Skip to main content

tv   Brexit  BBC News  March 26, 2019 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
hello. it's tuesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. who's in charge of brexit? mps have decided they are — they've voted to take you're watching bbc control of the process. news at 9:00 with me and tomorrow they'll start to vote annita mcveigh — the headlines. on options for the future of brexit. but the government says they might mps back an unprecedented move ignore parliament anyway to take greater control of the brexit process the only way to deliver on a brexit as they prepare to vote tomorrow on possible alternatives that's ready and can allow us to get on with it is to vote for the prime minister's deal. to theresa may's plan. three ministers resigned from government last night to vote against theresa may. but the prime minister says one of them — richard there are no guarantees she'll abide by their votes as her supporters harrington — is with us. he says the pm is "playing russion urge mps to back her plan. roulette with the lives the only way to deliver on brexit of british people". that's ready and can allow us to get on with it is to vote do you back mps who are now for the prime minister's deal. in control of this? let me know today. i'm nicky campbell. are public attitudes towards brexit changing? awareness of breast ironing — we want to hear your views ironing a girl's chest with hot in a special programme coming up objects to delay her breasts in just a few minutes. from growing — should be taught in schools, the largest teaching union finding answers for bereaved parents — coroners in england and wales may may be given new powers to investigate stillbirths. england win 5—1 in montenegro in their euro 2020 qualifier —
9:01 am
but there are calls for action after players were subject to racist abuse by some of the home fans. it's a real sad thing to hear. i didn't hear it personally but my team—mate danny heard it. so, it's a sad thing to hear. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9:00. mps have backed an unprecedented move to take greater control of the brexit process. three government ministers — steve brine, alistair burt and richard harrington — resigned so they could support the cross—party amendment. there will now be a series of votes on what kind of brexit the commons will support. the government says it sets a dangerous precedent. our political correspondent
9:02 am
nick eardley explains. this was supposed to be the week the uk left the eu — but instead, what brexit looks like is still up in the air. last night, the government suffered another defeat in parliament. the ayes to the right — 329. the noes to the left — 302. this one allows mps to take some control over what happens next. tomorrow, they'll consider their own brexit ideas. that could include things like a closer trading relationship with europe in a customs union. it could mean replacing our current relationship with a free trade deal, leaving without a deal or another referendum on leaving at all. but it's far from clear whether mps here can agree on anything. it's possible nothing at all will get a majority and even if it does, the prime minister says she might not implement it. when we've tried this kind
9:03 am
of thing in the past, it's produced contradictory outcomes or no outcome at all. commotion. order! there is a further risk when it comes to brexit as the uk is only one half of the equation and the votes could lead to an outcome which is unnegotiable with the eu. labour said the pm had to respect the process. mr speaker, the government must take this process seriously. we do not know what the house will decide on wednesday. this house must also consider whether any deal should be put to the people for a confirmatory vote. there isn't much time if mps are to agree a new plan. eu wants some clarity in a fortnight. the government will still try to win more support for its own deal and maybe bring it back for another vote, but ministers now fear parliament will try and force something else. nick eardley, bbc news. coroners in england and wales could be given new powers
9:04 am
to investigate the deaths of stillborn babies. currently, inquests are only held for infants who have shown signs of life after being born. under the government's proposal all full—term stillbirths, which happen after 37 weeks, would be looked into, giving bereaved parents some answers as to what happened. social media companies could be required to remove content which promotes misinformation about vaccines, the health secretary matt hancock has told bbc news. nhs leaders are concerned about campaigns against vaccinations including measles, mumps and rubella. the uptake of mmr has been falling in england and last year there were more than 80,000 measles cases in europe, the highest in a decade. now it's time for a special programme with your views on brexit. as mps vote to look at alternatives.
9:05 am
hello, i'm nicky campbell and welcome to this special edition of your call — today we're broadcasting notjust on bbc radio 5 live but also on the bbc news channel. we arejoining forces to hear your views on brexit, and to take comments and questions from you — our viewers and listeners. brexit was due to happen this friday but is now delayed, and it's not entirely clear what happens next. so how are you feeling about it? are we nearer or further away from the brexit you want? good morning, nikki. i'm annita mcveigh. you can get your comments and questions in now — on twitter use the hashtag #bbcaskthis or @bbc5live. joining us to help answer those questions
9:06 am
we have the bbc‘s reality check correpondent chris morris with us. so, any of those brexit issues that have been confusing you? doesn't matter how simple or basic you think they are — get in touch. and if you just want to rant, that's fine too. if you want to text 5 live the number is 85058 or call us on 08085 909 693. and also tell us how optimistic you're feeling about the brexit you want being delivered. whether that's theresa may's deal, another referendum, no deal or revoking article 50. thanks, nicky. so how might public attitudes towards brexit be changing? we've been looking at the latest research from the british social attitudes survey. natcen social research polled more than two and a half thousand adults last month about their views on brexit — and compared this with data from february 2017.
9:07 am
when asked, just 7% thought the uk government had done a good job in the talks, while 81% said they were handling them badly. the data suggested that public faith in the negotiations has dramatically fallen — as when questioned in 2017 — 29% thought the government was handling brexit well. and a1% said negotiations were being handled badly. and in another startling revelation only 6% expect britain to get a good deal now, down from 33% in 2017. and 63% now expect britain to get a bad deal — up from 37% two years ago. the poll also indicates that 55% would now vote to remain in the eu. here's sirjohn curtice,
9:08 am
whose team conducted the research, on the poll findings. the truth is that the public are now deeply critical of the way in which the uk government has handled the brexit negotiations. around four in five of us think they have been handled badly by the government and leave fighters are almost as likely as remain fighters to hold that view. against that backdrop, it's not surprising we've now become deeply pessimistic about the kind of deal we are getting out of the brexit process with their two thirds of people thinking it's going to be a bad deal. leave voters, the people theresa may is trying to satisfy, arejust as theresa may is trying to satisfy, are just as critical as those who voted remain. leave voters have become somewhat less certain about the economic consequences of brexit although the movement is nothing like as sharp as it has been in terms of how brexit has been handled. that hasn't helped to ensure they are still committed to their leave cause. the treaties,
9:09 am
most voters would vote the same way ina most voters would vote the same way in a second referendum as they did in 2016 although the polls show a remain lead not least because those who didn't vote two and a half years ago are decidedly more pro—remain than pro leave. what do you think? we'll be back with annita and chris morris our fa ct with annita and chris morris our fact checker. let's go to nathan in warwick and kirsty in wapping. good morning. nathan, you have a specific question for chris which is excellent and a vital part of our exercise this morning. nathan, you wa nt exercise this morning. nathan, you want a second referendum. where are you at the moment on all this? i'm
9:10 am
really bored at the moment. we have three years on and we still haven't really achieved anything. i was there on saturday at the march in london. comparing that to nigel farage's march. we had a million people from all corners of the uk. going back to the indicative votes, we'll see probably no majority for anything. be that no deal, theresa may's deal, norway or another vote. how do you think things are progressing? one thing i agree with his i'd think it's disappointing the way things are turning out. i'm really disappointed with the two week delay to the 12th of april and i really don't think that's going to solve anything. the prime minister said over 100 times at the dispatch
9:11 am
box we are leaving on the 29th of march and that's looking increasingly unlikely. i disagree we need a second referendum. back in 2016, there was initially the mps voted for the referendum, we had an overwhelming 17.4 million people fighting to leave the eu as opposed to the 1 million people on the streets on saturday. i really think we would erode the trust of people up we would erode the trust of people up and down the country and i think that would be very evident in the may local elections. i nathan, make the case in a sentence for a second referendum. it's never undemocratic to have more democracy. i totally ee, to have more democracy. i totally agree, 17.4 million people voted leave which gave us a direction but it didn't give a destination. people knew what they were voting for but
9:12 am
some of that was contradictory. theresa may's deal exists in the real world whereas the abstract leave vote in 2016 didn't. put it back to the people and if they say yes, fairenough, if back to the people and if they say yes, fair enough, if they say no go back to the status quo which is to stay in the eu. in a second referendum people can still vote to leave, quick response from you. we don't have democracy by referendum, that's not how it works. back in 2016 david cameron was very clear that this was a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity and that's why we had such a massive national debate. i was 011 such a massive national debate. i was on the way to a nightclub on the saturday night and people were talking about brexit. we've never had a democratic discussion like that in our lifetime. to say we now need to go back and have a referendum, we had that referendum,
9:13 am
we had that decision and the decision needs to be whether it's this deal or leaving on friday. ak. we are going to leave it there. thank you both. nathan, you have a quick question for chris morris. thank you both. nathan, you have a quick question for chris morrism we we re quick question for chris morrism we were to leave without an agreement, with that automatically lead to a hard border in ireland? this is the question a lot of people ask and it's a really good question because everyone involved in that border and looking after it is incredibly coy about the answer. what it wouldn't lead to is the sudden appearance of barbed wire and checkpoints over night. eu law mandates that there needs to be checks of things coming into the single market and particularly is quite strict about checks on things like food and animal products. the irish government appears to say we
9:14 am
don't intend to put up any infrastructure of any kind, we want any cheques to be taking place away from the border. a senior eu official has told the bbc we would expect some kind of infrastructure. where it would be, he would put it up, how far away from any border isn't clear and i think that's one of the reasons why the backstop has become such a problematic issue. there are those who argue we should call their bluff. david davis said this quite a lot, they don't want to put upa this quite a lot, they don't want to put up a border and nor do we so where is the problem? but under eu law, there needs to be more intrusive checks at that border because it would become the border of the single market. it's not a particularly satisfactory answer but it's one we've asked people from the irish government, british government and eu a lot and we haven't really had a full answer. thank you. we are going to hearfrom annita now on had a full answer. thank you. we are going to hear from annita now on the social media. we've been inundated,
9:15 am
deluged with comments and opinions and rants and analysis from our listeners. people are still very much engaged with this but i think there are more questions than a nswe i’s. there are more questions than answers. there really are and yes they are engaged. in the mornings at 9am on the news channel when we look at the most popular stories, what people are reading may stand watching most, very often it is brexit related. people are expressing their frustration that almost two and a half years after the referendum we still don't quite know where we are going. they are still really, really interested. thank you to all of you who are contributing to this today. let me read out a few messages. julia in pontefract says: crashing out of the eu without a deal based on people being sold lies would be a disaster. let's have another vote now
9:16 am
we're better informed. julia doesn't say whether she voted to leave or remain in the first place but she's saying let's have another vote. most people would probably agree that they know more about what this involves one way or another at this stage. talking not only about the practicalities but the psychology of this, the emotional worries around brexit. a message from david davis, not the former brexit secretary i hasten to add!
9:17 am
let's go back to chris morris who has been fact checking and trying to unravel the complexities of brexit. will david davis be able to continue working across the eu countries? yes but it might be more difficult is the short answer. it depends partly oi'i the short answer. it depends partly on his business, whether it's a goods business or services business. it also depends to a large part on what still has to be negotiated in the future. it sounds like he's based in the uk. 0ne the future. it sounds like he's based in the uk. one of the main difficulties is for brits based elsewhere in europe because the rights they are being given under the withdrawal agreement that theresa may has agreed with the eu only apply to the country in which they are living. for example, if you live in france you would have the
9:18 am
right to remain living and working in france, but if you live in france and have business in germany or italy you wouldn't necessarily retain those rights in the future. again, a slightly unsatisfactory answer it depends what gets negotiated in the future. this comes back to the fact that we have the withdrawal agreement which is legally binding but the other part of the deal is the non—binding political declaration and it depends what comes out of that to be able to answer david's question. that's one of the things parliament will start to address, should we be in a customs union, should we have a common market 2.0? should we just go for a fairly basic free trade agreement? unfortunately, all of these questions should be decided in negotiations which are still to come. thank you, chris. basically,
9:19 am
uncertainty is the word. when i talk to people i hear it a lot and i bet it's the same for you with your callers. a good person to go to now would be in belfast. we've got mark in middlesbrough coming up as well. good morning. caroline, ithink i'm right in saying you have a business and you employ people on both sides of the border. how are you feeling about this right now? i'm director of public affairs at an online recruitment company and across the island we are seeing various levels of anxiety. some of our offices in the north are experiencing queries and concerns from some of our contracted migrant workers who are either deciding to move to our southern neighbours or are considering returning to their country of origin because of their anxiety around brexit. what is the road ahead for you? we have so many
9:20 am
options on the table now, theoretically, possibly, definitely, maybe. where do you want it to go? the uncertainty is bad for business. 0ur head office is in belfast and it's very natural but political concerns around the border and the backstop are on everybody‘s mind. your other caller referred to the backstop and the reason why it's been such a thorny issue is because of the idea and notion of a return toa of the idea and notion of a return to a hard border is absolutely sending shivers down the spine of anybody across northern ireland. it harkens back to the dark days of the troubles. the concerns around that are legitimate and those people that say it can be dealt with with electronic checks haven't articulated how they would work in practice. any security apparatus around the border, whether it's closer or slightly away from it,
9:21 am
will cost money and will cost considerable disruption to people in border regions. mark, do you think there was enough concentration on this particular issue in the referendum campaign two and a half yea rs referendum campaign two and a half years ago? do you understand as a leaver how caroline feels and can you appreciate her concerns? about the backstop? about the situation with the border, the uncertainty and fears for the future. well, the united states of america is our biggest trading partner. do we have trouble importing and exporting from them with border control? do we have any trouble from australia? why are we making a really massive issue of it? i don't understand it at all. whatever happens, we voted out, we have to go. i understand and respect
9:22 am
the democratic outcome, but eu law binds us to maintaining those checks and they will still have to take place at the border. so does every country outside the eu and where do we have a problem? we don't have any problems at all. i don't understand the northern ireland border check is going to create many problems. why is it going to create problems? it's causing a considerable headache that theresa may. she has had her partners in government, the dup, effectively holding her... inaudible you can understand our anxiety is a because not only do we have the uncertainty for business and for people around the outcome of brexit but we don't have a local administration up and running.
9:23 am
political uncertainty reigns supreme here at the moment. hang on a minute, mark. we are going to check some facts with chris morris. america our biggest trading partner and also, we hear this quite a lot from listeners and viewers, this border business, has it not been com pletely border business, has it not been completely inflated as a problem? surely we can sort it out. in terms of trading partners, if you take individual countries, then yes the united states is our biggest trading partner. if you take the single market as a whole, then if you add france, germany, netherlands and belgium and so on together, that's by farour belgium and so on together, that's by far our biggest single trading partner. it's 27 countries in effect acting as one economic area. the single market is our biggest trading partner, the us as an individual country is our biggest trading partner. the backstop, goodness me, if anyone had a simple solution to
9:24 am
the irish border they would have put it forward already. it is tricky and the reason is because i think two deep red lines of the two sides collide. for the uk, deep red lines of the two sides collide. forthe uk, the deep red lines of the two sides collide. for the uk, the sanctity of the union, and for the european union the sanctity of its single market. both of those issues are absolutely dependent on what happens at the border and that's why so far technical fixes and other suggestions haven't been deemed sufficient. many supporters of brexit say you could just use technology to make the border disappear and make it technology to make the border disappearand make it as technology to make the border disappear and make it as invisible as it is now. technology can certainly help but at the moment there is no border anywhere in the world between two separate customs territories and regulatory territories and regulatory territories where the rules and regulation governing the economy are different. no border anywhere which is as open as the irish border at
9:25 am
the moment. that's the challenge. if you can find a way to make it so, i can guarantee officials on both sides would jump at it but they aren't there yet. caroline, this is your show, or uk. ijust aren't there yet. caroline, this is your show, or uk. i just think it's useful to point out that you can't underestimate the emotive aspect around the border as well and the fa ct around the border as well and the fact the eu has been very good in terms of providing money to community groups across northern ireland. there is a motivating factor people probably understand better in terms of what the eu project has done for peace here. coming up we've got caroline and simon. it's a really strong and thought—provoking point there, caroline. there's a lot of stuff on social media. people say things like, i was in switzerland and i crossed to italy, no problem. and switzerland isn't in the eu so why
9:26 am
should there be any problem with northern ireland and ireland? there isa northern ireland and ireland? there is a pylon about the schengen area. a quick explanation of that. schengen is the passport free area whereby you don't have to show any documents to pass across a border. if you cross from switzerland to france or germany with a lorry load of goods in the back then you may well be stopped. you have to go through some form of infrastructure. anyone who has been across the swiss french border for example, it's very efficient and moves quickly. the idea there is infrastructure is untrue. that's the problem in ireland. however smooth you can make it, take another border, the border between sweden and norway. we got this information from the norwegian customs authority. the average time it takes to do the customs checks that are necessary as 14 seconds but the whole point on the irish border is they should be no checks and no infrastructure at all and that's the
9:27 am
issue. from making something pretty frictionless to completely frictionless. thank you to caroline and mark. more from chris and annita shortly. we arejoined by we are joined by caroline and chris. sign in, you have a specific question perhaps. it was related to the irish border because i think the peace process is far more important than brexit and i'm talking as someone than brexit and i'm talking as someone who than brexit and i'm talking as someone who wants than brexit and i'm talking as someone who wants out of the eu for 25 years. someone who wants out of the eu for 25 yea rs. as someone who wants out of the eu for 25 years. as i understand, theresa may's deal, we leave the political union, we leave the single market, we leave the ec], we leave the common agricultural and fisheries policy but we stay in the customs union because of the irish border. we keep that irish border open. we made commitments during the peace process to keep the border open. we had 3000 people die in the war and a
9:28 am
lot of people injured and we can't let peace slip through our fingers. my let peace slip through our fingers. my question is about staying in the customs union and how that would affect us. how much influence do the ecj have? would we still have a seat at the table in further negotiations with countries on free trade deals? would it be all we needed to do to keep that border open in the future? and also, what is in contravention of the 1997 good friday agreement, chris. theresa may's deal and her aim is not to stay in a customs union. the only reason there would bea union. the only reason there would be a customs union would be if the backstop had to come into effect, then there would be a temporary customs union between the whole of the uk and the eu. until some sort of future trade agreement removed the need for the backstop to be in place. what is a customs union do?
9:29 am
it depends, your view of a customs union depends how you, this politically. those who think it's a goodidea politically. those who think it's a good idea say it's helpful to businesses because it removes any tariffs, import taxes on goods moving across the border between the uk and eu including obviously the irish border. it also removes any need for bureaucracy and checks. those who don't like it, and this isn't a specific irish issue but it's for the uk as a whole, say another thing which theresa may has promised is that the uk will be free to do its own independent trade deals around the world. if you're in a customs union, you have to set the same tariffs on goods coming in from elsewhere in the world as the eu does. that obviously limits your ability to carry out or to sign and negotiate pay is independent trade deals around the world. it depends on your political position at at the
9:30 am
moment both the government and the eu say the only way they can see if keeping that border open is to keep the customs arrangements as they are and for northern ireland to follow more closely than the rest of the uk many of the rules of the single market. that's basically what the backstop says, even though both sides say only if it had to come into effect and it would only be temporary. because, a quick clarification, the good friday agreement, we hear this a lot especially from people on the remain side of the argument. if we leave this will be in contravention of the good friday agreement, what
9:31 am
would adhere to it and what would contravene it? both sides are clear nothing in the withdrawal agreement supersedes the good friday agreement. what the good friday agreement. what the good friday agreement did was almost take the border out as an issue by creating deliberate ambiguity. all sides could read into that whatever they wanted, it was a very clever solution, but one of the things that underpinned it was the fact northern ireland and ireland were in the european union. obviously we both joined at the same time in the 70s. all these economic issues, membership of the single market, customs union, are part of what underpins the good friday agreement. it isa underpins the good friday agreement. it is a complex process and i think it's really important the point that was made. as well as all the technical stuff it is a very emotive issue in ireland as well. thank you. more from a moment but let's go to caroline. hello. your thoughts? at this testing time. very testing. it's been a very testing almost three years. i'm very definitely a
9:32 am
remain. iam retired now, i managed to sell my small business which was a toy shop and i don't it for almost 16 years. and i think brexit was a nightmare. basically all the prices within six months, my prices had gone up by around 20% on average. we don't really make anything in this country, everything is from either the eu orfar east, you are buying in dollars and pounds. the prices went up. people had no confidence. they start not having a big birthday party, inviting all the kids, you know, less inclined to spend. where are we now? i think this will
9:33 am
resonate with everyone. whichever side of the argument you are emotionally invested with, it ebbs and flows, doesn't it? do you think things are going your way or are they slipping away. i think things are going in favour of remain and i think the most sensible way forward is the wilson amendment. we've got to start realising the reality. people were promised a lot of things that can in no way be delivered. it basically says i will put your withdrawal agreement through mrs may if we have a referendum. yes, people get a chance and they will know the fa cts , get a chance and they will know the facts, they will know the nhs isn't going to get loads more money, we are not going to be signing up to trade deals the minute we leave and so on. a lot of their rights and things that are being achieved by the eu on our behalf will disappear. 0k. whatever anyone says on any side of the argument the flak will then fly from the other side, so anita, lets put on the tin hats, don't we?
9:34 am
nikki, i don't know about you but i neverfail nikki, i don't know about you but i never fail to pause and think we are still discussing this nearly two and a half yea rs still discussing this nearly two and a half years later. what are people saying? let me tell you. jon in norwich... people have been watching and listening to the going on in parliament. it's been essential watching and listening. i can't tell you how much i despise this rabble in the house of commons. if there is a general election, the conservative and labour parties should ensure that their manifestos are printed on something soft, absorbable, and flushable. john painting a picture there! chris in preston... let's face it, the only resolution is for a referendum. may's deal is the only option other than remain. brexit was an unobtainable ideal and the sooner people accept they were sold a lie the quicker
9:35 am
we can all get on with our lives. what will bring the uk to a resolution question that is this question we are all struggling with. michael in manchester... who voted leave what has happened to democracy in this country? we voted to leave. all mps trying to stop us from leaving should be ashamed and should resign. and some more questions coming in, including this one. pollitt sends us this. what are any issues with revoking article 50, as a kind of reset, with the possibility of triggering it again when the country is properly ready? chris morris, that question has to be considered, tell us what you think. what happened to democracy, pretty philosophical. let's face it, we are a parliamentary democracy, that's how the system works. you
9:36 am
look at the referendum from 2016. it wasn't a legally binding referendum in the strict sense that the 2015 referendum act does not say anything about implementing the referendum in law. but obviously, a lot of people argue and the prime minister has argued consistently it was politically binding, and instruction was given. you rememberthe politically binding, and instruction was given. you remember the leaflets and round to every household in the country by the government in the referendum campaign, it says this is your decision, the government will implement what you decide. not strictly legally binding but you know, there is a very strong argument that politically it was so. in terms of revoking article 50, a separate question. the european court ofjustice has made it clear
9:37 am
that the uk can do that unilaterally, it doesn't need to consult with the other 27 countries like it does about an extension to article 50. it can say, you know what, we have had enough, we are withjoint notification what, we have had enough, we are with joint notification to leave and that would mean staying in the eu on exactly the same terms we have now. we keep the budget rebate, we pay the same amount into the budget and so on. the same amount into the budget and so on. can you then two weeks later say we're going to start again, declare again? the european court of justice says any revocation would have to be unequivocal and unconditional and it suggests legally, it would take a very dim view of a country triggering article 50, dry to renegotiate the position the union, then withdrawing that notification and doing it all again ina few notification and doing it all again in a few weeks or months later. i think the legal position and the warning from the european court is if you take it off the table, that is it for some time to come. chris, thank you and thank you to paula and michael for the questions. that one about democracy, how much democracy is too much democracy, nicky, is another referendum too much?
9:38 am
we arejoined by we are joined by two more callers. and thanks to you both. city, what would you like to say. and thanks to you both. city, what would you like to saylj and thanks to you both. city, what would you like to say. i think it's a shame. the original vote, the vote to leave, there was a disassociation between the people and parliament. both main parties, labour and the conservatives, the conservatives particularly, promised a hard brexit. but labour as well, they said they want to honour the referendum result. ithink said they want to honour the referendum result. i think the way things are going it's very much moving to a disassociation between parliament and the people. i think it's a shame. the chance to turn
9:39 am
that around, it is not being turned around. if i may that around, it is not being turned around. ifi may say, don't that around, it is not being turned around. if i may say, don't you think wherever you go, whenever there is a gathering of people, there is a gathering of people, there are as many different views on this, there are as many different nuances on this and one of the things, is it not important to point out, mps are getting a lot of criticism from people including the prime minister and her now almost notorious speech but don't you believe those people who are elected to represent us, they are in good faith with the best conscious, doing what they believe is in the best interest of the country? whether they are doing what is in the best interest of the country, that is another matter but they promised certain things at the uk general election, and sue bree and sarah willison, stood on manifestoes that said specifically no deal is a bad
9:40 am
deal and they said we are not conservatives any more. —— anna soubry. it's about breaking promises they made at the general election, not whether they are acting in the best interests of the country, what they are showing to the country as we are going to say something and another thing. i don't think that's going very well for them right now. lucy, what would you like to add? so, i've got a few feelings around this. ijust liked to caveat everything i say by saying i definitely —— initially was a remain, ivoted definitely —— initially was a remain, i voted to remain but as a business owner who is exhausted and frustrated by the paralysis that we've arrived at in this scenario right now and who was under the understanding we would leave on the 29th of march which is next friday and now were not, —— this friday. i
9:41 am
wa nt and now were not, —— this friday. i want clarity. i want certainty and a decision to be made so we can unlock the spending in business. that is being held back currently. everybody is really uncertain and it's just exhausting and the other thing i'd like to say as well, i think theresa may has had a really hard time from everybody. and i would just like to thank her for doing the job that absolutely nobody else has wanted to do. and to you know, just acknowledge her for that. do. and to you know, just acknowledge herforthat. because it's been a really tough time and she must be absolutely exhausted. given the ambitions which are evident in the cabinet to do her job, there are quite a lot of people who would love to step into her shoes. do you really think so? i think they are making a lot of us to try and sort of blow their own trumpets and i don't think anyone really wants her job trumpets and i don't think anyone really wants herjob right now. they might want it when everything has
9:42 am
been resolved in a few weeks and they can bask in the glow of being they can bask in the glow of being the person that is getting things back together again but right now, today, the next couple of weeks, i don't think anyone wants a job. that's my opinion. poisoned chalice. you pay tribute to her resilience and fortitude. do you have a question for chris? i did, it was very specific to my business industry, i work in the tech sector, i have a digital agency and it's to do with the digital single market which i think is a subject that's been massively overlooked. that's one of my concerns. the ideological stuff the whole time, we are talking about but the reality is, the minutiae, the practical things that are not being addressed because the discussion is so ideological. hello, lucy. the digital single market is a massive part of the way the eu sees the future of its economy. what will out the future of its economy. what will our relationship with it be? if
9:43 am
theresa may 's deal goes through she says we will not be part of the digital single market for the obvious reason she doesn't want to be part of the single market as a whole. she wants the uk to leave it. if, of course, one of the different suggestions that they will be debated in parliament this week, for example, this idea of the common market 2.0, staying in the single market, things would be different. you would know this from your position in the industry. the uk is a world leader in many digital areas of the economy so you have to say it's going to be in the eu 's interest to cooperate with us as closely as possible, but being outside the single market is not as close a relationship as being inside it and nothing can match that the way for those who would like to retain the relationship you have at the moment. thank you very much, lucy. excellent. we will hear from any need to shortly to tell us what's happening on social media.
9:44 am
right now let's good to phil in wellington. good morning to you. hello, nicky. how's you? 0ver it to you. i'd just like to reflect and ask the levers, how do they expect society to run? my father has just died. he was supported from folk from zimbabwe, could poland. myjob is working with european colleagues to build solar farms and wind turbines, we have a climate emergency. we will need to do a lot of flood prevention work across the somerset levels. the population shows we will need to bring people in from around the world, whether
9:45 am
from europe, africa, asia, we are going to need more people to help in these industries and i cannot see where we will get the people from so we need to be united and tolerant and support our neighbours. my condolences to you about your father. thank you, he had a good, long, innings, i am very grateful for the life he gave us. where are we going to get the people from? we need to work out, whether in a climate emergency we want to have a low footprint on the planet and work with european neighbours or we want to fly people in and fly our people around the world ? to fly people in and fly our people around the world? tell us about the specific challenges when it comes to the beautiful somerset levels. already, we had the floods in 2014. the organisations, councils, volu nta ry the organisations, councils, voluntary groups, communities working hard to try and get the ditches and drains cleared, try and create the fields and murders so water can be retained and there is going to be a lot of artwork going on over the next few years if we don't want bridgwater and the like to flood. -- moors. why can't that be done if we leave the eu?m
9:46 am
to flood. -- moors. why can't that be done if we leave the eu? it can but where will the resources come from? we ran out of labour in the country, we had to go to europe to bring the labour in for recent works. the same might happen again. 0ne works. the same might happen again. one of the arguments. thank you so much. anita, one of the arguments, people are worried there are myriad issues, what ever the solution to theissues issues, what ever the solution to the issues may or may not be, they are currently being ignored because of what is happening in politics. nicky, absolutely. i hear that all the time. this thing is so huge, is one of the other colours were saying, a lot of focus on the ideological arguments but some people feeling perhaps not so much ona people feeling perhaps not so much on a more detailed practical issues. let me get you through some more comments. ted, england... why are the bbc so pro remain????
9:47 am
it is unfair you reporting this way....this tweet will not get on a tv 100% maybe that was reverse del might reverse psychology, ted. but let me tell you, we often get complaints from both sides, may be that edgy we are trying to strike a balanced line and givea are trying to strike a balanced line and give a range of opinions and here at the bbc we spend a lot of time making sure that whatever we are covering, we are giving a balanced range of opinions. ted, i hope you are happy with that response. ben in hampshire — if brexit doesn't happen, i will never vote for a politician again. a divorce lawyer wouldn't come back after two years and say "sorry, i cannot find a way for you to divorce" andy, cornwall... nearly everybody i speak to are fuming with our politicians who it seems from the very outset have refused to accept the result of the referendum and have put every spanner in the works possible
9:48 am
to stop it happening, we, the average person on the street, are not stupid. this question is for chris morris. joe says i think if we can get this question up, let me read it to you again, given the 22nd of may extension is contingent on the stroll agreement being approved is there any point in voting on it again if it is not this week? chris, talk to us about the timeline.. really good point. i was in brussels la st really good point. i was in brussels last week at the eu summit which came up with new deadlines, if you like. it was noted that the language of the conclusions of the summit we re very of the conclusions of the summit were very specific. you can have an extension until the 22nd of may if the withdrawal agreement is improved bya the withdrawal agreement is improved by a meaningful vote in parliament
9:49 am
this week. the implication being that happens after friday that's too late. politically though, there's always wiggle room. i think it would be unthinkable, frankly, if next tuesday, for example, a week today, f theresa may 's deal was approved in parliament that the eu would turn around and say that's a couple of days too late. i mean, we have seen, i think, the way language can change. i don't think that is an issue. i think the real deadline for passing that meaningful vote is the 12th of april. because, as the eu has emphasised, and as the government admits, that is really the deadline for making arrangements for the uk to take part in the european elections in may. and the eu decided last week that the uk cannot stay in the eu if it's not going to take part in those elections. i think there were some
9:50 am
legal options that could have such that a little bit but the strict interpretation of the law was that it wasn't possible. that was the position pushed by the european commission. there were differences of opinion on that but member states eventually, if you like, opted for the safe rather than sorry approach and said yeah, if you are not going to take part in european elections, then you cannot stay in the eu belong del mag —— beyond the 22nd of may. could that still change? nothing is impossible, we are getting into speculative territory but if a patrol deal was done at the very la st but if a patrol deal was done at the very last minute, to the uk have a special uk election temporarily? it's a possibility. but that is the deadline which has been set down at the moment. ok, chris, thank you very much. politically, you say, there is still wiggle room, it's interesting seeing so many of the comments and thoughts coming in, nicky. people being frustrated with politicians, frustrated with this process but you had a couple of
9:51 am
callers who are sympathetic to the politicians including theresa may? yes! paying tribute to her indefatigable a day. what i wanted to ask of what you have been doing on the telly, but i have been doing on the telly, but i have been doing on the telly, but i have been doing on the radio? have you got the sense that over the last two and a half yea rs that over the last two and a half years people have been doubling down and digging in and getting more and more entrenched in their opinions? and lucy ‘sjust a couple more entrenched in their opinions? and lucy ‘s just a couple of minutes ago, when she said i voted to remain but now i want them to get on with it. maybe people with those views arejust it. maybe people with those views are just less vocal at the moment because there are such sound and fury on both sides, isn't there? yes. i don't think there's any strong sense, nicky, if any referendum were to happen that there would be a clear and decisive majority for one side or the other. but you know, maybe people are doubling down, i've certainly got that feeling, we've heard some
9:52 am
voices saying they have changed their mind and interestingly yesterday, i was chatting with friends and a friend of the event i heard about who voted to remain but said, if there was another referendum, he would vote to leave not because he personally thought leaving was a good idea but because he thought the original vote should be respected. just as there are so many views among mps right now and maybe we will know more about what they really think in the next 48 hours or so, you know, that's reflecting the huge range of opinion amongst our viewers and listeners. social media is a turbulent place. let's go, let me see, we've got keith in north yorkshire. sarah in glasgow. hello to you both. good morning. good morning. sarah, you go first. ijust wanted morning. good morning. sarah, you go first. i just wanted to talk from the business perspective, i'm in glasgow and i rang my clients last night to get the general consensus and one of the biggest concerns is they are actually in no man's land. we are where we are, so you've
9:53 am
got some indicative votes. yes, rather than rehashing over what has happened in the past, ithink rather than rehashing over what has happened in the past, i think most businesses are going, can we make a decision of what's happening? obviously in the vote last night, parliament have ta ken obviously in the vote last night, parliament have taken over, as you saw in parliament, they were mentioning who would do the facilitating. well, iactually mentioning who would do the facilitating. well, i actually think have somebody outside parliament saying, for example, a head teacher who knows how to control kids in school who have a different opinion. at the end of the day, whether you voted remain or leave we all have very different opinions and we have to respect each other and just like a business contract, you compromise and you develop and you deliver. let me bring in keith while we have time. keith, what about a national government of all the talent and lack of talent to take us through
9:54 am
this, what do you reckon? yes, we definitely need to move forward positively. i've got a very strong opinion now, i've really struggled with this for a long time. i really do think we are getting to the stage where it's almost like the law of thejungle will where it's almost like the law of the jungle will take over. it's almost down to natural selection, the youngest and fittest will emerge. ifeel we need new leaders and leaders will move us forward and u nfortu nately, and leaders will move us forward and unfortunately, i don't think that is going to happen quickly. i own a business in north yorkshire, i've been desperate for clarity to move on and! been desperate for clarity to move on and i just been desperate for clarity to move on and ijust have to accept it's not going to happen. and we need to move this forward, the only way to move this forward, the only way to move it forward is going to be with new leaders who can undo some of this and i think their time is coming very quickly now that they are going to come forward. it's
9:55 am
going to end with a general election, not a referendum, but a general election. so we need a nugeneration of political leaders because of this process, the kind of political assembly line has to speed up political assembly line has to speed up and probably has speeded up? the new lights come into play?m up and probably has speeded up? the new lights come into play? it needs to be fit for the 21st—century. democracy and politics are going to have to go through a radical change. the main reason for this i feel, is that the younger generation coming through now have got such strong values and such strong feelings, they are looking for accountability and the truth and honesty. there's lots of things that they won't have in their lives, there is a lot of things they will have and it will be
9:56 am
driven by these really strong values that i think they have. it could be very scary for some of the older politicians and mps. very scary for some of the older politicians and mp5. quite inspirational words to come from our last contributor this morning. i pay tribute to you. thank you. i feel very strongly about this, i really do. and we have to have a shift and i have wanted this to happen quickly. thank you so much, keith. you want to change, a change is going to come, or is it? that's all we have time for the day on the news channel. we will continue until 10am of course on five live. thanks so much to everyone who called in and participated. great to do this with you nikki and thank you for all your texts, tweets and e—mails and also to the bbc reality check ‘s chris morris for answering all those questions. the man is a veritable walking encyclopaedia of brexit. he is out. a fascinating special edition of your call, linking up with the bbc news channel and five live and for viewers on the news channel goodbye. nicky, thank you and to five live listeners, it's goodbye from the news channel. goodbye.
9:57 am
good morning. a rather chilly start to the day across southern parts of the uk. we had frost this morning. high pressure dominating the weather over the next few days. weather fronts are skirting to the north. this cold front starting to make inroads across the rest of the uk. some sunshine across many southern areas this morning. that was the scene first thing in bristol. there will be some fair with a cloud developing across south wales, much of southern england. it will be largely sunny. further north we head into more cloud, quite a bit for northern england, northern ireland, much of scotland with outbreaks of rain affecting the far north and north—west of scotland. maximum
9:58 am
temperatures this afternoon getting up temperatures this afternoon getting up to 11—13d in northern areas. further south at the highest 12—13d. overnight, still continuing with cloud and rain affecting the far north of scotland. elsewhere clear spells, clearest spells for long as they could be some frost into wednesday morning. generally though, temperatures between 3—7d. during wednesday's summer rain across the far north of scotland. elsewhere, it's going to be a repeat performance, bright and sunny spells developing across a good part of the uk. going to be dry for all of us, maximum temperatures creeping up a notch, 12—14 possibly 15 degrees on wednesday afternoon. high pressure is still with us as we go through thursday. the weather fronts brushing the far north of scotland, for many on thursday going to be another dry day. around an area of high pressure, the air coming from a clockwise direction, you can see the orange colour across the uk. 0ne clockwise direction, you can see the orange colour across the uk. one on thursday, some patchy mist and fog
9:59 am
first then, tending to clear leaving clear and dry weather and sunshine on thursday, temperatures reaching 13-16 on thursday, temperatures reaching 13—16 possibly 17—18d. goodbye for now.
10:00 am

8 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on