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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 20, 2019 8:00pm-9:00pm GMT

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hello, i'm ross atkins. the uk once a delay to brexit. the un artist terms. i believe a short extension will be possible. but it will be conditioned on a positive vote on the withdrawal agreement in the house of commons. iam ben i am ben brown comply from downing street. we're expecting her to talk to the british people to why she is the agreement with the european union for three months.
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earlier, the prime minister will ask mps will vote for a third time on her deal — if, that is, the speaker of the house of commons will allow it. with a week or two days before brexit is scheduled to happen, uk politics is being pushed to the breaking point. we'll guide you through it all step by step. and your questions are welcome through out. the stakes could not be higher for the uk. brexit will shape its future for many years to come — and with 9 days to go until brexit is scheduled to happen — every element of it remains uncertain. right down to the future of the prime minister who is trying to deliver it. it's been a day in which her authority was seriously shaken first by an uncertain performance at prime minister's questions and then by a setback with brussels
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saying they won't allow a short extension to brexit unless mps vote through her deal. something was she's been struggling with. this is a feed coming inside downing street. we're expecting to hear from theresa may in the next few minutes. when that happens, we will bring it to you. it seems certain she will present mps with a choice between her deal and a no—deal brexit. and that choice is in part shaped by today's intervention by the eu. it outlined the terms of granting any extension to brexit. in the light of the conversations i have conducted over the past days, i believe a short extension will be possible. but it will be conditional ona possible. but it will be conditional on a positive vote on the withdrawal agreement in the house of commons. the question remains open as to the
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duration of such a next surgeon —— such an extension. prime minister may's proposal has its merits, and creates a series of questions of a legal and political nature. and here is the bbc‘s norman smith reacting to that... earlier, the prime minister sent the eu's donald tusk this letter in which she asked for a brexit extension "until 30 june." she went on... and... they are scheduled to happen from may 23. i can't give you a date for when the prime minister will ask parliament to vote on her dealfor a third time.
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i think we have all given up giving predictions, but it could be as soon as monday. and if you're surprised by the detail of theresa may's request, you're not the only one. yesterday, it was widely briefed that she would ask for a short extension — but with the option of a longer one. that was met with fury by some of her party and once again, she's changed tack. the longer option is gone. this was earlier. the government intends to bring forward proposals for a third meaningful vote. if that vote is passed, the extension will give the house time to consider the withdrawal agreements bill. if not comedy housel have to decide how to proceed. but as prime minister, as prime minister, i am... i am not prepared to delay brexit any further than the 30th ofjune. and then there's the issue of how she can put that boat to parliament.
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the daily telegraph's brexit correspondence. just to explain what james rothwell is alluding to there, the reason the vote was not able to go ahead earlier this week is the speaker of the house said the prime minister cannot bring the deal back if it is not substantially changed. we await to see what the definition is of substantially changed. let's bring in the bbc‘s ben brown live from downing street. we are seeing the prime minister's authority being chipped away ask them our by our. yes, we are going to have a statement in about ten minutes. not out here, inside downing street. it's a live address to the nation, to the british people. we don't know exactly what she's going to say or what she's going to talk about but
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there is speculation that she will attem pts there is speculation that she will atte m pts to there is speculation that she will attempts to talk to the british people about why she has applied to the european union, to the european council president donald tusk, for that three month delay untiljune 30, when she had said time and time again, and it really was her mantra, that the united kingdom is leaving the eu on march 29. it is thought she is going to use this address. just a couple of points on what's also been happening here in downing street is various opposition leaders, including jeremy corbyn to me to find some way out of this brexit still made. jeremy corbyn actually walked out of that meeting because there was chuka umunna
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there. he did not want to sit with chuka umunna, and some of his critics said, is that the way to behave in national crisis? we are going to wait and see... what did you think of the comment from the prime minister in the house of commons that if brexit did go beyond june 30, she would not be the one in charge. yes, she said as prime minister, i cannot consider a longer brexit than june 30, minister, i cannot consider a longer brexit thanjune 30, and there has been pressure on her, let's face it, to promise she would stand down. a lot of the brexiteer wing of the party have been telling her, if you can promise you would stand down, that might encourage us to vote for your deal. whether she will make some of hints about that in this statement about her own position, that will be very interesting to see as well. then, you are going to stay with us through the hour. thanks very much indeed. if theresa may is
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going to be alive speaking, you're going to be alive speaking, you're going to be alive speaking, you're going to see it live on 0utside source. rob watson is live with us and when spencer. —— in westminster. what did you make —— they make of the prime minister's performance coachella they are not happy. jenny will be amusement at the tone the predecessor took in prime ministers questions. the reason why brexit looks like such a horrible model and disasters because mps were busily couple getting —— contemplating their navels and not getting on with their navels and not getting on with the will of the will of the people and that your taste both remainders and that your taste both remainders and levers alike. —— that era tates. as they would see it, the prime minister has mishandled all of the
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negotiations, people on the remains side was say this is all a bit rich coming from the prime minister given that she was the one who took so long to try and come up with a plan. and she got a plan with the eu commission delay putting into a vote, so there is a lot of irritation and i think they could welcome back to haunt the prime minister when she comes to sell the deal, if she is indeed allowed to buy the prime minister —— by the speaker next week or whenever. no matter how angry they are, they have been boxed in to a situation where they may have to choose between a no—deal brexit and a brexit deal which most of them consider to be something akin to a disaster. they are going to have to choose one of them. you've obviously been looking at my twitter posts! i've got four choices. i will go through them very quickly. i think you are right about
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being boxed in. that is actually the drama of the last 12 hours, boxing and british politicians, but i've got four options. 0ne and british politicians, but i've got four options. one is her deal with the second one no deal, the third one, revoking article 50. very ha rd to third one, revoking article 50. very hard to imagine the prime minister doing that after her performance in parliaments. the fourth one i've got is mps trying to find an alternative to 1-3. is mps trying to find an alternative to 1—3. is there some way parliamentarians are opposed to no deal, opposer theresa may, parliamentarians are opposed to no deal, opposertheresa may, is parliamentarians are opposed to no deal, opposer theresa may, is there some way at 11 this hour that they could coalesce and stop both of those eventualities? if you would then ask me what i think, my answer is, i don't know. but the stakes are immensely high. this is the sense you get from talking to mps. these are the most difficult decisions of the morse —— most difficult decisions, portentous times. thank
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you for the moment. we are awaiting theresa may. she is going to give a televised address inside downing street. and of course, when it all begins, we will see it here on 0utside source. this whole choatic mess was never the plan from those on either side of the brexit divide. and this frustration, disgust and embarassment is in plentiful supply. this is the conservative dominic grieve. i have never felt more ashamed to be a member of the conservative party, or to be asked to lend her support. she spent most of her time castigating the house for its misconduct. at no stage did she pause to consider whether it is, in fact, the way she is leading this government which might be contributing to this situation. i have great sympathy for her. i've known her for many years
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and have had a personalfriendship beyond and outside of this house, but i have to say, i could have wept. wept to see her reduced to these straits and wept to see the extent to which she was now simply zigzagging all over the place rather than standing up for what the national interest must be. a bit earlier, ben brown was telling us a bit earlier, ben brown was telling us that as well as many opposition parties, the prime minister also met mps from her own party who support brexit. there's no sign they are changing their minds, no sign they are willing to vote for her withdrawal agreement. this is one member of the european research group, which wants a clean brexit. and if need be, a no—deal brexit. the default position is, if nothing else changes, we leave the european union on the 29th of march. today is t -9. and i
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union on the 29th of march. today is t —9. and i don't believe the deal will go through. my colleagues are as solid as they've ever been against it and the reason why we are so passionately against it, is because we read it and we know that we we don't leave the european union because of things like the backstop and other elements of the treaty as well. remember, it's a draft treaty well. remember, it's a draft treaty we are asked to vote on. they leave us we are asked to vote on. they leave us half outcome a half in the european union, and that is not with 17.4 million people voted for and my collea g u es 17.4 million people voted for and my colleagues in the erg and i, we are actually the good guys. we are fighting to honour what 17.4 million british people voted for and we do not intend to give in. just want to bring in rob from westminster. help me out. it is in agreement that's scheduled to finish at the end of next year which is not so far away. why is it they cannot hold their noses for the withdrawal
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deal in the hope that the long—term plan will be most closer to what they want coachella to help you out, they want coachella to help you out, the erg... i am relying on you to shut me up when you see the prime minister approaches because nobody would want to listen to me when they can listen to that. the principal objection they have is that they are worried this arrangement prevent their being any border in any case in ireland. they very much sell brexit is the idea of being able to strike new trade deals, different trade policies, and then the won were essentially all eu countries have the same trade policy with the same tariffs. most experts on trade and most businesses don't actually think much of that idea, but that is one of their objections. and they also... there were other things they don't like. they don't like this idea of a very long
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transition. it is essentially two, three years staying in the european union and they're worried about that kind of arrangement staying permanent. think you for that. on theissue permanent. think you for that. on the issue of how they will vote, he was able to contain a smile in that clip. i feel they feel within touching distance of a no—deal brexit, which for some of them is the desired outcome. absolutely. if you think about it, theresa may was threatening people like him is, it is either vote for ideal or a very long extension, and who knows? another referendum was had or a softer brexit? it seems to me she's lost a lot of leverage over her party. thank you very much indeed. while we wait for the prime
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minister to appear in front of the camera ten downing st, let's bring in my colleague david eades in brussels. there is in one sense a sort of meeting of minds. i am not sure if that is the best expression. but donald tusk the man best place to represent all that you member states, he is prepared to say, yes, i think you can get an extension, mrs may, a short one, provided you get your book through parliament. —— represent all eu member states. that said, as you well know, what donald tusk might say is only at best a sort of middle ground position at this stage. there will have to be a very full discussion in a very frank one, and it's not going to be
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straightforward. i think the french in particular have made that absolutely plain. in their view, they don't want an extension at all. they want something to be done and they wanted to be done by march 29. they are prepared to state if there had to be a small extension when we got that food, there could be, but let mejust read got that food, there could be, but let me just read the language from the french foreign minister. mrs may must offer enough guarantees on the credibility of her strategy. guarantees are in very short supply. credibility is in very short supply. i think the french are really putting the squeeze on here, to the extent of saying, we certainly will not put up with a long—term extension. we would sooner have a no—deal brexit than a long—term extension. that is the french position. it's not the majority position. it's not the majority position. it's not the majority position. it is nonetheless one country that can veto what would seemly case a visible majority
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position. i think it's fair to say at this point, yes, they're going to wait to see what theresa may has to say in the matter of the next few minutes. there is exacerbation beyond belief here, as has been going for month after month, and now as these final days are ticking away, hour after hour, as these final days are ticking away, hourafter hour, but as these final days are ticking away, hour after hour, but until they know what the british position is, really, and as rob watson was saying, there are still so many options, it is difficult for them to put a definitive finger on what they are can offer in return. david from you and i have done a few of these brussels summits. where does brexit fit in among all the other priorities? you can't avoid it, to be honest. whatever the agenda says, this is the big issue for them to tackle at the moment. we are getting to the 11th hour, or even the last few minutes of the 11th hour, really, and they know they have to do with it. but that is precisely the point. we have european
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elections coming up. that is going to bea elections coming up. that is going to be a mighty battle ground. it's a very uncomfortable european union in any case, they do not need to be wasting time, as many would see it's come on detail like this. and one country that friendly wants out anyway. they know they've got other issues to deal with them and that is turning a lot of opinion, that is changing mood. as we get closer to those european elections, that is becoming a more intense field. they wa nt becoming a more intense field. they want british mps involved in anyway and that election? no, of course they don't. they want that done and dusted. that's why even theresa may's request for a june 30 extension may be, i tell you what, we'll give you up until european elections and not more. david, thank you. we are waiting for theresa may to give a statement from inside
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downing street. it was scheduled for a few minutes back. for whatever reason, the prime minister is a touch behind the time we expected to come out. this is a live address in which she will respond to a number of obstacles that have been put in her way today. she had a rough ride during prime minister's question time. and then we had that surprise. the european union say, actually, no, the european union —— june 30 union say, actually, no, the european union ——june 30 is not going to work. theresa may is confirmed she is not interested in the longer—term delay. probably worth our whilejust the longer—term delay. probably worth our while just pausing to remind ourselves of what is in this brexit deal. the house of commons has addicted twice already. first of all, there is the financial sentiment comedy so—called divorce bill. that is how long... we think thatis bill. that is how long... we think that is going to come in around £39
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billion, or $51 billion. then there's the issue of citizens‘ rights. there‘s the issue of citizens‘ rights. this details the status of britons in the yukon eu citizens in the uk, and once the uk has left, all that you nationals have a valid passport able to register in the uk for settled status —— all the eu nationals. it also outlines what we call a transition period. this would keep the current uk— eu trade agreements in place while a new trade agreement is worked out. for this period, the uk is aligned with eu rules but it won‘t have any say in eu affairs. and finally, the most controversial element of all, the irish backstop. here is chris morris to explain that. you may have heard about the backstop. it‘s a baseball term, so what does it have to do with brexit? think of a safety net
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and you get the idea. this line between the irish republic and northern ireland will be the only land border between the uk and the european union. and that matters for trade because in theory, there should be checks on staff crossing the board after brexit. but no one wa nts the board after brexit. but no one wants new inspections at the border. they bring back memories of 30 years of conflict in northern ireland. checkpoints could become a target. the uk and the eu have to agree a trade relationship in the future that keeps the border as open as it is now. but if they can‘t, or if there‘s a delay, that‘s where the backstop comes in. it‘s a legal guarantee to avoid a hard border under all circumstances. the government in the eu have come to an agreement about how it should work, but theresa may‘s critics aren‘t happy. they say there‘s no get out clause to allow the uk to leave the new customs relationship it sets
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out. the eu says, don‘t worry, we don‘t like it either. it was only ever designed to be temporary. eu says the backstop has be part of the withdrawal agreement, which need to be ratified before brexit is due to happen on march 29. without a backstop, there would be no brexit deal at all. the mps who don‘t like the backstop, and there are quite a few of them, do so because they are worried uk is going to end up never getting out of the backstop and therefore staying in the eu‘s customs union indefinitely. theresa may‘s deal for scant department in january, this was the primary reason it was defeated by 230 votes. —— deal came before parliament in january. two weeks after that, parliaments then voted on an amendment that said the prime minister should go back to that you asked for the backstop to be changed 01’ asked for the backstop to be changed or replaced. in time, the prime
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minister went to strasburg done next draws work. —— went to strasbourg. this only elite some of the concerns the mps had. crucial to this was the attorney general, geoffrey cox. he said the deal... the reason that caused trouble is of the word indefinitely. everyone waited to see if those strasbourg documents would change —— change geoffrey cox‘s advice. his advice did not change and he told that to mps. question for the house is whether, in the light of these improvements, as a political judgement, the house should now
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enter in to those arrangements. off the back of that advice come in the house voted a second time i theresa may‘s deal. it was defeated again, this time by 149 votes, the fourth—largest government defeat in history. the mp still didn‘t like it, and many of them, that remains their sentiment. here‘s the scottish national party. the per minister is... expression it‘s frustration at the mechanic... it is privily obvious it should have been consigned to the scrapheap —— it is very obvious. let me show you these pictures from a little bit earlier. here‘s the prime minister arriving in a motorcade back in downing street after an intense day, another intense day, in the palace of westminster. we are expecting a seaman from the prime minister in
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the next few minutes. we‘re expecting it a few minutes ago, but so far, she hasn‘t appeared in front of the lectern. there is the shot we‘ve been looking at for a good half an hour or so now was not needless to say, as soon as the prime minister begins to talk, i will take that to you immediately. but speak to henry newman from the think tac... and georgina wright, institute of government. i wonder what you would advise them to do now. the premise is dangerously close to make this about her survival and not her deal. what she is actually doing is giving them an incentive to do, vote her deal down so they get rid of her, but what she is trying to do is get her deal over the line. we have seen the european union turn up the pressure today. we are now nine, ten days away from no deal and we still don‘t know what policy will be. is there going to be a hard border or not? it
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is showing her‘s border. going to be a hard border or not? it is showing her's border. between now and friday, there may be no time for... and friday, there may be no time for. . . they and friday, there may be no time for... they need to set up a timetable for her departure. she needs to get a deal through and overturn those historic defeats, but equally, she need to get the deal through to get her colleagues to back it. she needs to say, i am not going to go on and on. it is for someone else to take it the rest of the way forward. tree critics on both of the south don‘t act —— both of the sides need to back her. both of the south don‘t act —— both of the sides need to back henm both of the south don‘t act —— both of the sides need to back her. it is not going to happen, is it? wejust saw chuka umunna at a meeting, jeremy corbyn storming out. quite a lot of them don‘t want a second referendum but do want brexit delivered. let's talk about france.
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it looks like it‘s turning the screw ina way it looks like it‘s turning the screw in a way that some of the other eu member states are not. how do you read the mood music coming out of paris? it's not very surprising, to be honest. what you've heard over the past couple of days when it became clear that the uk would be seeking an extension, the member states were divided about it. they we re states were divided about it. they were open to an extension, thinking they want to avoid no deal, but how long for and what is the purpose? if it'sjust going to long for and what is the purpose? if it's just going to delay this decision but actually they will be no change to that decision, is it worth it? i think it is france's key message, you need to prove joyce this is to make a difference the —— make a difference... -- make a difference... that is why the house of commons are divided on this. they came out with that statement, agreeing to a short extension if the house of commons supports the geo next week. they are absolutely sile nt on supports the geo next week. they are absolutely silent on what happens if
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mps rejected. let'sjust stand back a little bit. whatever side we are the brexit debate. it‘s achingly shambles. this is what it looks like when you try and get something really, located through with a hung parliament stomach from —— three hung parliaments... notjust a hung parliament, but a prime minister... there then defeats in the comments ona there then defeats in the comments on a customs union, the single market, a single referendum and her deal. if you put parliament in charge, i don‘t think it will get less. i think it will get worse. the prime minister is doing her best to get three mandate. this deal does deliver almost all of what was promised during the referendum and it offers a path out of the customs union. brexiteers are voting down a deal that gets them out of the
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customs union and labour mps are voting down a second referendum. it's voting down a second referendum. it‘s mad. voting down a second referendum. it's mad. standing back even fervor, what‘s even interesting here is we have political systems which should cope with any eventuality bowl you‘re seeing as there are limits. —— but what we are seeing is there are limits. new country is ever done this before. it's a new negotiation for the eu this before. it's a new negotiation forthe eu and it's this before. it's a new negotiation for the eu and it's definitely a new negotiation for the uk. you have to, but as henry said, hung parliament is in great —— isn't great. it's not just about finding a compromise here. it's about whether that compromise will fly in brussels. what we found is when mps have come together, have back to something, the government was not able to deliver it in brussels. that's going to be the key issue. what i always say is if we think this has been, located, let'sjust brace ourselves to what's coming next because we haven't even begun discussing trade and all of those issues... that's
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true but at least it will put behind is the question of whether we should leave it not. we have had a never ending discussion of the benefits of leaving. everyone has her —— rehearse their same position. political problems in the states, and france, not trying to get into a comparative competition... they have political cultures for compromise is normal. extremist right wing party in germany, if you look across, we are trying to do something very difficult. of course mps have very different views, but they need to compromise on both sides. there have been mistakes on both sides, eu and the uk, but i think it's been quite a learning curve because you can
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essentially call the shots and the eu and if you disagree with the policy before, you would say so in the council and build coalitions, you would have member states and get them on board and then they would come up with an alternative, all the semifinalist is in the situation where we cannot do that any more and what has been put on the table, the kind of relationship to they are seeking to have the eu, all of a sudden there is a lot more at play and there are new ways of not knowing what you want but how you approach it as well stop by talking about potentially better speaking to several people who are in this position and the prime minister, she did not entertain alternatives seriously and corbyn did not want to take part, which is business as usual for all angles. this is the only deal, we can discuss what we want in the future,
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but ultimately the political declaration. the only deal she has managed to get and if you put us in charge, we would do something different. there is no alternative ending anyone who thinks they can get for the changes is diluted, they said do not take no deal off the table because it can be used as leverage to get further concessions. no deal is still on the table. it is. it has to be because of something does not happen. not offering an extension, it would be very humiliating, but i think the threat of a veto is a bluff, i cannot imagine that france would sign with them and destabilise the economy which is of course a member state that is the most at risk for no deal. they're trying to put pressure on the uk understandably, but when it comes to it, they'll be
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forced to beg for a humiliating extension on negative terms and whatever parliament decides, we will not have left. we are taught that we would leave at the end of a two year period and they do need to grow up and accept the reality that there is one deal and if you wanted, vote for it, if you do not want to leave, be honest with that. i just want to say that you‘re absolutely right, voting against the deal does not make no deal off the table. 0r against the deal does not make no deal off the table. or you stop the process altogether. it was interesting today is that he was silent on what would happen if they rejected the deal next week, so i think that does open the door for options. they are not going anywhere, sending your questions and m essa g es anywhere, sending your questions and messages and the twitter handle on the screen. let‘s check in on downing street, things are behind schedule, not long after eight o‘clock. but that evidently has not
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happened, ben is out on downing street. we have a delay to the prime minister possible statement, and we will address the british people, we do not know which reason they will be saying, some will speculate that she is going to discuss why there is a delay to brexit, why she has applied to the european union and european council for that three month extension june, so european council for that three month extensionjune, so not march the 29th as had been her mantra as she has said time and time again, that the uk would be leaving. we we re that the uk would be leaving. we were expecting her to make that live address to the british people about half an hour ago, then it was going to be 20 minutes ago at a quarter past eight, local time, then it was
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going to be half past and so, we are still waiting. while we wait, tell us more about these discussions at the prime minister had earlier with opposition mps, was this an exercise in showing willing or was there progress made? not much made with the opposition leader, but there was a former labour member of parliament from the so—called independent group of former labour and conservative mps who left their parties over brexit and other matters and jeremy corbyn objected to her being there, saying that he was not a party leader, so no progress there and jeremy corbyn said we are in the middle of a full—scale national crisis and some of his critics have been saying is this a way to behave in the middle of the national
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crisis? but apart from that, according to some of the sticking part, there was talk of having a meaningful vote, a third vote in the deal next monday, we, do not know conclusively when that will be, but next monday has been noted and of course the question of if she loses, which he possibly revoke article 50. nearly three years have passed since they voted to leave the european union. it was the biggest democratic exercise in our country prosperous history. i came to office on a promise to deliver on that verdict. in march 2017, i triggered the article 50 process for the uk to exit the eu and parliament supported it overwhelmingly. two years on, mps have been unable to agree on the way
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to implement the uk‘s withdrawal. as a result, we will now not leave on time with adl on the 29th of march. this delay is a matter of great personal regret for me. and for this, iam personal regret for me. and for this, i am absolutely sure that you the public have had enough. you are tired of the infighting, you are tired of the infighting, you are tired of the political games in the artane procedural grounds, tired of mps talking about nothing else but brexit. when you have real concerns about our children‘s schools and national health service, knife crime. you want this stage of the brexit process to be over and done with. i agree. brexit process to be over and done with. iagree. i brexit process to be over and done with. i agree. i am on your side. it is now time for mps to decide. so today, i have written to the president of the european council to have an extension of article 50 up
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to the 30th ofjune to give mp the time to make the final choice. do they want to leave the eu with a deal that delivers on the result of the referendum that takes a back control of our money, borders and laws while protecting jobs and our national security? do they want to leave without a deal? 0r national security? do they want to leave without a deal? or do they not wa nt to leave without a deal? or do they not want to leave at all? causing potential irreparable damage to public trust, not just potential irreparable damage to public trust, notjust in this generation of politicians, but you are entire democratic process. it is high time we made a decision. so far, parliament has done everything possible to avoid making a choice. motion after motion and amendment after amendment has been tabled without parliament ever deciding what it wants. all mps have been willing to say is what they do not want. i passionately hope that mps will find a way to back the deal i
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have negotiated with the eu. a deal that delivers on the result of the referendum and is the very best deal negotiable. and i will continue to work night and day to secure the support of my colleagues, the du p and others for this deal. but i am not prepared to delay brexit any further than the 30th ofjune. some argue that i am making the wrong choice and i should ask for a longer extension to the end of the year or beyond, to give more time for politicians to argue over the way forward. that would mean asking you to vote in european elections nearly three years after our country decided to leave. what kind of message with that send? and just how bitter and divisive with that election campaign be? at a time in the country desperately needs bringing back together. some have
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suggested holding a second referendum. i do not believe that is what you want and it is not what i want. we asked you the question already and you gave us your answer. now, you want us to get on with that. and that is what i am determined to do. so there is the prime minister talking about her having to ask for a delay to brexit isa having to ask for a delay to brexit is a source of great personal regret, let‘s bring in ben brown who was a live just outside the front door of downing street, would you point out where the most crucial points of that statement? apart from explaining why to the british people why she has applied for this extension to the european union for three months delay to brexit, really
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she has continued effectively what is an attack on parliament, on members of parliament and the blame game really which shows she was talking about in the house of commons earlier on during prime minister‘s questions when she accused members of parliament of navel—gazing over brexit. and attacked mps again in this statement here, quite a short statement, it has to be said, but she said to the british people, you are tired of the infighting, you are tired of the arcane political games, you want this stage to be done with and i ee, this stage to be done with and i agree, iam this stage to be done with and i agree, i am on this stage to be done with and i agree, i am on your this stage to be done with and i agree, i am on your site. in this the british prime minister, very ha rd to the british prime minister, very hard to tell the british people that she agrees with them that they want parliament to get on with it and she wa nts parliament to get on with it and she wants parliament to get on with it. what is interesting is that she said it is high time to make a decision because they have accused her of kicking the can down the road. they have accused her of kicking the can
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down the road and perhaps we are running out of road, that is what many of her critics have been saying and they would say that she has deliberately played a very long game, pushed the meaningful vote as late as possible, up to the deadline of march the 29th in order to tell critics that she hopes she‘ll get members of parliament to concentrate their minds, to leave them with choice —— little choice but to leave with her deal. she says her deal is the best deal, the only realistic deal to enact with the british people have voted for that referendum almost three years ago by the 17.4 million people voting to leave the european union and she again is saying that she is on her side and —— at their site and not wanting to vote and european elections three years after leaving the eu. will be back with you a
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little bit later. next on the programme. let‘s bring in let‘s dominic grieve, former uk attorney general by westminster the government has been really striving in the last few months to do two things, one is to get a deal andi do two things, one is to get a deal and i recognise the prime minister has obtained it and second is to avoid anybody questioning that deal. and unfortunately, the vast majority of the house of commons thinks the deal is not good. for different reasons, that they are sincerely held reasons. and the government seem to be seeking to close down every other avenue of discussion and now take us to the brink of no deal and saying the choice is between
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this deal and i am afraid that while i recognise the prime minister has done everything she can to get a deal that she considers to be good for the country, i cannot support it. if she wants to put this deal to the people of the united kingdom and the people of the united kingdom and the referendum, i will support her in doing that. she says it would cause irreparable damage to public trust. the damage coming from taking the uk out of the eu when members of parliament looked at it and think it is not a very good deal and the public take the same view, it will be even greater and that is the point. i recognise there are no easy solutions for this, i recognise that the referendum is not an easy solution, of course it is not. but it provides clarity and in my view it provides clarity and in my view it is the better way forward and what i will not be is bullied by anybody in government into supporting something which i think is going to do our country a great deal of harm. let's be explicit
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about what the prime minister has just said by watching the nation and saying that she is on their side, she is effectively saying that people like you are not. and i very much regret that as i said earlier in the house of commons. i think this attack by the prime minister on the integrity of members of parliament is very unfortunate. 0f course i disagree with some of my colleagues, some of them take a different view from my own, but i never question their integrity and their views are sincerely held and they think is best for the country and just attempting to be people over the head with an iron bar to secure what she believes is the only correct outcome is, i think, a mistake. just having said that, i appreciate that she holy sincerely holds these views. you said earlier that you‘d never been more ashamed to be a conservative mp — has anything changed tonight?
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it is in great part this party has been a part of some of the most bitter divisions, you talked about your regret about how the prime minister is behaving yourself. why do you not leave? because i am a conservative and if i see there‘s a problem i would try to correct that. it has performed valuable services to this country and i believe he can do so in the future. if next week, she brings her deal and the speaker of the house allows that to happen and it is defeated at the european union says there is no foundation here for an extension, what do some of your colleagues say and want to do about it was yellow we have a stark choice, the choice will be crashed out crash out with no deal, revoke article 50 which would be a very dramatic thing for parliament to do or alternatively, insist on holding a referendum where he put her deal to the british public, which would be my preferred option.
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ido which would be my preferred option. i do not think on the basis of what i understand, if this were to happen, there would be any other options at all. thank you very much for joining options at all. thank you very much forjoining us, live with us from the palace of westminster. if you‘re just joining the palace of westminster. if you‘re justjoining us, she addressed the uk in justjoining us, she addressed the ukina justjoining us, she addressed the uk in a televised address and it is a point of great personal regret that brexit may have to be delayed, she told everyone watching that you have had enough, she criticised arcane procedural methods, and sent to all mps that it is high time we make a decision and also reiterated her commitment to delivering brexit and if you saw earlier, she seemed to say that if brexit were to go beyond the 30th ofjune, that would beyond the 30th ofjune, that would be something she could support from the role of prime minister. for all the talk of taking back control during the brexit campaign — the bald facts of the matter
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are that the uk is asking for an extension — but it won‘t get one unless all 27 eu members agree. they‘ll meet tomorrow at a summit in brussels. here‘s the invitation letter donald tusk has sent confirming that discussing the uk‘s request will be the first item on the agenda. and this may not be straightforward. this is le point reporting that emmanual macron will veto the extension request if there‘s no clear route for the deal. and this is the french foreign minister. a situation in which mrs may was not able to give the european council sufficient guarantees about the credibility of her strategy would lead to the extension request being dismissed and a no deal exit. 0pposition labour mp.
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well yes and no. he says he wants to a route to a deal. if theresa may gets her deal through next week, that‘s a route. remember, theresa may says even if the deal goes through next week, more time is needed for the full ratification process. that‘s why she says she needs more time. more time is still needed in parliament for the full ratification process. next this is the here‘s the irish prime minister earlier. there is a lot of political instability in london at the moment, as people can see. and there is a real risk that we wish to avoid of no deal happening by accident, despite people‘s best intentions. so i think it‘s time now to cut them some slack, to cut the british
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government some slack when it comes to their request for an extension and when it comes to their request that the strasbourg agreement be ratified firmly by the european council over the next two days. so, we are willing to support both of those requests, but obviously we are not entertaining any change to the withdrawal agreement or the backstop. the eu has said. the eu says if the uk wants an extension past 23 may it will need to take part in european parliamentary elections. so the choice is either extend to before may 23 — or extend well beyond. theresa may is not willing to ask for that. the eu argues says it‘s easier to shorten a long extension rather than to lengthen a short one.
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they want to concentrate on other eu business, start remember many brexiteers promised during the campaign that trade talks would begin as soon as the uk voted out. in fact, the eu has refused to have any significant talks on a the future trading relationship until the withdrawal deal is done. david eades they have been quite strict on that, haven‘t they? they have been quite strict on that, haven't they? no, they've been very consistent, the message really is you, britain tell us what you‘re going to do and then we can work out what we can do with that. and theresa may sent that message across
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that the request for an extension and he would seem to be the one who is most minded to give her a pretty much what she wants. even if the extension does not go as far as she would like it to be. but even then, there has to be that vote and that vote has to be put through the house of the majority in the house of parliament even for that extension and just to bring you back again, to the french perspective because they are saying quite clearly, we want enough guarantee of the credibility of theresa may‘s strategy and will be heard in downing street, that strategy hangs really on extremely ha rd strategy hangs really on extremely hard work that she is promising and hope that she can deliver and we will wait to see what comes from the council meetings, there may well be a agreement for some sort of extension, but they‘re going to push very ha rd to extension, but they‘re going to push very hard to get something a little bit more than hope and hard work
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before they pressed the button on an extension. one of our correspondence says. the european union might like that idea, there‘s no sign they‘ll go for that option which, if we think where we are at the moment it‘s extraordinary, that would put us into new territories. if you‘re anticipating clarity from the eu 27 on anticipating clarity from the eu 27 o n exa ctly anticipating clarity from the eu 27 on exactly their view on an extension, even though it will be a days away from brexit happening, we may not get it, this is also interesting from the data paul.
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those of you watching on the bbc news channel, if you agree with that assessment, let us know through e—mailand assessment, let us know through e—mail and the hashtag throughout. if you missed the televised address, let me show you again. it is high time we made a decision. so far, parliament has done everything possible to avoid making the choice. motion after motion, amendment after amendment has been tabled without parliament ever deciding what it wa nts. parliament ever deciding what it wants. all mps have been willing to say is what they do not want. i passionately hope that mps will find a way to back the deal i have negotiated with the eu. a deal that delivers on the result of the referendum and is the very best deal negotiable. and i will continue to work night and day to secure the support of my colleagues, the dep and others for this deal. but i am
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not prepared to delay brexit any further than the ofjune. some argue that i am making the wrong choice. and i should ask for a longer extension, to the end of the year or beyond. give more time for politicians to argue over the way forward. that would mean asking you to vote in european elections nearly three years after our country decided to leave. what kind of message would that send? and just how bitter and divisive with that election campaign be? at a time in the country desperately needs bringing back together. some have suggested holding a second referendum. i do not believe that is what you want and it is not what i want. we asked you the question already and you gave us your answer. now, you want us to get on with that. and that is exactly what i am determined to do.
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labour mp for sefton central and shadow business and international trade — has tweeted early theme to pick up bond. dominic sa nkey early theme to pick up bond. dominic sankey did not like the way she appeared to be questioning the mps —— says. few people talking about the revocation of article 50. eu sources saying they are watching out for that option, with emphasising that we are away away from that
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happening. benedicte paviot is a french journalist here in london — and president of the foreign press association thank you for your time and what do you make of all of this? extraordinary, reality surpasses addiction. younger of the 27 eu leaders across the world. they have become internationally famous and so has the dup, and nine days away from the 29th of march, quite extraordinary to see the profoundly divided parliament and this prime minister blaming very much mps, it is quite an extraordinary and fascinating time to be half french, half british. we had a briefing with
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a very big march here in central london and people were coming from all corners of the united kingdom to march against brexit and of course the will of the british people was clear, they wanted brexit. some very much say that it was not clearly defined but are we witnessing the last days of the prime minister, but also the conservative party without writing it off, it is quite extraordinary what we are seeing. something like a former attorney general saying what he said just now on this channel and also saying what he said in parliament, so very divisive times and one hopes that the healing that theresa may said in her letter back in december could happen in the united kingdom can indeed happen. thank you very much for your time, we appreciated, that is what we‘ve got to his brexit. more coverage coming up in a minute,
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both on bbc news channel and on bbc 0ne news. i‘m ros atkins. 0utside source. it's 1000 it‘s 1000 days since the uk voted out of their opinion. theresa may just finished a televised live address and she tells me it‘s high time mps made a decision over brexit. you gave us your answer already, and you want us to get on with it, that is what i am determined to do. earlier, the eu laid out its terms for backing any delay to the brexit process. i believe that a short extension will be possible. but it will be conditional on a positive vote on the withdrawal agreement in the house of

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