Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast BBC News Channel  BBC News  March 22, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. a cold front will move this is business live from bbc south—eastward, introducing cooler news with maryam moshiri welcome to breakfast, air into the north—western areas. and samantha simmonds. with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. britain buys more time our headlines today. the rain could be heavierfor a time as businesses warn that neither across scotland and northern the eu or the uk are ready ireland, eventually sunny spells, a for a no—deal brexit. the eu agrees to delay brexit few cysts —— micro showers coming live beyond the 29th march after late from london, that‘s our top story on friday 22 march. night talks in brussels. through. remaining mostly dry and pretty cloudy today. it will be the good morning. welcome to breakfast all options will remain south—east where temperatures could with charlie stayt open, and the cliff edge and mega munchetty. date will be delayed. our headlines today: get up to 16 degrees. elsewhere, typical values, 12 to 15 degrees. it the eu agrees to delay brexit theresa may has been beyond the 29th march, offered two new brexit after late night talks in brussels. deadlines in april and may. will turn more chili in the we ll tell you what happens next. north—west later on. the rain all the 12 april is now the new 29 march. confused? well, rescue workers try to reach that‘s the new departure date people cut off by floods, but fizzles out later on, just a for the uk to leave the eu one week after a major cyclone hit all options will remain open and the legacy of cloud into the south. only if british mp‘s reject mrs may‘s deal again. further north, temperatures two or but her problems in parliament cliff edge date will be delayed. southern africa. remain, and delaying the date three celsius. a few wintry showers doesn‘t make them go away. theresa may has been offered two indonesia‘s national carrier garuda says it has asked to cancel new brexit deadlines before coming to the north west of in april and may. a week since the christchurch mosque a multi billion dollar we'll tell you what happens next. attacks, memorials are held scotland. that weather front will be across new zealand in honour of the victims. with you in southern parts during rescue workers try to reach a humiliating day people cut off by floods after a major cyclone in southern for scottish football. saturday. elsewhere, fresher, cooler africa. they‘re thrashed 3—0 by kazakhstan, a country ranked, 77 places below them, air. that is moving in during
6:01 am
d—day for debenhams. one week since the christchurch mosque attacks, memorials are held reports say the ailing across new zealand in department store chain saturday. cloudy in southern areas, should be dry. elsewhere, lots of honour of the victims. blue skies and sunshine. a much brighter day compared to the last is creeping closer to a deal morning. on its debts but it needs few days. one or two showers coming in. ten to 13 degrees. cold into that to keep the company afloat. in sport, a humiliating night for scottish football. sunday morning, a touch of frost they're thrashed 3—0 by kazakhstan, a lot of cloud around, some rain and a country ranked 77 places below here and there. clear skies and them in their european sunshine across many parts. the championship qualifier. wind scotland and northern ireland, good morning. all the details in 15 minutes. the kentucky fried crisis. cloud in the south will start to just how does a fried chicken move away so it should get brighter chain run out of chicken? into the afternoon. showers in the boss of kfc tells me that last year's shortage redfined a bad day it‘s friday 22nd march. our top story. at the office and that the firm north—west scotland, could be wintry a delay to brexit has finally been ofa is now stockpiling to prepare for agreed by eu leaders north—west scotland, could be wintry of a higher ground. temperatures on brexit. good morning and that is a dry, after talks dragged on late cloudy day today for england and wales. we have wind and rain into the night in brussels. par saturday. settled weather into arriving in scotland and northern ireland. i will bring you all the theresa may has been details for today and the weekend offered two new deadlines, next week. as the prime minister once again urged mps back at home throughout this morning. to get behind her deal. so, lets take you through those new dates for your diary. brexit day, as things good morning. it's friday 22nd march. stand, is the 29th march our top story: a delay to brexit has seven days from now. finally been agreed by eu leaders but if mps pass theresa may 5 deal after talks dragged on late next week, we will leave into the night in brussels. the eu on the 22nd may.
6:02 am
theresa may has been offered two new deadlines, as the prime minister once if her deal‘s not approved, then, again urged mps back at home to get behind her deal. april 12th becomes the new deadline. so let's take you through those new dates. at that stage, mps will have to come up with an alternative plan brexit day, as things which could mean a longer extension, stand, is the 29th march, leaving with no—deal, seven days from now. or even revoking article 50, that‘s to say, cancelling but if mps pass theresa brexit completely. may's deal next week, we will leave the eu on the 22nd may. let‘s find out more about exactly what happened last night, then. if her deal isn't approved, then april 12th becomes here 5 our political correspondent chris mason. the new deadline. you know it‘s rather late at that stage, mps when the prime minister offers this will have to come up with an alternative plan, greeting at the end of a long evening. good morning. which could mean a longer yes, agreeing a delay to brexit had extension, leaving with no itself been delayed, deal, or even revoking article 50, that's to say cancelling brexit completely. but at gone midnight, let's find out more about exactly it was eventually signed off, what happened last night then. and the prime minister said... here's our political correspondent, chris mason. you know it's rather late i hope we can all agree we are now when the prime minister offers at the moment of decision, this greeting at the end of a long evening. and i will make every effort good morning. to ensure that we are able to leave with a deal, and move our country forward. yes, agreeing a delay to brexit had we now know, if the british
6:03 am
parliament agrees to it, itself been delayed, but at gone midnight, brexit will not happen a week today, it was eventually signed off, and the prime minister said... as planned, with the eu saying that if the uk doesn‘t want to sign up i hope we can all agree we are now at the moment of decision, to the withdrawal agreement, it has until april the 12th to work and i will make every effort to ensure that we are able to leave out what it does want. with a deal and move our country forward. we now know, if the british what this means in practice is that, parliament agrees to it, until that date, all options will remain open, and the cliff edge brexit will not happen a week today, date will be delayed. as planned, with the eu saying the uk government will still that if the uk doesn't want to sign up to the withdrawal agreement, have a choice of a deal, it has until april the 12th to work no deal, a long extension, out what it does wants. what this means in practice is that, or revoking article 50. until that date, all options will remain open, and the cliff edge revoking article 50 means cancelling the brexit process, date will be delayed. an idea that‘s attracted more than two million signatures on parliament‘s own website. the uk government will still have a choice of a deal, but the government has no deal, a long extension, flatly rejected the idea. for the prime minister this morning, or revoking article 50. a series of dilemmas have been postponed, but not resolved. there are still no revoking article 50 means easy answers for her. cancelling the brexit process, chris mason, bbc news.
6:04 am
an idea that's attracted more than 2 million signatures on parliament's own website. but the government has let‘s speak now to our political correspondent flatly rejected the idea. ben wright in westminster. for the prime minister this morning, ben, what has parliament‘s reaction a series of dilemmas have been postponed, but not resolved. been to this new timetable? all of those dates depend on what there are still no easy answers for her. happens next week. chris mason, bbc news. that is true. there was a lot of we'll get the reaction concern a couple of days ago that from parliament injust a moment with our political the uk was heading at high speed two a no—deal brexit at the end of next correspondent, ben wright. but first, our reporter week, friday 29th, because theresa adam fleming is in brussels. may had been saying, though for this deal before the clock runs out. it it is kind of almost pathetic was clear that deal would not get fallacy when you are trying to sort through this week which is why it of see through the mist of all of this and backs it, good morning, was postponed. she was running out how's it going? yeah, hi there. i love that the weather of brussels of time. the eu last night in this a lwa ys love that the weather of brussels always delivers a perfect metaphor. very long meeting had to provide the it is ok to bea always delivers a perfect metaphor. it is ok to be a little bit confused about what is going on, even donald uk with another plan, a way out for tusk, the president of the eu theresa may and parliament. they have shunted brexit day forward, the
6:05 am
council, chaired the meeting, when condition is if the deal goes he announced that yesterday, he got one of the date so many had to through, the uk will leave on may correct it, so thatjust tells you a 22, if it cannot go through next little bit about the shenanigans that went on in the room last night. what happened is that there were week, parliament and the government lots of discussions among the other have a couple of more weeks until april 12 to figure out what they 27 presidents, prime ministers and chancellors about what to do with wa nt to april 12 to figure out what they want to do. that could be from the date of the extension, some thought that the date on the table, deciding to ask voters to have the 27th of may, it was too late, another referendum, to revoking some thought the conditions were too article 50, two coming up with a harsh on the uk, some thought they softer brexit keeping the eu and uk we re harsh on the uk, some thought they were too easy, lots of people were worried that where they would end up was actually with an emergency closely aligned, something to get a summit next week, it looked like no majority in parliament which is a deal could be one day away and they challenge if as seems likely the we re deal could be one day away and they were not very many options on the table and the eu was going to have deal is rejected again. to share half of the blame. they just clarify one thing for us which have done ours created some more space and therefore the still remains, which is, by law, the responsibility back onto the uk. —— 29th of march is still the date we what they have done now. just listen leave the eu? to emmanuel macron, the french president, when he left the summit that is right, it is in uk and eu last night. he said he had to step law. the fact there will be an extension deals with the eu law in and take control of this process issue but the government will have because the british political
6:06 am
establishment was not able to. if to change a statute here to scrub you like the eu, they have saved the out march 29 from the legislation day and given the uk more space. if and replace it with something else. you hate the eu, then they are intruding on british politics. if not a complicated process, it takes you are theresa may, she can still a couple of days to go through say i'm going to introduce my bill parliament using parliamentary procedure but it has to happen. to to parliament next week, please vote reset the clock even for a short for it and we will still leave the time. it will feel too many there is eu, just a bit later than planned. thank you very much. some breathing space for everyone to that's the view from europe, but let's speak now to our political regather their thoughts, calm down, correspondent ben wright in westminster. ‘sjust ‘s just tell us what is going to think clearly about what they want happen in westminster next week. to happen next. it doesn‘t make the outcome anymore certain, we are in well, the government will have the middle of a big political another final attempt at ramming crisis, the pressure is off the theresa may's withdrawal deal to the commons. this week, did not happen government and parliament a bit but she is going to have one last go after brussels last night. thank you. out doing that. as you have been explaining, if it does go through, in new zealand, thousands of people have backs that they would be on march observed two minutes‘ silence in memory of the 50 victims of last friday‘s mass shootings the 27th, after all the necessary at two mosques in christchurch. brexit laws have gone to parliament. special ceremonies and prayer if it falls and i think there is services took place across the country to mark a week still very little chance of this on from the killings. passing because of the scale of our correspondent phil mercer
6:07 am
joins us from there. opposition to it, on her own side phil, what has the mood mainly, then parliament and the been like there today? government will have three weeks to come up with an alternative course you have been there all day, what is of action, plan to put in front of the eu by april the 12th. that is going to be the key deadline, so in the mood light? a matter of two or three weeks, they have got to do something, which over two years they have completely it has been an excruciating week for failed to do, which is to find a new zealand. we heard from the imam compromise here about the kind of exit they want. there is though i of the al al—noor mosque where a2 of think a real sense of relief around the 50 victims died a week ago. the westminster and there will be because the idea of an ideal cliff edge brexit now next friday has now gone, that is not going to happen, imam saying new zealand was heartbroken but not broken. he also where as a few days ago that broached the issue of global islamic suddenly felt like a real possibility. just to clarify, the phobia, saying there was an law does have to change between now and 29th because as it stands, that irrational fear of islam, of the still exist. you are completely right, charlie. they've got to make food muslims eat, the prayers they a tweet to the lord just change the make, the clothes they wear. he said exit date because at the moment, in statute, comments as it is friday. that kills. a poignant day for that now has to be scrubbed out and replaced with something else, either a specific date or left open but thousands of new zealanders who
6:08 am
both eu and uk law have to change gathered in christchurch and around now to accept and recognise the new the country to observe this day of reality that exit day is not going to the 29th of march. thank you very solidarity, of remembrance. we have also had a mass burial of 26 of the much. correction fluid, loving out victims today. so, another sad and with a special racer, who knows? —— painful day for their relatives and families. as for the survivors, we rubbing out. have 27 people still ill in hospital in new zealand, thousands of people have observed two minutes's silence suffering from gunshot wounds, five in memory of the 50 victims of last friday's mass shootings of those remain in intensive care. at mosques in christchurch. special ceremonies and prayer services took place again, we have had a show of across the country to mark a week on from the killings. solidarity right around the country our correspondent phil mercer joins us from there now. one can only imagine the sadness as new zealand has paused to that pervades the air there at the remember the atrocity of a week ago. moment. hi. that was reflected by indeed. thank you. aid agencies say hundreds of thousands of people have been the imam of the al noor mosque when affected by the tropical cyclone which hit southern africa last a week ago 42 people were murdered, week, oxfam says an area of about 3,000 square kilometres, is now under water. gamil fouda, the imam saying that he whole towns and villages have been submerged, was there at the time, he could see and victims have been left stranded on roofs and stuck in trees. rescue teams are continuing to work the rage and hatred in the
6:09 am
government's eyes and he said that to save survivors, as our africa editor fergal keane reports. his actions, had broken millions of hearts around the world but he said a town separated from its country. that the love and compassion that new zealand has displayed during the buzi is now an island, last seven days really meant that while new zealand was heartbroken, it was not broken. we have also had its people marooned on rooftops. the burials, the funerals of 26 victims today, so another today, the country‘s president visited. filipe nyusi saw for himself the wretched excruciating day for the families of conditions of his people. those individuals. we have also had "the first thing we‘re an update from the hospital, 27 going to do is rescue people from the water", people remain in the care of he said, "so that they do not die." christchurch hospital, five of those there was a small hand out of food are in intensive care, so a week on aid, too small for so many, with inevitable frustration. from this event, this terrible event here in christchurch, we have a very we joined a rescue team approaching buzi from the water, from where the pungwe river sombre day of solidarity and remembrance. thank you. burst its banks. within a few minutes, counter—terrorism investigations are underway we saw the first survivors calling in birmingham, after windows were smashed at five to us from the shore. mosques in city. —— in the city. sledgehammers were "we were in the water for four used in the attacks, which detectives are days", said this man.
6:10 am
treating as coordinated. "we have lost our houses." from the air too, more rescues. the home secretary sajid javid has called the vandalism "hateful", this was the scene at the stadium saying it had absolutely in buzi, and again, the limits no place in society. of what‘s possible to achieve aid agencies say that hundreds of thousands of people have been with still such limited resources. affected by the tropical cyclone which hit southern africa last week, and here, those who‘d heard that rescue was coming crowded onto the banks. oxfam says an area of around 3,000 square kilometres is now under water. whole towns and villages have been submerged, and victims have been left stranded as we pulled away, others pleaded to be taken. on rooves and stuck in trees. we saw the indian navy rescue 67 people along the river, rescue teams are continuing but as others are left behind, to work to save survivors, the sailors will be back tomorrow as our africa editor and for days to come. fergal keane reports. fergal keane, bbc news, a town separated from its country. on the pungwe river, mozambique. police searching for 21—year—old buzi is now in ireland, its people libby squire have confirmed a body marooned on rooftops. today, the recovered from the humber estuary is that of the missing country president visited. he saw hull university student. during the initial investigation, a 2a—year—old man was arrested for himself the wretched conditions on suspicion of abduction. of his people. the first thing we he‘s been remanded in custody on unrelated charges, and remains under investigation. are going to do is rescue people from the water, he said, so that
6:11 am
they do not die. there was a small hand out food aid, too small for so many, with inevitable frustration. some breaking news and wejoined a rescue we‘re just hearing that many, with inevitable frustration. we joined a rescue team approaching rush—hour commuters are being warned buzi from the water, from where the of major delays at waterloo this morning. all trains in and out of the station river burst its banks. within a few were halted earlier due to overrunning engineering works. minutes, we saw the first survivors up to 100,000 commuters are likely to be affected. calling to us from the shore. national rail said there was an "electrical issue" and confirmed services started translation: we were in the water running again 7.25am, but warned the disruption is set for days. we have lost our houses. from the air too, more rescues. this to last until this afternoon. was the scene at the stadium in buzi and again, the limits of what is possible to achieve still such limited resources. and here, those we will keep you updated. who had heard that rescue was coming. they were crowded onto the imagine looking up at the sky banks. as we pulled away, others and seeing this sight before you. pleaded to be taken. we saw the indian navy rescue 67 people along it might look like a burning meteor soaring through the sky, but it was actually professional the river, but as others are left skydivers performing a stunt behind, the sailors will be back thousands of feet in the air. tomorrow and for days to come.
6:12 am
the team in special wingsuits with pyrotechnics jumped police searching for libby squire have confirmed a body recovered from from a helicopter at a,000 feet, the humber estuary is that of the missing student. before gathering speeds of up to 120mph to mark the final supermoon of 2019. during the initial investigation, a 24—year—old man the last images you see here, the was arrested on suspicion of abduction. he's been remanded in custody on unrelated charges, and remains under investigation. pilots flying through the sky, a tougher standard for amazing images. punctuality will be introduced on britain's railways next month, it looks like out of a marvel movie. in an attempt to improve performance. train times will be recorded to the minute at every fabulous. we‘ve been hearing all morning stop, instead of the current system, about theresa may‘s new timetable which classes them as "on time" for delivering brexit. if they reach their final but to avoid leaving with no deal destination within five or 10 minutes of the timetable. on the 12th of april, punctuality across britain sank she still requires parliament‘s support for her to a 13 year low in 2018. withdrawal agreement. a group of mp5 from different parties have come up with an alternative plan which they believe could gain more support amongst colleagues if the prime minster‘s deal is defeated again. imagine looking up at the sky the labour mp lucy powell is one and seeing this sight before you. of them, and joins us now. cani can i ask, before we turn to that
6:13 am
it sort of looks like a burning plan, what do you make of what has meteor soaring through the sky, emerged from the eu last night? but it's not. it is quite complicated. what is isn't it? it was actually professional skydivers performing a stunt goodis thousands of feet in the air. it is quite complicated. what is good is they do not seem to be presenting, during the course of the team, in special yesterday, we worried what they were wingsuits with pyrotechnics, jumped from a helicopter at 4000 feet, before gathering speeds of up presenting was a very short to i20mph to mark the final extension or to crash out with no supermoon of 2019. deal. that would have been very they look like big superheroes, damaging as an outcome. now, they seem to be offering something else, don't they? that is obviously one of either a short technical extension, or we can go back to them for a the pictures taken as they were coming down, amazing. unbelievable. have you done that? sci-fi movies, longer extension if necessary. what does that do for parliament, you had been there, what does that sorry. i covered the world do for the mood? i feel like there‘s pilots coming championship of wingsuit flying in down, falling of eclipse, not salisbury, they let me jump off the knowing where we are going. it might table in wingsuit. i flew probably ten feet that they were jumping help the prime minister —— falling out... and yeah, they can travel out for miles. 120 miles an hour? it is offa help the prime minister —— falling off a cliff. her talent has been the arg wing of her own party. the
6:14 am
amazing. can you imagine that speed. european research group, hard line so where are you starting us? the bet it is. many of them wanted no deal, so a choice between the prime scotla nd so where are you starting us? the scotland newspaper is calling scott and's defeat to kazakhstan last mr‘s deal and a no—deal, they would night in kazakhstan as the worst result since 1872. you know it is just not have voted for her deal. it might help a different argument, bad... i'm trying to work out what happened in 1872, iwill either her deal or a long extension. bad... i'm trying to work out what happened in 1872, i will need to find out because it must‘ve been bad. i have no -- i doubt that scott and in terms of your position? you area and in terms of your position? you are a member of a cross—party group of backbenchers. what have you been and played kazakhstan in 1872, so... trying to get on the table? it was a night of like many mps, we have all calamity in kaza kstan, especially for scotland's defenders. alex mcleish‘s side conceded two goals inside the first ten recognised a compromise is needed to minutes and then another break the deadlock. a group of us after half—time, as their attempt to make next summer's came together, labour and european championship finals conservatives, some more on the leave side, others on the more got off to this terrible start. remain side, with a proposition afterwards, the manager said that he wouldn't "be drawn" on his future. declan rice has apologised called common market 2.0, a version for a social media post four years ago, in which he made an apparent reference of how norway is. we would leave the to the ira. the west ham midfielder
6:15 am
was an ireland youth player. eu, the political institutions, common agricultural policy, the jurisdiction of the european court he's now switched to england and is likely to earn his first cap ofjustice, but we would assert our against the czech republic tonight. current rights of members of the next year's tokyo olympics will be simone biles's last. european economic area to stay in the 22 year—old gymnast says the single market so we have the it feels like her body is "falling apart" from the wear and tear of the sport. frictionless trade, we come to a she won four golds for the usa at the 2016 games in rio. customs arrangements with the eu to reduce the backstop issues. it is and after abu dhabi hosted the largest ever world event something that could happen very for athletes with intellectual disability, the head quickly because we can move into of great britain's special olympics programme is urging the government to back a bid to stage it here. this other separate to the eu, outside the eu but part of the and it was such a great success, i economic area. and people would have to accept really love watching the footage and coverage of all the different sports freedom of movement. out there in the special olympics. there is freedom of movement but... you say that in a dismissive way but you're going to stay around for a for a lot of people a big part of look at the papers with this in just a moment. here's sarah with a look their vote to leave the eu was to at this morning's weather. stop freedom of movement. your plan that's a lovely picture. is that would mean freedom of movement what we should be experiencing? it continues. is that true? it is true, however,
6:16 am
was taken in scottish borders by one there are new powers you have in the of our weather watches. we have european economic area... barely cloudy skies across much of the country. mixed fortunes out you said yes to that, why is that there today because we are going to a cce pta ble see some wind and rain weaving in you said yes to that, why is that acceptable to those people who voted from the north—west but for the rest for brexit? of the country, a fairly settled and because what we would have is a cloudy story. a breezy field to the unilateral emergency brake on free movement which is not something we weather today, particularly further north. some rain moving on from the currently have. norway, iceland, the north—west and that's all down to this weather front, quite an active other countries in the european cold front. we got high pressure not economic area have this unilateral power to bring in an emergency brake far away to the south and east but on free movement if there are for if we look at some of the wind gusts example a large movement of people we might see through this morning, across the continent, economic 40 we might see through this morning, a0 miles per hour across parts of circumstances, societal northern england and scotland, some of those gusts could touch 70. circumstances. your government can around exposed hills and coasts in the far north—west. england and determine that, our government has wales in particular, a lot of cloud that unilateral right. it is that but mostly dry in the day. some wording, that clause that david holes in the cloud so blue sky cameron spent months in the run—up glimpses to the east of higher to the referendum trying to get from
6:17 am
ground, north—eastern wales, eastern europe as an exception for the uk. england. temperatures 13—15. we would have free movement but we scotla nd would have some fresh powers we do england. temperatures 13—15. scotland and northern ireland, cooler is the cold front pushes its not currently have. how do you deal, this applies to you way towards the south—east and through this evening and tonight, the front tends to fizzle out, a few andi how do you deal, this applies to you and i am assuming to your spots of drizzle left. the rest of conservative colleagues, that you the country is under those clear are breaking a manifesto pledge, skies. a cold night ahead. quite a both conservative and labour said freedom of movement would stop. asi freedom of movement would stop. as i say, we are in a difficult cold start to your weekend. we have this high pressure pushing in from circumstance. so it is ok to break a the atlantic but there is the risk pledge? no, it is not, but we are ofa the atlantic but there is the risk of a frontal system lingering in the trying to work through this. this is south. not much in the way of rain. a compromise position. in the run—up particularly anywhere south of the ma corridor. a fairly cloudy story to the referendum, including the here. sunny skies for the rest of whole of the referendum campaign, the main leave proponents, boris the uk. still some sleet and snow showers. it will feel rather cool. johnson, nigel farage, all that said we could be like norway, they said 10- 12 showers. it will feel rather cool. 10— 12 degrees. plenty of sunshine we could be like norway, they said to compensate for those lower we could be in the single market, temperatures. when we got that have all the benefits but leaving the political institution of the eu. cloud, it will be mild overnight
6:18 am
saturday night but the blue colours across the rest of the maps show a it is me who has moved as someone cold night. what a widespread frost who was a remain, i argued against to start your sunday morning. not that, i have moved to that that chilly start to sunday, a bit of cloud in to — should tend to compromise. there are compromises that come with this. we would still break up. double — should tend to be in free movement but with break up. double — should tend to critical new powers to unilaterally break up. double — should tend to break up. temperatures should start to creep up by the time we get to bring in. if a sunday. around about 10—13 degrees. critical new powers to unilaterally bring in. ifa new critical new powers to unilaterally bring in. if a new countryjoin the eu. let us talk about process. many a quick look ahead into next week watching i will say the eu has said for you. with high pressure you can extend, what does that mean? building, it should be mostly dry what will happen now in parliament? and settled. some sunny spells, a you are part of one group that has a bit of mist and fog but reasonably dry, settled and springlike weather as we head through the course of plan, others have plans that aren‘t next week. theresa may‘s. there is a big 150 therapists who claim to "cure" contingent against theresa may. what autism have been served enforcement notices happens in terms of presenting your by the advertising watchdog, ideas, getting support? amid warnings their methods have no scientific credibility, and could severely harm children. the advertising standards authority there are two crucial things. our said claims that ‘cease plan which is gaining a lot of therapy‘ could cure the condition were of serious concern. the treatment claims to remove support from all sides of the house
6:19 am
"toxic imprints" caused by vaccines and medications. of commons is about rewriting the samantha fenwick reports. political declaration so the future relationship... there are two parts, the withdrawal agreement which the eu says is non—negotiable, we would agree with that. the future when this woman's son was diagnosed relationship, the political as autistic, she felt she had no declaration that means we have to have the backstop, is the bit we support. you've been through loads wa nt to have the backstop, is the bit we want to change. let us see what of uncertainty. is he, isn't it? and happens with her deal first. that i you finally get an appointment with say it does not go through. many the paediatrician and you get the conservatives backing our plan also yeah, his autistic anything, let's that hers, they will vote for that help him and then nothing. just first. we are then hoping, through amendments, through procedural nothing. wide to try and get help, checks if you like, to very quickly this to a treatment called cease, after her deal. hopefully, the next com plete this to a treatment called cease, complete and limitation of autism spectrum exhibition. i was stupid. i day, this week, have a position thought it can't hurt, it's a tribe where finally parliament cant say what it does want. andi we have not had that opportunity.- thought it can't hurt, it's a tribe and i don't really believe in homoeopathy but you are reaching out for something to help and they give it stands now, were parliament to you a remedy and you go back after
6:20 am
two weeks and say, well, i think the vote on your proposal, let us call eye co nta ct two weeks and say, well, i think the eye contact was a bit better or it the common market 2.0, do you perhaps he is communicating a bit more. did you see any changes? no, think it would pass? is it your but i desperately wanted to. cease hunch there are enough people who would support it if it came to, say, therapy is homoeopathy based on the monday? idea that toxins in the environment ido monday? i do not think it would pass before and vaccines may cause autism but the prime minister‘s deal has been these claims have been found to be voted on again because many of the false and experts say this treatment is potentially harmful. there is no conservatives... the support does scientific basis whatsoever. it exist, potentially, we have not talks about curing autism and autism tested it. we have a lot of support is not a disease. it's not something that needs to be cured. for many conservatives. most will vote for her deal first. if her deal psychologically, it's really harmful to give parents the idea that the falls, then, yes, potentially, there way to love and nurture their would be a significant majority, a autistic child is to try and cure their autism. the treatment also proper majority for something like this. you will be aware of the frustrations of the electorate. you recommends giving autistic children 4- recommends giving autistic children a— five times more zinc than is recommended by the department of area labourmp. health and 200 times more vitamin c frustrations of the electorate. you are a labour mp. how has it turned to the point a labour mp is sitting
6:21 am
which might cause diarrhoea and vomiting. the practice of here and not supporting her party homoeopathy in the uk is not regulated and this angers some leaders, her party leader‘s plans campaigners. as an autistic adult, for brexit? ijust support for brexit? i just support those as well. but it disgusts me but these charlatans you have your own plan. we had some are taking advantage of parents and extensive conversations with him. he in turn making children very sick. i've been campaigning for five years is not leading you. it is a hung for legislation against fake cures parliament and this is how these for legislation against fake cures for autism. there needs to be a legislation brought in to stop these things have to come from. jeremy corbyn has proposed close alignment snake oil salesman taking advantage with the single market and a customs of pa rents. union, that is not that far apart snake oil salesman taking advantage of parents. there are 150 cease therapists in the uk and all of them from our proposal. but something have been told that they must stop thatis from our proposal. but something that is directly proposed byjeremy claiming the treatment can cure would not necessarily get cross— party would not necessarily get cross—party support it needs. this autism. five face prosecution and isa the advertising standards watchdog cross—party support it needs. this is a delicate issue of a hung has told the bbc they will take parliament. it we have had! we have further action if others don't comply. the society of homeopaths is 110w comply. the society of homeopaths is now thinking about renaming cease had two very long meetings with therapy to make sure claims are not jeremy corbyn at his request, we have gone through areas of made that can't be substantiated.
6:22 am
this mum, who spent a few hundred commonality, areas of diversion. i pounds on the treatment, has this think he can see that with our advice to parents. don't go for the support, working together with him, this is something we could get stupid parity, put your purse away and go for something more sensible. through parliament. it is a you can hear more on that story challenge. thank you for speaking on radio a's "you and yours" with us. at 12.15 today. here‘s sarah with a look the daughter of the man at this morning‘s weather. who saved ‘flying scotsman‘ good morning. a day of mixed from the scrapyard will wave off the world‘s most famous steam locomotive when it pulls out of swanage station fortu nes good morning. a day of mixed in dorset this morning. fortunes today. pretty cloudy across much of the country. but i have our correspondentjohn managed to find you some blue sky. maguire is there for us, and can tell us more. mostly dry across england and wales good morning. the flying scotsman is but there will be rain moving into scotla nd but there will be rain moving into scotland and northern ireland. not a lwa ys good morning. the flying scotsman is always a crowdpleaser in a crowd just the rain but fairly brisk winds puller. it‘s great to see it so down to the fact we have an active close up, such a huge engine, almost cold front moving in from the 100 years old, built in 1923 and on north—west. in the south east, high pressure over europe will be car, used to travel at 100 miles an hour between scotland and london, dominating england and wales. just look at the size of the wheels, this morning, a0 miles an hour
6:23 am
they are taller than i am. the widely across northern england, daughter of the man who is widely northern ireland and scotland, even up northern ireland and scotland, even up to 70 around exposed hills in the recognised as having saved the flying scotsman from the scrapheap north—west of scotland. that meant pushing south eastwards. will be setting off later on today. she is here at the swanage road. we have cloud over england and wales. a view brighter skies in just looking at all the metres, making sure pressure is up. the eastern england and the south—west. flying scotsman will go through five temperatures around 1a degrees for tons of coal a day. i don‘t suppose england and where is. some cooler the engine will be doing 100 miles an hour today. we are expecting big air moving in over scotland and northern ireland. some late sunshine crowds to come along and see the here. still some wintry showers. flying scotsman pulling carriages, doing what it‘s designed to do. an chilly conditions filtering their way south but it will be mild across amazing day for you guys. it's a southern parts of england and wales where you keep that cloud tonight. over the weekend, high pressure real unique experience for the moves in from the atlantic. we still railway. tell us what car 1a years. have this week and a stubborn front sitting over southern england, slow it's railway. tell us what car 1a years. it‘s an observation coach which is a to clear away. that will bring a
6:24 am
band of cloud towards the south of pullman carriage which went around america and penny pegler, who will the ma corridor with cloud lingering. for much of the uk, not a green flag to train up today, was 17 bad day. a return to sunnier skies yea rs old green flag to train up today, was 17 years old when it went around america and she is very emotional by saturday. still some wintry flurries for northern and western about the flying scotsman. we scotland. temperatures up to 13. famously know the flying scotsman is what the engine did in britain. under those clear skies, a cold penny knows it from this story in night into sunday morning. frost america. images in my mind of the around, and a few miss d patches on sunday morning. then, sunday is not train being taken across the a bad day. showers across scotland atla ntic train being taken across the atlantic and working in america for that period of time. it would have been absolutely incredible. and northern ireland. england and that period of time. it would have been absolutely incrediblelj that period of time. it would have wales should be dry on sunday and been absolutely incredible. i am sure when you interview penny later, will lose that cloud in the south. she will tell you all about it. we temperatures up to 13 degrees for sunday. high—pressure bills into nearly sold out today. it‘s a next week. looking mostly dry and remarkable achievement. and why? why settled, sunshine, with mist and fog. those temperatures will is this the most famous train in the gradually rise through next week. world, the most famous real train in
6:25 am
the world. only thomas the tank thank you. engine can be more widely known. the world. only thomas the tank engine can be more widely knownlj think it‘s become the people‘s john maguire‘s at swanage station, locomotive. it has a special place where he‘ll be waving off the flying scotsman later. in people‘s hearts. they come in their thousands to see it as we will see today. it‘s quite amazing. if i that is a fine sight. toot the whistle! can we do the knew the reason why, it has its own whistle? yes. no, not in the magic. its history. it speaks for itself. so many ups and downs in its station! we are on board the flying scotsman, life. it‘s like a cat with nine possibly the most famous chain ever lives. it‘s had so many existential crises over the years but it keeps built in the uk, built in doncaster, coming back. and it is a remarkable spending time at swanage station in dorset, and reunited with a carriage achievement for the swanage railway it last towed in north america. to have it here. the ten days, 15 later in the programme, we will meet penny, herfather in 1963 days it goes to cult castles of the later in the programme, we will meet penny, her father in 1963 for a few public can come and actually get thousand pounds saved the flying onto the footplate and go through scotsman from the scrapheap. this the corridor and into car 1a. famous chain that can travel at over
6:26 am
100 miles an hour, look at the size onto the footplate and go through the corridor and into car 14. people will actually be able to go up on the footway. and so it‘s going to be of the wheels, an incredible piece of the wheels, an incredible piece of engineering. the beginning of its summer touring around the country. taking passengers. we talked a it is normally kept at the national little bit about the speeds that it railway museum in york. wherever it was famous for, topping 100 miles per hour. our maximum speed limit on draws, it —— it goes, it draws huge crowds. now for the local news, the swanage per hour. our maximum speed limit on the swa nage railway per hour. our maximum speed limit on the swanage railway is 25 miles per travel and weather. hour. each train will carry 315 passengers. five trains a day. all the very best for the next few days. always a magnificent sight. the flying scotsman. let‘s take you from dorset right around the uk to see the news, travel and whether you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news.
6:27 am
i‘m sonja jessup. knives, knuckle—dusters and class a drugs have been found onboard a bus carrying paris st germain fans to a women‘s champion‘s league game against chelsea. up to 50 psg fans were denied entry to the quarter—final tie at kingsmeadow in kingston. police were first called to reports of vandalism at the stadium— then later to disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. one man onboard the coach has been arrested. today marks the second anniversary of the westminster terror attack but some survivors are unhappy there‘s no official commemoration. five people were killed after the attacker drove his car into crowds on westminster bridge and then stabbed pc keith palmer outside parliament. lawyers representing survivors say they want to have talks with the mayor on how to officially mark the tragedy. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube— the district line has no service between parsons green
6:28 am
and wimbledon— there‘s been an electrical fault. now if you‘re not a fan of the gym, how about this instead? these classes are called ‘drag diva fit‘— they‘re aimed at people who as you might have guessed aren‘t keen on conventional work outs and they‘ll be cheered on and entertained by drag queens while they‘re exercising. fitness should be fun and it shouldn‘t feel like work. we have guys, shouldn‘t feel like work. we have guys, girls, straight girls, gay men. it‘s a place that they can feel co mforta ble men. it‘s a place that they can feel comfortable in the gym and just really enjoy themselves.
6:29 am
hello, good morning. yesterday‘s exciting fun packed day of weather was filled with cloud, a few brighter spells here and there are, light winds and of course it stayed dry as well and today it‘s looking very similar, i replay what we had yesterday. mild, misty start to the morning, lots of low cloud around. the cloud will lift into yet more cloud as we lived through the morning. some brighter spells, particularly towards south—eastern areas. they could even be a bit of sunshine in the best of any brightness and sunshine, highs of 15 01’ brightness and sunshine, highs of 15 or16 brightness and sunshine, highs of 15 or 16 celsius. otherwise underneath all that low cloud, twelves and 13 ‘s. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud is just going to persist. a few spots of drizzle into the north—west as we had with the start of the day tomorrow and that is going to spark offa tomorrow and that is going to spark off a few changes. it‘s a cold front which will introduce cooler air over the course of the weekend. quite cloudy, particularly towards southern areas of the capital.
6:30 am
brightness further north. more reliable sunshine on sunday and a frost to start the new working week. and i‘ll be back in around half—an—hour. now it‘s back to charlie and naga. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. time now is exactly 6:30am. all the latest news and sport in a moment. also on breakfast this morning: we‘re celebrating one of britain‘s loudest exports, heavy metal music hits the ripe old age of 50. does not normally look like that, it is an unusual heavy metal video, which involves shopping for toiletries. we‘ve been out shopping to find out why toiletries made for women are more expensive than those for men. and michael ball will be
6:31 am
here to tell us how he got his "best kick in years" writing the songs for his new album. what pictures were they? hello it was michael ball. his latest album? did you say we are going to be singing? no, no, i said that he likes to sing. i was just putting that out there. we will warned you as well in advance of that is going to happen. —— we will warn you well in advance. good morning. here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. theresa may has been offered to new deadlines as the prime minister once again urged mps to get behind the deal. so let‘s take you through those new dates for your diary. brexit day, as things stand, is the 29th march — seven days from now. but if mps pass theresa may‘s deal next week, we will leave the eu on the 22nd may. if her deal is not approved, then april 12th becomes the new deadline. at that stage, mps will have to come
6:32 am
up with an alternative plan, which could mean a longer extension, leaving with no deal, or even revoking article 50 — that‘s to say cancelling brexit completely. in new zealand, thousands of people have observed two minutes‘s silence in memory of the 50 victims of last friday‘s mass shootings at mosques in christchurch. special ceremonies and prayer services took place across the country to mark a week on from the killings. a mass funeral for 30 of the dead is also taking place today. counter—terrorism investigations are underway in birmingham, after windows were smashed at five mosques in the city. sledgehammers were used in the attacks, which detectives are treating as coordinated. the home secretary, sajid javid, has called the vandalism "hateful", saying it had absolutely no place in society. police searching for 21—year—old libby squire have confirmed a body recovered from the humber estuary is that of the missing hull university student. during the initial investigation, a 2a—year—old man was arrested on suspicion
6:33 am
of abduction. he‘s been remanded in custody on unrelated charges and remains under investigation. a tougher standard for punctuality will be introduced on britain‘s railways next month, in an attempt to improve performance. train times will be recorded to the minute at every stop, instead of the current system, which classes them as "on time" if they reach their final destination within five or 10 minutes of the timetable. punctuality across britain sank to a 13 year low in 2018. jay—z‘s album the blueprint has officially been recognised as culturally important. now, the new yorker‘s sixth studio album was inducted into the us national recording library‘s list of culturally, historically, or aesthetically important recordings. itjoins martin luther king‘s i have a dream speech and a 19th
6:34 am
century recording of twinkle twinkle little star. it isa it is a playlist, isn‘t it? hello well, it is an impressive playlist. if you are with martin luther king‘s speech, it is a shame we cannot listen to it at the moment. we‘ll have to have a listen to it. i do not know how a recording can be aesthetically important. —— well, it is. in the old days, used by a re cord is. in the old days, used by a record for its front cover a new stability cherish front covers, you do not get that anymore, do you? and coloured vinyl as well, there were some good one. i used to have one that was bright pink, brilliant. well, i found out what happened in 1872, the scotsman newspaper is calling this scotland defeat in the european championship qualifiers to kazakhstan in kazakhstan last night the worst result since 1872, which
6:35 am
was scotland's worst ever international match, goalless draw with england. so it is its worst performance in its international playing history. they have been a few bad nights for scotland over the years, costa rica, peru, iran, barrow islands, this is right up there, kazakhstan. in fact, a place thatis there, kazakhstan. in fact, a place that is changing its name from almaty to nursultan. —— its capital's name. this was one scotland were expected to win and needed to, with much hardesr tests against russia and belgium to come. kazakstan are ranked 77 places below them in the world rankings, but they managed to score twice inside the opening ten minutes. and things got worse after the break as they conceded a third. scotland play san marino on sunday, and they‘ll be looking for a much better performance. it is never finished it is neverfinished until it is never finished until it is finished. we bounce back from a poor performance in the israel game in
6:36 am
israel and that is what we must do after this game. we have all the players to come back, there are obviously players who will be more experience to have got to come back. northern ireland had a much more positive start to their euro 2020 qualifying campaign, with a 2—0 win over estonia at windsor park. the home side to be patient before early in the second half, niall mcginn got the final touch to make it 1—0. steven davis added the second from the penalty spot after the referee decided george saville was fouled in the box. michael o‘neill‘s men play their second qualifier against belarus on sunday. england start their qualifying campaign against the czech republic tonight, but the build—up has been overshadowed by an old social media post. midfielder declan rice made an apparent reference in support of the ira in an instagram post back in 2015, when he was an ireland youth player. he‘s now switched to england last month and has apologised for "any offence caused" by the "poorly
6:37 am
expressed comment". those are his words. his new national manager doesn‘t think the incident will affect rice‘s reception by england fans. i think people understand, most people will have children of those sorts of ages and people are still maturing at that age and you are in conversations with friends that you can get giddy and you can say things that maybe you do not even know enough about all you don‘t understand the context, so i think oui’ understand the context, so i think ourfans and our public understand the context, so i think our fans and our public will recognise that fact, i am sure. marcus rashford will miss both qualifiers with an ankle problem picked up against liverpool last month. he has been playing through the pain, but has returned to manchester united for treatment. chelsea ladies have won the first leg of their last eight champions league tie against paris saint germain.
6:38 am
hannah blundell got chelsea‘s first. watch this for a strike. erin cuthbert scored the second and it finished 2—0. the second leg is in paris next wednesday. class a drugs and weapons, including knives and knuckledusters, were found on a coach carrying psg fans to last night‘s game. one man was arrested. the remaining passengers were escorted from the area by police. there were also reports of vandalism at the stadium and disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. in tennis, jo konta is through to the second round of the miami open. and dan evans is also through in the men‘s draw. he lostjust two games in beating tunisian malekjaziri. evans, remember, was only playing in the first round because he was a lucky loser earlier in the week. if only scotland could claim that. ronnie o‘sullivan will play either neil robertson or mark allen in the final of snooker‘s
6:39 am
tour championship, after a thrilling 9—8 win overjudd trump in llandudno last night. the match went down to the very last black in the last frame. o‘sullivan rolled it in having won five of the last six frames. if he wins the final, he‘ll be world number one. gymnast simone biles has confirmed that next year‘s tokyo olympics will be her last. the 22 year—old won four golds for the usa at the rio games in 2016. she says the wear and tear from the sports has taken its toll on her body, which she says feels like it is "falling apart". at the age of 22, we have often heard this in gymnastics. will smith said that he just found his body was in such pain. well, the stress they put on their bodies, from such a young age as well. more than that to come later on, but she will be retiring next year at the tender age of 22. warrington moved level on points with super league leaders st helens, but only after holding off a remarkable second—half comeback by wakefield. with 20 minutes left, wakefield were trailing by 22
6:40 am
points but ran in four tries. they‘d have snatched a draw if danny brough hadn‘t missed this conversion. the final score 3a—32 to warrington. now as we‘ve heard, it wasn‘t such a great day for scotland‘s footballers but how about this from golfer russell knox last night? here he is in the first round of the valspar championship in florida. he was stuggling at this point but watch this. an albatross, so he found the hole with just his second shot. he finished the day on a—under par along with england‘s luke donald. just one shot off the lead. you do not hit the ball like that. you do not hit the ball like that. you have not had one of those yet, have you? no. ido you have not had one of those yet, have you? no. i do not hit the ball as long as that. however the big cat?
6:41 am
behind mel reid here. looks like a bobcat out for a stroll. that was a good event, some good golf there. and some good wildlife as well. thank you very much, we will speak to you later. my greenkeeper story later on in devon involves a big cat. 0k. greenkeeper story later on in devon involves a big cat. ok. that is going to be very apt because there‘s this new film and we are talking to the grandson of a man who was a german business here, got spotted, ended up doing amazing things at manchester city. you‘re going to love the story. goalkeeping theme of the year. —— prisoner of the war. so let‘s turn our attention back to what happened very late at night in brussels. at a summit in brussels last night,
6:42 am
eu leaders agreed a plan to delay brexit, meaning the uk will no longer be leaving the eu in seven days. theresa may now has an alternative timetable to work to, but still needs the support of parliament to vote her deal through. for the eu though, there are still other options on the table. the uk government will still have a choice of a deal, no deal, a long extension, or revoking article 50.|j hope we can all agree we are now at the moment of decision, and i will make every effort to ensure that we are able to leave with a deal and move our country forward. we are joined now by our brussels reporter adam fleming, who can explain what the feeling is in europe this morning. it has cleared up a bit since we last spoke, 20 minutes ago. i‘m not sure the whole story has and i will say, there was that in soil and social media yesterday. i know whether it sums it up, you tell me, may just waiting to whether it sums it up, you tell me, mayjust waiting to see what whether it sums it up, you tell me, may just waiting to see what they we re may just waiting to see what they were kind of say, shoved out in the
6:43 am
cold a bit? yeah, because how the brexit process has worked is that the 27 countries that are remaining in the eu discussed brexit without theresa may after they get a bit of an update from him, so she gets ushered out of the room. one of the things that happened yesterday is that she spoke and answered questions for about 90 minutes, which is one of the longest of those episodes we have had an offer she left the room, the other leaders we re left the room, the other leaders were really unimpressed. they were com pletely were really unimpressed. they were completely unconvinced that she had planned to win the vote next week and that she had a plan for what to do after that, and i think that is why emmanuel macron, the french president in particular, felt that the eu had to step in and create some options and create some space to avoid no deal. i also think, i mean yesterday i was talking about the prospect of there being an emergency summit next week with no—deal brexit being about 20 hours away and how it made me feel bit queasy and a bit ill, people took the mickey out of me for being a bit melodramatic but i think eu leaders
6:44 am
felt the same and we started thinking about this last night. they did not want to be in a situation when we came back to brussels next week, in a massive crisis and a crisis that was going to be half their problem. what they have done now is put the responsibility back on the uk to choose some options and find some solutions but you have got to remember, theresa may‘s planning is to put the deal to parliament next week and for it to go through and then the uk to leave just a bit later than planned, but it is very ha rd to later than planned, but it is very hard to find people who think the planner is actually going to happen and is going to work. and we're going to be explaining that throughout the morning, but what has the relationship in like between theresa may, the prime minister, and the rest of the eu leaders because there was, i am reading what some of laura kuenssberg, our political correspondent, was saying and she was saying that she was almost kind of evasive, that she was asked what
6:45 am
she was going to do her deal was not passed, and they said she was not really answering them. theresa may is having to be really cryptic because anything you say in that room with the other leaders then leg straightaway and could be ripped apart at home, so theresa may was just trying to protect a deal not create a huge political crisis last night when all the stuff is going on with the eu. donald tusk summed up really well in the clip you played, either the deal goes through as theresa may wants or by the 12th of april, the uk will have to decide doesn‘t want to pass the deal, doesn‘t want to pass the deal, doesn‘t want to leave with no deal, doesn‘t want to leave with no deal, doesn‘t want to long extension, which might mean, it will definitely mean having to take part in the european parliamentary elections, or doesn‘t want to have a massive reasoning and cancelled exit once and for all? those will be the full options that will be on the table on the second of april if the deal does not pass. get some sleep, adam. good to talk to you, we will see later.
6:46 am
imagine how tired our political correspondence are. someone on social media said chris mason looked about 12 when this process started, now he looks like a father of five. they are working hard. it will continue until next week. let's look at the weather with sarah. spring has sprung. it‘s one of those mixed days, isn‘t it. a little bit mixed down they are today. some dry and settled weather on the clouds — on the cards. here is the picture this morning, stapleton in bristol. a bit ofa morning, stapleton in bristol. a bit of a breezy field to the weather and we‘ve seen over recent days. there will be that rain and wind pushing
6:47 am
into the north—west. high pressure dominates the weather for many of us today. i pressure sitting across europe. this fairly active cold front moving on from the north—west. it is going to be pretty windy out there, particularly for parts of scotla nd there, particularly for parts of scotland and northern ireland. a0 mile—per—hour gusts but we could see gusts touching 70 miles per hour around exposed coasts and hills. for england and wales, it‘s looking largely dry. a few spells of sunshine, particularly for parts of eastern england and eastern wales as well. it will be turning colder here. looking for temperatures of about 13— 15 degrees. that frontal system pushes its way further south and overnight, it will tend to fizzle out so a few spots of drizzle band of cloud sitting across southern england, keeping temperatures up but a cold night elsewhere, frosty night to come and wintry showers packing in over the
6:48 am
higher ground of scotland. living through to saturday, high pressure dominating this time moving in from the atlantic but we‘ve also got this lingering cold front and that‘s going to be a little bit stubborn to clear away so it‘s going to bring quite a lot of cloud on saturday, anywhere south of the ma corridor. more sunshine further north. there will be a few of those wintry flurries are still over the high ground of scotland and it‘s not going to feel particularly warm out there so temperatures around 10— 12 degrees on saturday. into saturday night, the blue—collar is on the map shows us we got a really cold air mass around. still reasonably mild but a frosty night to come. gardeners take note, quite frosty on sunday morning. rain, sleet and hill snow showers for scotland and northern ireland. england and wales should be dry and more sunshine. after a cloudy start, it should dry up after a cloudy start, it should dry up in the south. temperature—wise, starting to nudge up as we get into sunday. 9— 13 degrees or so. it may
6:49 am
start off fairly chilly on monday but lots of dry and settled weather over the next week or so should see return to something more springlike. sunshine and mist and fog. h eavy m eta l heavy metal music plays. we are sort of celebrating heavy rock music. it‘s a sound that began 50 years ago in birmingham and has since reached every corner of the world. ido i do think it‘s worth celebrating because heavy metal bands across the globe, they love it. now heavy metal bands and fans from across the globe are gathering in london to celebrate a great british invention. david sillito reports on the first ever ‘world metal congress‘.
6:50 am
the world metal congress. it‘s the first ever global gathering of musicians from around the world to celebrate the good and the great of metal culture. it‘s been 50 years since the birth of heavy metal if you count the first record by black sabbath as ground zero. they came from birmingham. it began here in birmingham. black sabbath in 1969 and a culture that has now truly spread around the world and is today gathering in london. this is japan‘s endon and they‘re rather loud.
6:51 am
and they‘re not alone. there are now metal bands in over 1a0 countries. to my mind, i never expected heavy metal to come from places like botswana or indonesia or nepal or syria. all countries that will be represented this weekend. syria? absolutely. i am from the band maysaloon from syria, damascus. and he and his group are more than just one of a dozen metal bands in a city that has now endured eight years of conflict. tell me, what‘s it like playing a gig in damascus when the war is on? alright, i will tell you this. all the gigs we did in damascus,
6:52 am
mortar shells were dropping. at the place that was like, i won‘t even express how it is. so what explains the global appeal? well, volume is a part of it. heavy metal has to be loud. but it‘s also a way of life, a community. heavy metal gets a really bad rep. it revels in the imagery we are familiar with, firebreathing dragons and that sort of stuff, but it is welcoming and inclusive. we really are. but i think the fact that we are is what makes it such a wonderfulfamilial genre and culture because everyone is invited. so 50 years on, a celebration of the global appeal of a great british invention. # god bless you all.#
6:53 am
kfc is opening up its kitchens next weekend to show customers just how it makes its meals. it follows a tough year for the fast food chain. last february, it ran out of chicken after a botched handover to a new delivery firm. ben has been talking to the boss. cast your mind back to february last year when kfc — the fried chicken chain — ran out of chicken. it had switched to a new delivery firm and it all went wrong. 700 restaurants were forced to close. customers were angry, some rang the police. so what really went wrong? in the first tv interview she‘s
6:54 am
done since the crisis, the boss told me how that day redefined ‘a bad day‘ in the office. i‘m not going to lie, it was really, really tough. many things transpired to mean that we did run out of chicken. but it‘s really cemented in people‘s mind is that it‘s very fresh chicken and you can run out. ona fresh chicken and you can run out. on a normal day, if i had even five, ten stores closed, restaurants closed, that would be because for concern so to be in a situation were up concern so to be in a situation were up to 600,700 of our stores were closing, it totally redefined a bad day. you can‘t almost understand how awful that was for a business. we are nearly 30,000 people employed by kfc in some fashion across the uk, we we re kfc in some fashion across the uk, we were all working 20 out of 2a hours. we didn‘t see ourfamilies, we didn‘t come home but it‘s just needs, must. it was all hands to the pump by everyone. what do you want to see? what outcome would work for you? we can manage through anything,
6:55 am
any tariff set up, and any tax structure. any agreement, butjust not knowing what that agreement is causes us no way of not knowing what that agreement is causes us no way of planning, no certainty or anyone. all of our chicken on the bone and nearly all of our wings comes from the uk but a lot of our chips for example comes from the continent, comes from europe so we do have to think, what is actually feasible to stockpile in the uk? we like others on the high street will be ok for so long but if there is mass disruption for eve ryo ne there is mass disruption for everyone then at some point it does run out. i'm looking at your menu board and they‘ve all got calorie content on them and no—one is pretending that deep fried chicken is good for us but how important is nutrition in terms of what you are serving to people and what they are eating? you may remember that we sold grilled chicken for a while or that we sold pulled, slow cooked chicken but the shame if it is in some regards when you sell those products, people still come in and thereby the same fried chicken that
6:56 am
they always want and they‘ve been after. there is no silver bullet. have made a big public pledge that by 2025, we are taking out 20% of all calories in a kfc meal. that is an incredible amount. it amounts to 15 billion calories annually so a huge amount out of the uk‘s diet. but why does it take six years to do that? it is like any bold goal, you don‘t know how you are going to do it on the first day but what you are putting out there is a big public commitment that we will get there. putting out there is a big public commitment that we will get therelj imagine you make 99% of your money from selling meat, chicken but there isa from selling meat, chicken but there is a big move towards vegetarian, more vegan is a big move towards vegetarian, more vegan options. does it worry you? what are you doing about it? we wa nt you? what are you doing about it? we want people to be able to come here and enjoy meat some days and not meet other days. there is also to have stopped being worked on potentially vegetarian, vegan, it is top secret but we don‘t want to give
6:57 am
the game away but we have plans coming through. that was the uk boss. are you ok, charlie? plans coming through. that was the uk boss. are you 0k, charlie? is chicken sandwich went down the wrong way. charlie will recover. it was interesting talking to her because there are 70 parallels between the supply chain issue that they have clearly faced during the crisis last year of getting things to their stores on time so many of those warnings about briggs it, whether deliveries will come on time so she said they are stockpiling, the need to make sure they have enough staff and you might wonder why they need to import things like chicken from thailand. most comes from the uk. she said it‘s because we eat more chicken in this country and we produce. a simple equation. fascinating interview. it was not a chicken related copping fit. i'm just putting it out there.
6:58 am
good morning from bbc london news, good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. passengers using waterloo are facing major disruption this morning with no trains running in or out of one of britain‘s busiest stations. it‘s because of over—running engineering works and commuters are being warned it‘s expected to continue till midday. knives, knuckle—dusters and class a drugs have been found onboard a bus, carrying paris st germain fans to a women‘s champion‘s league game against chelsea. up to 50 psg fans were denied entry to the quarter—final tie at kingsmeadow in kingston. police were first called to reports of vandalism at the stadium then later to disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. one man onboard the coach has been arrested. today marks the second anniversary of the westminster terror attack but some survivors are unhappy there‘s no official commemoration. five people were killed after the attacker drove his car into crowds on westminster bridge and then stabbed pc keith palmer outside parliament. lawyers representing survivors say they want to have talks with the mayor on how
6:59 am
to officially mark the tragedy. on the tube the district line has severe delays betweeen earls court and wimbledon. there is also major disruption for services in and out of waterloo but lines have repoened. still, delays. roadworks are slowing traffic down in forest hill — the a205 london road has temporary traffic lights at the junction with sydenham hill. now if you‘re not a fan of the gym, how about this instead? these classes are called drag diva fit — they‘re aimed at people who as you might have guessed aren‘t keen on conventional work outs— and they‘ll be cheered on and entertained by drag queens while they‘re exercising. fitness should be fun and it shouldn‘t feel like work. we have guys, girls, straight girls, gay men. it‘s just a place that they can feel comfortable in the gym and just
7:00 am
really enjoy themselves. hello, good morning. yesterday‘s exciting fun—packed day of weather was filled with cloud, a few brighter spells here and there are, light winds and of course it stayed dry too and today, well, it‘s looking really very similar, a replay of what we had yesterday. a mild, misty start to the morning, lots of low cloud around. the cloud will lift into yet more cloud as we head through the morning. some brighter spells here and there, particularly towards south—eastern areas of the capital. there could even be a bit of sunshine and in the best of any brightness and sunshine, we will see highs of 15 or 16 or 16 degrees celsius. otherwise underneath all that low cloud, 12s and 13s. through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud is just going to persist. there could be a few spots of drizzle arriving from the north—west as we had with the start of the day tomorrow
7:01 am
and that is going to spark off a few changes. it‘s a cold front which will introduce cooler air over the course of the weekend. still probably quite cloudy, particularly towards southern areas of the capital. some brightness further north. more reliable sunshine on sunday and a frost to start the new working week. and i‘ll be back in around half an hour. you can take a look at our website for more news, travel and weather. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the eu agrees to delay brexit beyond the 29th march, after late night talks in brussels. all options will remain open and the cliff edge date will be delayed. theresa may has been offered two new brexit deadlines in april and may. we‘ll tell you what could happen next. rescue workers try to reach people cut off by floods, one week after a major cyclone
7:02 am
hit southern africa. one week since the christchurch mosque attacks, memorials are held across new zealand in honour of the victims. police say a body recovered from the humber estuary is that of the missing student, libby squire. good morning. in sport, a humiliating night for scottish football. they‘re thrashed 3—0 by kazakhstan, a country ranked 77 places below. good morning. the kentucky fried crisis. just how does a fried chicken chain run out of chicken? the boss of kfc tells me that last year‘s shortage redefined "a bad day at the office". good morning and it is a dry, cloudy day across england and wales today. there will be more rain and some winter to mark the scotland and northern ireland. i will have the full forecast for today and
7:03 am
throughout the weekend in about 15 minutes. good morning. it‘s friday 22nd march. our top story: a delay to brexit has finally been agreed by eu leaders after talks dragged on late into the night in brussels. theresa may has been offered two new deadlines, as the prime minister once again urged mps back at home to get behind her deal. so let‘s take you through those new dates. brexit day, as things stand, of course, is the 29th march — seven days from now. if mps pass theresa may‘s deal next week, we will leave the eu on the 22nd may. if her deal is not approved, then april 12th becomes the new deadline. at that stage, mps will have to come up with an alternative plan, which could mean a longer extension, leaving with no deal, or even revoking article 50 — that‘s to say cancelling brexit completely. let‘s find out exactly
7:04 am
what happened last night then. here‘s more from our political correspondent, chris mason. you know it‘s rather late when the prime minister offers this greeting at the end of a long evening. good morning. yes, agreeing a delay to brexit had itself been delayed, but at gone midnight, it was eventually signed off, and the prime minister said... i hope we can all agree we are now at the moment of decision, and i will make every effort to ensure that we are able to leave with a deal and move our country forward. we now know, if the british parliament agrees to it, brexit will not happen a week today, as planned, with the eu saying that if the uk doesn‘t want to sign up to the withdrawal agreement, it has until april the 12th to work out what it does wants. —— want. what this means in practice is that, until that date, all options will remain open, and the cliff edge date will be delayed.
7:05 am
the uk government will still have a choice of a deal, no deal, a long extension, or revoking article 50. revoking article 50 means cancelling the brexit process, an idea that‘s attracted more than 2 million signatures on parliament‘s own website. but the government has flatly rejected the idea. for the prime minister this morning, a series of dilemmas have been postponed, but not resolved. there are still no easy answers for her. chris mason, bbc news. we‘ll get all the reaction from parliament injust a moment with our political correspondent, ben wright. first, our reporter adam fleming is in brussels for us right now. very good morning to you, adam. so donald tusk laid out the options pretty clearly, just take us to
7:06 am
events because theresa may appeared before the eu 27 and by all accounts, not very convincingly. yeah, so theresa may went in to speak to the other leaders at the start of yesterday afternoon. she spoke for about 90 minutes, answering questions, and that is an incredibly long time her to speak in this process, normally it is much quicker than that. she then left the room and the leaders had a discussion and they basically found her to be quite unconvincing, they did not think she had a deal to get the plan through parliament next week or a plan of what to do if the deal did not go through. they were really, really not impressed by her and that is what informed the big discussion they then had for several hours after that, with all sorts of ideas and date and plans and theories and strategies being discussed among the leaders around the table, which does not happen very often because normally, these things are arranged in advance by diplomats and ambassadors and ministers and just signed off by leaders. this was a proper brainstorming session by the people
7:07 am
that run the continent of europe. it was fascinating to watch. they had two things in their mind, one, they we re two things in their mind, one, they were really worried about having to come back next thursday for an emergency summit, where it looks like there could have been no deal happening in about 20 hours‘s time and they did not really want to get involved in that, the other thing that was really at the forefront of their minds was what to do about the european parliament elections and whether the uk was going to take part, not take part, be dangling the idea of taking part, and they realise that they had to basically have an answer to that by the 12th of april. those other two things to bear mind when you want to understand why eu leaders have ended up understand why eu leaders have ended up with the package that they have got and it is ok to be confused, donald tusk, the president of european council chair the meeting, was confused himself. he got one of the dates wrong when he was announcing what they had agreed. adam, thank you very much. that‘s the view from europe, let‘s speak now to our political
7:08 am
correspondent ben wright in westminster. now we‘re just waiting for the reaction back home, aren‘t we? now we‘re just waiting for the reaction back home, aren't we? that is right and i think around westminster, mps are gone back to their positions today but there will bea their positions today but there will be a sense of belief that what look like a possible no—deal brexit next friday has now been ruled out. 2a hours ago, did feel that suddenly we we re hours ago, did feel that suddenly we were hurtling towards that moment, you had those warnings from cpi and the tuc, mps from across the parties wanting about what they think could be the damages and consequences of the no—deal brexit but it look like that may happen if the deal went down again. now, everyone has got a bit of time, they have brought some time, the weeks, and it looks like next week, to be will have a final go getting her deal to the house of commons but the fundamentals of the problem of not changed. she fundamentally does not have the numbers to get to because a lot of her own brexiteer toys hated, labour and the opposition parties are not on board, the dup do not like it,
7:09 am
but now after the summit in brussels, we know that there will be a two—week window after that vote, where the mps and the government must finally try and come up with a compromise to get through this, or adding an amendment to the deal, or revoking article 50, perhaps even asking for an extension further. all thatis asking for an extension further. all that is still in play but the march 29 exit is not going to happen, that is not facts that day. 0k, thank you very much. —— brexit des. —— brexit day. in new zealand, thousands of people have observed two minutes‘ silence in memory of the 50 victims of last friday‘s mass shootings at two mosques in christchurch. special ceremonies and prayer services took place across the country to mark a week on from the killings.
7:10 am
a mass funeral 30 of the dead is also taking place today. —— a30. —— for30. aid agencies say hundreds of thousands of people have been affected by the tropical cyclone which hit southern africa last week, oxfam says an area of about 3,000 square kilometres is now under water. whole towns and villages have been submerged, and victims have been left stranded on rooves and stuck in trees. rescue teams are continuing to work to save survivors, as our africa editor fergal keane reports. a town separated from its country. buzi is now an island, its people marooned on rooftops. today, the country‘s president visited. filipe nyusi saw for himself the wretched conditions of his people. "the first thing we‘re going to do is rescue people from the water", he said, "so that they do not die." there was a small hand out of food aid, too small for so many, with inevitable frustration.
7:11 am
we joined a rescue team approaching buzi from the water, from where the river burst its banks. within a few minutes, we saw the first survivors calling to us from the shore. "we were in the water for four days", said this man. "we have lost our houses." from the air too, more rescues. this was the scene at the stadium in buzi and again, the limits of what‘s possible to achieve still such limited resources. and here, those who‘d heard that rescue was coming, crowded onto the banks. as we pulled away, others pleaded to be taken. we saw the indian navy rescue 67 people along the river, but as others are left behind, the sailors will be back tomorrow and for days to come.
7:12 am
police say a body recovered from the humber estuary is that of the missing student, libby squire. a tougher standard for punctuality will be introduced on britain‘s railways next month, in an attempt to improve performance. train times will be recorded to the minute at every stop, instead of the current system, which classes them as "on time" if they reach their final destination within five or 10 minutes of the timetable. punctuality across britain sank to a 13 year low in 2018. imagine looking up at the sky and seeing this sight before you. it looks like a burning meteor soaring through the sky, this was actually professional skydivers performing a stunt
7:13 am
thousands of feet in the air. the skydivers wore special wingsuit ‘s and glided to the air, before getting up to speeds of 100 miles an hour. they are like superheroes. we can see the final shot even one of the divers themselves, comes attached. it is amazing. high above the skyline there. counter—terrorism investigations are underway in birmingham after windows were smashed at five mosques in the city. the home secretary, sajid javid, has called the attacks "hateful", saying they had absolutely no place in society. the vandalism came just days after the mosque shootings in new zealand‘s christchurch, which left 50 worshippers dead. we‘re joined now from birmingham by adil parker from the city‘s council of mosques. a very good morning to you, adil. i‘m just looking at the islamic
7:14 am
centre behind you with what looks like a window smashed in, boarded up. was that the subject of these recent attacks? hello yes, this was one of the five centres attacked in the early hours of thursday morning. —— yes. the community is actually quite taken aback with what is going on. yes, tell us a bit more about how people are feeling about the attacks are place? as you can appreciate, this has happened on five islamic or muslim institutes and mosques. the congregation is feeling fearful, they feel vulnerable, there is a lot of anger amongst the community, as you can appreciate, every day, five times a day, people come to pay, families come along. there are kids that get dropped off every evening for islamic studies, so the parents are really worried about what is really going on. today is in a general sense of tanks in the community.
7:15 am
have the patrols by the police been stepped up in the community and our people reassured by that if that is taking place? so yes, yesterday we had really good meetings with the chief constable, the deputy chief co nsta ble of chief constable, the deputy chief constable of the police and i have to admit that the police authorities since last friday have been really forthcoming, the police have stepped up forthcoming, the police have stepped up their vigilance, they have been amount even outside this mosque last night, they were here till they opened up in the morning. so a huge thank you to the police, they have been really forthcoming. and because what happened in christchurch of course, so many people shocked by happened there. do you get a sense that this may have happened because of that or is has just been part of the process that has been going on over time. —— has it. the process that has been going on over time. -- has it. we were
7:16 am
talking about this a while ago as well, it really is not rocket science to understand this thing. the person was done this wanted to emulate in his own sense, in his own way, what in christchurch, but it is our absolute request and p to the authorities that these kinds of hate crimes, islamophobia, has to be stamped out of birmingham and of the uk once and for all. -- plea. thank you very much for your time. here‘s sarah with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. we have got conditions like this across much of the country. this is the scene at the moment the skies above norwich but we have got a lot of cloud on the forecast through today. it‘s dry and settled weather on the cards for much of england and wales but we have got some rain pushing and across parts of scotland and northern ireland. also quite windy through today as well. pressure not
7:17 am
far away. we got this fairly active cold front moving on from the north—west. lots of isobars on the map. particularly windy today across parts of scotland and northern ireland, especially towards the far north—west where some of those gusts could touch 70 miles per hour. we could touch 70 miles per hour. we could see gusts across northern ireland and england. more breezy than recent days. cloudy for most parts but we have some sunshine pushing into the south—west of england. also seeing a few breaks in that cloud. if you are lucky, you will see a glimmer of blue sky. approaching scotland and northern ireland through the afternoon. it will move on its way through northern and one. temperatures around about 1a— 15 degrees to the south about the colder hour working in from the north so as we move through this evening and tonight, the colder our sinks its way south. it will bring some wintry flurries over the high ground of scotland. we are expecting a touch of grass frost
7:18 am
on the north. milderfurther south we are holding onto all that cloud. through the weekend, high pressure dominating the weather. moving on from the atlantic but this weather front is stubborn and slow to clear. on saturday, particularly anyway south of the ma corridor, we will hold onto all that cloud through the day. sunny skies for the rest of the uk. wintry flurries packing into the north—west of scotland. temperatures not doing great for the time of year. but at least there is some sunshine to compensate. with clear skies by day, saturday night could prove to be quite a chilly night. it will feel a little colder. a touch of frost around as we head on into the early hours of sunday. sunday sta rts the early hours of sunday. sunday starts off on a chilly note. showers moving in from the north—west. snow over the mountains of scotland. further south, a bit more sunshine breaking through by the time we get to sunday. not a bad day.
7:19 am
temperatures 9—10. as we head through the course of next week, i pressure builds. lots of dry, settled weather. a bit of a chilly start of the new working week but you are pleased — be pleased to hear that damages should start to rise through next week. should skincare products and toiletries marketed to women cost more than those for men? and is there actually any difference between them? mps are debating a bill today that aims to scrap the "gender price gap", often known as the "pink tax", on items such as razors and deodorants. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been putting some of the products to the test. for him and for her. when it comes to toiletries, the packaging and the marketing are different. but how about what‘s inside? over a week, i‘ve been testing them out. using
7:20 am
men‘s and women‘s versions. alternate days and alternate armpits. to find out whether those designed for me feel any different to those designed for the boys. this is by no means a scientific experiment but for me a lot of the products didn‘t feel any different at all, whether it was razors, shower gel, shaving cream, much of a much must really. the shampoo, at a big fan of two in one shampoo selected and work for me so well but the surprise of the week was the face cream. the men‘s one, much cheaper than the women‘s and it felt really nice. so the centre is the big difference. if you don‘t mind smelling a bit like a bloke for a while it might be worth a trip down a different aisle. women are the majority of consumers and they are the majority of purse holders in that way and the marketing and advertising industry very much play to that. i stocked up on toiletries targeted separately at men and women to see if there is still a
7:21 am
difference in price. even after all the publicity about this over the last couple of years, this bag of female products cost me £2a 20 but my bag of mail versions only set me back £19 22. that‘s a 23% difference. it definitely doesn‘t feel fair. changing the law seems like a long route to solve the problem. shoppers can definitely say now by ignoring the packaging and being willing to try something that looks different. the mp christine jardine, who introduced the bill to parliament, joins us now. there will be lots of people around the country saying yes, i‘ve noticed this but i didn‘t actually think there was anything i could do about this. what will this bill do? it's set to stop manufacturers saying, we
7:22 am
are going to charge more for women because there is no difference at all. i spoke to scientists who got involved in this. basically the same products. marketed differently. we all have the same skin types. there is no difference between men and women. there is a difference between people but there is nothing to do with gender. the whole idea of men having a thicker abbey dermis is nonsense. where is the potential of this not to work? everyone hearing that will think it‘s not fair but the potential is if the manufacturers just say, people are buying it at this price, so we will sell it at this price, thanks very much. what happens then? i did research with the government in parliament, and they said no. i've taken parliament, and they said no. i've ta ken matters parliament, and they said no. i've taken matters into my own hands,
7:23 am
writing to the major manufacturers and retailers to say this is unfair because people will say, if you're prepared to pay more, you should. but if you are like me brought up in a family of three girls, that 20% difference in the toiletries bill over your a year difference in the toiletries bill overyoura year is difference in the toiletries bill over your a year is massive. that's not fair, especially the people at the moment i may be just managing. not fair, especially the people at the moment i may be just managinglj the moment i may be just managing.” com pletely the moment i may be just managing.” completely understand, it‘s unfair. they could say, don‘t buy it if you don‘t want it. we will keep the price the same. that is true, you canjust not price the same. that is true, you can just not buy price the same. that is true, you canjust not buy it. if you mind that you buy something that is marketed for a man, by the cheapest offer. but it's all part of, we also have this thing where we still market everything to boys and girls so by the time you get to 20, you are used tojust going down the aisle of a supermarket that has women's stuff in it. a friend of mine phoned me after lunch and said,
7:24 am
she was in the supermarket and saw things marketed to boys and girls and it's ridiculous. and i'm not a huge feminist but i balk at trying to sell things to boys and girls in a different way and they don't feel they have to go that way. it doesn't matter if you are a feminist or not, it‘s about equality. we need to talk to you about what‘s been happening with breaks it. a big intake of breath. your reaction to what happened last night. was it largely expected in terms of the eu agreeing to extend the deadline?” expected in terms of the eu agreeing to extend the deadline? i think what we've seen overnight from europe is what we've been seeing in parliament. very little progress. wanting to step forward. that extension, either of those extensions, they are not particularly long. to find a deal
7:25 am
that gives me that. you think theresa may‘s deal needs to come off the table. it's been rejected twice. the astonishing thing, one of the things he was surprised that, she doesn‘t appear to have a plan b. i don‘t think it‘s enough to keep saying the mps are blocking it. the government themselves are blocking it. theresa may‘s own mps are not supporting it. what you have in parliament is a feeling that this is not the best deal for the country in the country deserves a better chance. it‘s about what‘s best for the country. there have been real concerns, particularly about some of your females expressing real concerns about their safety this time. what about you? to be honest, i haven't worried about it. i probably will think more about it now. there have been times in parliament where it's been uncomfortable for all of us, when there were lots of protesters, we
7:26 am
had to walk to do an interview. i haven't experienced any problems but then again, i come from a constituency, my constituents voted, more than two thirds of them, to remain in the european union. i was elected on a platform of opposing going ahead without taking it back to the people so if you like, i don't really have a problem but i do know a lot of mps, especially the women mps are finding it tough. that is why it is so important that we find a way out of this wide thank you very much. christine jardine, scottish liberal democrat mp. john mcguire is at swanage station. why? he has a very special guest. the flying scotsman, is there a more famous train in the world? has there ever been a more famous engine than this? i would argue not. once
7:27 am
famously travel that more than 100 miles an hour, now restricted to 75 miles an hour, now restricted to 75 miles per hour. on the swanage railway, which is a heritage railway, coming up onto the footplate here. this is one of those places as a kid where you always dreamt of sitting on the driver‘s seat on the flying scotsman. jack is going to put a bit of coal in. the man who saved the flying scotsman from the scrapyard, we will meet him, it was back in the 60s when stea m we nt him, it was back in the 60s when steam went over to diesel. that is all steam went over to diesel. that is a ll after steam went over to diesel. that is all after the news, travel, and weather where you are watching brea kfast weather where you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. passengers using waterloo are facing major disruption this morning after over running engineering works prevented any trains running in or out of one of britain‘s busiest stations. lines have now reopened
7:28 am
but commuters are being warned disruption is expected to continue till two o‘clock this afternoon. knives, knuckle—dusters and class a drugs have been found onboard a bus carrying paris st germain fans to a women‘s champion‘s league game against chelsea. up to 50 psg supporters were denied entry to the quarter—final tie at kingsmeadow in kingston. police were first called to reports of vandalism at the stadium then later to disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. one man‘s been arrested. today marks the second anniversary of the westminster terrorattack— (00v) but some survivors are unhappy there‘s —— terror attack but some survivors are unhappy there‘s no official commemoration. five people were killed after the attacker drove his car into crowds on westminster bridge and then stabbed pc keith palmer outside parliament. lawyers representing survivors say they want to have talks with the mayor on how
7:29 am
to officially mark the tragedy. travel now. on the tube — the district line has minor delays betweeen earls court and wimbledon. now we told you earlier about the major disruption at waterloo — some services may be cancelled or delayed by up to an hour. and on the roads, this is how the a13 looks — getting busy as usual heading into town from barking. now if you‘re not a fan of the gym, how about this instead? these classes are called drag diva fit — they‘re aimed at people who as you might have guessed aren‘t keen on conventional workouts and they‘ll be cheered on by drag queens. fitness should be fun and it shouldn‘t feel like work. we have guys, girls, straight girls, gay men. it‘s just a place that they can feel comfortable in the gym and just really enjoy themselves. time for the weather — here‘s elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday‘s exciting fun—packed day of weather was filled with cloud, a few brighter spells here and there, light winds and of course it stayed dry too and today, well, it‘s looking really very similar,
7:30 am
a replay of what we had yesterday. a mild, misty start to the morning, lots of low cloud around. the cloud will lift into yet more cloud as we head through the morning. some brighter spells here and there, particularly towards south—eastern areas of the capital. there could even be maybe a littlle bit of sunshine and in the best of any brightness and sunshine, we will see highs of 15 or 16 degrees celsius. otherwise underneath all of that low cloud, 12s and 13s. now, through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud is just going to persist. there could be a few spots of drizzle arriving from the north—west as we had into the start of the day tomorrow and that is going to spark off a few changes. it‘s a cold front, it will introduce some cooler air over the course of the weekend. still probably quite cloudy, particularly towards southern areas of the capital on saturday. some brightness further north. more reliable sunshine on sunday and a frost to start the new working week. and i‘ll be back in around half an hour. you can take a look at our website for more news, travel and weather. now it‘s back to charlie and naga.
7:31 am
hello. welcome back. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. a delay to brexit has finally been agreed by eu leaders, after talks dragged on late into the night in brussels. theresa may has been offered two new deadlines as the prime minister once again urged mps to get behind her deal. now, if parliament does support her proposals when it goes to a vote next week, then we will leave the eu on the 22nd may. if a deal isn‘t approved, then the 12th of april will become the new deadline for brexit. i hope we can all agree we are now at the moment of decision, and i will make every effort to ensure that we are able to leave with a deal and move our country forward.
7:32 am
in new zealand, thousands of people have observed two minutes‘ silence in memory of the 50 victims of last friday‘s mass shootings at two mosques in christchurch. special ceremonies and prayer services took place across the country to mark a week on from the killings. a mass funeral for 30 of the dead is also taking place today. rescue workers are desperately trying to reach survivors in south—eastern africa cut off by floods caused by cyclone idai. people have been left stranded on roofs and up trees, with whole towns and villages submerged in water. oxfam says an area of around 3,000 square kilometres is now under water. the cyclone hit the region last week. police searching for 21—year—old libby squire have confirmed a body recovered from the humber estuary is that of the missing hull university student. during the initial investigation, a 2a—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of abduction. he‘s been remanded in custody on unrelated charges and remains under investigation. a tougher standard for
7:33 am
punctuality will be introduced on britain‘s railways next month, in an attempt to improve performance. train times will be recorded to the minute at every stop, instead of the current system, which classes them as "on time" if they reach their final destination within five or 10 minutes of the timetable. punctuality across britain sank to a 13 year low in 2018. so let‘s have a look at the sport now. mike is here and we have a performance by scotland which has been widely divided. so bad that commentators and the scotsman newspaper have said it was the worst result since 1872, when they played their first ever international against england. 's who are they playing in what was the score? last night, it was against kazakhstan. they were in astana, which is now changing its name to nursultan. this
7:34 am
goes down in a long list of scottish embarrassing notes of football, iran, peru, costa rica, but this really usurps them all according to some of the pundits. craig kelly, former scotland manager has just said it is abysmal, but says he is not surprised. that is how bad scotla nd not surprised. that is how bad scotland island at the moment, so it is pretty damning. scotla nd were expected to win with much hardesr tests to come, against russia and belgium to come. lowly kaza khsta n lowly kazakhstan managed to score twice again scotland inside the opening ten minutes. and things got worse after the break as they conceded a third. scotland play san marino on sunday, and they‘ll be looking for a much better performance. it‘s never finished till it‘s finished. we bounced back from a poor
7:35 am
performance in the israel game, in israel, and that‘s what we must do after this game. now, we have all the players to come back, obviously there‘s players who will be more experienced who have got to come back. northern ireland had a much more positive start to their euro 2020 qualifying campaign, a 2—0 win over estonia at windsor park. the home side had to be patient, before early in the second half, niall mcginn got the magic touch there to make it 1—0. steven davis added the second from the penalty spot after the referee decided george saville was fouled. michael o‘neill‘s men play their second qualifier against belarus on sunday. there‘ll be no marcus rashford for england in their opening qualifier against the czech republic tonight, as he‘s injured, and the buildup has been overshadowed by an old social media post. midfielder declan rice made an apparent reference in support of the ira, this was in an instagram post in 2015, when he was an ireland youth player.
7:36 am
he has now switched to england last month and has apologised for "any offence caused" by the "poorly expressed comment". his new national manager doesn‘t think the incident will affect rice‘s reception by england fans. i think people understand, you know, most people will have children of those sorts of ages and people are still maturing at that age, and you‘re in conversations with friends that, you know, you can get giddy and you can say things that maybe you don‘t even know enough about or you don‘t understand the context, so i think ourfans and our public will recognise that fact, i‘m sure. chelsea ladies have won the first leg of their last eight champions league tie against paris saint germain. hannah blundell got chelsea‘s first. watch this for a strike. living all the way over the keeper into the bottom corner. —— looping
7:37 am
it. erin cuthbert scored the second and it finished 2—0. the second leg is in paris next wednesday. however, this was a bit shocking. class a drugs and weapons, including knives and knuckledusters, were found on a coach carrying psg fans to last night‘s game. one man was arrested. the remaining passengers were escorted from the area by police. there were also reports of vandalism at the stadium and also disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. in tenis, jo konta is through to the second round of the miami open, and dan evans is also through in the men‘s draw. in fact, he lostjust two games in beating tunisian malekjaziri. evans, remember, was only playing in the first round because he was a lucky loser earlier in the week. british number two cameron norrie was knocked out though overnight. ronnie o‘sullivan is edging his way back to the world number one spot for the first time in a decade. he beatjudd trump last night in snooker‘s tour championship in lladudno, on the very last black in the last frame. o‘sullivan rolled it in having won five of the last six frames. what a comeback. if he wins the final, against either neil robertson or mark allen, he‘ll be top dog again in the sport.
7:38 am
warrington moved level on points with super league leaders st helens, but only after holding off a remarkable second—half comeback by wakefield. with 20 minutes left, wakefield were trailing by 22 points, but ran in four tries. and they‘d have snatched a draw if danny brough hadn‘t missed this conversion. the final score then 3a—32 to warrington. now as we‘ve heard, it wasn‘t a great day for scotland‘s footballers but how about this from golfer russell knox last night? here he is in the first round of the valspar championship in florida. he was struggling at this point, but watch this. an albatross. so he found the hole with just his second shot. 3—under par for the hole. he finished the day on a—under par, along with england‘s luke donald, just one shot off the lead. we have never had an albatross, we can only dream about those. yeah. talking about animals, real animals. what? absolutely, pterodactyl ‘s or pigeons, i don‘t know, whatever you fancy. have you got something else
7:39 am
to show us? go on. we‘ve seen alligators, snakes, baboons on golf courses before. elephants? i don't know, i don't know about elephants on a golf course. for mel reid, it is behind you. then you realise it is arizona and it is just you. then you realise it is arizona and it isjust a you. then you realise it is arizona and it is just a little bobcat. pretty harmless, it looks bigger though. bobcat is taking any notice of the golf. i was in devon years ago and the greenkeeper said do not stay there after dusk because there have been sightings of big cat. i do not know how big, whether it was someone‘s pet or whether it was a black panther. it would be exciting. thank you so much, see you later on. quote, "i have neverfelt this level of tension". those were the words of deputy speaker lindsay hoyle
7:40 am
in an email to mp5, advising them to take steps to ensure their own safety ahead of a potentially crucial vote on brexit next week. it follows growing concern about mps‘s welfare in the face of brexit—related abuse and threats. here‘s what politicians have been saying. last week, i received a message saying that my head should be chopped off, among lots and lots of other messages, in common with many other messages, in common with many other members on both sides of this house. i don't mind getting criticism but i do get effort. one came in yesterday. i'm not able to go home this weekend, i am not safe. and when a senior police officer tells your partner that if it was his wife in a situation that i am m, his wife in a situation that i am in, he would say i am frightened for her safety, i think that tells you everything. let‘s speak now to will geddes, who is a security consultant. good to speak to you, joining us in westminster and, you are listening to all of this, it almost seems so extreme that do you think there is a credible threat now that mps are
7:41 am
facing? i think they're very much is and we have seen the development of the kind of anti— sentiment and negativity towards mps grow more aggressively since 2016 and the death ofjo aggressively since 2016 and the death of jo cox aggressively since 2016 and the death ofjo cox and this is something which is absolutely way is probably many mps‘s concerns. they have also not necessarily had very direct that‘s against them but as your report shows, many are receiving messages through social media, which in many cases can be their main way of communicating with their main way of communicating with their constituency. we were talking to christine geraldine, a scottish mpfor edinburgh to christine geraldine, a scottish mp for edinburgh west. she was on the sofa this morning and we were talking to her about her security and she was saying it is true, the reports of mps being told to install panic alarms in their homes, kay panic alarms in their homes, kay panic alarms in their homes, kay panic alarms as well, and these are not just screamers, these panic alarms as well, and these are notjust screamers, these are ones that actually connect to the police, this is happening. does that seem like normal to you? hello well,
7:42 am
again, measure of what normal is these days is very difficult to gauge but when we look at the negotiations about brexit, which is fuelling in many waysjust negotiations about brexit, which is fuelling in many ways just the general unrest among the british population but drawing more specifically towards both far left and communities, we are seeing this very much being illustrated and demonstrated in social media, as i mentioned. -- yes. and that in many ways ca n mentioned. -- yes. and that in many ways can be that kind of vomited public sentiment. now, messages are inevitably coming third mps which are concerning them and many cabinet ministers will have a full on protection detail, with general members of parliament, they have to consider that they are moving amount within the local communities, they are trying to operate a constituency as normal and it is those occasions, which we saw with jo as normal and it is those occasions, which we saw withjo cox, that they can rightly feel exposed when they are receiving a lot of hateful communication. and of course, mps have surgeries as well they can see
7:43 am
their constituencies face—to—face, i do not know that there has been any advice at the moment telling them not to do that, but they do not have a security detail. absolutely, and the need to be able to communicate with their constituencies that do not have those surgeries puts them ina not have those surgeries puts them in a very, very difficult position. the police give them advice and that will be personal security and personal protection advice and as you say, there is a nominal budget thatis you say, there is a nominal budget that is afforded to mp5, and also to have panic alarms that they carry with them, which can cost on average up with them, which can cost on average up to £1000 a year. but there is a response mechanism to those panic alarms and how long it will take for the police to be a common there are also briefings taking into the various states that they receive, which ones are genuine, which ones they have to take very seriously and which isjust general they have to take very seriously and which is just general public dissatisfaction. how easy is it to judge that, when someone is just simply angry and what‘s kind of
7:44 am
localised anger or when someone, it is more than that, it is going to be something more sinister? well, it can be quite difficult but there are a lot of indications within a message that can give an indication of how serious it might be. one is repeated messages coming from a single source or it has been anonymized all the content of the message itself, if it is more precise and is indicating that the third itself knows that particular person with that particular victim‘s pattern of life, do they know their whereabouts? have they mentioned we re whereabouts? have they mentioned were actually given a specific piece of information that would say that they are monitoring that potential target? 0k, thank you very much for going through that with us, security co nsulta nt going through that with us, security consultantjoining us going through that with us, security consultant joining us in westminster. got a lot of cloud in the skies
7:45 am
today. similar story up and down the country. england and wales, keeping this cloud through the course of the day. or scotland and northern ireland, rain in the forecast. when it clears away, a bit more sunshine later on. but it‘s also going to be very windy in the north—west because we‘ve got an active cold front moving in. high pressure not far away. that will dominate the weather in the south and east. will that wind, these are some of the gusts we might see. touching 70 miles per hour on exposed locations in the north—west. all down to this weather front. england and wales stay dry for most of the day. temperatures here, around about 12— 1a degrees. cold where moving on from the
7:46 am
north—west. we‘re looking at single figures as we head on into evening hours. most of the rain will tend to fizzle out. perhaps the odd spot of drizzle in the south first thing saturday morning. clear skies for the rest of the country. still some wintry showers. or saturday, high pressure builds in from the atlantic. we‘ve still got this lingering cold front. it will be a bit stubborn through the day. bring a small cloud, and you are south of the ma corridor. more sunshine for the ma corridor. more sunshine for the rest of the uk. still a few wintry flurries pushing and across parts of scotland. lots of dry weather on the map this saturday. which is not great for the time of year. 10—13. under the clear skies, and we have you had this cold air mass saturday night and into sunday. quite a chilly night. a touch of frost, particularly in the north.
7:47 am
we‘ve still got the cloud on the south to start the day on sunday but it should tend to pin and break up. a bit more sunshine developing. temperatures, nine or 10 degrees in the north and about 12 or 13 further south. again, quite a cold night sunday into monday but as we head through the course of the working week, next week looks quite dry and settled. with high pressure generally in charge, those temperatures should start to creep up temperatures should start to creep up and feel fairly springlike as we head through to next week. i think we should apologise about the heavy rock music. we did it as a bit of a joke. i should have been rocking out of the end of that forecast. we thought you
7:48 am
had that in you. that was why. would you like to do it again? i am with you, sarah. we will see charlie rocking out. let‘s move on. i absolutely agree. you may remember last year, a crisis engulfed kfc like no other. they ran out of chicken. they just like no other. they ran out of chicken. theyjust couldn‘t get the chicken. theyjust couldn‘t get the chicken there in time. because so many problems. people complained. it turned into a national crisis. one yearon, turned into a national crisis. one year on, i‘ve been speaking to the boss about how all that unfolded and she told me that it redefined what you can class is a bad day in the office. i‘m not going to lie,
7:49 am
it was really, really tough. many things transpired to mean that we did run out of chicken. but it‘s really cemented in people‘s mind is that it‘s very fresh chicken and you can run out. on a normal day, if i had even 5—10 stores closed, restau ra nts closed, that would be a cause for concern so to be in a situation were up to 600, 700 of our stores were closing, it totally redefined a bad day. you can‘t almost understand how awful that was for a business. we‘re nearly 30,000 people employed by kfc in some fashion across the uk, we were all working 20 out of 2a hours. we didn‘t see our families, we didn‘t come home but it‘s just needs, must. it was all hands to the pump by everyone. what do you want to see as far as brexit is concerned? what outcome would work for you? we can manage through anything, any tariff set up, and any tax structure. any agreement, butjust not knowing what that agreement is causes us no
7:50 am
way of planning, no certainty or anyone. way of planning, no certainty for anyone. all of our chicken on the bone and nearly all of our wings comes from the uk but a lot of our chips for example comes from the continent, comes from europe, so we do have to think, what is actually feasible to stockpile in the uk? we, like others on the high street, will be ok for so long but if there‘s mass disruption for everyone then at some point it does run out. i‘m looking at your menu boards here and they‘ve all got calorie content on them and no—one is pretending that deep fried chicken is good for us but how important is nutrition in terms of what you are serving to people and what they are eating? you may remember that we sold grilled chicken for a while or that we sold pulled, slow cooked chicken but the shame if it is in some regards when you sell those products, people still come in and thereby the same fried products, people still come in and they buy the same fried chicken that they always want and they‘ve been after. there is no silver bullet. but we have made a big public pledge that by 2025, we are taking out 20% of all calories in a kfc meal. that is an incredible amount.
7:51 am
i think it amounts to 15 billion calories annually so a huge amount out of the uk‘s diet. but why does it take six years to do that? it‘s like any bold goal, you don‘t exactly know how going to do it on the first day but what you are putting out there is a big public commitment that we will get there. now, i imagine you make, what, 99% of your money from selling meat, chicken but there is a big move towards vegetarian, more vegan options. does it worry you? what are you doing about it? we want people to be able to come here and enjoy meat some days and not meat other days. there is all sorts of stuff being worked on potentially vegetarian, vegan, it is top secret but we don‘t want to give the game away but we have plans that are coming through. you would be mad not to have plans.
7:52 am
we also want to talk a little bit about breaks it in terms of supply chains. a lot of the worries are about what might be stuck at ports. will that she can still be able to get in. she explained to me that most of the chicken is sourced from the uk. isaid, why i said, why the heck do need to employ — and poor chicken from thailand? in this country, we consume more than we grow. they have been stockpiling a little bit to make sure they have what they need but like all businesses, they say, in the short—term, it should be ok. it depends what happens in the longer term. some really big questions. who would have thought he would get your chicken from thailand. and look at this picture here. you can step on board the flying scotsman this morning. john mcguire is there for us this morning. good
7:53 am
morning to you, john. they call it rock, bad job, good job? morning to you, john. they call it rock, badjob, goodjob? they are going to let you drive it, aren‘t they? the engine belongs to the national rail museum. it's always interesting to drive a different engine. they are all different and they all work in a different way. they‘ve got foibles but you‘re not going to get the chance to drive this at full speed. apparently, it absolutely drives like a proper racing machine. they were very fast. they were designed to go nice long
7:54 am
distances. they got nice, soft, cushioned seats. other engines which are much older in their designs are rudimentary. this is the luxury end, the racing car end of steam engines. and to drive it, you would have had to put your head out of the window backin to put your head out of the window back in the day. it would have been quite a difficult thing to do. you will see photographs of people with goggles on all glasses, and as you can see, with the glass year, you‘ve not got a lot of vision otherwise. thank you very much, all the very best. we‘re just going to show you what the flying scotsman looks like from the outside while we climbed down off the footplate. it really is an absolutely magnificent machine, built in 1923 an absolutely magnificent machine, built in1923 in an absolutely magnificent machine, built in 1923 in doncaster ‘s almost 100 years old she is and i‘m reliably informed by jack who is up there cleaning her at the moment
7:55 am
that you do refer to steam engines as female, call the flying scotsman of course. peter with us. we have some old footage of you with long hair from some old footage of you with long hairfrom back in the some old footage of you with long hair from back in the 805. some old footage of you with long hairfrom back in the 805. i don‘t know if you remember and that was filmed but that was along the swanage railway somewhere. a long time ago. a5 years i‘ve been involved and it‘s been quite satisfying. you have a situation today we have the flying scotsman. we had her back in 9a and came down here for a short spell and what a lovely engine. it‘s magnificent. if you go to any pub quiz and anybody asks the question what is the name ofa asks the question what is the name of a steam engine, you will get the flying scotsman. why do people love it, why do people love the crowds. the history that it‘s got with the public and now it‘s back in public ownership, people know the engine,
7:56 am
they love the engine. when they get a model train set, everybody wants to have a flying scotsman there. really good to talk to you this morning. the flying scotsman was saved from the scrapheap back in 1963 by a man called alan pegler. his daughter will be here to tell us about a special family length, what memory she has, riding on it in north america. it‘s going to be absolutely fascinating to talk to her. don‘t miss that. coming up later on in breakfast, the news, travel, and weather now where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m sonja jessup. passengers using waterloo are facing major disruption passengers using waterloo are facing major disruption this morning. no trains have been running in or out of one of britain‘s busiest stations. it‘s because of over—running engineering works
7:57 am
and commuters are being warned disruption is expected to continue till midday. knives, knuckle—dusters and class a drugs have been found onboard a bus carrying paris st germain fans to a women‘s champion‘s league game against chelsea. up to 50 psg supporters were denied entry to the quarter—final tie at kingsmeadow in kingston. police were first called to reports of vandalism at the stadium— then later to disorder at waterloo and wimbledon stations. one man‘s been arrested. today marks the second anniversary of the westminster terror attack but some survivors are unhappy there‘s no official commemoration. five people were killed after the attacker drove his car into crowds on westminster bridge and then stabbed pc keith palmer outside parliament. lawyers representing survivors say they want to have talks with the mayor on how to officially mark the tragedy. on the tube — the district line has minor delays
7:58 am
between wimbledon and earl‘s court now we told you earlier about the major disruption at waterloo— some services may be cancelled or delayed by up to an hour. and on the roads traffic‘s building on the highway as you can see here from the limehouse link tunnel as far as tower bridge. now if you‘re not a fan of the gym, how about this instead? these classes are called drag diva fit — they‘re aimed at people who aren‘t keen on conventional workouts and they‘ll be cheered on by drag queens. fitness should be fun and it shouldn‘t feel like work. we have guys, girls, straight girls, gay men. it‘s just a place that they can feel comfortable in the gym and just really enjoy themselves. time for the weather— here‘s elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday‘s exciting fun—packed day of weather was filled with cloud, a few brighter spells here and there, light winds and of course it stayed dry too and today, well, it‘s looking really very similar, a replay of what we had yesterday. a mild, misty start to the morning, lots of low cloud around. the cloud will lift into yet more cloud as we head through the morning.
7:59 am
some brighter spells here and there, particularly towards south—eastern areas of the capital. there could even be maybe a littlle bit of sunshine and in the best of any brightness and sunshine, we will see highs of 15 or 16 degrees celsius. otherwise underneath all of that low cloud, 12s and 13s. now, through this evening and overnight, all of that cloud is just going to persist. there could be a few spots of drizzle arriving from the north—west as we had into the start of the day tomorrow and that is going to spark off a few changes. it‘s a cold front, it will introduce some cooler air over the course of the weekend. still probably quite cloudy, particularly towards southern areas of the capital on saturday. some brightness further north. more reliable sunshine on sunday and a frost to start the new working week. and i‘ll be back in around half an hour. take a look at our website for more news, travel and weather at the usual address. bye for now.
8:00 am
8:01 am
8:02 am
8:03 am
8:04 am
8:05 am
8:06 am
8:07 am
8:08 am
8:09 am
8:10 am
8:11 am
8:12 am
8:13 am
8:14 am
8:15 am
8:16 am
8:17 am
8:18 am
8:19 am
8:20 am
8:21 am
8:22 am
8:23 am
8:24 am
8:25 am
8:26 am
8:27 am
8:28 am
8:29 am
8:30 am

167 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on