Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 22, 2019 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

11:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 11:00: after a 22 month investigation, robert mueller delivers his report on alleged links between russia and president trump's 2016 campaign. in a letter to mps tonight, theresa may suggests she might not even try to bring her twice—failed deal back to the house of commons. at the inquest into the victims of the birmingham pub bombings almost 45 years ago, a witness names four ira men he says were responsible. police say they're treating the death of university student libby squire as an unlawful killing. more rescue operations to save thousands cut off in southern africa after floods caused by the cyclone and at 11:30 we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers, nicola bartlett from the daily mirror, and giles kenningham, former director of communications
11:01 pm
for number 10. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the us special counsel, robert mueller, has concluded his investigation into whether the trump campaign colluded with russia during the 2016 election. the investigation has lasted almost two years. we don't yet know what's in the report, but there's been much speculation on what it could containt. the report was delivered to the us attorney general william barr, who in a letter to us senatejustice commitee said:
11:02 pm
the highest ranking democrats, nancy pelosi and chuck schumer, say the white house must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of the mueller report are made public. a white house spokesperson say they are looking forward to taking part in the process. according to a senior official in thejustice department, mr mueller will not be recommending any additional indictments. 0ur north america editorjon sopel takes a look at how the process unfolded and what happens next. it is hard to overstate the significance of this day. people have been waiting with trepidation about the report. it has been finally delivered to the attorney general and, for the past two years, the subject of russia — was that
11:03 pm
collusion? robert mueller, a former fbi director, was appointed special counsel almost two years ago, but in that time he is not made a single public comment about his investigation. reporter: mr mueller, are you investigating the president? donald j trump! he's been looking into whether there was collusion between the trump campaign and the kremlin during the 2016 presidential race. did donald trump know that russians had hacked hillary clinton's campaign and given e—mails to wikileaks to release? russia, if you're listening, i hope you're able to find the 30,000 e—mails that are missing. i think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press. what happened at a trump tower meeting in june 2016 between key campaign officials, including donald trump junior, and russians with links to the kremlin? and this question — did the president fire the then fbi directorjames comey in an attempt to obstruct justice? the president has repeatedly
11:04 pm
claimed it's a witchhunt. the witchhunt, as i call it, should never have taken place. the entire thing has been a witchhunt. it's a witchhunt. that's all it is. traitor! there's been a string of convictions. traitor! paul manafort, donald trump's one—time campaign chairman, has been found guilty of financial crimes but not collusion. michael flynn, the president's former national security adviser, pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi about his contacts with russia. long—time trump advisor roger stone has been accused of lying to congress about his efforts to get in touch with wikileaks during the 2016 campaign. michael cohen, donald trump's former lawyer, also made a plea deal with the special counsel and turned on his former boss. now the new attorney general, william barr, has been handed the mueller report and it's for him to decide what will be made public.
11:05 pm
chuck schumer has been speaking in the last hour and said the report had to be published in full. now that special counsel robert mueller has submitted his report to the attorney general it is imperative for attorney general it is imperative foer barr attorney general it is imperative for mr barr two provide the full report and make it public. he must not give president trump, his lawyers or his staff and his neck preview of findings and evidence. the white house must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings were — — or evidence should be made public. they should focus on questions that go to the integrity of our democracy itself, whether foreign powers corru ptly interfered in itself, whether foreign powers corruptly interfered in our elections and whether unlawful news
11:06 pm
we use to hinder the investigation. the american people have a right to the truth. the watchword is transparency. katie benner is thejustice department reporter for the new york times. generalised like you would be edging what is in this long—awaited report. how lucky do you think you are going to beg? about as lucky as the rest of the world. we will get the summary of the world. we will get the summary of the attorney general‘s finding. including whether or not there was collusion is or finding of obstruction. after that it is up to the attorney general as to what he and robert mueller decide is ok to release publicly. we are expecting no further indictments? that's correct. so if anyone was waiting
11:07 pm
for another silver bullet, how likely are they to find it in this report? not in this report but may be from the southern district of new york and other officers who have taken pieces of the investigation and run with them because i did not relate directly to the elections. what will we see chris make congress will see whatever it can. again, they will receive what they can. the attorney general and robert mueller will consult to see what else they feel can be made public. because anything put to congress will eventually become public. they are strategising how to fight. including introducing evidence to see if they can obtain them and release them publicly as well. how safe is the
11:08 pm
president, families and associates from further scrutiny and potentially legal cases, if not from this from elsewhere? that is com pletely this from elsewhere? that is completely unknown but i think the idea that the president, his family and inner circle are free from scrutiny is not going to happen for them. have a democratically controlled house eager to continue to scrutinise the president, his family, their actions, security clea ra nces for family, their actions, security clearances forjared kushner, and whether or not the family has and itself by having mr trump as president. it could go well into the 2020 election cycle. the democrats will try to make milage out of this? everybody will seize on anything
11:09 pm
that comes out of congress. thank you. standing outside a very windy justice department. we can speak to our washington correspondent chris buckler. from somewhere a little calmer. 22 months into the waiting and we still do not know how much we will find out about what it contains. yes, as you can tell, this place was not to come a little earlier on when robert mueller dropped off the report at teatime, washington. you got a sense that, in some ways, this isjust teatime, washington. you got a sense that, in some ways, this is just the beginning, not the. they may have been waiting for this report for 22 months but it is like to find out what is in it. we think robert mueller will be giving indications ofa mueller will be giving indications of a way he charged some people and not others. some of the details
11:10 pm
inside it. but it is worth remembering the core questions. did russia interfere in the 2016 elections? was that collusion involved in the trump campaign did the president tried to obstruct justice at any stage? that is what they are asking. 0ne justice at any stage? that is what they are asking. one of the key things regarding this is that mr mueller is saying there are no further indictments. that is the suggestion coming from the department ofjustice. i have seen one of mr trump's supporters inside congress, a republican, saying that is evidence that there is no collusion is. i suspect democrats will see it differently. they will wa nt to will see it differently. they will want to be getting as much information as they possibly can. every indication coming from the us attorney general, william barr, now
11:11 pm
deciding what information would be released, every indication he wants to do that as soon as possible, in a statement he says it could be as early as this weekend. he wants to be as transparent as possible, he says but he has to work through this report along with rob rosenstein and robert mueller himself. the democrats sank the white house must not be allowed to interfere. what scope is that for them to interfere quest make the question is, will the white house be able to get a look at this. there have been questions and suggestions along the way. it could potentially be that president trump uses his privilege to stop some information. could he use executive privilege quest make one of the ideasis privilege quest make one of the ideas is that if they were conversations between president trump and his advisers, could that fall into some of the information
11:12 pm
privilege. a lot of it dates back to richard nixon's time and what was decided in the supreme court then. but i think ultimately william barr is determined to make as much public as possible. democrats are concerned about president trump and aware that william barr was appointed attorney general by president trump and therefore does that interfere potentially with what information comes out? i think for the moment, they are going to hold their nerve and see what they discover. 0f course, the key thing is, for them it is not going to be the. i keep on saying this because it is true. it is likely they will use congressional committees to find out more information and to push for more information and to push for more information and to push for more information to see if there is evidence of collusion, as it is being called time and time again and
11:13 pm
president trump will continue to say this is nothing but a witch—hunt and a huge waste of money. theresa may has written to mps tonight, spelling out the options now open to parliament and the government, as she comes under intense pressure to find a way forward on brexit. the uk was originally meant to leave the eu in a week's time, on march 29th. but after two failed attempts by theresa may to get her withdrawal agreement through the commons, the eu last night agreed to an extension. it means if she gets her deal through parliament next week, brexit will happen on 22nd may, to give mps time to pass the necessary legislation. but if the deal fails again, the uk has to propose another way forward to the eu by 12th april and if there are no new proposals, we could leave without a deal. the prime minister outlined the options to mps tonight, leaving with no deal; cancelling brexit; or asking for another extension. labour'sjeremy corbyn said mps should be given a series of alternatives to vote on. 0ur political editor
11:14 pm
laura kuenssberg reports. how long now? how much longer before we leave? how much longerfor this prime minister? how much longer can our politics really go on like this? just after midnight in brussels, theresa may confirmed the eu granted not as long a delay she had asked for, but a pause. good morning. an extra fortnight to give her another chance to pass her deal. the date of our departure will now be extended to the 22nd of may. if parliament does not agree a deal next week, the eu council will extend article 50 until the 12th of april. at this point, we would either leave with no deal or put forward an alternative plan. so we'll leave a little late, if mps back down and back her. but why would they do that when she strongly pointed the finger at them? doesn't this delay just postpone the dilemma you still find yourself in?
11:15 pm
what is it that makes you think you have a chance of passing your vote next week, and do you think actually you should apologise for the remarks you made about what parliament has done? there are passionately held views on all sides of this argument. and yes, as i said last night, i expressed frustration. but i know mps are frustrated, too. getting the deal through next week in a meaningful vote means that we can have that extension to the 22nd of may, get our legislation through, deliver on the referendum. theresa may missed out on this last photocall in brussels, with its booming music and cheesy grins.
11:16 pm
theresa may missed out on this last photocall in brussels, with its booming music and cheesy grins. but no one here really believes she'll get her deal through back in westminster. 0dds—on, it will then be for mps to determine a different deal, or a longer delay. the fate of brexit is in the hands of our british friends. at the eu, we are prepared for the worst, but hope for the best. as you know, hope dies last. how much hope, though, does number ten's weary team really have? if the deal fails, they've already promised mps can have different votes on different versions of brexit. what isn't clear though is whether those votes would force ministers' hands and change the plan, orjust give a sense of direction. the government would provide parliament with the means to come to a view on the options available. some ministers think the government should lead that process and be bound by whatever gets most support in the commons. the problem is, others and many backbenchers are horrified by the idea.
11:17 pm
with no majority, though, theresa may's choice might be to budge or be budged. hello, have a nice weekend. are you supporting the indicative votes? parliament now has to take control of the process. the government has failed, the prime minister has failed, her deal has gone. neither labour nor even some of the prime minister's allies are coming to her aid. she's got to listen and consult with parliament. she cannot go on living in a bunker and pretending it will come all right next week. it won't unless there's a change by her. the government has not taken a grip of the situation. it has been prepared to be pushed around at every level. i think cabinet divisions have caused real problems for the prime minister. conservatives on all sides of the raging brexit argument are angry, frustrated and disappointed with the prime minister's predicament. for months, theresa may has hung on to the idea that her deal is the only one, there's no alternative to the compromise she
11:18 pm
brokered over two years. but now an alternative might be forced upon her by parliament and forced upon her soon, and that could make her leadership impossible to maintain. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. after a 22 month investigation — robert mueller delivers his report on alleged links between russia and president trump's 2016 campaign in a letter to mps tonight theresa may suggests she might not even try to bring her twice—failed deal back to the house of commons. at the inquest into the victims of the birmingham pub bombings almost 45 years ago — a witness names four ira men he says were responsible.
11:19 pm
rain, rising rivers, and broken bridges are hampering aid and rescue efforts for those affected by cyclone idai in southern africa. the death toll officially across the region is over 550, although the true number is thought to be far higher. hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced across mozambique, zimbabwe and malawi. the uk has donated 22 million pounds to the aid effort, 8 million of that is from the public. fergal keane has travelled deep into one the worst affected areas, the district of nhamatanda in mozambique, where many people have died and thousands more are still in need of aid. the bridge on the road towards namatanda crosses a river that has 110w namatanda crosses a river that has now engulfed the countryside. this road is a trading lifeline for southern africa. survivors of the flooding have found a way across farmland that has become a swamp. they have told of many deaths in the
11:20 pm
countryside beyond. a lot of people have died in my village. we saw the bodies of 76 people and today, we found four more. we continued on foot. thanks to the kindness of locals, who want the world to see what has happened to their lives. 0n the other side, another driver to negotiate the battered road. where dozens negotiate the battered road. where d oze ns of negotiate the battered road. where dozens of taken shelter. little protection from the rains. now there are reports of cholera. disease is the inevitable consequence of so many living in such terrible conditions. this 76—year—old war vetera n conditions. this 76—year—old war veteran has come to fish. and while scientists assess the cause of the
11:21 pm
job — the cause of the weather, he says it is the worst he has known. job — the cause of the weather, he says it is the worst he has knownlj was born in says it is the worst he has knownlj was born “119113, ranchers says it is the worst he has knownlj was born in 1943, ranchers go told me, andi was born in 1943, ranchers go told me, and i haven't seen one like this. we arrived in namatanda as the un was leaving. much more food is needed. in a place where they saw hundreds lose their lives and thousands are destitute. how many people are you taking care of you? 0ver people are you taking care of you? over 2000 people? katarina was waiting in the hope of getting food. her mother was drowned in the storm. the eldest of her seven children was trying to repair the family home. katarina is a widow and crops been destroyed. the way i am now, she
11:22 pm
told me, i don't know how i will survive with my children. i have no work and everything at my farm was destroyed. and remember, they live with the trauma of losing dozens of oui’ with the trauma of losing dozens of our neighbours in the storm. then there was a glimmer of better news. some food had come. you can see there are armed guards on the truck because hunger breeds desperation. it's entirely understandable, when people have gone for days without food. there are bigger questions about the causes and solutions to such disasters but on the ground, it is still an unfolding crisis, a question of survival. a former ira bomber has named the people whom he believes were responsible for the 1974 birmingham pub bombings. the man — known as witness ‘0' — was giving evidence during the inquest into the deaths of the 21 victims.
11:23 pm
he said he'd been given permission to reveal the names by the current head of the ira. sima kotecha reports. it was an evening in november 1974. two explosions in two pubs in birmingham. 21 people were killed and more than 200 were injured. six men were falsely imprisoned for the crime. after spending almost two decades in jail they were acquitted, and that's when some of the families of those killed began calling for fresh inquests. four weeks in and today a former volunteer of the ira told the court who he thought was responsible. he said he'd been given permission to do so by the head of the ira in dublin. the man known as witness 0 gave four names. he said seamus mcloughlin was the officer commanding the ira in birmingham at the time, and was in charge of selecting targets. mick murray, he said, was one of the bombers. another member of the bombing team, he said, was michael hayes. and then when asked
11:24 pm
about a james gavin, witness 0 said, "well, he was involved." all are dead apart from michael hayes, seen here two years ago. in court, my brother and my sisterand i, we were all sobbing, hearing what witness 0 had to say about one of the bombers who, quote, said, "he's harmless now". that's because the damage has already been done. what makes what was said in court today so significant is that for 18 months there was an ongoing legal battle between some of the families of those killed and the coroner over the scope of the inquests and whether it could include the potential perpetrator issue. the court of appeal
11:25 pm
ruled that it could not. but today, for hours, the court discussed suspects. when asked about a michael patrick reilly, witness 0 said he didn't recall him at all. reilly has always denied playing any part. 21 killed 44 years ago, and now the names of the potential perpetrators have been mentioned for the first time in a formal setting. the inquests continue. sima kotecha, bbc news, birmingham. police say the death of the university student libby squire, whose body was found in the humber estuary on wednesday, is being treated as a "potential homicide." the 21 year old, originally from buckinghamshire, disappeared at the beginning of february after a night out with friends. police say a 24—year—old man arrested on suspicion of abduction remains under investigation. danny savage is in hull with the latest. libby squire was last seen on friday, february the first. late that night, she vanished. there has
11:26 pm
been a huge police investigation taking place ever since but it's a lwa ys taking place ever since but it's always been treated as a missing person enquiry but all that changed this week because libby's body was found floating in the humber s3 down its burn point. a postmortem examination took place yesterday and asa examination took place yesterday and as a result of that examination, police now believe that libby squire died asa police now believe that libby squire died as a result of a crime. this afternoon, they have released a statement saying that libby's death in the recovery of her body leads us to solely investigate this as a potential homicide. that can mean murder, manslaughter, unlawful killing but any thought that people may have had that libby squire was u nfortu nate may have had that libby squire was unfortunate and fell into the river by accident is now not the main line of enquiry. she was a 21—year—old student studying felicity here at
11:27 pm
the university of hull. this is almost turned into a shrine now for her, ever since the news broke that her body had been found. people in the area are deeply upset by what happened and may be more so tonight, 110w happened and may be more so tonight, now knowing that police are treating this as a major crime. and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers with our reviewers nicola bartlett from the daily mirror and giles kenningham, former director of communications for number 10 — that's coming up after the headlines at 11:30. now it's time for the weather with tomas schaffernaker. hello. thanks for joining hello. thanks forjoining me. let's get a check on the first the next couple of days, for the weekend and on the whole, it's not looking bad for most of us. there will be a lot of dry weather around, not necessarily sunny. showers in some parts of scotland and windy weather as well that on balance, a lot of dry weather around. this is what's been happening in the last 24 hours so been happening in the last 24 hours so through friday, we saw cooler
11:28 pm
winds reaching scotland and northern ireland so into the early hours of saturday, chilly air across the northern two thirds of the country. temperatures in some spots below freezing. in the south of the country, we have cloud. it's stretching out of scandinavia across the southern portion of the north sea and down towards the south—west of our neighbourhood. to the north of our neighbourhood. to the north of that, and air stream of slightly colder air. with that weather front, tomorrow, on saturday, a lot of cloud here. some of the cloud will be thick enough to bring some drizzle to places like plymouth. possibly as far north as london before most of us, it's looking absolutely fine. a lot of bright weather around. a few showers are expected in scotland. it's quite cool expected in scotland. it's quite cool. temperatures averaging about 10 degrees. the skies were clear saturday night into sunday. you will see a frost developing here. the
11:29 pm
ground sometimes gets colder. temperatures early on sunday morning widely across the country are pretty low, single figures in some areas. here is sunday's weather forecast. sunshine for the southern part of the country. a strong north—westerly wind bringing showers. 0n the country. a strong north—westerly wind bringing showers. on balance, it's not looking bad at all. next week, high pressure is building across the uk so that spells a lot of dry weather and sunshine. with high—pressure building, a big area of high pressure establishing itself across the british isles. this is what it looks like on monday. you can see deflected to the very far north—west of us, plenty of bright weather around. temperatures up to 11- 13 weather around. temperatures up to 11— 13 celsius, not especially high
11:30 pm
01’ 11— 13 celsius, not especially high or low, decent enough. next week the high—pressure is really going to anchor itself across the uk and when you get a strong high—pressure system there, the jet stream is afflicted towards the north so that is where all the weather fronts are going, the clouds in the rain to the north into scandinavia, just maybe clipping the very far north—west of scotla nd clipping the very far north—west of scotland so the vast majority into monday, tuesday and wednesday will have fine weather. temperatures not changing from day—to—day, 10— 13 celsius. that is tuesday. wednesday and into the end of the week we start to see a slight change out in the north atlantic here. this cold airwill be the north atlantic here. this cold air will be approaching us. reaching us air will be approaching us. reaching us around about friday. things are set to cool off and perhaps become a little more unsettled. friday into the weekend, next weekend but until then, it looks like the weather is going to be settled across most of
11:31 pm
the

10 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on