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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 19, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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i'm karishma vaswan in singapore. the headlines: fears of at least 1,000 dead in mozambique after cyclone idai fears that hundreds of thousands hits the country, leaving a 30—mile are homeless in africa after what the un says might be one of the worst natural disasters stretch of land underwater. to hit the southern hemisphere. theresa may asks for more time. the prime minister will tomorrow write to the european council president to lay out the really striking thing as you the government's plan for delaying brexit, but an impatient brussels walk through he isjust wants a concrete strategy. the really striking thing as you walk through he is just how exhausted they are. person after person has come up to us, asking for help, wondering when aid is going to new zealand's prime minister has arrive. the first funerals begin vowed never to say the name in christchurch for some of the 50 of the christchurch mosque gunman. people who were killed in the mosque it comes as people gather attacks last friday. in the city for a burial ceremony i'm kasia madera in london. for one of the victims. also in the programme: 50 people were killed theresa may will write to the eu to ask for a brexit extension, in last friday's attack. possibly for a few months or maybe for up to two years. and a warning from the head the eu's negotiator sounds unimpressed. of the environment agency that, within 25 years, england will not and after 18 years, polio returns to papua new guinea. have enough water to meet demand.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster david davies, and jessica elgot, the chief political correspondent for the guardian. most of tomorrow's front pages are now in. the guardian carries a striking picture of the devastation caused by cyclone idai, in southern africa, as the search for survivors continues. the metro leads on a letter that theresa may will send to the eu on wednesday formally asking for brexit to be postponed. but the times carries a warning from brussels that the price of an extension could be a general election or another referendum. the mirror reports on fractures in theresa may's cabinet, with eurosceptic ministers said to be furious over the possibility of a long delay to brexit. reports of a cabinet row also make the front page of the express. it says the commons leader, andrea leadsom, described her colleagues as a remainer cabinet.
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the daily mail bemoans what it calls 1,000 wasted days, as it tallies up the time since the uk voted to leave the eu. and finally, the sun claims itv has sent it a letter detailing new plans to offer therapy for love islanders, after the death of two of its stars. so a varied set of front pages, with brexit dominating most. let's see what our reviewers make of it all. i think we have to start, really, in southern africa. 0n the guardian, this striking picture really only gives you a snapshot of the devastation that has been caused by this cyclone idai. the race to find survivors after the deadly cyclone. imean, itjust...
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survivors after the deadly cyclone. i mean, itjust... it is so awful, it is almost difficult to comprehend, isn't it? it is, and people are saying it is one of the worst weather—related disasters in the southern hemisphere, which sort of gives you a sense of the scale of it. the fourth largest city in mozambique is apparently now effectively in ireland, cut off from the country, 500,000 people living there. and as you go further down there. and as you go further down the story, you just get sort of more and more details that really sort of you up. that people are having to decide whether to drop food for people stranded on rooftops or rescue them, depending on how dire their situation is. the risk of cholera and typhoid, you know, in stag na nt cholera and typhoid, you know, in stagnant water like this, and also, you know, how things could potentially get worse because there are major dams near these areas, at risk of bursting, some of them in major need of maintenance. so it really is i think a story that we are going to hear, unfortunately, more tragedy coming out of the coming days, if that is possible.
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and it is interesting, david, the focus has been on mozambique, but this has also hit neighbouring zimbabwe and malawi, hasn't it? these are not wealthy nations, these are some of the poorest nations on the planet, and malawi, as i mentioned an hour ago, is a country that i was lucky enough to visit in 2005. and, you know, it has made a huge impression on me, which still stays with me today. one of my friends helped to set up an irrigation, ironically, an irrigation, ironically, an irrigation scheme for a vast farm in malawi. but, you know, when you read this story, deadly floods ruining crops and killing and injuring thousands of people, it is difficult to comprehend. you know, even for those, i suspect, to comprehend. you know, even for those, isuspect, people to comprehend. you know, even for those, i suspect, people in our own country who have had terrible experiences, and quite recent —— in quite recent years, with floods ruining their homes, in some cases again and again. i was interesting
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to read, actually, that the official death toll in mozambique is 84, but the president of mozambique has said more than 1000 people may have been killed, and you can't help fearing that the numbers might rise. hundreds killed, but the toll expected to rise in coming days is the line in the guardian. let's turn to matters brexit, because in different ways that is all over different ways that is all over different front pages. it is a striking front page of the daily mail. 1000 wasted days. talk us through this, jessica. mail. 1000 wasted days. talk us through this, jessica. it is an incredibly striking page from the daily mail, it is quite difficult to disagree with it, although the daily mail shows its historic edition from the front page of the day after the referendum result, saying 1000 wasted days and if you look closely at one of the headlines, it says it also blames the hard brexit zealots, thatis also blames the hard brexit zealots, that is a bit of a turnaround from
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the daily mail and where they were perhaps 1000 days ago. but we have seen changes in the last 1000 days. we may yet see a fourth brexit secretary by the time this is out, we have had ten cabinet resignations, we have had votes lost by 230, the most historic margin ever, and yet where are we? in terms of material difference to the uk's position, apart from being sort of billions of pounds spent on preparing for brexit and no deal, we still don't actually know the way we're going to leave the european union. and whether you are a leaver 01’ union. and whether you are a leaver ora union. and whether you are a leaver or a remainer, union. and whether you are a leaver 01’ a remainer, you union. and whether you are a leaver or a remainer, you can't help thinking this will strike a front page with a lot of people. thinking this will strike a front page with a lot of peoplem thinking this will strike a front page with a lot of people. it will, and right in the middle are words a laughing stock. that is the real worry for some of us. the reputational damage to our country thatis reputational damage to our country that is being done by this whole process, and how it has been managed or mismanaged, however you want to
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describe it, is difficult to assess at the moment because it is not over yet. and you do wonder what, whatever the outcome is, and presumably one day all this will be over, somebody, you know, will have to do, you know, start again to rebuild this country and bring the country together. because, at the moment, those of us who are a little older cannot remember a time when this country was so divided. let's turn to the daily express. you don't wa nt to turn to the daily express. you don't want to deliver brexit. now, i think my understanding is that this is the leader of the commons, the cabinet member, of course, andrea leadsom, who blew her topping cabinet. is that fair to say, jessica, today? but didn't necessarily get the backup she was hoping for or expecting. i think that she... i think that andrea leadsom is certainly the strongest voice in
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cabinet, with some backup from the cabinet, with some backup from the cabinet secretary chris grayling and liam fox, others kept quieter, perhaps there was a bit of a disappointment. but certainly the positions of those cabinet ministers are looking very shaky tonight if the pm does press on and asks for a long extension. and is that the objection? it is the extension that she is asking for, the possibility ofa she is asking for, the possibility of a delay for brexit could be as long as 21 months. and you know, essentially, what downing street are thinking is that if they ask for that they are essentially starting to rip up the deal and starting again. for a lot of these ministers, who perhaps have their own qualms about theresa may's brexit deal, who stuck with it, that idea is com pletely stuck with it, that idea is completely galling. 0ne stuck with it, that idea is completely galling. one of the best exa m ples of completely galling. one of the best examples of that, i suppose, and we don't know what he is going to do over the coming days, is the brexit
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secretary, steve barclay, who gave a speech in the house of commons recommending an extension and then voted against it, explaining he didn't think he could countenance a long extension. what is his position like in the coming days? i think we are going to see a lot of turmoil. it is quite interesting how every single day, this time last night, your newspaper reviewers were talking about mr bercow, and at some length, and on the news tonight there was mr bercow with his rucksack over his back, he had offering people cups of coffee in that strange little coffee shop next to westminster station, and all the re st of to westminster station, and all the rest of it. and mr bercow has disappeared today. but you know, i am ina disappeared today. but you know, i am in a minority, not the first of the last time in my life, i've having some sympathy for mr bercow, not least on this issue, where constitutional experts have said whatever you think ofjohn bercow,
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his advice yesterday was right. going back to these presidents of 1604 and all the rest of it. and you do wonder, if that is the case, did the government know that was coming? and if they didn't, why did they not know that was coming?” and if they didn't, why did they not know that was coming? i think the argument, though, ifi know that was coming? i think the argument, though, if i am right, david, was that he has applied that inconsistently. so he has allowed other amendments to be brought back and brought back. so why would he not allow theresa may's deal to be brought back? it was unquestionable he could allow that issue to be raised. and it seemed the government was totally and utterly unprepared for what came out yesterday. i find that confounding. but jessica, it is your view, is it, that the cabinet is deeply split on this issue? we know they have all got different views, but this sounds quite serious. i think they are certainly deeply split on the matter of a long
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extension, i think a short technical extension, i think a short technical extension, if they could be a way of passing a deal, i think that has generally been accepted. but i think there is also some feeling, certainly amongst brexiteer cabinet ministers, that the john certainly amongst brexiteer cabinet ministers, that thejohn bercow ruling yesterday that parliament couldn't vote again on the brexit deal unless something substantial had changed was a bit of a red herring. in fact downing street had thought that if they brought the boat back this week, because they hadn't won the support back of the dup, which is so crucial to delivering a lot of tory brexiteer votes, they were going to lose it anyway. so john votes, they were going to lose it anyway. sojohn bercow gives them a convenient way out. i don't think thatis convenient way out. i don't think that is what they thought 24 hours ago but that could be what they think now. a convenient way out of not having to hold the vote this week. which has infuriated some cabinet ministers, like andrea leadsom and others, because they wa nt to leadsom and others, because they want to have another go because they think the threat of a long extension may be enough to get the deal over
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the line. but we are a long way from that deal getting over the line, and it may be wishful thinking. well, that then takes us to the daily mirror. rather a good headline. may begging for brextra time. a bit of a sporting headline. this now brings into play brussels, and mrs may is going to write this letter tomorrow, we understand, asking for an extension. we don't know what will be in the letter, will she ask for a short or a long extension? we also don't know, really, whether brussels is minded to grant her wish? well, does theresa may know what will be in the letter? that is what some of us in the letter? that is what some of us might ask, and you hope so. as far as brussels, this is the big issue. what is the length of the extension to brexit going to be? and there was mr barnier today saying... what were his words? he was talking about the usefulness of a delay, the
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reason for a delay, and he wants to have a strategy... what is the new strategy of the government stop my suspicion —— of the government? my suspicion —— of the government? my suspicion is there will be a short delay, but there appears to be some enthusiasm now, even amongst the ha rd enthusiasm now, even amongst the hard brexiteers, for a longer delay. but how on earth that would ever be justified by mrs may, goodness only knows. and let's not forget, jessica, the eu is as keen to avoid a jessica, the eu is as keen to avoid 3110 jessica, the eu is as keen to avoid a no deal as many members of the house of commons, at any rate. they are, buti house of commons, at any rate. they are, but i also think patience is wearing thin with brussels and there is not very much appetite to grant an extension with no idea at all what it might be, whether it is just to allow theresa may to make sort of
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incremental gains in her own party, i think there is a lot of frustration with that. i suspect that we will get an extension from brussels, but theresa may is going to need to spell out exactly what thatis to need to spell out exactly what that is going to before. i suspect that is going to before. i suspect that what she will say is that parliament intends to hold a sort of series of indicative votes among mps to see, is their support for a second referendum ? to see, is their support for a second referendum? is there support for a kind of soft brexit, including a customs union? can that sort of thing when a majority, to kind of set the direction of the next 21 months or nine months, if we were to have such a long extension. i think what theresa may will have to come to terms with, if that is what she decided to do, is that her withdrawal agreement that she spent so withdrawal agreement that she spent so long promoting was dead in the water, and particularly the political declaration about the future relationship was completely over, and that she was going to have to start again from scratch. whether she is prepared to do that, i am not
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sure. you may conclude that theresa may's decision as prime minister is more perilous tonight than it's been fora... more perilous tonight than it's been for a... virtually all the way through. and yet she clings on. what makes you say that? well, because there's something called local elections. remember those? they are going to be the first thursday in may. go out to the shires, go going to be the first thursday in may. go out to the shires, go out to the conservative grassroots, and conservative counsellors are not looking forward to, as things stand, to local elections. in the current circumstances, not least if there is an extension. and brexit has not been delivered by 29 march. so there is some pressure coming from there, and also, as we saw an hour ago, some of the newspapers are talking about problems not just some of the newspapers are talking about problems notjust within some of the newspapers are talking about problems not just within the cabinet, but also between the whip's office and number ten. cabinet, but also between the whip's office and numberten. so cabinet, but also between the whip's office and number ten. so you do wonder that this could be a pivotal
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weekend coming up. another one. another one. let's turn to the times also leading with this story, slightly different y—spin, may pleads for delay to brexit as eu stands firm. now this is more explicit in the times, picking up on what you are saying, brussels wants election or second referendum. it does raise the question, if brussels agrees to a longer extension, what conditions will it attach or could it attach to that? i think theresa may will have to provide that explanation when she goes to the eu council in brussels on thursday and friday. i can't see... if you go there and says we just need more time to convince our mps, i don't know how much that will wash with people. and eu leaders and officials and negotiators have said that quite
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explicitly, that it won't wash. yes, they are keen to avoid a no deal. 0ne they are keen to avoid a no deal. one of the things that the times makes explicit is that essentially we we re makes explicit is that essentially we were supposed to see this letter that theresa may was writing to donald tusk with, we were supposed to see that today and yet it hasn't emerged. i think she is probably carefully crafting that. she has to walk a tightrope between convincing the eu that she needs that time and the eu that she needs that time and the kind of things that she could try and negotiate in that time, you know, whatever that might be, and not prompting the resignation of several cabinet ministers by the content several cabinet ministers by the co nte nt of several cabinet ministers by the content of that letter. that is a very delicate thing to do is not what we have heard a lot about redlines over the last 1000 days. i am looking at your copy of the times. there are a lot of redlines. what has caught your eye? times. there are a lot of redlines. what has caught your eye ?|j times. there are a lot of redlines. what has caught your eye? i am struck by the final paragraph on the la st struck by the final paragraph on the last page saying the irish foreign minister has told number ten that
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the eu may well veto a request for a short extension, unless, asjessica pointed out, some of these conditions, something new is forthcoming. now, then we are in a very interesting situation, very perilous situation of heading towards no deal. again, my instinct still is that next week at the 11th hour, 11:37pm on the thursday, maybe, there was even talk tonight i saw from the bbc's europe correspondent that there might be anothersummit at correspondent that there might be another summit at the back end of next week. now, i wonder what they will be talking about there. if nothing has been forthcoming this week. does that ring true? i think certainly one of the things that might happen next week is that theresa may will choose to try to hold another meaningful vote in
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parliament, being able to say to mps, brexiteers, here it is in black and white, here is what you are facing. it is this a 21 month delay 01’ facing. it is this a 21 month delay or you facing. it is this a 21 month delay 01’ you can facing. it is this a 21 month delay or you can vote for me tonight. what aboutjohn virgo? or you can vote for me tonight. what about john virgo? people think that is easy to overcome, that the circumstances, if there is an extension on the table, they will be substantially different. it would be ha rd to substantially different. it would be hard to argue they wouldn't be substantially different —— john bercow. so that could be held on the 28th of march. if you had said to any of oursix 28th of march. if you had said to any of our six months ago that might be the final time we held a vote, i doubt any of us would have believed it, but it could happen next week. lets and with what i hope is some good news on the front of the times, certainly for those who walk ten minutes a day. —— let's look at. this almost sounds too good to be true. let's say straightaway i am afraid i am not a fan of research
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into blindingly obvious. laughter. look, exercise is good for you, tick. i think we knew that. too many of us don't do enough of it, tick. we know that as well. i see a conspiracy in this story. the study looked at 88,000 american adults aged between 40 and 85 no less, over an average period of nine years, who carried out this research. the research is from shandong university in china! noting that working adults would find it difficult to maintain this level of exercise. would find it difficult to maintain this level of exercise. what, ten minutes walk? ten minutes a week? exactly! i find the whole thing quite extraordinary, the whole story. there is, front of the times. i was right when i said it was too good to be true. what did you make of it? i mean, i feel quite sceptical about the idea that ten minutes of brisk walking a week can make much of a difference, you know, especially if you're leading a
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working lifestyle. i think it is really a —— an extremely low expectation to say working adults can't possibly manage ten minutes of brisk walking a week. all of the taxis home! brisk walking a week. all of the taxis home! i would like to think that we can manage better than that. well, on that, we shall leave it there. we will walk off into the sunset. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you david davies and jessica elgot. goodbye. good evening.
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here's your latest sports news: there's a new owner and a new name for cycling's team sky. it's been confirmed this afternoon that britain's richest man, sirjim ratcliffe, is stepping in to secure its future. the british team will now be known as team ineos starting from the tour de yorkshire at the beginning of may. led by sir dave brailsford, the team has won the tour de france six times since it was formed nine years ago. sky sponsored them from the start, but will withdraw its backing from the end of this season. this will come as some relief, certainly to the staff of team sky here at the national cycling centre, and of course their fans who, over the last few years, have seen this era of unprecedented success. the tea m era of unprecedented success. the team has won the tour to france in six of the last seven years with three different british riders, that's undoubtedly contributed, hasn't it, to the upsurge and
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popularity of cycling here in britain and! popularity of cycling here in britain and i think the fans would like chris froome and geraint thomas to be part of the rebound, reincarnated team. however, there is controversy. 0ver recent years the tea m controversy. 0ver recent years the team has been forced to deny allegations they cheated. 0ver team has been forced to deny allegations they cheated. over a year ago a group of mps accused team sky of crossing the ethical line over the use of medical exemptions for banned substances. just a few weeks ago the team's formative doctor was meant to stand in front ofa doctor was meant to stand in front of a gmc medical tribunal. in the end, that was locked down in legal argument in the case was adjourned. he denies any wrongdoing, as does the team. despite the controversy, ratcliffe has been tempted to come along as saviour. he already invest in sailing and football and clearly he thinks it makes sense as well. we've had a first look at some england's new young talent as they've trained with the senior squad this afternoon ahead of their euro 2020 qualifiers against the czech republic and montenegro. amongst them, chelsea's18—year—old winger callum hudson 0doi. he is yet to start a premier league match for his club but england captain harry kane says he's
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an exciting addition to the squad. a great guy, great to talk to and good to know. he's come in and he wants to take full advantage of his opportunity. so, yeah, he looked like he was enjoying it out there today, scoring a few goals in training. we're excited to have him. everyone's fighting for places in the england team. i'm sure he sees it as an opportunity for himself. wales will be without the injured trio of ethan ampadu, sam vokes and tom lawrence for their opening euro 2020 qualifier against slovakia in cardiff on sunday. arsenal midfielder aaron ramsey will miss tomorrow's friendly against trinidad & tobago in wrexham, but manager ryan giggs confirmed he will be available to face slovakia. ajoint bid from north and south korea are among a record nine expressions of interest to host the women's world cup in 2023. a decision will be made by fifa next march on who will follow france, who stage the tournament this year.
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josh warrington will defend his ibf world featherweight title against another yorkshireman in june. warrington will take on kid galahad in his home city of leeds in the second defence of his belt after retaining it with a win over carl frampton in december. galahad is also unbeaten in his professional career. england and australia will wear names and numbers on their shirts for the ashes in the biggest change to kits in test cricket for 142 years. the icc thinks making players more easily identifiable will help more people engage with test cricket, and the series in england will be the first of the new test cricket championship. thats all the sport. enjoy the rest of your evening. hello there, good evening to you. well, this week will feel very
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springlike because we are importing mild airfrom the springlike because we are importing mild air from the south—west. we could see quite a bit of cloud around because the air we import from the atlantic will be moisture laden. you will really notice how mild it will be even if you get cloud or sunshine, temperatures will be above seasonal average. the reason is high—pressure building in the south—west, bringing south—westerly winds. we will have low pressure to the north of the uk. this will bring unsettled weather to the far north and west of scotland. 0vernight, temperatures shouldn't fall below 9—10 degrees for western areas. further east, 5— eight degrees. we start off on a mild note tomorrow. a lot of cloud around, likely sore today. hopefully we see brea ks likely sore today. hopefully we see breaks developing for central, southern and eastern areas. when that happens we could see17— southern and eastern areas. when that happens we could see 17— 18 degrees, where you have the cloud, low—to—mid teens celsius, always breezy with outbreaks of rain for north—west scotland. the weather will pep up, to bring persistent heavy rain to the north and west of the highlands. rainfall totals
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really mounting up. elsewhere, a quiet day, light winds, variable cloud, spells of sunshine and again very mild indeed with temperatures 16-17, very mild indeed with temperatures 16—17, may be higher than that, 13-14 16—17, may be higher than that, 13—14 north and west. as we head into friday this area of low pressure deepens and it will bring a speu pressure deepens and it will bring a spell of rain and gales to the north and west of scotland. further south, close to the area of high pressure, it will be a very quiet one with variable cloud and sunshine. the rays will be stronger across the board on friday. it will be very windy with gales, 50—60 mph, maybe more than that, and the band of rain will slowly sink south and east, eventually pushing into north and west england, into wales late in the day. something coolerfollows on behind. ahead of it another mild day given some good spells of sunshine. through friday night the rain band sink south and east words, tending to fizzle out into just a band of cloud by the end of the night. behind it we see showers following on, these will be wintry over high ground. that's because we are
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bringing in coolerairas ground. that's because we are bringing in cooler air as we head on into the weekend. toppling right across the country, still with high pressure in control, it's going to be largely fine and dry. so with some cool, dry and living in from the north—west, we should see more sunshine around, fewer clouds, hopefully. but it will be cooler, notice. temperatures just into double figures and that also mean the notes will be chilly as well, maybe a touch of frost in places, for example, on saturday night. enjoy the mild weather and the springlike field through this week. —— geel.
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