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tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 23, 2019 10:30pm-11:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. we will be taking this is bbc news. i'm ben bland. the headlines at 11:00: a look at the papers injust of among others, the president's this is bbc news. we will be taking a look at the papers in just a hundreds of thousands former campaign chairman moment withjoe of demonstrators take to the streets of london to demand paul manafort, the former a look at the papers in just a moment with joe phillips a look at the papers in just a moment withjoe phillips and nigel national security adviser michael nelson. first, the headlines. flynn, and mr trump's another brexit referendum. one—time personal lawyer, hundreds of thousands of people have michael cohen. marched through central london we wa nt demanding another brexit referendum. we want to know what brexit will protesters gathered to hear speeches but none of those cases directly from across the political spectrum. look like because they do not know. address the key questions of whether the president tried this deal pleases no one. if you to obstruct justice now we do and we should make an and whether russia colluded voted remain, it is a rubbish deal. with the trump campaign informed decision. the country is in in the 2016 election. if you voted leave, it is a lousy i don't know what's a mess, brought on by government deal. there are no winners, only in the report, nobody does. democrats already have their eyes incompetence. american—backed kurdish forces declare victory over islamic state on 2020 and those out campaigning after capturing the group's last to become mr trump's opponents losers. american backed kurdish remaining stronghold in syria. in next year's presidential election police in west london launch a murder investigation, have a new rallying cry. following the fatal stabbing forces have declared victory over of a teenager last night. islamic state after capturing the a huge operation is underway off group's last remaining stronghold in the coast of norway to rescue that report needs to be made public. syria. police say a 17—year—old boy 1300 passengers stranded who was stabbed to death in west on a cruise ship in trouble on stormy seas. the american people have a right london yesterday was chased by a group of men before he was attacked. and a need to know. the remarkable new technology behind these 3d images of babies a huge operation is under way off the decision about what is released rests in the hands of this man, the coast of norway to rescue 1300 the us attorney general. passengers stranded on a cruise ship in trouble on stormy seas. bill barr went to work this morning
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with the intention of publishing the main findings of the report before the end of the weekend. but while the special counsel's probe is at an end, other investigations are still taking place and democrats are determined to push their own inquiries here at congress. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. hello and welcome to our look ahead scientists have begun to what the the papers will be using remarkable new technology bringing us tomorrow. to produce detailed 3d images with me arejo phillips, of babies‘ hearts while they political commentator, are still in the womb. and nigel nelson, political editor of the people & sunday mirror. many of tomorrow's front doctors say the technique pages are already in. will help them provide better the prime minister treatment for babies born is pictured alongside her deputy with congenital heart defects. our health correspondent, on the front of the sunday times. it reports senior ministers say james gallagher, reports. may's days are numbered and david lidington is named this is the view inside the womb, as an option to replace her. and doctors are using images the cabinet coup to install like this to inspect the foetal heart. michael gove as a caretaker violet—vienna developed life—threatening abnormalities prime minister is across the front in the blood vessels around her heart while she was of the mail on sunday — still inside her mum. it says even the prime minister's but doctors spotted them early chief whip julian smith and planned how to save her life. has advised her to set out her departure plans. she was put on medication as soon britain marches towards as she was born and had heart election disaster
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surgery a week later. says the sunday express, adding that she is doted on by everyone downing street fears being forced into calling a divisive vote but she is just thriving and it's as cabinet rounds on may. all thanks to the specialists cabinet plans to oust and all this technology. may also features like i said, it's honestly as the lead on the sunday telegraph — the paper also warns the end amazing what they do. it's life—saving. of the so—called islamic state group's self—declared caliphate could mutate to become if a routine pregnancy scan a deadly insurgency. identifies a problem then women are sent for a detailed mri scan and a series of pictures the protest march demanding a second brexit of the heart are taken. referendum is spashed across the independent sophisticated computer software with the headline "now pieces those images together and then builds an unprecedented 3d give us the final say". image of the heart. look at this. a model of the foetal heart made from this technology. right, so, brexit dominates the papers, as is to be expected. let's about eight in every thousand babies in the uk is born with a congenital heart defect. start with that one from the times. and this research is enabling doctors to look at them talk of a cabinet coup. was this the in incredible detail. week when everything changed?” and importantly, it's think it was. nigel and i werejust improving care for babies. talking about this before we came on it allows us to have beautiful 3d images of the abnormality so we have complete certainty and plan ahead air. ithink talking about this before we came on air. i think theresa may's speech, for what treatment is needed — addressing the nation on wednesday,
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what's the operation was a pivotal moment where you thought as though this was a woman that we need to do? that really helps the parents who had lost all power and it was to have the right support to know what's going to happen. but it also really helps the babies reeking of desperation. the because they have the right equivalent of geoffrey howe's speech operation at the right time to margaret thatcher, which left and have the best outcomes. violet—vienna was one of the first everything in train for her to go. to benefit from these 3d scans accept she set in train for herself. and the researchers hope the technology that helped her will soon become routine. james gallagher, bbc news. i think it has. as you have just done, going through all of the you can see more on all of today's sunday papers, they all have this stories on the bbc news channel. story that the cabinet has turned on that's all from me. her. i don't think she has any goodnight. support at all. it is a question of whether she will go willingly, she probably will not, but whether she will go with grace and dignity because she realises what an hello. it wasn't too bad today. many absolute mess we are in right now, 01’ absolute mess we are in right now, or whether they have to force her saw some sunshine. a relief after out. there is absolutely no doubt that it out. there is absolutely no doubt thatitis pretty grey days through the working out. there is absolutely no doubt that it is no longer a question of if, but when. some of the papers are talking about it happening as soon as this coming week. there are talks week. sunshine was hazy in places. ofa as this coming week. there are talks of a cabinet coup, which will take
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further north a few showers. place on monday. we have to see. tonight it's stays windy with further showers as the area of low pressure pulses obviously my guess is that she would only go this week if one of the to the north of the uk. indicative votes coming up on wednesday, in other words somebody finds an alternative brexit, if that happens, i think she would go. the most m ost pla ces most places will be dry, key data, i think, is april the temperatures falling to the low single figures and some frost 12th, which is the point where we further north. there will be a have to decide to go into eu strong wind across scotland through the night with plenty of showers, some merging together to produce elections and then be looking for a longer spells of rain. wintry on the long delay on brexit. that will be the point where theresa may has failed on every possible level. you high ground. values and cities falling to about two or four celsius, a touch of frost out of town across northern england and the only have to look at the quotes from north of scotland. starting sunday on quite a chilly note, plenty of sunshine across england, wales and northern ireland. a lot of showers cabinet ministers, her judgment only have to look at the quotes from cabinet ministers, herjudgment has across scotland. into the afternoon, started to go haywire, i think they will become more scattered. things will settle when she is no some will be heavy and there will be snow to the hills. wind touching gale force. for much of england and longer prime minister, a growing move for david liddington to take over. is there a danger that the
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wales it will be dry with more cabinet is about to do what parliament has done and say what it sunshine than what we had today, top temperature is or 14 degrees. the doesn't want, who doesn't want, but perhaps unable to agree on who should step in and take over? do you think there are key figures weather system is being kept at bay emerging? david liddington, her de through much of next week, that will settle things down quite nicely, a chance of returning milder, too. it fa cto emerging? david liddington, her de facto deputy, is emerging as the will be mainly dry next week —— that sort of caretaker, the safe pair of hands. i mean, we will come onto it area of high pressure, and some good ina minute, hands. i mean, we will come onto it in a minute, there are moves to get spells of sunshine. the air is still michael gove in there, there are quite chilly across northern areas, others who have leadership but across next week it looks like a ambitions. i think there is a mild airwill but across next week it looks like a mild air will topple in across the uk is high—pressure establish itself. this is the picture for general consensus that things are so monday. a fairly cool start. there will be lots of sunshine around, grave that you have to get somebody wind from the north or north—west, that will feed in thicker cloud to in who will get everything to the the north and west of scotland. next phase with the european negotiations, then you have a proper leadership challenge and campaign in the autumn. which is what the sunday elsewhere, a lovely looking spring telegraph comes onto. the question day. temperatures reaching 13 is how? we are in the middle of a major crisis. so therefore, can you degrees across the south, 709 for scotland. throughout the week it just sibley get rid of the prime minister in one go and then what do stays fine and dry, turning milder you do? under the like i showed you. we could see
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minister in one go and then what do you do? underthe rules minister in one go and then what do you do? under the rules at the moment it means a long leadership temperatures reaching the high teens election, which obviously you celsius. the nice will continue to be chilly with mist and fog. —— couldn't afford to have. the idea seems to be put a caretaker in. the nights. caretaker would have to agree not to stand for the leadership. you would get over the immediate brexit problems. once you have got a long delay of extension that europe will probably give, you can't then have a leadership contest over the summer and install a prime minister by the autumn. if that delay were to happen, if europe were to agree to it, there is then the prospect of the uk having to take part in european elections. you might as well say we are going to. if theresa may cannot get her deal through, and all of the indications are that she won't, by april the 12th, we sign up to the european elections and at that point we have also signed up for a long extension. yes, i mean, matt, as ever, coming to the fore
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with his cartoon? it is marvellous. brexit has made him funnier than ever. a woman looking at a rack of cards in the westminster card shop, with the captions, sorry you're going, or sorry, but with the captions, sorry you're going, orsorry, but you with the captions, sorry you're going, or sorry, but you are going. who would be buying which card? that same story on the front page of the mail on sunday. but their take on it, the plot is to install michael gove. that would go down better with those that are pushing for brexit within the cabinet? probably. the other thing is that you could have david liddington there and michael govein david liddington there and michael gove in some position as chancellor or home secretary, something like that. i think whatever happens, it needs to happen quickly. in the end, u nless needs to happen quickly. in the end, unless you have somebody who is fairly moderate, like orjeremy
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hunt, or philip hammond, are going to end up with the same group of people, like jacob rees—mogg, to end up with the same group of people, likejacob rees—mogg, in to end up with the same group of people, like jacob rees—mogg, in the european research group, who have basically held the country to ransom for the last three years. they would say they have defended what the majority voted for. well, they do, from the point of view, if you like the idea of no deal, they've got a point. we don't know why people voted the way they did. all we know is that they voted to come out of europe. what the erg argue is that that means no deal. what is interesting about the mail on sunday putting michael gove into the caretaker role, it does strike me that whoever the caretaker is cannot be the next prime minister. they really do have to agree to be a caretaker. why not? could you imagine the other candidates actually allowing the caretaker to have that head start on the racetrack? also, we have seen what happens when you get a coronation,
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we saw that with gordon brown. the public, who... we saw that with gordon brown. the public, who. .. and we saw that with gordon brown. the public, who... and we are the public, who... and we are the public, they have probably had enough of all of this and would actually say that a fair way to do this is to go for a general election. that is a possibility, too. if she goes in, david liddington goes as caretaker and says he will not stand in a proper leadership election, you might be able to hold off a general election. jeremy corbyn is perfectly within his rights to try and table a vote of no confidence in the government. what happens to the withdrawal deal of the eu? do you think whoever ta kes of the eu? do you think whoever takes over as caretaker picked that are fun to run with it or do you think that is now... that is dead. unless a miracle happens and suddenly the brexiteers get really spooked by what is going on, and agree to vote for theresa may's deal, that is off the table. that is
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what i mean about the fact that i think we are almost certainly heading for a long extension of two years. basically, negotiating brexit from square one again. that is why it is so important that parliament comes up it is so important that parliament comes up with something they can't agree 011. comes up with something they can't agree on. that is the idea of the indicative votes coming up on wednesday. if they can come to a consensus wednesday. if they can come to a consensus that there is a way forward. if you wait for the negotiations almost starting from scratch, the clamour for a second referendum becomes greater and more reasonable. that takes us nicely onto the independent, this march through central london. organisers say they were trying to get 1 million people. i heard earlier that a p pa re ntly million people. i heard earlier that apparently the police do not give numbers anymore because it is such a political charged thing to do. i mean, clearly vast numbers out there asking for whatever deal is agreed for it to be put to the people, to have the final say as to if they are
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happy with that deal. then you can't have a binary choice, if they don't like the deal and they say we don't like the deal and they say we don't like it, what does that mean? they wa nt like it, what does that mean? they want no deal, they want to stay in? exactly. there is a point in this that democracy in this country is hanging bya that democracy in this country is hanging by a thread. people have had enough of being ignored. when we had the march against going into iraq, 1 million people took to the streets and were ignored. people will feel that they are ignored on this. there are4 that they are ignored on this. there are 4 million people at the last count who have signed the petition, which i think is the biggest petition that has ever been lodged on the parliamentary website. the government and politicians across the country and across the house of commons are really hanging by a thread in terms of are they listening to people? if you are representing a constituency that overall voted to leave, why would you then vote for a second referendum? you then vote for a second referendum ? why would you then vote for a second referendum? why would you then say,
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well, we will go with this deal, we will renegotiate. you've either got to a cce pt will renegotiate. you've either got to accept the result of the referendum, personally i don't think we should ever have had a referendum, but that is neither here nor there. we agree on that one. given that the whole thing was so badly managed and david cameron had never thought about what the outcome would be if it didn't go the way he thought it would, and clearly there was no preparation. it is very difficult to say there should be a second referendum. without it sounding like we want to try to change the outcome. at which point... which is true. then don't be surprised if the millions of people who voted to leave actually go... that is the point about this, if the figure is 1 go... that is the point about this, if the figure isi million, what this shows isi million people turned out because they feel really strongly about brexit. millions of other people who may be levers stayed at home but feel equally strongly. well, they are certainly
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not a strongly. well, they are certainly nota margin strongly. well, they are certainly not a margin with nigel farage. no, exactly. -- certainly not marching with nigel farage. the independent polling shows the position has not changed, if you were a lever in 2016, you probably still are. so there has not been a huge swing either way, which is the only reason i think you can naturallyjustify a referendum. we have seen after two and a half years of negotiations that have moved us, like sitting in a sluggish trafficjam, operation stack, which will probably come in soon, the negotiations, the point we have got to, there isn't anything clear enough for people to vote on. as you say, is it a go with this negotiation will leave with no deal? you would have to have something on the table, it would have to be a deal agreed in parliament, the table, it would have to be a dealagreed in parliament, a the table, it would have to be a deal agreed in parliament, a deal agreed in europe, and then put that to the people with a remain option. the danger is that people have been talking about giving the public the
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option of two different brexits, without putting remain on, which would be even worse. you would have to have something binary, it would have to be remain or leave. the mood kind of shifted, there was a turning point this week. i wonder if it also became a little bit more toxic, given that the organiser of the petition, a 77—year—old woman, has spoken about how she had three phone calls as death threats. i'm afraid thatis calls as death threats. i'm afraid that is no surprise at all. anna soubry, the former mp thatjoined the independent group, is not thought to be safe in her own home because of the threats against her. we have seen it and we have seen it since brexit and before brexit, the whole toxicity around the debate. we all know it in our own lives with friends, family, colleagues and stuff like that. it is absolutely impossible. after jo stuff like that. it is absolutely impossible. afterjo cox, there are genuine fears. mps do not walk
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around alone, they have to go in groups. ministers have to go from their offices to the house of commons by car. mps have panic alarms in their home. all of these precautions are taken because there actually is a genuine threat to them. you know how far it is to go from the commons to the bbc millbank studios. it takes three minutes to walk here. it is quicker to walk and drive. now they have to go by car. it is ridiculous. those are the effect on mps. at the effects on people that are far removed from westminster, the fear is kicking and our shortages. the telegraph, carrying a reassurance, saying there is no need to stockpile medicines. the only bit of good brexit news. good brexit news story. it is from the royal college of paediatrics and child health, they are saying there is plenty of drugs around, doctors
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should discourage patients from taking anything more than they need. and they will not be a problem. so, great news if they are right. yes, but this is the royal college writing to gps. i imagine what is happening is people are going in and asking for repeat prescriptions or extra stuff. it probably won't stop people from stockpiling. you can't blame them if they have the slightest fear. people are stockpiling or things like toilet roll. this is a hugely significant story that could easily get submerged under the brexit coverage. the apparent end of the so—called caliphate of is, the last bit of land reclaimed by the syrian democratic forces, backed by the us. the point the telegraph is making is that it might not be unalloyed good
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news. yes, islamic state has been defeated, the question is what next? it was once described to me like a lake, as least you know where they are, as soon as the banks break and they trickle out, you have no idea. the idea is they might turn to underground terrorism and we would be at more threat than less. the battle took 7307 days, four times longer than the liberation of western europe from the nazis after d—day. and that is a tiny sliver of land ina d—day. and that is a tiny sliver of land in a syrian village. there is a story on the sunday times that may be we will touch on later about the suggestion that isis are not gone, they have just spread out across europe. this is the real fear. they have just spread out across europe. this is the realfear. no one has tracked down or is aware of where the de facto leader is, despite having less and less
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territory in which to hide, they still have not tracked him down. all the hostages. the territorial aspect, although that is complete, aspect, although that is complete, as we gather, there are still many loose ends that need to be tied up. we will perhaps delve into that more later. for the moment, thank you very much. that is it from the papers. we will be back at 11.30 four another look at the papers. next, the weather. not too bad today. many of us did see some sunshine. a relief after grey days through the working week. sunshine was hazy in places. further north a few showers. tonight it's stays windy with further showers as the area of low pressure pulses
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to the north of the uk. there will be quite a strong wind across scotland through the night with plenty of showers, some of them merging together to produce long spells of rain. they will be winter in the higher ground. values in cities falling to about two four celsius, a touch of frost out of town across northern england and in toward scotland. we are starting sunday off in quite a chilly note, but plenty of sunshine across england, wales and northern ireland. lots of showers across scotland. they will produce longer spells of rain through the morning. into the afternoon they will become more scattered. some of them will be quite heavy and they will be snow to the hills, touch and gale force for northern scotland. showers pushing into northern ireland and england for the rest of the day. for the rest of the day, more sunshine around than we had today. top temperature 13 or 1a degrees. you can see high—pressure toppling and across the uk, keeping weather systems at bay throughout much of
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next week. that really will settle things down quite nicely. there is a chance of returning milder, too. for next week it will be mainly dry, thanks to that area of high pressure with light wind and we should see some good spells of sunshine. the air is still quite chilly across northern areas. as we head through next week, it looks like some of the mild airwill next week, it looks like some of the mild air will topple in across the uk as high pressure establishes itself. this is the picture for monday. a cool start again. a lot of wind coming from the north or north—west, that will feed into thick clouds in the north and west of scotland, may be into northern ireland. elsewhere, a lovely looking spring day. temperatures reaching highs of 12 or 13 degrees across the south, closer to seven or nine for scotland. throughout the week it stays fine and dry. turns milder like i showed you. temperatures reaching the high teens celsius. the night will continue to be chilly with a bit of mist and fog.
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