now give me significant changes so i can go back to parliament next week, and we have now changed the deal and i can get the support of parliament. whether the eu will play ball is anyone's guess. so far, they haven't shown any desire to do so. many things happen at the last moment, so maybe it will go to the wire, maybe there will be a concession on the backstop, maybe they will come back next week and say it is a different deal and therefore please will you allow us to have a vote on it, and request people to support them. thank you very much forjoining us here this morning.
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it looked murky outside. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everyone. the weather isa good morning, everyone. the weather is a pretty mixed but you could say it is going to be fairly cloudy with sunny spells. pictures are great. another beautiful one here. we are seeing some sunshine first thing this morning but equally fog around, some dense fog across lancashire and yorkshire. cloudy to start with and misty. for most of us today, it will remain dry but we have two weather fronts coming in. the first one is weak, the second one that little bit stronger producing stronger rain. clear skies. this is where the temperature has dipped. parts of
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eastern scotland and eastern england close to freezing. the odd shower here and there. the first weather front going through, taking rain with it. the second one bringing heavy rain. temperatures ranging from nine in the north two highs of 14 in aberdeen and london. overnight, a lot of cloud around. the weather front sinking south, getting into southern scotland, northern ireland and possibly as far south as northern england. leaving clear skies behind it and cloudy skies ahead. we are not anticipating any problems with frost when you look at the temperatures. the jetstrea m look at the temperatures. the jetstream is to the north of us. allowing high pressure to settle in, keeping the weather fairly benign.
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most springlike tomorrow. tomorrow is the spring equinox. tomorrow, if anything, it will be that bit milder than today. we also have a weather front approaching the north—west of scotla nd front approaching the north—west of scotland bringing in some rain and it is going to be windy with gusts of up to 50 miles per hour. into thursday, high—pressure and trenched on our shores. this weather front sinking slowly south, bumping into the high pressure so not getting anywhere quickly. it will bring some rain. on thursday, it is not going to be as windy in the north—west as on wednesday. cloudy but with breaks, sunshine coming through and temperatures above average. 9—15. for friday, we have all this rain
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across the north and west. it will be particularly windy across the north—west of scotland stop 55 miles per hour. some brightness. still quite a bit of cloud around and temperatures up to about 16. a bit of blue as well. 16. we don't mind that. i like weather, i like ca role mind that. i like weather, i like carole too. football clubs from across the english football league will today come together to highlight the important role sport can play in tackling some of societies biggest issues. on the agenda is everything from homelessness to the battle against plastic pollution. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at derby county's pride park stadium for us this morning, what are they doing there today? a gaggle, a full dugout! good morning. we are giddy this morning. we have been practising what is
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known as the derby bounce. take it away. # bounce, you have to bounce your red #. we are giddy because it is the day of action. 72 clubs around the country doing brilliant things in the community. prostate cancer survivors here this morning, helped by derby county. in many of these amazing projects, sometimes professional footballers get involved, thinking it is important to spread the word especially if they have personal experience. we went to see a preston north end player and spent the day with him. tell me about your mum? incredible person. very loving.
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unfortunately... some of the memories i have will live with me forever. today he plays for preston north end but when he was 15 he lost his mum to alcoholism while another relative was sleeping rough fighting the same addiction. how to cope with my feeling. i would lock myself in a bedroom for probably a year. did not wa nt to bedroom for probably a year. did not want to speak to anyone about it. when i see other people going through the similar situation. i might not know these people but i am very sympathetic towards them because it is an illness first and foremost and people need to understand that. at home with his family, he knows how fortunate he
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is. working with the community branch of his club has given him the opportunity to give back, share his experiences, help others but also himself. preston north end is very good with the community. you have been volunteering at the homeless centre. how is it going? brilliant. they are incredible there, all the volunteers. so thoughtful. i remember speaking to a lady there, she reminded me of my mum. a little bit emotional at the time. i am a very, very lucky to sit here with my fiance and my two kids. they are a lwa ys fiance and my two kids. they are always there for me. some people do not have that. i feel places like the centre give this people the opportunity to share problems and speak... and hope, exactly that. i
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mean, even be a friend. very, very proud to be part of it. so many amazing projects going on all over the country in what is the world ‘s oldest football league. todayis world ‘s oldest football league. today is all about celebrating those campaigns and projects and all that work that allows life to be changed. you are singing about the rates before. eunice and paul. you have been helped by middlesbrough. take me back. you came over to this country from eritrea and it was tough. it was at times and eventually omit with a lady called elsa working for charity groups and she put me in contact with the foundation. an i became involved
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with them. if it had not been for the club reaching out to you, they would have been darker days because it was tough in middlesbrough at the time and this idea, paul, that you do working with social cohesion and integration is so important?m do working with social cohesion and integration is so important? it is. middlesbrough gets oversubscribed with refugees and asylum seekers and new arrivals and the foundation is seen as welcoming. you have great friends? things are going good? i have lots of friends and things are good. going well. very well. so nice to meet you both. come and meet lauren. bristol. you had a tough time asa lauren. bristol. you had a tough time as a teenager. talk us through
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some of the challenges and how bristol helped you ? some of the challenges and how bristol helped you? the community trust gave me a safe place to go. they help me get my emotions out. they help me get my emotions out. they help me being in going through the homeless shelter and gave me a new house. with your mum. give her a hello. you have had some tough times. your mum has multiple sclerosis and you are living in hostels for quite a long time. yes and with people that aren't always nice to be around. the community helped a lot. are you a big fan?|j go every now and then. it is a brilliant hearing all those stories. so much more to hear later on. and now we're to the news, travel and weather wherever you are waking up.
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take away, gents. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. mp's have come to the defence of grime music artists, saying they're the victims of prejudice and discrimination. the same committee of mp's have taken the unusual step of warning music fans — against using the ticket resale site, viagogo. it comes as hundreds of customers who use the site it comes as hundreds of customers who use the site have complained of being overcharged. mps say viagogo — which was started in londonjust over a decade ago — has a history of flouting customer law and has yet to prove itself trustworthy. viagogo insists it's made improvements. mp's have come to the defence of grime music artists, saying they're the victims of prejudice and discrimination. a committee of mp's argue that the genre of music, which has made stars of people like south london's stormzy — is at risk — as many venues turn down requests for live performances. london artist shadow, told mp's how a venue once cancelled on the day of his performance when they realised what kind of music he was playing.
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there are calls for the government to offer guidelines to venues and local authorities. londoners know what an expensive city this is to live in but it may come as a surprise that we're nowhere near the most expensive. although london has climbed up the global rankings, to the 22nd most expensive, you don't have to go far to be in the world's joint most expensive. it's paris. let's take a look at the travel situation now... tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow at the moment. on the roads, in the west end of london: 10 bus routes are on diversion as regent street is closed southbound at oxford circus. that's for emergency water works. in hounslow, hanworth road is closed for gas works. while the a1 northbound has a lane closed for roadworks — just before mill hill circus.
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mitcham: cricket green remains closed northbound for roadworks now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. it's another very quite day of weather today. it will stay dry or mostly dry. perphaps just a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud, at times. an aweful lot of cloud around today, with maybe a few brighter spells here and there. and it's a reasonably mild start to the day as well. temperatures generally between 5 and 7 degrees celsius. a few early mist patches aruond, they shouldn't last too long. a few early mist patches around, they shouldn't last too long. we'll keep that low cloud through the morning. maybe something a bit brighter developing through the middle part of the day for many areas. temperatures all the way up to 12 to 14 degrees celsius with just a light breeze. as we head through the afternoon the cloud will thicken at times. overnight tonight, we will keep those layers of cloud. again, a little bit of mist, some hill fog around. and a milder start to the day tomorrow than we are seeing at the moment, between 7 and 8 degrees celsius. no big changes for the next few days.
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it's going to stay dry and settled. perhaps a few more spells of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures generally between 15 and 16 degrees celsius and then cooler at the weekend. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london from 7 with her breakfast show until 10. i'll be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. theresa may will chair a meeting of the cabinet this morning, as she considers her next steps in the brexit process. they'll discuss their response to the commons speakerjohn bercow‘s refusal to allow a third vote on the prime minister's brexit deal. mr bercow said mps couldn't keep voting on the same question. a senior government official has said the process of leaving the european union will now be "significa ntly more complicated". new zealand's prime minister has
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said she will never say the name of the man accused of killing fifty people at mosques in christchurch. jacinda ardern has been talking in the country's parliament where she urged her fellow citizens to do the same and said the person responsible would face the "full force of the law" he sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. that is why you will never hear me mention his name. he is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when i speak, be nameless. two others, i implore you, speak their names of those who are lost, rather than a name who took them. the uk has pledged to donate up to six million pounds in aid to assist rescue efforts across several african nations after they were hit by cyclone idai. more than 1000 people are feared dead in mozambique alone with many
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more in need of food, shelter and medical supplies across large parts of malawi and zimbabwe. a man's been arrested after three people were killed on a tram in the dutch city of utrecht. he's been identified as gokmen tanis, who's 37 and from turkey. officers say the motive for the shooting isn't clear. the incident led to a city—wide manhunt and the closure of schools. nhs patients may not benefit from improvements in cancer treatment because of a shortage of senior doctors, according to the royal college of radiologists. a survey has found 70 consultant clinical oncologist posts are currently vacant in the uk, more than half of which have remained unfilled for at least a year. there may not be enough clean water to supply england's needs within 25 years, the chief executive of the environment agency will warn today. sirjames bevin will tell a conference that climate change and a growing population will threaten supplies unless we take ambitious action.
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the water companies say they are committed to cutting leaks and helping people cut useage. the harlem globetrotters are known around the world for their tricks and ball skills but look what happened when they asked members of the crowd if they wanted to give it a go. an enthusiastic fan gets his hands on the ball — talk about stealing the limelight! turns out of course he isn'tjust anybody, but the basketball freestyle world champion, pawel kidon! i'm not sure many people can produce this kind of magic with a basketball. that is very impressive. the things he does at his arms! love it. and, official happy birthday to
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dan! thanks! i've had enough of them. if you want to bring me some take, you can. i didn't, i forgot! them. if you want to bring me some take, you can. i didn't, iforgot! i forgot it was your birthday... thank you, that is lovely. i can think of no finer way to spend it on with you. i never say no to take. no finer way to spend it on with you. i never say no to takelj no finer way to spend it on with you. i never say no to take. i will bring one tomorrow. carol will be here with the weather at 7:45. what a weekend it was for wales, you think they would be partied out. they had a big homecoming last night. i love the look on alun wyn jones's face, he definitely looks like they have had a big party! warren gatland says wales can bring the world cup home.
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a public reception was held at the senedd in cardiff bay following their record 14th win in a row over ireland and gatland says if they play like they did in the six nations they can win the sport's biggest prize. we enjoy each other‘s company, we challenge each other on a lot of things, we don't always agree but when we make a decision we support each other 100% and that is the way things work for us really well. i promise you these guys will give 100% in every game in the world cup, and if we play as well as we played for the last year and in this tournament then we can bring home the world cup. what a moment for chelsea youngster callum hudson odoi who's been called up to the england squad for the first time. he's yet to start a game for chelsea in the premier league this season but is a late inclusion in gareth southgate's senior squad ahead of games against the czech republic and montenegro. he admitted he thought his manager wasjoking when he was told the news.
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so how has he made thejump up? he was part of that brilliant under—17s side that won the world cup a few years ago. only made 19 appearances for chelsea so far, mainly as a substitute, and not much in the premier league. but that didn't stop the german giants bayern munich making a huge bid for him injanuary, a move the 18—year—old wanted to make before chelsea said no. if the papers are to be believed today, britain's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, could be in line to mke a bid for chelsea football club after stepping in to secure the future of team sky. the cycling outfit have enjoyed huge success on the road, but with sky ending its backing at the end of the season, ratcliffe, who's worth around £21 billion, will become the new principal backer, renaming it team ineos after the chemical company that he owns. dame kelly holmes, paula radcliffe and sharron davies are writing to the international olympic committee to ask for more research to be done on the benefits of being a transgender athlete. they're worried about sport being "manipulated", and have questioned whether it's "fair for a biological man
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to compete alongside women". athletes who've transitioned and want to compete have to keep their testosterone levels below a certain level for at least a year, but radcliffe says more research is needed to keep competition fair. now, it's a claim that might not go down too well back home, but australian cricket legend shane warne reckons england are one of the favourites to win this summer's cricket world cup. it's being played here in england so home advantage could be key, and warne says he's been really impressed with england's progress in the shorter form of the game. england and india, i think. i think they go in as favourites. i love the style england are playing, i think they are very well led by eoin morgan, he has instilled confidence in their team where theyjust go out and play. and they are super aggressive, which i love. and after the world cup, in the ashes there could be a big
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change to players' kits. england and australia are expected to wear names and numbers on the their shirts in what would be the biggest change to kit in 142 years as test cricket goes through a bit of a revamp. it already happens in shorter forms of the game. we've seen the extremes people will go to break a world record ? but skiing in your swimwear has to be a step too far? this is what these russian skiiers are attempting. trying to break a record the resort holds for the most swimwear—clad skiers and snowboarders. i like the stripy ones that come down ina i like the stripy ones that come down in a minute. there they are! i like the stripy ones that come down in a minute there they are!|j can give you a pair of those via birthday, if you want. a thousand and eight set the record a few years ago. but organisers say rain and fog put people off —
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not the risk of frostbite. you would think frostbite would be a bit offputting. disappointing to so many to turn up and not get a record. you would be so cranky at all those who said they would come down and didn't. in the light of the massacre at a mosque in new zealand, questions are being raised about what the uk is doing to tackle far—right extremism. brenton tarrant, who's been charged with murder following the attacks in christchurch, was able to spread his views around the world using social media. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. police in stand well in surrey last night after a non— fatal stabbing, which detectives suspect was a terrorist attack inspired by the far right. it raised new concerns about the possibility of a new zealand style attack in the uk. 21 months ago, there was an attack on worshippers near a mosque in finsbury park. darren osborne drove
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into a finsbury park. darren osborne drove intoa group finsbury park. darren osborne drove into a group of muslims, killing macro mallee. of those that we have had most concerned about, and that is something called the channel programme, last year almost half of those were far right extremists. counter—terrorist and m15 have experienced a sudden surge in the threat from the extreme right wing. four attacks got through, three murders and one that came very close. of the 18 foiled suspected terrorist plots in the last few yea rs, terrorist plots in the last few years, four came from the extreme right wing. vicious languor devout muslims has been circulating... had a regents park mosque today, sajid javid was repeatedly warned about the language that had crept into everyday politics. our leaders that
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use language like "sixasian paedophiles,", they need to be called to account. some recent uk attacks have been linked to neo—nazi groups, like the national action group. but some are simply driven by the unrestrained extremism that can be found in parts of the internet.. number of people are self radicalising. they are not members of organisations or at best is in far right groups, but are listening to the propaganda, watching it on the internet and becoming inspired by it, and without any political background that all are then acting to carry it out. so, another far right attack could easily happen in the uk, but strict gun laws make a mass casualties firearms attack unlikely. hifsa haroon iqbal is from the government's prevent scheme, which aims to stop people
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being radicalised. i know you have been working in this for some time now. have you noticed a rise in the far right? absolutely. i think if you look at the data that was released by the home office last year, it is very clear that there has been a massive increase in the number of referrals that are coming through to prevent cases that went to channel over the last few months. it was a 50—50 split between islamist ideologies and far right ideologies. and, mark roughley last year made the comment that there was a real sense of the far right increasing in this country. and it is not something that anyone should be ignoring, particularly after the events in christchurch last week. be ignoring, particularly after the events in christchurch last weekm the past you have written about your experiences of far right ideology growing up in leeds in the 19705, you think there is a difference now?
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ha5 you think there is a difference now? has the ideology changed? absolutely, when i was growing up in the things i have specifically written about was about the national front. if you look at far right groups in this country now and in other parts of the country, whether we call them far right or extreme right wing, ultimately we are talking about groups and individuals who have a very specific worldview thatis who have a very specific worldview that is anti—immigration, anti— muslim, and it has this sort of nation used agenda. so, they are talking about this cultural identity and they buy into conspiracy theories around the great — i have lost the word... from the manifesto of this chap, the great replacement, my apologies for that. and they talk about how the white race is being taken over and being replaced by the
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other, the other being muslims. that is very different from when i was growing up, because that was purely based on skin colour. this is very much an anti—immigration and anti— muslim sentiment that is growing, not just muslim sentiment that is growing, notjust in this part of the world but in britain as well. what can be done to change minds? prevent has been very clear that it is about stopping people from becoming involved in something that could ta ke involved in something that could take them down the route of either supporting terrorism or committing a terrorist offence themselves. it was reviewed in 2011, making it very clear that this was not about a particular community or particular faith group. it is across the board. and there was a recognition at the time that the far right was increasing in this country. and, if you look at the work of some of my collea g u es you look at the work of some of my colleagues who have been working
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with prevent for a lot longer than i have, they will tell you that they are getting referrals from far right cases as far back as 2008. and it works by raising the awareness of what radicalisation is, how it takes place, and actually what vulnerabilities are, how they can support young people who may be vulnerable for all sorts of reasons. whether it is poverty, identity, and about making sure that they receive the right support at the right time. prevent basically works in the same way that every safeguard concerned works, whether you are talking about child exploitation or radicalisation. all of the referrals are voluntary, aren't they? had used people slipping through the net? at the end of the day, we are human beings and all we can do is raise awareness. look at myself, i work specifically with colleges and
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universities, so i do a lot of work with staff and students about raising understanding about how this agenda works. how people might pull you into a particular agenda, make you into a particular agenda, make you believe certain things. in the end, it is about safeguarding, making sure people notice changes, changes that may concern them. people who may continually do or say certain things, and it is about making sure they know what those processors are to ensure that individual receives the right support at the right time. so we have something called the channel scheme, which is a mentoring scheme, where those individuals who agree to having the support, and a vast majority of them do, will be put in touch with people who can provide them with the right support and hopefully take them away from this area of influence that they are coming under. thank you very much real time. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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it is foggy for some of us this morning. a lovely weather watching picture. we have some dense fog in linkage and if the vale of york which will slowly lift as we go through the day. for most of us, drying, cloudy and milder. as always, there is a fine ointment. the first one bringing in apache light rain and the next one bringing in heavy rain. busy as well but particularly across the north—west. some of this cloud is producing the odd shower here and there ahead of the weather front. the weather front
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goes through taking the rain and this is the second one coming in. a lot of cloud, dampness, some brighter breaks, for example in north—east scotland. and we could see highs of 13—14 degrees in those breaks. for most of us, fairly cloudy. rain into southern scotland, northern ireland and possibly into northern england. some clearance in the north of scotland. breaks in the clouds but not anticipating any problems with frost. tomorrow, that jetstrea m problems with frost. tomorrow, that jetstream is to the north of us. allowing high pressure to build across allowing high pressure to build a cross m ost allowing high pressure to build across most of the uk. the milder colours are telling you the air will be milder as well. tomorrow is the spring equinox and it will feel quite springlike. some holes in the
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cloud to the east of high ground. north—east scotland could see some sunshine. the north—west, a weather front producing rain and gusty winds, 50 miles per hour. temperature wise, if you ignore eight degrees up here, most of us mild for the time of year. wednesday sees high pressure still ripping our weather. the weather front not making much progress, bringing in some rain. a brighter day with sun sunshine. further south, we are looking for the holes in the cloud. there will be sunny intervals as well. the breeze will be that bit lighter. not as windy across the north—west. 9—15. friday, the weather front across scotland and northern ireland. quite a bit of cloud around ahead of it. rain sinking into northern england in north—west wales. where we have the brakes, highs of up to 16. something
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will big call—up for the weekend. not too bad. not too bad, about 13. i don't mind a cool weekend. good morning. you are watching breakfast on the bbc. more than four million people work in hospitality in the uk, 700,000 of them are from the eu. steph is at a hotel in york this morning, the latest stop on our brexit roadtrip to find out how different parts of the economy are getting ready. good morning to you. as soon as the tv camera comes out, everyone had. everyone says it is too early to be on telly. we're talking to the tourism and hospitality sector. have a look at the view from where i am. the beauty that is york minster.
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that is 800 years old, took 250 yea rs that is 800 years old, took 250 years to build. it is buildings like that and other parts of the city which attract lots of tourists. tourists who are crucial to make sure the city fries. lots of people working in every sector wondering what brexit will mean for them. sarah, tell me a bit about your business and what you do? me and my brother opened a coffee shop in bath nearly five years ago now. we have taken a second venue over a year ago so things are going well. how do you feel about what is going on? so things are going well. how do you feel about what is going 0mm so things are going well. how do you feel about what is going on? it is exciting if nothing else. i have about five members of staff from the eu and! about five members of staff from the eu and i think the perception is that whatever happens, and we really
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do not know at the moment, a slight feeling of being unsettled and not welcomed any more even if we ended up welcomed any more even if we ended up remaining, they might leave and that would be said for my business. have you had to do any preparation? it is hard because we do not know what is going on. we are a small business and i am just waiting to see. i felt like we have been saying i don't know for about forever. let's wonder past. good morning, sir. we have with us tony and kate. how many croissant have you now eaten? i lost count and i haven't even started on the muffins yet. tell me a bit about what it is like in hospitality at the moment? the uncertainty around brexit is not helping in terms of investment
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decisions and employment. the british workforce is augmented with foreign workers and a lot of doubts and fears from that part of the workforce. have you seen stuff leaving businesses, eu nationals who have gone back already? most of that was immediately after the referendum. we have seen the net migration figures suggesting that is happening anyway so it would affect a sector such as ours. what preparation have businesses been doing? in terms of employees, really, all you can do is to ensure they are well informed if they are foreign workers about their right to remain. if they have the right documentation at least let them know how to do that. as a recruiter, you know a lot about what is going on in this sector. are there lots ofjobs
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in hospitality? still loads of opportunities. whether you are skilled or not skilled. that is not pushed enough. come and start with us pushed enough. come and start with us and you can progress and have a great career. the industry needs to sell itself better, to younger people, getting schemes rain, knowing you can have a long—term career. it is great to work in. people do not necessarily know the industry, that it is poorly paid and tough hours. there are some employers that remain like that but a lot is changing. people are saying yesterday they were looking at more flexible working and flexible sheaves to try and attract workers into hospitality. that is interesting. it is about engaging
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with people and making sure the team is ok and if you do that you have a great working environment and people will stay with you and get that development. hospitality have steps to do that and that would solve some of the problems. i think it will be filled with other things regardless. i will let you finish your pastries. to be fair, they have not eaten all of them. anyway, more from me a little bit later. we wa nt we want to talk about our favourite story. back by popular demand. a pigeon has sold for more than 1.1 million pounds. he's called armando and is described as the most successful racing bird of all time. he's already retired and is now living the life of riley in china. so what makes him so valuable? caroline rigby reports described as the lewis hamilton of pigeon racing, armando has created quite a coup.
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exceptionally strong wings and a fantastic sense of direction make him one of the best competitors of all time. but, despite spending his life flying in the fast lane, the online auction initially crawled by. fuelled by the growing popularity of pigeon racing in china, it is thought two chinese fanciers fought over two weeks to take him under their wing. eventually, a dramatic race to the finish saw armando sell for more than $1.4 million, $1 million more than the going rate for his fellow feathered athletes. translation: a very special day. we got up thinking, is it going to rise a lot more, or not? we'd hoped for a little more, as we'd already broken the record, but he's more than doubled. that was hectic, incredible. the five—year—old, who could live until he is 20, will now swap beating his wings for breeding, as one of the world's greatest ever
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homing pigeons moves to his new home — a chinese stud farm. so many funds one pigeon fax fact, 60 miles an hour and they can do that for many hours. no other animal can do that. i am excited because we will have a pigeon here... not that one, too expensive. time to get the news and travel where you. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. mp's have taken the unusual step of warning music fans — against using the ticket resale site, viagogo. it comes as hundreds of customers
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who use the site have complained of being overcharged. mp5 say viagogo, which was started in london just over a decade ago, has a history of flouting customer law and has yet to prove itself trustworthy. viagogo insists it's made improvements. the same committee has come to the defence of grime music artists, saying they're the victims of prejudice and discrimination. a committee of mp's argue that the genre of music, which has made stars of people like south london's stormzy, is at risk as many venues turn down requests for live performances. london artist shadow, told mp's how a venue once cancelled on the day of his performance when they realised what kind of music he was playing. there are calls for the government to offer guidelines to venues and local authorities. one in five tube workers has been physically assaulted by the public.
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they have been threatened with knives and shoved towards train tracks. union bosses have called for action against the growing tide of violence. every assault is fully investigated and it is working with police. londoners know what an expensive city this is to live in but it may come as a surprise that we're nowhere near the most expensive. although london has climbed up the global rankings, to the 22nd most expensive, you don't have to go far to be in the world's joint most expensive. it's paris. let's take a look at the travel situation now... talking of surprises, of good service on all lines. tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow at the moment. on the roads, in the west end of london: 10 bus routes are on diversion as regent street is closed southbound at oxford circus. that's for emergency water works. in hounslow, hanworth road is closed for gas works. hello, good morning. it's another very quite
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day of weather today. it will stay dry or mostly dry. perphaps just a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud, at times. an aweful lot of cloud around today, with maybe a few brighter spells here and there. and it's a reasonably mild start to the day as well. temperatures generally between 5 and 7 degrees celsius. a few early mist patches around, they shouldn't last too long. we'll keep that low cloud through the morning. maybe something a bit brighter developing through the middle part of the day for many areas. temperatures all the way up to 12 to 14 degrees celsius with just a light breeze. as we head through the afternoon the cloud will thicken at times. overnight tonight, we will keep those layers of cloud. again, a little bit of mist, some hill fog around. and a milder start to the day tomorrow than we are seeing at the moment, between 7 and 8 degrees celsius. no big changes for the next few days. it's going to stay dry and settled. perhaps a few more spells of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures generally between 15 and 16 degrees celsius and then cooler at the weekend. some decent temperatures they. vanessa feltz is on bbc
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radio london from 7:00 with her breakfast show until 10:00. i'll be back in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... what next for theresa may's brexit plan as a third vote on her deal is blocked? she'll chair a cabinet meeting this morning. good morning. one of the industries wanting to know what this means for thenit wanting to know what this means for then it is the hospitality sector, i and ata then it is the hospitality sector, i and at a hotel in york to find out how they are preparing. a race against time to help communities devastated by cyclone idai in south—east africa — thousands are homeless, many hundreds feared dead. england could run short of clean water within 25 years without urgent action — a stark warning from the head of the environment agency. in sport, warren gatland backs his wales side to bring the world cup "home" on a night of six nations
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celebrations in cardiff. some patching their stand fog to watch out for this morning, today will be generally cloudy, the cloud thick enough for some dampness and a bit breezy across the north west. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it's tuesday march 19th. our top story... theresa may will chair a meeting of the cabinet this morning, as she considers her next steps in the brexit process. a senior government official said it was significantly more complicated after the speaker, john bercow, announced he would prevent a third vote on the prime minister's brexit deal unless there were substantial changes. in a moment, we'll get reaction from brussels with our reporter, adam fleming. first let's speak to our political correspondent, iain watson, who's at westminster for us this morning. how serious is this? what does it mean? one of the most senior law officers in the government says it
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isa officers in the government says it is a constitutional crisis, and who amito is a constitutional crisis, and who am i to disagree? he says it is something which has simply not been welcomed by downing street and those around theresa may. essentially speakerjohn bercow says if she wa nts to speakerjohn bercow says if she wants to try to bring the deal back for a third time this week, she has no chance of doing that. brexit secretary stephen barclay has confirmed it is the case. theresa may has to go to brussels at the end of the week to ask european leaders for a short extension to brexit if she can get the deal through subsequently, or a much longer extension. there has been lots of sound and fury in newspapers, lots of people criticising john bercow, especially brexit supporters. i think theresa may will still have to concentrate minds and westminster and whether ministers are prepared to back a deal they do not like much to back a deal they do not like much to avoid a long extension to brexit. if she wants a vote on that you will have to wait until next week, there are parliamentary manoeuvres to try
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to bypass the latest barrier putting her way by speakerjohn bercow, but she would have to be pretty convinced that mp5 would be willing to change parliament rules and back a deal. this is an additional obstacle, but the fundamental problem for theresa may is getting the majority in the first place and there is no indication yet that she has managed to do so. thank you, iain. our reporter adam fleming is in brussels for us this morning. let's find out how that latest development has gone down, there. good morning, adam. it depends on who you ask in brussels, some people think it is a massive spanner in the works that makes theresa may's life very difficult and others think it isa very difficult and others think it is a speed bump and nothing has changed, theresa may will be coming to asymmetry of eu leaders on thursday where she will ask them to delay brexit from the 29th of march and they will either say yes, yes with conditions attached or no. —— a
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summit of eu leaders. we had a meeting of you're in —— european affairs ministers from member states, they are preparing the ground for the meeting on thursday. label the cut the legal, political and constitutional implications, the pros and cons, they will not make a decision. it is about laying the groundwork. but we have seen a memo prepared by one of those member states which reveals what the eu is worried about, one of those things as if you have a long delay to brexit then the uk will indulge in arm—twisting, either about negotiating the future permanent relationship between the uk and the eu which is only meant to be negotiated after brexit day, not when the uk is still a member, and that the uk could use continued membership to affect big decisions made by the eu including its long—term budget from 2021 to 2027, which would have to be decided in 2020. that gibson idea of some of
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the concerns the eu has while making this decision of the extension —— that gives some idea. but all the signs are that the eu will say yes if the uk asks to delay brexit, although with some caveats added. new zealand's prime minister has said she will never say the name of the man accused of killing 50 people at mosques in christchurch. jacinda ardern has been talking in the country's parliament where she urged her fellow citizens to do the same. he sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. that is why you will never hear me mention his name. he is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist, but he will, when i speak, be nameless. to others, i implore you, speak their names of those who are lost, rather than a name who took them.
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a very powerful speech. our correspondent phil mercer is in christchurch. what else did she say? before that would have justice. the what else did she say? before that would havejustice. the new zealand pm jacinta arjun took issue with facebook, saying it did not do enough to remove the graphic vision live screen —— live streams by the gunman during his attack. —— the new zealand pm, jacinda ardern. the prime minister said the vision is still available online and it is facebook‘s responsibility to remove it. in response, we are hearing there are companies in new zealand thinking about removing their advertising from social media. one state—run lottery has already done so. worth noting that the chief censorin so. worth noting that the chief censor in new zealand has declared that video officially objectionable,
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meaning it will be an offence here to view, have all shared that sort of material. as far as the survivors are concerned, of material. as far as the survivors are concerned , we of material. as far as the survivors are concerned, we understand that 30 people remain in hospital in christchurch, nine of them critically ill. thank you, phil mercer. the uk has pledged to donate up to £6 million in aid to assist rescue efforts across several african nations after they were hit by cyclone idai. more than 1000 people are feared dead in mozambique alone, with many more in need of food, shelter and medical supplies across large parts of malawi and zimbabwe. aid workers say an area around 50 kilometre wide is under water. and in a short while, we'll speak to save the children's emergency response manager in mozambique to get the latest on the rescue operation. nhs patients may not benefit from improvements in cancer treatment because of a shortage of senior doctors, according to
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the royal college of radiologists. a survey has found 70 consultant clinical oncologist posts are currently vacant in the uk — more than half of which have remained unfilled for at least a year. there may not be enough clean water to supply england's needs within 25 years. that's the warning from the chief executive of the environment agency. sirjames bevin will tell a water industry conference later today that climate change and a growing population means unless we have a different attitude to water, in a few decades there may not be enough to go round. keith doyle reports. our summers are getting hotter and drier, which means there will be less water available, with some rivers having 80% less during these months. a growing population, particularly in the south—east, means there will be significant water shortages by 2050. this stark warning comes from the chief executive of england's environment agency,
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sirjames bevan, who says we are facing what he calls the jaws of death, the point on a graph where water supply falls below demand. this could happen in 25 years unless we change our attitudes to water. he says we need to balance our needs between protecting the environment and natural water sources. the shortage can be prevented. he says cutting personal consumption from 140 to 100 litres, and reducing leakages, would give enough clean water for an extra 20 million people. building desalination plants, new reservoirs, and moving water across the country from where there is a surplus is another solution. water companies say they are committed to cutting leaks and helping people cut consumption. the government, water companies and the public all have a role to play, according to the head
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of the environment agency, who says wastage of water needs to become as socially unacceptable as throwing plastic bags into the sea. good morning, you are watching brea kfast. a lot of progress has been made in tackling the stigma around mental health, but almost half of men are still not asking for help when they need it. that's according to research by samaritans which found that two in five men between the age of 20 and 59 prefer to try to solve problems themselves. we're joined now by neil peters from samaritans and tony robertson, who struggled with undiagnosed depression for most of his life. good morning, thank you both very much forjoining us. we will continue in a minute, tony. neil, pa rt continue in a minute, tony. neil, part of this new survey is to just get one conversation, you think even one conversation could turn a life around? we are launching the real
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people, real stories campaign today and want men in particular to understand that seeking help before they reach crisis is important. the campaign is men who have come through tough times, sharing stories of hope, they have come through a difficult time and can get better. who was that conversation with for you, tony? with my mum, on the back ofa you, tony? with my mum, on the back of a suicide attempt i had made it felt like a bit of a turning point. i started to open up, i decided i did want to be here, it felt like a huge relief. for a did want to be here, it felt like a huge relief. fora number of did want to be here, it felt like a huge relief. for a number of years i had been struggling internally and not let it show, if you like, i had been putting a bit of a facade up, but that conversation initially with my mam and those close to me over the coming weeks and months started to come things —— things together. a
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vestigial mum initiate the conversation, or did you feel more comfortable? conversation, or did you feel more comfortable ? it was conversation, or did you feel more comfortable? it was myself, something changed my mindset, i knew i really wanted to be here and i knew something needed to change, and for the first time i started to genuinely open up. for years i had given it lip service until people what they wanted to hear, but for the first time i was pretty honest and over the coming it became easier and over the coming it became easier and easier to open up and my whole mindset changed, it was the one conversation that started it and it followed from birth. sometimes you think they are stereotypes, but you we re very think they are stereotypes, but you were very much saying you did not wa nt to were very much saying you did not want to talk and all the rest, how did you get that change? you were in a very desperate state. how do you get people to start conversations before that? it is almost normalising the fact that people can
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seek help, having those conversations, being inspired by stories like tony's. men are not necessarily that great at starting conversations and opening up and talking about how they are feeling, we are trying to encourage the fact that people do that. how defence and family open the conversation, when they can see somebody is clearly struggling? —— how do friends and family? not being afraid of what they might say, asking direct questions, not closed questions. ask how they are feeling, don't ask a question that may be a yes or no response. ask how they are feeling. ask if they are feeling suicidal, it will not make the conversation worse, it might help them to open up. if somebody is watching this
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this morning and know somebody who might be going through the same thoughts and feelings that you were, what would your advice be to bend this morning? that they are not alone, far more people are suffering in the same way and that one conversation can make all the difference, just to know that there is somebody who cares, a nonjudgemental year, somebody who can be there and share whatever problems they are going through, they are very real and difficult and they are very real and difficult and they are very real and difficult and they are struggling to manage them, but the initial conversation can be the start. open questions, direct questions. and how did you respond to those direct questions, was it difficult? it was initially, but the more that you do it... initially it was like a weight off my shoulders, i was finally being honest about what was going on in my mind and what was going on in my mind and what was going on in my mind and what was thinking, then it generally
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gets easier to the point whereas in a few months i was openly going to people seeking to talk, as opposed to waiting for them to come to me do people open up to you because you are open? two very much so, i have been quite open for the last two or three years and i find people are saying, i three years and i find people are saying, lam three years and i find people are saying, i am going through something similar, it is great you are talking. the idea is to encourage more people to do that, it is really important. it is very encouraging advice, it is sometimes hard to know how to listen and respond when you hear those things. there is a fear you may make the situation worse, but we know that it's not the case. if people create a space where people can talk, i contact, reiterate back to them what they said so you understand what they are saying, make a space for them to talk to you. presumably, tony, it is
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ongoing. it is not an overnight cure, there are days where you feel in that dark place, my coping mechanisms are different, i have replaced a lot of negative coping strategies with positive ones. the most important one has been to talk to people. i do that everyday, when lam to people. i do that everyday, when i am feeling down i will have a coffee with somebody or pick up the phone, that is the biggest shift for me and the most positive outcome for it. i know sitting on live television with lots of people cannot be easy, thank you so much for coming on today, you have helped a family, for coming on today, you have helped afamily, an for coming on today, you have helped a family, an individual, many people. great to talk to you. details of organisations offering information and support with mental health are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free, at any time to hear recorded information on 08000155 998.
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you can contact the samaritans on the free helpline 116 123. to make contact if you need to. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. how are you, carol? very well, thank you, hope you are, too. the weather is quite mixed, some others are seeing some sunshine. this little dog is enjoying that. for some, there is quite dense felt, across parts of lincolnshire and yorkshire. the order of the day will be fairly cloudy, damp at times, patchy light rain and drizzle buds and sunny spells and milder than yesterday. we have to weather fronts coming our way, this one producing patchy light rain, the second one coming behind
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it will be more potent, as you can see from the isobars across the north of scotland it will be quite windy. light breezes for most. lots of clouds to start the day, showers and patchy light rain and drizzle in the west, drifting is through the day. then we had a second system coming on across the north—west which will bring some heavier rain. in between, some glimpses of sunshine, for example across north—east scotland, some eastern parts of england, particularly so if you are in the shelter of the pennines and the shelter of welsh hills. temperature —wise, nine in lerwick to about 14 towards london. through the evening and overnight, lots of clouds, a weather front six across scotland, taking rain into the south, northern ireland and potentially as far south as northern england. there will be holes in the clouds ahead of it and behind it, but not anticipating any problems
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with frost, overnight close between six and nine. ajet stream to with frost, overnight close between six and nine. a jet stream to the north of us tomorrow allows high pressure to build across the uk. yellow and timbre indicates it will be milder, some more springlike weather for the spring equinox. be milder, some more springlike weatherfor the spring equinox. lots of cloud interspersed with sunny spells, a weather front bringing rain across the north—west of scotland, it will be particularly windy, gusting to 50 mph, but look at those temperatures, 14 to 16, possibly 17 towards the south—east. wednesday into thursday, high pressure is still ensconced, the weather front is trying to make inroads across the north west. it will introduce rain during thursday but it will not be as wendy across the north—west as it will on wednesday. fairly cloudy for the rest of us, we are looking for holes in that cloud to see sunshine, and
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there will be some around. temperatures of nine in lowick and stornoway, 16 in hull, 15 towards london. on friday we have all this rain, totals mounting up, particularly so across north—west scotland. still a fair bit of cloud, once again there will be brighter breaks. temperatures ranging from nine to about 16. into the weekend, temperatures slip a little bit, but it will be brighter through the weekend, so instead of16, of 16, highs of that to 13. let's return to one of our top stories now. cyclone idai has claimed more than 1000 lives in mozambique alone. it's swept through a number of african countries and the uk has pledged up to six million pounds
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in aid to help rescue efforts. we can speak now to daisy sitoi, who is an emergency response manager at save the children, who joins us from the capital of mozambique, maputo. thanking some much forjoining us, i know you are probably incredibly busy but it is important for us to get information on what is happening. how many people and how many children in particular have been impacted? good morning. the assessment is ongoing, we don't have exact figures, but it is estimated that six injured person people will be affected by this event. yesterday the president of mozambique did an assessment and he mentioned that 84 people are dead and there is 100,000
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people are dead and there is 100,000 people at risk now and they need urgent support to save their lives. we are looking at pictures coming in from that cyclone, what sort of support are you providing on the ground through the charity? we have a cargo arriving today with non—food items. also we are still planning our response. we are working as a consortium, which is safe the children, oxfam and care, we are looking at all areas like washing, food security, child
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protection, all those things to make the life of people impacted acceptable. we are seeing pictures of people being rescued, standing on top of things above the flood water. in terms of access, how hard is it to get to some of these areas? is still a challenge by road. some of the sections of main roads are cut. but it is possible to reach that place using aeroplanes as well as by c. but at the same time we have another province that is also having heavy rain as a consequence of the cyclone, we don't yet have the
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numbers of people affected. assess m e nt numbers of people affected. assessment is ongoing. but this province, it is possible to reach it by road. thank you for coming on the programme. i know we had some problems with sound, but really important to find out what save the children are doing, and daisy was telling us about hundreds of thousands of people, children particularly, in real danger at the moment, trying to access then, keep them warm and housed. we know the government here is donating money for that rescue effort. steph mcgovern is in york, telling us steph mcgovern is in york, telling us how brexit might affect tourism. good morning. look at this beautiful view, gawker minster, over 800 good morning. look at this beautiful view, gawker minster, over800 years old. 250 yea rs view, gawker minster, over800 years old. 250 years it took to build. ——
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york minster. lots of tourists come to york every year and they really rely on it in the city. there are many other industries, tourism is big. one of the people who rely on it is this hotel. we are looking at what of the impact —— what the impact is of brexit industries like hospitality and tillerson. i will be speaking to various tests, and we have a couple of vikings over from thejorvik have a couple of vikings over from the jorvik centre. have a couple of vikings over from thejorvik centre. we have kate and sarah, good morning. they have made their way through the breakfast buffet and are ready to chat. they rn barrister bout that! more from me later. —— they are embarrassed about that. very good. sold for over £1 million, we are talking about why he is so
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valuable, there will be a pitching here to explain. excuse me, mister picture, can you explain?! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. yesterday was dominated by heavy rain and showers. a little bit of sunshine giving some lovely rainbows. today for many it will be dry and mild, compared to the last few days. lots of cloud around through this morning that will last into the afternoon. the mist and the merc will clear away. they could be spots of rain in western and northern parts of scotland. elsewhere it should remain
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dry and there will be breaks developing to give some brighter spells. maximum temperatures higher than yesterday, about 11 to 14 degrees. tonight it could turn misty and murky and they will be some hill and murky and they will be some hill and coastal fog and some and murky and they will be some hill and coastalfog and some rain and murky and they will be some hill and coastal fog and some rain across northern ireland and into southern scotla nd northern ireland and into southern scotland and the far north of england. but again, a mild night with temperatures no lower than six to8 with temperatures no lower than six to 8 degrees. the mild air sticks with us over the next few days. you can see it coming up from the south. this weather front in scotland separating where the colder air will be across the far north of scotland during wednesday. a lot of cloud again on wednesday but they will be brea ks again on wednesday but they will be breaks developing to give us some sunny spells. it will feel like spring during wednesday. temperatures getting 14, 16 and perhaps 17 degrees. but cloud and outbreaks of rain in the far north—west. these weather fronts
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dominating towards the north and west. high pressure is dominating towards much of the uk, but with the rain across the north it will continue and it will bring gusty winds during thursday. elsewhere, on thursday, it will be a dry day. fairly cloudy but some brighter or sunny spells. temperatures up at 14 to 16, perhaps 17 degrees. colderto the north of the weather front with 9 degrees in the far north of scotland. that is it from me, goodbye.
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