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tv   The Papers  BBCNEWS  March 24, 2019 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news, ‘two people on i'm martine croxall. the headlines at ten: going because one or two people on land, emergency services, said they pressure mounts on theresa may. we re land, emergency services, said they were surprised we were travelling up senior conservatives tell the coast in a bad storm. there was the prime minister her brexit deal is more likely to pass a norwegian liner which do not sale if she stands down. that day because of the storm but her departure is guaranteed. then again, i am not an expert in what is not guaranteed is her legacy and is her legacy going to be that she that. i am pleased we are able to failed to deliver on the largest talk to you and you are safe. thank mandate that any government has been you very much. it is a pleasure, given to a referendum or has she thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. succeeded in doing that? ministers are reported to be split over whether brexiteer michael gove should take over — gusts of wind at the moment in the or mrs may's de—facto deputy, david lidington. far north of scotland but for most the chancellor says of us this is what we have got, you a change won't help. can see for miles because of blue to be talking about changing the skies and sunshine. there is a weather front producing sharp players on the board frankly is showers and stronger winds but for most of the country high pressure is self—indulgent at this time. we have building and that will be the theme to decide how we wanted to proceed. of our weather over the next week. rescuers are airlifting hundreds of passengers those showers continue for the next and crew from a cruise ship, off the coast of norway. couple of hours, a frequent rash of showers falling as snow across the mountains of scotland and they will
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push south and east through the morning. throughout the morning plenty of showers to scotland pushing into northern ireland and into the borders of the north of england. for the rest of england and wales, what you have got at the moment is what you are going to stay with the rest of the day. lots of dry, sunny weather on offer and temperatures will peak at 14 degrees which will feel pleasant in the sunshine. a little bit cooler in scotla nd sunshine. a little bit cooler in scotland with eight to 10 celsius. high pressure will stay with us for the rest of the week. hello, this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines: pressure mounts on theresa may. senior conservatives tell the prime minister her brexit deal is more likely to pass if she stands down. her departure is guaranteed. what is not guaranteed is her legacy. and is her legacy going to be that she failed to deliver on the largest mandate that any government has been
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given through a referendum or has she succeeded in doing that? ministers are reported to be split over whether mrs may's de facto deputy, david lidington, should take over, or brexiteer michael gove. rescuers are airlifting hundreds of passengers and crew from a cruise ship off the coast of norway. mozambican authorities say half a million people are affected by cyclone idai. the raf will fly out aid supplies today. the organ transplant service is at breaking point, that's the warning from one of the uk 5 leading transplant surgeons. and in just a few minutes, we'll have our sunday morning edition of the papers. our reviewers are owen bennett,
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head of politics at city am, and prashant rao, global editor at the atlantic. stay with us for that. before the papers, sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's richard askem. wales get their euro 2020 qualifying campaign under way today, with star player gareth bale saying he is raring to go. the welsh take on slovakia this afternoon at the cardiff city stadium and bale will be looking to put a difficult campaign with real madrid behind him for now. he is still scoring goals in spain, but hasn't played much and apparently doesn't get on with some of his real team—mates. he's clearly enjoying being back with his national squad and had an admirer in his pre—match press c0 nfe re nce . yeah, sure, no problem. it's a good last question. good last question. we don't usually do things like that, that's a first at oui’ press conferences, and it's not something we'll
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mick mccarthy says he hated every minute as the republic of ireland narrowly beat gibraltari—o. it was his first competitive match since returning to the job after 17 years. holly hamilton reports 17 years after his last game in charge, mick mccarthy finds himself somewhere between a rock and a hard place. after a dismal nations league campaign and four games without a goal, this is an ireland side with a mountain to climb. and gibraltar ensured this would be an uphill struggle. on the artificial pitch, the boys in green unable to find the net time and time again. david mcgoldrick came closest to breaking the deadlock but no cigar. the grass here may be fake but ireland's frustrations were very real. into the second half and a wake—up call for the visitors. this from a team ranked 194th in the world. but soon relief for the travelling fans. jeff hendrick with his second international goal. enough to settle the nerves and take
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the three points back to dublin. perhaps not enough to reassure fans of ireland's euro 2020 prospects. holly hamilton, bbc news. scotland will be desperate to put their humiliating defeat to kazakhstan behind them today. on paper, it should be simple to do. they play san marino, who are officially the worst side in the world. and manager alex mcleish says it's the perfect opportunity to put things right. the only apology we can give the fans is to go out and win the next game. we are all hurting. we're fans as well. you know, i followed the team as a young man and always proud to wear the jersey and these guys are as well. boxing now. tyson fury‘s getting back into the ring this summer to fight german heavyweight tom schwarz. there were rumours of a re—match with deontay wilder,
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or a super—fight with anthonyjoshua, but fury‘s gone with the 24—year—old unbeaten german. they'll fight in las vegas, and it's the first of five bouts as part of a multi—million—pound deal that fury signed with an american broadcaster. there was a shock defeat for naomi osaka at the miami open tennis. osaka's won the last two grand slam events and is the world number one, but she was beaten in three sets by taiwan's hsieh su—wei. meanwhile serena williams has pulled out of the tournament with a knee injury. in the men's draw britain's dan evans is out. he lost in three sets to canada's denis shapovalov, losing the final point on a double fault. kyle edmund now the only brit left in the draw, he plays milos raonic later today. it's been a good morning for england's women, who've beaten sri lanka in the first international twenty20 of a three match series.
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henry moeran was watching in columbo. england were dominant and ruthless and ensured victory in double quick time. they bowled the hosts out for just 94 with lindsey smith 3—18. three wickets on debut for the 20—year—old debut ms davis, performing in england colours for the first time. england have two games left in the subcontinent and they are on a roll. it makes it eight wins out of eight in the odi against india last month. it is as good a run at the side have been on since that notorious 2017 world cup campaign. if they can make it ten from ten with the final t20s here at the end of the week, it will be a fine end to the winter and are perfect momentum going into the summer. with the six nations done and dusted, all eyes on domestic rugby for the rest of the season. and defending premiership champions saracens earned a hard fought win over harlequins at the london stadium.
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two tries from australian will skelton helped them come from behind to win by 27 points to 20. it keeps sarries second. there were also wins for gloucester, worcester and relegation threatened newcastle. in the pro 14, leaders glasgow made it five wins in a row with a bonus point victory over the cheetahs. scott cummings scored the fifth and final try at scotstoun. ospreys, ulster and munster also won. in the super league, bottom side leeds rhinos' poor start to the season has continued after defeat to the catalan dragons. they were beaten 26—22 in france despite having a decent lead early on. the rhinos have now lost five in a row, and were in a relegation battle last season. it looks like more of the same to come if that run continues. there were no medals for great britain at the gymnastics world cup
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in birmingham, with a costly mistake on the uneven bars costing british champion ellie downie. trying a new element to her routine, downie missed the high bar completely and fell onto the mats. fortunately she was ok but the error cost her any chance of a medal, finishing down in seventh. tha nkfully thankfully she was not hurt. that is all the sport on bbc news. now back to martin for the papers. —— martine. hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review. with me are owen bennett, head of politics at city am, and prashant rao, international editor at the atlantic. let's take a look at the front pages. it is not all about brexit, but that does dominate. the prime minister is pictured alongside her deputy on the front
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of the sunday times. it reports that senior ministers say may's days are numbered with david lidington named as an option to replace her. the cabinet coup to install michael gove as a caretaker prime minister is across the front of the mail on sunday. it says even the prime minister's chief whip julian smith has advised her to set out her departure plans. britain marches towards election disaster says the sunday express adding that downing street fears being forced into calling a divisive vote as the cabinet turns on may. the sunday telegraph has more on the plans by may's senior ministers to oust her. the paper also warns that the end of so—called islamic state's caliphate could mutate to become a deadly insurgency. and a picture of the people's vote march is splashed across the observer as the paper reports more than1 million people including senior politicians joined the uk's biggest demonstration to demand a fresh referendum on brexit. let's make a start with the fortunes and the future of the prime minister. we will begin with the
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sunday times. cabinet coup to ditch theresa may. she has gone haywire, says a minister. she has been threatened so many times and she had survived. it is hard to tell how seriously to take this. she went through confidence motion after confidence motion. she has lost historic levels of votes. what is it 110w historic levels of votes. what is it now that makes it happen and why now when we are so close? three weeks away now from the next departure date. it is astonishing. frankly, all the people who are betting on her to leave now, i would be curious how much money they lost betting on her to leave every time before that. it is like an accumulator in reverse! what good would it do? the deal remains the same and their withdrawal agreement hasn't changed. i would change in the prime minister make a difference to getting it through the house of commons? that isa through the house of commons? that is a good point. if you are an mp opposed to the deal that locks us into the backstop on a permanent basis, why would theresa may change
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that? it wouldn't. you are playing politics, some might say. people are scared that it would trigger a snap general election, which would leave the tory party in. but under the fixed term parliament act, they would need to vote for the general election, which stops that. and there is a fear she might take the uk into the next stage of negotiations and deliver a permanent customs union. let's look at the mailon customs union. let's look at the mail on sunday. the pm is told she must go, that is on the front page, and we will look inside in a moment. the caretaker prime minister. how does that work? david lidington is one of the names but he is too much ofa one of the names but he is too much of a remainerfor some one of the names but he is too much of a remainer for some tastes. the other is michael gove and i believe you have a book about him coming out. i declare my interest. you have a book about him coming out. ideclare my interest. it you have a book about him coming out. i declare my interest. it would be nice if he became prime minister! under the tory leadership contest, you only need two mps do nominate you only need two mps do nominate you to stand yourself. they might get that nice david lymington to stand, and then the backbenchers might not want this remainer running
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the country. —— david lidington. they might want someone else. then you have a leadership contest and that will take months. where does this leave people with the deal? if she does step down, they are left with the same mass, aren't they? that goes back to your point. what does changing the prime minister do? if the goal is to make something happen on brexit, what will this change? all the papers say this. there is no mention of the fact that the eu have said time and again that they will not change this deal. what will change in the prime minister do? in that sense it is very unclear through all of this. let's look at pages eight and nine of the mail on sunday. it is a bleak coup. putting an expletive in the paper and pulling the punch at the last minute! leaving michael gove favourite to be caretaker prime minister. but who would want this
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job? michael gove! who wouldn't want to be prime minister? under these circumstances? inheriting this? every politician thinks they could be the one. the person who thinks they can turn that bad boy good. they can get in and solve this. what if it is somebody who doesn't think they can do it? you need that hubris? it is like russell crowe and gladiator, reluctantly coming in to do it. i don't know who that is. gladiator, reluctantly coming in to do it. i don't know who that ism could be david lidington because by all descriptions it —— but it doesn't want to be prime minister. ancient rome? that is where we are right now! it could be david lidington. i can't see the erg wearing david lidington as the pm. they could maybe live with michael gove because he is a brexiteer. changing the prime minister would not solve the problem, nigel evans
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said, that he would not be drawn on whether his colleagues wanted him to make an intervention. you talk to people all the time in the cabinet. how much pressure is she under this coming week? intense pressure. every time somebody tries to help her, like her chief whip, she completely burns through her credibility, like in that speech. they have worked very ha rd in that speech. they have worked very hard to gently get labour mps on side and she bears that out with her speech. if you are thinking of backing her, and then theresa may if their speech, and you pick up your ball and go home, are you working on the national interest? you can make that on the labour side as well. but the speech was they misjudged and it wound up so many people, that you are sitting there going, there is only so much we can do, boss. we are giving you the ball two yards out, and somehow you get yourself sent off. 1 millionjoined and somehow you get yourself sent off. 1 million joined the and somehow you get yourself sent off. 1 millionjoined the march against brexit as tories plan to oust theresa may. we don't know
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quite how many people were there. the organisers say it could have been more than 1 the organisers say it could have been more than1 million. these people may have voted to remain at some of them may have changed their minds, but it doesn't overturn the referendum and it doesn't make a second run any more likely, despite the petition, does it? it probably doesn't because the politics of it are quite complicated but we should cast our minds back to another seminal march in london 16 years ago. almost to the day, when people protested against the iraq war, and the politicians of the day decided not to heed that warning. i am not saying this is similar in terms of what will happen afterwards, but the fa ct what will happen afterwards, but the fact is that large marchers have shown themselves in britain not to have the intended effect over time, u nfortu nately for have the intended effect over time, unfortunately for the people who did much, and the 4500, how many people have signed this petition. it is
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very difficult. but nobody should ever say never because theresa may said there wouldn't be an election. and no deal was better than a bad deal. but now no deal is not on the table. and she said we would leave on the 29th of march. lots of things. this does help theresa may a little bit. she can say that there are lots of people out there who don't want brexit to happen at all, and this gives succour to that. that helps sa to the erg get behind the deal. —— that helps theresa may say to the erg. i rememberjeremy corbyn speaking before the iraq war march, and then became labour leader. so who spoke about the march yesterday and could now be leader? 17.4 million voted to leave and we are
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not seeing that acted upon. let's look at the times. thatcher's has been told her to quit and theresa may should as well. denis thatcher is said to have said to margaret thatcher, you have done enough, old girl, it is time to go. words to that effect. i just wonder girl, it is time to go. words to that effect. ijust wonder if it we re that effect. ijust wonder if it were a man who were prime minister, would we be reporting what his wife was saying to him? i think the press is to pick up on what cherie blair said to tony blair, said there could be interest there. but i think you are right. the man will come in and put his arm round the little woman, they're there, dear, here is a tissue and we can go home. would this happen the other way around? you can pair theresa may to margaret thatcher, but actually the better comparison is theresa may and john major, a minority government spent over europe, but nobody make that comparison. he went to lloyds to watch some cricket. yes. this is startling to me. theresa may's
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frailty through the process. the quote from a cabinet minister, she was ill all the time in december. people get sick. she is also diabetic as well. and she has done a lot of talking. she is probably working 18 or 20 hours a day and has been for god knows how long. reasonable things do happen to certain people. the times, the story is still to do with politics. mp expenses hit a new high. how much have they been spending on what? according to the sunday times, they are using public data, mps claiming expenses, that amount has not only riven above ten years ago but it has risen above it accounting for inflation. you remember that massive scandal ten years ago with mps
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claiming for various things like duck houses. they are running with richard bunyan, who claimed for two toilet seats within the space of a month. the difference is they make the point thatjohn prescott, the last time this happened, claimed for a toilet seat that cost £210. richard banyan had claimed for two... why are we talking about this? these are important bottoms that need to sit down! he claimed for £17. the figures largely take into account the fact that one of the biggest increases in spending was on staffing costs, and they want to pay more than minimum wage and unpaid internships are no longer the norm, so this does seem to be quite good. people are being paid more and there are no longer people not being paid. and we come back to this again, buta regular paid. and we come back to this again, but a regular mp does not own again, but a regular mp does not own a huge amount of money for the work
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that they do compared to other parts of the world. absolutely. and the case load has increased since brexit. people used to go to citizens advice, and those things are no longer there, citizens advice, and those things are no longerthere, so citizens advice, and those things are no longer there, so there is more casework. we are desperate to find the duck house in 2019 but all we found is the toilet seat. and i got to say bottom! twice now. and maybe a third time! the sunday telegraph, the caliphate crashed at last, but a warning that i could rise again. it is not so long ago that it felt like isis were indestructible and yet they have been pushed into a retreat.|j indestructible and yet they have been pushed into a retreat. i was in baghdad when isis took mosel and we
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thought that the country was crumbling and we thought that baghdad would fall. to get to this point is quite remarkable. iraq has liberated moselle and now the last vestiges of territory have gone. —— mosel. but the idea that isis is a spent force is a dangerous one because they have shown themselves capable of carrying out attacks around the world and claiming attacks. similarly with al-qaeda, people can act in the name of al-anda, even if they are not part ofa al-anda, even if they are not part of a particular branch of it in a formal sense. yes, they can act as independent cells with no mainframe direction additives and ideology, an idea, and how do you defeat an idea? looking at the quotes from gavin williamson, saying this is a major milestone. in donald trump that they are losers and they will always be losers. take us back to the idea of the war on terror that george w bush
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launched. it is still going, isn't it, ina launched. it is still going, isn't it, in a different way? it might not have the same headline, but the same powers are having to fight the same sorts of threats. yes, it speaks to the fact that the united states and other countries have made notable su ccesses other countries have made notable successes in terms of cutting off the financing to al-qaeda and isis to certain degrees. these groups, because they are ephemeral and they follow ideology rather than holding territory, they are able to also change and adapt. this notion that they will ever be defeated is also something we should be wary of because it is something we have seen over time. they are really hard to defeat in the binary sense of the word. let's just defeat in the binary sense of the word. let'sjust finish with the sunday telegraph. scrap hs2 and spend the cash on the roads, says x treasury chief, at a time when we are being encouraged to give up the car in favour of public transport.
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there are two things that are quite interesting there. there are millions of things not being told that in britain because about that and this is one of these crucial things. —— not being talked about. hs do, massive infrastructure spending, a very important issue, but it gets to the point of how do you plan for urban infrastructure as we go forward and this discussion needs to be had more and more. what does a city look like if you have d riverless does a city look like if you have driverless cars? cards that are entirely electric, less of a load on the environment? our trains, entirely electric, less of a load on the environment? ourtrains, how should we see them versus driverless cars? and long-term projects of any type are politically difficult. you have got to put your money where your mouth is, that he might not be in power when it comes to fruition.
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and you need cross—party support. liz truss at the spending review said the government is to focus on less sexy transport projects. i don't know if you think hsz is sexy, but you think that is all about potholes, which people outside of london care about more. i think she is completely right in that respect. people want to see the basics done properly and these huge infrastructure projects, they will not see the benefit of that. rural areas are particular hard up for things like bus services these days, aren't they? it is one thing to struggle to get across the city and another to struggle to get across the countryside. as we delve deep into this, council funding the countryside. as we delve deep into this, councilfunding has been cut and it is harder to run bus services, and there needs to be a lot of thought put into these projects, but there is not enough time. that is it from the papers this morning. you can catch up online with the bbc news website which is available seven days a week. if you miss the programme in the evening, you can watch it on bbc iplayer. the papers is back tonight
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at10:30pm and 11:30pm, iplayer. the papers is back tonight at 10:30pm and 11:30pm, but not with me because i will be wrapped up in bed, and usually. lovely to see you both this morning. after the weather, we will be saying goodbye to viewers on bbc one. good morning. it is a sunday of contrasts for most of us. today it isa contrasts for most of us. today it is a glorious spring morning with lots of sunshine and not a cloud in the sky, as you can see in dorset, but there are some sharp showers around and they are falling as snow to the tops of the mountains, as you can see in the highlands as well. showers frequent in the far north west because of this weather system syncing across scotland this morning. high pressure is building in from the west, from the atlantic, and it will be with us for quite some time. for the next few hours, a
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rash of showers continuing across scotland, and they are falling as snow, as we have seen, and they will continue to do so across the mountains. that weather front will push slowly south and east, across the borders and into ireland as well. through the morning and the early afternoon, the showers will ease, and more sunshine comes into the north west. cloud and rain through the afternoon will gradually push into the isle of man and the la ke push into the isle of man and the lake district. the rest of england and wales, pretty much what you have got at the moment is what you will keep through the day. like twins, plenty of sunshine, with temperatures peaking at 14 in the south—east but cooler further north. -- light south—east but cooler further north. —— light winds. that weather front will move south over night, weakening all the time, behind it clea ra nce weakening all the time, behind it clearance and lots of clear skies
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through the night, and temperatures falling away. single figures to greet us first thing on monday morning. quite chilly to start but we do it all again. that is because the high pressure stays with us. a good deal of dry weather in the forecast and the difference between this week's weather in comparison to last is there will be more in the way of sunshine. high pressure continues to push on from the atlantic. weather fronts might interact with the far north of scotland. as the high pressure pushes into europe, we start to see a change in the wind direction. to start off in the week, it comes from a north—westerly, and that weak weather front produces cloud and showery bits and pieces in the far north west of scotland, but elsewhere we keep the sunshine and temperatures nine to 13. on the exposed north sea coasts, it might be on the chillier side. as we go through the rest of the week, we keep the dry, settled them, as you can see quite clearly. the wind direction will change to more of a south—westerly, introducing slightly warmerair south—westerly, introducing slightly warmer air from south—westerly, introducing slightly warmer airfrom the south—westerly, introducing slightly warmer air from the atlantic. temperatures will peak. up into the
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high teens across england and wales into the weekend. and it stays in dry and feeling springlike. enjoy.
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