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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  March 25, 2019 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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other european news outlets covered saturday's march in london, makes the impact for a small moment but it doesn't do much to change the in favour of a second referendum — here it is on like france's le monde and the headline: "historic demonstration in london for a second ethnic tick in the house of commons vote" and a similar headline and last time the vote was down by on liberation, the article went on to say an impressive crowd two, so will someone follow richard marched in good humor. harrington, we know that tobias ellwood has spoken vocally, margot james, there are a number that we have been watching. mark field, the first minister to come out on sunday and go as far as to say he thought we should revoke article 50. that was a huge moment. but again it you spend a lot more time looking at didn't last very long. they are all these things than i do, those headlines will not surprise you, freelancing. there is no cabinet that people are looking at theresa may in this way. couple of thoughts, responsibility. we had the chancellor airing towards a on this side of the water, referendum again at the weekend, steve barclay says we have got to headlines, which will be reflected tomorrow morning, is this new word have a general election, they are all going in different directions. the lexicon for brexit, theresa may in the commons, standing up today saying, my brexit, no brexit or slow the interesting thing we'll see if brexit and one senior diplomat said we see as many as abstentions as we to me today, the event so far have saw last time. it'll be interesting to see having had the riot act read
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been a concorde "brexit", hardly, so to see having had the riot act read to them about abstentions, whether what on earth does slow brexit men? they will. it means european elections, british mep sitting, a lot longer on i think we have had the sense today that they have been counting the numbers to see how many ministers negotiations. one thing that very might have to resign to get the amendment through. damaging defeat few people take into consideration, potentially for the government they don't want to british meps again, could it help her in a sitting for the sake of order within roundabout sort of way, by focusing the european parliament in these elections in may, but also, because the minds of the eurosceptics, here if britain has mps sitting, britain still has a voice in shaping the is parliament taking control. the minds of the eurosceptics, here is parliament taking controlm the minds of the eurosceptics, here is parliament taking control. if i next european commission, injune was trying to make optimistic views, i would do it in several ways, yes, there will be a new commission replacing jean—claude juncker, in it might make it clear that july, now, go back to the tony blair actually, the choice is this brexit, yea rs, july, now, go back to the tony blair years, where actually, tony blair ora far actually, the choice is this brexit, was pretty important in removing guy or a far softer one, or nothing at all. we can have these indicative verhofstadt, federalist liberal next votes, and find out there is not a elgin prime minister, and going for majority for anything, so parliament taking control will simply be parliament showing the same inability to decide as the jose manuel barroso, britain could have a big part in stopping any government has decided, which might put the ball back in the government federalist voice is still involved called. and it is conceivable that in european elections. ——
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it could put the labour leadership ina it could put the labour leadership in a difficult position, because they will have to stop thinking federalist. copy flowing in, richard harrington, junior business about alternative, they have been minister, has resigned according to relu cta nt about alternative, they have been reluctant to do that. at the same a government source, this is the man we are talking about, this has been time we have had an announcement confirmed by multiple sources. from the prime minister, refocusing the minds of the erg as if they did not already know it, that actually, international law trumps domestic law, you don't need a statutory instrument to extend from no deal on friday to april 12, because europe going back to christian, in westminster, i guess, controls it. uncomfortable reminder going back to christian, in westminster, iguess, in going back to christian, in westminster, i guess, in the end, the pressure was going to tell on at that eu law is supreme. antagonised least some of the government ministers, who wanted to support him a lot. 0n the indicative votes this indicative vote approach. some point, will be interesting to see whether the amendment tonight gets of the tweets we have had from nick through, how the government will whip. it is expected that... they boles, oliver letwin, supporting this choice of indicative votes, they thought the votes were tight, are going to whip. if it passed, i bubbly lobbying some of those remain ministers to come across. someone said today, one of the junior mean... would they then, yes, and ministers, said, not much point being one at the moment, not all different types of brexit and
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consulted, not brought into the the chancellor phillip hammond will loop, as it were, when it comes to goin... brexit, better supporting deal the chancellor phillip hammond will go in... putting on some votes and perhaps not on others. both sides tonight. maybe that is the decision that richard harrington has taken. seem perhaps not on others. both sides seem to be saying they have problems let's show you the house, it is with anything that is not in their filling up now, benches on both manifesto, which is slightly odd. sides, standing room only now. at anything in the manifesto we will whip you against. 0f the back of its... and i can see the anything in the manifesto we will whip you against. of course, the government has said, it is whipping tellers coming towards their against the left—wing amendment not because it disagrees with the positions. we should get a result in substance but because it doesn't a minute. while we wait for this, we like the principle of the backbenchers controlling business they think that is for the are hearing the view from brussels. government. the prime minister and the view that no deal is david liddington said, if this goes increasingly likely... so difficult down, we will do indicative votes at the moment to read the prime anyway, may be slightly different to the way that oliver letwin was doing minister, she stood up today and... them, i don't know if he has here we go... revealed his approach during the order! order. debate... something i don't understand, maybe you can tell me, if they take control on wednesday, and they find something they can the ayes to the right, the noes 529, fall in behind, consensus around one issue, could they take that then one
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to the left, 502. the ayes to the step further, and start legislating for that? the prime minister has said it is not binding on the government. it is up to the right, 529, the noes to the left, government. it is up to the government but bear in mind, go back one step, we don't know how they do 502. so, the ayes have it, the ayes they indicative votes, sequentially, altogether, system transferable vote, in terms of ranking them? from have it. unlock! we come now, to a lot of what i heard in the debate, oliver letwin is in in favour of a amendment f, f for freddie. i invite slower process to let things emerge organically but there is not that long before april. kenneth clarke is margaret beckett to move the amendment which stands in her name. in favour of transferable vote, that might allow winners to emerge. one the question is, that amendment f of the things that is emerging, for freddie be made. those to the within those indicative votes, they would take a referendum out because it would split the vote of the indicative votes, if you are still contrary, no... division. clearthe with me... then you amend those options with a referendum at a later date. incredibly confusing, there has been a general feeling that lobby! seven days away from leaving support for a second referendum is
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not that strong in the commons, without a deal, government must move people talk about it but it did not a motion within two sitting days to ever look at any point, i have not leave without a deal or request seen ever look at any point, i have not seena ever look at any point, i have not seen a point where i thought, if you extension, that is what they are put a second referendum to the house voting on at the moment and on the of commons, it would pass... i don't right you can see the result of the think it would pass tonight if that right, on the oliver letwin was the one option on the table. amendment, 529 approved, so it makes there is the idea of keeping it going, it is the last one standing. you wonder, why richard harrington you must have a referendum about has resigned tonight, because plenty of people have backed it, unless, he something, if you are talking about choosing outcomes, then it is the is resigning so he can back the question of, what is the process by indicative vote on wednesday. pretty which you get to the outcome, do you extraordinary, really good numbers, wa nt which you get to the outcome, do you want a referendum particularly if even this evening, we were you want to revoke or do something speculating it may not get through and it would be really close, that radically different, from something they thought they may have voted for isa and it would be really close, that is a resounding victory, the prime minister will be feeling pretty in 2016, 2017, then you need a uncomfortable, what has just happened is parliament has taken referendum to come back into the control of the business, and whilst process. stay with us, the house of she said she cant ignore what they now do, it is a huge moment for her. commons, bench is filling up, we don't see the tellers yet, let's check in, because ross has been keeping an eye on what the europeans how damaging, politically? she is plumbing the depths as it is, she think about this. just keeps carrying on regardless but this is a real blow to her power
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and authority, parliament controlling the business of the house for the day, to put forward huge amount of activity in westminster but a little less so in vote the government did not want put forward on wednesday is a massive brussels, on the politics side of things but they have been busy in other ways, let me take you through constitutional moment, quite apart from what it means in the brexit this, european union says no—deal brexit becoming more likely, here is process. ordinarily, the men in grey suits would be banging on the door, the statement: we are working with it is time to go, but it is because the cabinet is so deeply divided the statement: we are working with the united kingdom for an orderly that has not happened. they seem to withdrawal but unless we hear from be fighting battles they don't need them, then we are also prepared for to fight, the government has already a no—deal brexit. conceded the principle that they would have indicative votes if they them, then we are also prepared for a no-deal brexit. european commission released this statement, let me pull out a couple of did not get through, they have decided to make this an issue. oliver letwin said, just back my amendment, just back the government amendment, just back the government amendment, then you would not risk this defeat again, but again, one of these interesting things, it may be lines: down to her advantage if it sends a message to the a16, actually you will lose control of this and it bloomberg reporting here, the tweet might end up benefiting her, we see i was looking for is not there, but quite a lot of what i call boomerang bloomberg telling us british citizens will have to queue to get votes, the person promote something,
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ends up with it exploding in their passports stamped every time they come in and out of the european face later on down the process union, that is confirmed by the because it is so unpredictable, introducing new elements. the european union, and one senior figure has told the bbc, the eu government has gone down to a rather feels it is reasonably placed to unnecessary defeat. meeting arlene foster again today, well, spoke with deal with no deal, although we would her on the phone, no sign of her much rather that was avoided. gavin budging but some news tonight that lee is in brussels, for people who jacob rees—mogg, after a meeting of have not looked across the the erg said that he would hold his commission's no deal planning, what kind of things are we talking about nose and vote for the deal if the dup come across, that is where we here? big broad spectrum, 15 months we re dup come across, that is where we were a couple of weeks ago. this is to fully complete, everything from the theory, the domino theory, if your pets, considering the amount of you get the dup you get the tory vaccinations you might need, eurosceptics to follow. you get them medicine care, health care, roaming both if she resigns? not charges, which have been cancelled but will flipped back into having necessarily, the dup are on a different page to the erg, we roaming charges again, the day there co nflate different page to the erg, we conflate the two but they are they was, if there is to be a no deal. wa nt conflate the two but they are they want different things. this is one travel for passports, having 90 days of the lowest point, theresa may made an extraordinary statement in visa free travel for tourists across the commons, where she basically europe and then having to return and said, i wanted to leave on march 29, for the first time since britain joined the eu, having customers could have lived with a no deal but passports stamped again, so they can i'm afraid there is no assembly in
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northern ireland and your civil cumulatively work out how long you servants do not have the power. have been in europe. a lot more blaming northern ireland. they questions, you would not be in the reacted in an extraordinary way, eu queue, you would be in your own this is a whole new argument for why queue, and question for uk citizens she has had to extend article 50, about where they are going in europe, how long they will be, how which the dup are against, very strong negotiators, they think this much they will pay, how much they is weak and if you had taken it to will stay. details are fairly the line, the eu would have conceded comprehensive but still questions ground. today was a really bad day about flights, transport, how long for the dup and the government, not some of these issues will go for, looking like they will back it, in some of these issues will go for, some of these issues will go for, some of them a new shia, which the meeting that jacob rees—mogg saidi the meeting that jacob rees—mogg said i will support you, the dup, businesses still crowd for. and they're heading for this was that volume into the lobbies, in the same they're heading for this was that the european commission were sending meeting with sammy wilson, dup's out this information for european governments to give them a warning "brexit" spokesman, said, there is that they believe there is an no way we are backing it as it increased likelihood of a no—deal stands. they have not received any brexit, given the events over the of the concessions they wanted on last few days, in 18 days' time. —— the backstop, and so...|j some of the minutiae. lets look at of the concessions they wanted on the backstop, and so... i was going to ask you, before we went to the how theresa may's position is being vote, this idea about the no deal, viewed from the european union's point of view. she seems inscrutable or no deal, last week when i spoke with the dutch camp, various other camps within brussels, they were of the view that she was reconciled to no
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deal, but to date and how she said, no deal unless the house voted for it... which is it? the sense in europe is notjust that she would be willing to gamble or no deal to keep the party together, even if that is true, no one trust her to be in control of the situation, no one discounts the possibility of stumbling out with no deal despite what the prime minister wants, so thatis what the prime minister wants, so that is the real danger, she could lose the control of the process and the clock sticks down. we will go quickly to chris mason in the lobby, getting some sort of reaction from people no doubt drifting past him. another defeat, this time by 27 votes. . . another defeat, this time by 27 votes... richard harrington, resigned tonight, resume a plea to back the left—wing amendment, didn't need to. it reminds us, we must make this point, in this period of intense awkwardness, for parliament, really, because it is struggling to coalesce around anything, to agree on, as faras coalesce around anything, to agree on, as far as brexit is concerned,
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maybe these indicative votes will provide that opportunity, we regularly have moments where mps, andi regularly have moments where mps, and i looked down from the press gallery to the chamber, they are in a moment of deep anguish, conflicting loyalties, false to pick between. that loyalty to a government that he has served for a decent while, and believes in, and a deep concern about the brexit process. a methodology, if you like, a route map which may offer some sort of route to a solution, something that mps are willing to agree on. and, illustrative of a good number of mps agree on. and, illustrative of a good number of mp5 on all sides of the house who have regularly been confronted by these moments of huge high principle, because for all of the cynicism washing around peoples views about this place, of which there are bucketloads, as we know, thatis there are bucketloads, as we know, that is a reminder ofjust how difficult a decision things like this can be, for now former ministers like mr harrington.
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reading you this, from tom newton dunn, political editor of the sun, "health minister steve ryan has resigned, foreign minister, alistair burt, that would be three ministers to go in the last hour, what you make of that. extraordinary, and the fa ct we make of that. extraordinary, and the fact we are not as exercised or energised by this as might conventionally be the case is that these government defeats followed by some resignations have become so commonplace in recent months, whether it be all the switches from the cabinet, as a result of the brexit process, the waves of resignations of "brexit" secretaries, one example, a number of occasions that on nights like this the likes of you and me have been talking about government defeats, government defeats are normally a huge deal, particularly on central matters of their reason for being. and yet, the theresa may government has been inflicted by defeat after defeat after defeat and so defeat after defeat after defeat and so far has managed to brush itself down and carry on. news of the
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additional resignations. a long—standing believer, they are, in the european union, has gone up until now, delivering the will of the people as expressed in the referendum in 2016 but has reached a point, ultimately, i have not spoken with him, concluded from his course of action tonight that he could not go any further, that his loyalty to offering parliament that alternative potential solution was greater than his loyalty to the government in which he served. a further reminder, asi which he served. a further reminder, as i say, ofjust how tricky these decisions are. we now know parliament will get a chance on wednesday to seize control of business. that does not necessarily mean christian that they will seize control of brexit, the prime minister made it very clear earlier today that she is not giving them a blank cheque, as she described it, foran blank cheque, as she described it, for an outcome she may not be willing to support, so it is possible, on wednesday, a huge amount of discussion going on about how wednesday is formulated, what
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voting system is there, will they vote on all of the ideas at the same time or one after the other, some are worried that if it is one after the other, it could influence the result, it is possible that either parliament cannot come to a majority on any of the options, or, it does come to a majority on an option that either the government rejects all the european union rejects, in other words, the current stalemate, because the deal has been rejected and no deal has been rejected, gets even more foggy because alternative solutions are also, through one means or another, potentially rejected as well. i know i'm getting a little ahead of myself but that outcome, i suspect, a little ahead of myself but that outcome, isuspect, is a little ahead of myself but that outcome, i suspect, is actually quite likely. looking at a copy of richard harrington's resignation letter, "critical moment in this country is history, i regret that the approach to brexit of the government is playing roulette with the lives and likelihoods of the vast majority, i hope you will act
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in the national interest and find a consensus which we can use as our negotiating position moving forward, which would suggest that these three resignations we are seeing tonight are ministers who want the freedom to be able to vote on wednesday when they get to these indicative votes. there is a real consciousness here that inevitably, in a parliament, but particularly a parliament like this, tribalism runs very deep, the whipping system, the party managers who instruct their mps to vote in a particular way, and mp5 broadly respect that, they acknowledge that for the vast majority of mps, they we re for the vast majority of mps, they were elected because of the party ticket they represent rather than because their name happens to appear on the ballot paper, the loyalty mps have to their party is often one of the longest allegiances they have had in their lives, other than to their parents or siblings. often, many of them, in the 405, 505, 605, many of them, in the 405,505, 605, have been a political mac member of
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their political party since their teens, longer than they have known their spouses, even, so to detach themselves from the whipping system and the obligation to follow a voting pattern in a particular system, is something they do cautiously indeed. the fact, as articulated in the resignation letter, where it has come to the point that some ministers feel that despite all of that, they must be given the chance to express their own will, that give you some sense of how they are concluding that the only possible way that this parliament, balanced and hung as it is, could possibly coalesce around some alternative vision of brexit is if mp5, when it comes to it, are able to vote with a little less attachment to their party affiliation and more to what they might actually see as a workable brexit compromise even if it is not their first choice brexit compromise even if it is not theirfirst choice for brexit compromise even if it is not their first choice for what they would have liked to have seen happen. thank you, we will come back to you, if you are justjoining
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happen. thank you, we will come back to you, if you arejustjoining us, the government has been defeated again tonight, oliver letwin amendment, the so—called indicative votes that will be held on wednesday. parliament taking control of business on wednesday to look at the full gamut of brexit options. at the full gamut of brexit options. at the moment, showing in the house of commons, you will see it is starting to fillup, commons, you will see it is starting to fill up, just been through the lobby to vote on an amendment brought forward by the labour mp margaret becket that will give seven days from leaving without a deal. government must move a motion within two sitting days to vote on whether to leave without a deal or request extension, this is a vote on an insurance policy to take no deal off the table. let's go back to roz, looking at what's oliver letwin's amendment actually is. —— ros. with this vote, on the left wing amendment, whatever authority the prime minister had has been reduced further. this is confirmation of what they were talking about, junior business minister richard harrington has resigned after voting for the
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let wing amendment. junior health minister steve brian has resigned in order to vote against the government. remember, theresa may did not support this amendment, which made space on wednesday for indicative votes, in terms of trying to find an idea around which the commons can gather on terms of brexit. thejunior commons can gather on terms of brexit. the junior foreign commons can gather on terms of brexit. thejunior foreign minister, alistair burt, has also resigned, three resignations, all in connection with this amendment, bought by the conservative mp sir oliver letwin. a little confusing, if you have been following this through the day, this was very similarto an through the day, this was very similar to an amendment that labour was proposing, in the end, this one was proposing, in the end, this one was always more likely to get support, because tories were more likely to support a tory bringing an amendment, than one coming from jeremy corbyn, what it allows parliament to do is seize control of the agenda of the house of commons on wednesday, and that time will now
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be used to hold indicative votes, as we call them. this allows them to work through some of the options, alternative to the prime minister's brexit deal. well, we heard the government opposed this happening, some conservatives supported it, and here is one. the government boxed itself in with red lines in its negotiations with the european union. now what it is doing is boxing itself in with red lines in relation to the options available to this house to resolve the current difficulty in crisis. and i also worry, i have to say to my right honourable friend. if the stories about the cabinet minutes are correct, some of the reasons appear to be very now phone —— very narrow and partisan, at the time in a national crisis should be requiring us national crisis should be requiring us to look more widely. those of us who have tried to do that get vilified, i'm quite prepared to put up vilified, i'm quite prepared to put up with that because i think that is
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in the national interest, i think thatis in the national interest, i think that is where it lies. despite opposition to this, we heard the " b rex it" opposition to this, we heard the "brexit" secretary explaining what would happen if it did get through. the process would be that we would have an all—day debate on monday ahead of the vote, if that goes through, and the house of commons ta kes through, and the house of commons takes control of the order paper, then under the process, there would then under the process, there would then be indicative votes on wednesday. it would be for the government to decide on the timing and whether it brings back a meaningful vote, ahead of that or after that. and obviously that will be shaped by the debate on monday and by the shape of the vote. bringing in christian, along with his guest down at westminster as we await the outcome of the latest amendment being voted on.
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you might remember the spelman amendment on no—deal a couple of weeks ago, they lost the amended motion, and there was some confusion whether they were whipping against it or not. the chief whip was angry because some of the front bench remainers were told that they could abstain and of course the government lost. no such confusion tonight. i'm looking at a tweet from the deputy chief whip who is saying, we are voting no on the amended motion tonight, so after this vote there will be a vote on the emotion itself, the amendment motion, and presumably they are going to whip against it, so are they going to lose again? you would assume there lose again? you would assume there lose again. last time they did that they lost more heavily the second time they try to vote down the motion than they did the first time so maybe they think some people didn't show up or whatever, but these are critical votes, you
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wouldn't expect to be stuck in the bar, see bit of thought it was just another opportunity to go down but something might depend on whether they lose this motion, on the margaret beckett motion and whether it would go into their column that they would expect another defeat. they lost letwi n by they would expect another defeat. they lost letwin by 20
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