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tv   Monday in Parliament  BBC News  March 26, 2019 2:30am-3:01am GMT

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welcome to bbc news — broadcasting to viewers in north america this is bbc news, the headlines: and around the globe. theresa may has suffered my name is duncan golestani. another brexit defeat our top stories: in the british parliament. mps voted to take control of the parliamentary agenda on leaving the european union. they're now expected to hold a series of indicative votes to help decide what to do next. british mps vote to take control over brexit. israel has carried out the ayes to the right — 329. air strikes in gaza, the noes to the left — 302. after a rocket hit they'll now consider a series a house near tel aviv. of alternative plans — with critics condemning gaza's health ministry said seven the prime minister's approach as a "national embarrassment". people were injured in the attacks. several more missiles were fired into israel from the palestinian territory on monday evening. explosion. the exiled former prime after israeli airstrikes across gaza, palestinian militants minister of thailand, retaliate, firing a barrage of tha ksin shinawatra, has said his country's general election was rigged. rockets into israel. he claimed the military government had manipulated the result to stay in power. the electoral commission has said it yemen's humanitarian catastrophe worsens, will investigate any as the civil war enters its fifth year. allegations of irregularities. now on bbc news,
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monday in parliament. hello and welcome to monday in parliament. the main news from westminster. the commons agrees to set aside parliamentary time so that mps canfind set aside parliamentary time so that mps can find a way forward on brexit. the eyes to the right, 329, the noes to the left, 302. —— ayes. no further votes on theresa may's brexit dealfor the time no further votes on theresa may's brexit deal for the time being. no further votes on theresa may's brexit deal for the time beingm is with great regret that i have to conclude that as things stand, there is still not sufficient support in the house to bring back the deal for a third meaningful vote. the the house to bring back the deal for a third meaningfulvote. the labour leader has its time for a plan b. a third meaningfulvote. the labour leader has its time for a plan bi
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hope where the government has failed, this house can and will succeed. and looking on the bright side, of a succeed. and looking on the bright side, ofa no—deal succeed. and looking on the bright side, of a no—deal brexit. succeed. and looking on the bright side, of a no-deal brexit. we will get that put to bed. not necessarily to everybody‘s liking but better to end uncertainty and enable business to plan and get on with life. but first, theresa may's brexit state m e nts first, theresa may's brexit statements are a regular fixture. this one came at a pivotal point in the brexit process and omit intense personal pressure on the prime minister. last week, she was in brussels getting an extension to the brexit deadline. if this! but if the deal gets through, the uk will have until the 22nd of may to prepare. if not, the uk has until april the 12 to propose a way forward to eu leaders. after the trip to brussels, mrs may headed off to her country residence checkers to hold talks with brexit supporting conservatives including borisjohnson
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with brexit supporting conservatives including boris johnson and jacob rees—mogg. —— chequers. meanwhile, there was a flurry of expectation about if and when she would step down. then it was back to westminster for a cabinet meeting at a statement to parliament. mrs may announced she would be bringing back her deal to parliament for a third vote. she also said the government would be opposing a measure to hold a series of indicative boats on the way forward. mr speaker, i continue to believe that the right path forward is for the united kingdom to leave the eu as soon as possible with a deal, now on the 22nd of may. but it is with great regret that i've had to conclude that as things stand, there is still not sufficient support in the house to bring back
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the dealfor a third meaningful vote. i continue to have discussions with colleagues across the house to build support so we can bring the vote forward this week and guarantee brexit —— and guarantee brexit. vote forward this week and guarantee brexit -- and guarantee brexit. she expressed —— expressed doubts. brexit -- and guarantee brexit. she expressed -- expressed doubts. the amendment in the name of my right honourable friend, the memberfor dorset, i continue to believe doing so dorset, i continue to believe doing so woodbury —— bring unwelcome precedent. which would overturn the balance of our democratic institutions. so the government will oppose this amendment to this evening. but in order to fulfil our commitments to this house, would seek to provide government time in orderfor this process to proceed. it would be for this house to bring forward options and determine the procedure by which they will do so. but i must confess that i am sceptical about such a process of indicative votes. when we have tried this sort of thing in the past, it has produced contradictory outcomes oi’ has produced contradictory outcomes or no outcome at all so i cannot commit the government to developing an outcome from any votes held in
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this house but i do commit to engaging constructively with this process. there was a march in london on saturday calling for a further referendum which was attended by! million people. the labour leader didn't attend the event but did mention it. every step of the way along this process, the government has refused to reach out, refused to listen and refused to fight a consensus that can represent the views of the whole country, notjust the conservative party. large parts of our country continue to be ignored by this government. no wonder so many people felt compelled to march on the streets or sign petitions over the weekend. even the most ardent of levers, even, mr speaker, the most ardent of levers, thinks this government have failed. —— leavers. thinks this government have failed. -- leavers. he thinks it's time to ta ke -- leavers. he thinks it's time to take control. i believe there is a support in this house for a deal. the economy, jobs and full single
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market access and allows us to continue to benefit from participation in vital agencies and security measures. if the government refuses to accept this, we will support measures for a public vote to stop and no deal or chaotic tory deal. the government has had over two years to find a solution and has failed. it is time, mr speaker, we put an end to this and move on from the chaos and failure and begin to clea n the chaos and failure and begin to clean up the mess. it's time for parliament to work together and agree on a plan b stop if she is brave, the prime minister would help facilitate this. if not, parliament must send a clear message in the coming days. mr speaker, i hope where the government has failed, this house can and will succeed. theresa may faced questions from mps for over two hours. several voiced their anger at mrs may's remarks in atv
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their anger at mrs may's remarks in a tv broadcast last wednesday when she blamed the commons for delaying brexit. her illjudged speech before she departed for brussels concluded that everyone's to blame but herself. trying to put herself on the side of the people and blaming parliamentarians. mr speaker, it was trumpesque because of we don't need such royal populism at this time. it was flabbergasted. today is about parliamentarians but parliamentarians but parliamentarians taking control. people are watching and they are ashamed of this parliament, ashamed of this government, ashamed of the embarrassment that british politics has become. the prime minister may re call has become. the prime minister may recall that i spoke to her at the door of this chamber about a week ago and! door of this chamber about a week ago and i begged herto door of this chamber about a week ago and i begged her to dial down the hate. born notjust out of the incessant abuse and threats that i
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receive but for the millions of people in our country who are faithful. she responded wednesday evening with a despicable statement that frankly many of us felt put more of us and more of the public at risk. i was expressing my frustration and others have their frustrations. everybody has their frustrations. everybody has their frustrations in relation to this issue. i don't want to see anybody... the honourable lady, i genuinely don't. she may recall that following outlook — — genuinely don't. she may recall that following outlook —— following our conversation, i took action to make sure some of the things that she said to me were properly looked into because she has been subjected, well, i did, because she has been subjected, well, idid, i because she has been subjected, well, i did, i did. because she has been subjected, well, idid, idid. i because she has been subjected, well, i did, i did. i did indeed do that. i want to see the people of this country feeling that this parliament has been able to deliver for them. parliament has been able to deliver forthem. i parliament has been able to deliver for them. i think that is important for them. i think that is important for us and that is what we will do. i continue to believe that as we
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carry this debate forward, we should indeed take care and i will take ca re indeed take care and i will take care for the language that i use. there were mixed views about indicative votes. what will the prime minister say that they leave voter who we should leave on the 29th of march and thinks indicative votes are a waste of time because as she said, the options on offer have already been rejected once or twice in this parliament. i actually think —— agree with her that indicative votes are nonsense because in the end, they are talking about a future relationship and not about the withdrawal agreement. can i say to her now, why was she not start preparing properly and i don't call it an ideal, it is not an ideal, it isa it an ideal, it is not an ideal, it is a different type of deal that will take us out. it is a wto deal. why would she not prepare —— prepare for that and make sure that in the end what really matters is the
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people's vote, not what this parliament says. i voted for a withdrawal agreement before and i will vote for it again. but i owe it to my constituents that if that should not pass, i have the opportunity to debate in full the auto and —— the alternatives. the prime minister urges us against this tonight but says the government will bring time for alternatives to be considered. but can i press her again, as my right honourable friend dead, that if that is to be the case, when? i will say to my honourable fellow that he might have a bit more patience because it will set out more details on these in relation, the chancellor to the duchess of lancaster will set it out. what is going to happen in another two weeks that couldn't have happened up to now? there is a
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fundamental lack of preparation and the government is entirely responsible for that if that's the case because this is a new argument. i have to say, mr speaker. this is an entirely new argument that we are hearing for the first time as to why we need an extension. and he pointed to remarks made by the irish prime minister. leo radtke has made it clear that in terms of a no deal, he is very confident they will be no border checks. michel barnier has had the same. angela merkel had said the same. she shakes her head but that's what he said. that's what he said! the reality is, mr speaker, this backstop problem which has been elevated, why is it that the eu insists on this when the case of a ideal, it doesn't need to have checks? why is it the prime minister ever agreed to this backstop in the first place. we would ensure that we
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we re first place. we would ensure that we were moving for a temporary period because the leader — make the situation could only happen for a temporary period, with having checks for extensions. but the legal position is a different want in relation to the necessity to have certain checks taking place and the european union has been making clear that eu law would need to be applied in all of these circumstances. many mps wanted to know what mrs may's plan b was. if we don't get a deal through parliament by this friday then in18 through parliament by this friday then in 18 days time, by the 12th of april, we will have to decide whether we want a longer extension or whether we want to crush out without a deal. given that parliament has voted twice already not to do but not to leave without a deal, will you confirm that by the 12th of april, you will think that longer extension and abide by the wishes of this parliament? she knows because the chancellor told her so
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yesterday that a confirm a tree referendum, a people '5 vote, is a perfectly viable proposition. i don't want to interrupt her while she is on her phone but if she wouldn't mind... she was on the phone, mr speaker. iwant wouldn't mind... she was on the phone, mr speaker. i want her to answer specifically whether she confirms another referendum as something which, if this house agreed it, she would also perhaps not abide by that particular outcome? yes or no? i apologise to the honourable gentleman. just a bit of female multitasking. laughter. in terms of the confirmatory vote, that is often attached notjust to being a confirmatory vote but also to have remained on the ballot paper so that actually it is effectively a second referendum on whether or not we
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should leave the european union and i have indicated that that is what we should do because that is what we voted for in the first referendum. and there was an invitation. voted for in the first referendum. and there was an invitationlj voted for in the first referendum. and there was an invitation. i would like to take the prime minister to the beautiful misty highlands and in particular, i would like to... laughter. i would like to take her to the glenmore hotel by loch ness... to the glenmore hotel by loch ness. .. laughter. which, to the glenmore hotel by loch ness... laughter. which, by the way, is one of the best places to see the loch ness monster. the glenmore hotel is having enormous trouble hiring eu seasonal workers this year. mrs may joked that it was the first time in the commons she had been invited to a hotel but the government was taking steps to deal with the issues he had raised. you
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are watching monday in parliament with me, christina cooper. after that statement from theresa may it was time for mps to move onto the main debate. the snp drew attention to the mounting number of signatures to a petition calling for brags it to be stopped. pete we should also took a swipe at david livingstone over weekend rumours of a coup that would allegedly have installed mr leading to an as ca reta ker installed mr leading to an as caretaker prime minister. to the putative prime minister, it could not be a worse job than we've seen over the past few years but the petition that has now been signed by 5.5 million people across the uk. would you agree and concur that revoking, ending this madness once and for all, remains a real—life possibility for this country? no, andl possibility for this country? no, and i don't agree with him. obviously one takes seriously both
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the scale but also the strength of the scale but also the strength of the opinion that was being expressed in the demonstration at the weekend and in the number of signatories that have been attracted to sign the petition. but that does not mean that one can simply ignore or set aside the idea that 17.4 million people did vote to leave the european union in 2016. the key amendments stated mps would take control of parliament's amendments stated mps would take control of pa rliament‘s timetable amendments stated mps would take control of parliament's timetable on wednesday and allow a series of what i called indicative votes to try to show which option mps favoured to ta ke b rea ks show which option mps favoured to take breaks it forward. the government feared that would set a dangerous precedent but david salalidington said if the amendment was defeated, the commons would take time to have it saved. the government would take time to reject
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the so—called left—wing amendment this evening and take time for roughly the same thing so as far as ican see, roughly the same thing so as far as i can see, the only objection to the amendment we have today is it's been tabled by a backbencher and not by the government. wouldn't this all be resolved if he were concerned — if it was confirmed that the government would make this wednesday available for this purpose. we don't have much time and it seems typically would all be in total agreement and be able to perceive to be indicative votes. mr speaker, untilwe have had the division this evening, assuming there is one on this amendment, we won't know whether wednesday is available for the government or whether that is something we can look forward to other means of consideration. the prime minister has got herself and the government into a hopeless position. having disregarded views from across this
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house for the best part of two years, the government now finds itself with the deal it just can't get through the house and time has almost run out and today, we see a sort of agree with the initiative to break the impasse but don't agree with it also. if the prime minister had not tried to exclude parliament com pletely had not tried to exclude parliament completely then there would be considerably more goodwill for her in this place and there would be a chance for us to have done what should have been done to get the withdrawal act and the deal through parliament because it would have been done properly and now we are scrambling at the last possible minute simply because she has not done thejob properly. minute simply because she has not done the job properly. tonight really is about the opportunity to bring to an end the government's bailed approach. for two years, they've not put up a quotable plan
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or listened to other alternatives. i used to say the prime minister was surviving by the week. i changed that to buy the day and now, by the hour to get through to wednesday but really, enough is enough. we can't go on like this, the country deserves better and parliament must ta ke deserves better and parliament must take back control. we got the chance tonight and we should do it. after several hours of debate, mps voted for the proposal, giving mps control over parliamentary business on wednesday. the time will be used to hold a series of votes on options for brags it. the ayes to the right, 329. the noes to the left, 322. two other news and up to the recent spate of stabbings, mps have been debating a petition on night — knife crime which collected more than 100,000 signatures, calling anyone convicted with a knife to have ten yea rs convicted with a knife to have ten years injailand convicted with a knife to have ten years in jail and anyone convicted with a knife to have ten years injail and anyone using one to spend 25 years behind bars.
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0pening to spend 25 years behind bars. opening the debate, labour mp mike hill said the recent rise in knife crime had many causes but he agreed there was an argument for longer sentences. there really is an argument, no longer about resourcing police but increasing the tariff on custodial sentences. current ones are not sufficient to act as a deterrent to criminals in the mind of the public in a petition before us of the public in a petition before us reflects that opinion. the fact that the maximum penalty of four yea rs that the maximum penalty of four years applies only to re— offenders, not even first offenders, is deeply worrying. a labour colleague who has a constituency in london said tougher sentences alone wouldn't solve the problem. we're talking harsher sentences and does he agree with me that doesn't always act as a deterrent, the harsher sentence, and we do need to focus on so many more of the drivers that lead our young people into a life of crime. in many
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respects, some of them, its sheer desperation or pressure and so many other factors that prevention is key to this and looking at those drivers. the conservative mp for romford said knife crime had spread from the inner cities to suburban seats like his. as it stands, two thirds of those carrying a knife escape a custodial sentence and one in five repeat offenders avoid prison. people are quite frankly that up with the soft sentencing and it is quite clear why. in my borough of haber ring, knife offences have actually doubled in recent years. since 2014, with 333 recorded cases last year alone and we are in outer london borrow. we may be a greater london borrow. we may be a greater london borrow. we may be a greater london borrow but if anyone comes to havering, we are really nsx, on the
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outer edges of london and we hear about it in city centres but in areas like ours, we are not used to it and it's a terrible shock. having been somebody who is appalled by repeat cautioning, appalled by the fa ct repeat cautioning, appalled by the fact that the courts seem in many instances to fail to act weather is persistent offending, even i can see, if you've got one idiotic lad who is 12 years old and somebody stuffed a knife in his pocket but he can't prove it was stuffed in by somebody else, you have to sort of lets the court find out whether he deliberately done that or somebody put the knife on him or threatened to beat him up unless he did. sol do think we all have to be careful about saying, in every single circumstance, in every single case, the first time a pathetic girl or boy, because that's what they are, carries a knife, that in every single one of those circumstances, they should be jailed forever in the
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key thrown away. the justice minister said more people were going to prison for knife offences. they are defined quite closely. 82% of people found in the double position will find their way towards a sentence. who are those 18% who are not getting a sentence? is the guidelines stipulate very carefully early, what the mitigating factors r and lay them out. in extreme cases, i will give way to the right honourable member in a second, in extreme cases it could be somebody with learning difficulties, somebody with learning difficulties, somebody with mental health problems, somebody with a serious medical problem, somebody cooperating with police, all of those things are mitigating factors which may lead to somebody not receiving it. we end where we started on brags it. not the commons but the house of lords. piers were debating a motion calling on the government to halt brags it by revoking article 50. they were in a reflective mood. - - brexit. one
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thing i learned from my father was a tale he told me when i was about eight or nine. and it stayed with me. it's about a passing out parade. he was in the military. 0ne proud mother viewing the march side, oh, what a shame, that my son is the only one in step and all the others have got it wrong. it doesn't take much imagination to hear the remaining supporters of our prime minister echoing the same. what a shame that only she is right and all the others have got it wrong. lord newby pondered how theresa may was treated last week's eu council meeting. the prime minister was allowed into the council to petition other member states and was subject toa other member states and was subject to a lengthy and sceptical questioning. then, like a prisoner in the dock, she was led from the
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room to a windowless cell where she was kept until the verdict on her proposals had been reached. a modest meal was brought in. after a number of hours, the verdict was read out to her and she was allowed to leave. my to her and she was allowed to leave. my lords, this is the reality of taking back control. this is what it will be like week in, week out, where we ever to leave the eu. meanwhile, lord lilly set out the advantages of leaving without a deal. we should notjust look at advantages of leaving without a deal. we should not just look at the negatives. there are positives as well if we leave without a withdrawal agreement. first of all, we will not have conceded the £39 billion which under the withdrawal agreement we concede with nothing in return. we should have course be prepared to go to international
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arbitration confident in the advice that this house itself gave, that we can deliver article 50, allowing us to leave the eu without being liable for outstanding financial obligations. the second advantage is that it will truncate uncertainty. which under the withdrawal agreement, or prolonged membership of article 50, will continue for between 21 and 45 months. we will get that put to bed. not necessarily to everybody‘s liking but better to end uncertainty and enable business to plan and get on with life. peter lilly there. well, it's now time to put monday in parliament to bed. david cornet will be here wide—awake for the rest of the week but from me, christina cooper, by.
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hello there. if you like your spring weather dry, you will find plenty to like about this weather forecast. very little rain and the forecast for most of us. we will see dry weather. sunshine amounts will vary. often i think there'll be quite large amounts of cloud but the temperatures as we head towards the end of the week will start to creep upwards. high pressure in charge of the scene which is what's keeping things settled and as i run the sequence through the next few days, this high—pressure barely moves. so for most of us, things stay dry and quiet. up to the north, notice frontal systems scraping into northern scotland so here we'll patchy rains at times and it will be breezy. we start tuesday for many on a chilly note and towards the south with the lion's share of the clear skies but also the best of the sunshine through tuesday morning. the further north and west you are,
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the more cloud there is likely to be and across the north—west of scotland, outbreaks of patchy rain, quite breezy in northern scotland as well. elsewhere cloud thicken up to squeeze out the odd large shower but the vast majority drive. the afternoon brings a mixture of patchy cloud and sunny spells and temperatures generally between 11 and 14. get into some sunshine, that will feel quite pleasant. into tuesday night, we will see fairly large amounts of cloud and where it breaks up for any length of time, we are likely to see mist and fog patches developing. as a consequence of all the cloud, it's probably not going to get particularly cold. but if you do keep clear starry skies overhead for a time, don't be surprised if we do get a touch of frost. wednesday, very similar day. a mixture of cloudy areas and sunny areas. probably brightening up for many places. for scotland, again, we will see some outbreaks of rain. those temperatures may be up by a degree also. 12—15 degrees. high pressure still with us as we move out of wednesday into thursday. not many white lines are ricer bars
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on the chart but what wind there is will be moving in a clockwise direction. that will introduce a south or south—westerly flow across much of the uk, bringing some slightly milder hour. a mixture of patchy cloud and sunny spells once any early morning fog clears. sea breezes developing around the coast of eastern or southern england and those temperatures, by this stage, up to 16 or possibly 17 degrees. as we look further ahead, friday is going to be another mild if not warm day. again, we should see long spells of sunshine. as we get on into the weekend, it looks like thing will turn a little bit cooler. but most of us, it will be predominantly dry. that's all from me for now.
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