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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 26, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. after her latest defeat i'm joanna gosling, in the commons last night — live in westminster. mps back an unprecedented move the prime minister meets her cabinet to take greater control — to try set out of the brexit process as they prepare to vote tomorrow a new brexit strategy. this is bbc news. on possible alternatives in an unprecedented move — i'm joanna gosling, to theresa may's plan. live in westminster. we are stuck in a never ending mps voted to take greater merry—go—round of, you know, mps back an unprecedented move control of the process — to take greater control doing the same thing and expecting and to present their different answers, own alternative plans. of the brexit process so something has got to change. but it's unclear if the as they prepare to vote tomorrow government will let them. we've got to break the prime minister has on possible alternatives through this logjam. always been clear — to theresa may's plan. but the prime minister says it is a negotiation there are no guarantees between ourselves and we are stuck in a never—ending she'll abide by their decisions. the european union, and if parliament expresses a view merry—go—round doing the same thing it may be entirely undeliverable. the prime minister has and expecting different answers. always been clear. it is a negotiation between we'll also be looking at how public something has got to change. attitudes to brexit — ourselves and the european union and we have got to break and the negotiations — through this logjam. if parliament expresses a view, might have changed but the prime minister says over the past year. there are no guarantees and the other main she'll abide by their decisions. it may be entirely undeliverable. stories this lunchtime... jack shepherd — on the run after the prime minister has always been being found guilty of manslaughter clear, it's a negotiation between following a speedboat crash — ourselves and the european union, iam in i am in watford, speaking to people says he will be and if parliament expresses a view, about brexit. extradited to the uk. it may be entirely undeliverable. we'll have all the latest on the twists and turns as parliament tries to find a way more overnight missile strikes as the israeli military out of the political deadlock. attacks targets in gaza — the other stories on bbc news: after palestinian militants fired a man convicted of manslaughter for killing his iam in i am in watford, an area that voted girlfriend in a speedboat crash on the river thames to leave the eu by an extremely is to be extradited back
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narrow majority ofjust to the uk from georgia. to leave the eu by an extremely narrow majority of just 252 votes. we'll have all the latest uefa opens disciplinary proceedings on the twists and turns following allegations as parliament tries to find a way out of the political deadlock. of racist chanting directed the other stories on bbc news: towards england's footballers finding answers in their euro 2020 qualifier victory for bereaved parents. coroners in england and wales in montenegro last night. may be given new powers to investigate stillbirths. it is a real sad thing to hear. a man sentenced to manslaughter i did not hear it personally for killing his girlfriend but my team—mate danny heard it in a speedboat crash so it is a sad thing to hear. on the river thames has agreed to be sent back to the uk following his extradition from georgia. england win 5—1 in montenegro in their euro 2020 qualifier but there are calls for action after players were subject to racist abuse by some of the home fans. it isa it is a real sad thing to hear. i good afternoon, live from westminster. mps have voted to seize control did not hear it personally but my of the brexit agenda by taking ownership team—mate dani heard it so it is a of the parliamentary timetable sad thing to hear. in an unprecedented move to try to find a way to break the deadlock.
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they'll now begin voting tomorrow to see what type of brexit has the support among mps. the prime minister said she was "sceptical" about the process as it was not guaranteed to produce a majority for any one course of action and she would not commit the government mps have voted to seize control to abide by the result. of the brexit agenda three government by taking control of ministers — steve brine, the parliamentary timetable alistair burt and richard harrington — resigned last night in an unprecedented move to try to find a way forward so they could support the cross—party amendment, to break the deadlock. to allow the votes, they'll now beging voting tomorrow with mr harrington accusing the government of "playing to find out what type of brexit has the support among mps. roulette with the lives "and livelihoods" of britons. the prime minister said 0ur political correspondent she was sceptical about the process nick eardley has been looking as it was not guaranteed to produce at the options available to mps. a majority for any one course of action this was supposed to be the week and she would not commit the government to the uk left the eu — but instead, abiding by the result. what brexit looks like is still up three government in the air. ministers — steve brine, alistair burt and richard harrington last night, the government suffered — resigned last night another defeat in parliament. so they could support the cross—party amendment the ayes to the right — 329. to allow the votes, with mr harrington accusing the government of "playing the noes to the left — 302. roulette with the lives "and livelihoods" of britons. this one allows mps to take some our political correspondent nick eardley has been looking control over what happens next. at the options available to mps. tomorrow, they'll consider
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this was supposed to be the week their own brexit ideas. the uk left the eu — but instead, that could include things like a closer trading relationship what brexit looks like is still up with europe in a customs union. in the air. last night, the government suffered it could mean replacing our current another defeat in parliament. relationship with a free trade deal, the ayes to the right — 329. leaving without a deal or another referendum on leaving at all. the noes to the left — 302. but it's far from clear whether mps this one allows mps to take some here can agree on anything. control over what happens next. it's possible nothing at all will get a majority tomorrow, they'll consider and even if it does, their own brexit ideas. the prime minister says that could include things she might not implement it. like a closer trading relationship when we've tried this kind of thing in the past, with europe in a customs union. it's produced contradictory outcomes it could mean replacing our current or no outcome at all. commotion. relationship with a free trade deal, order! leaving without a deal or another there is a further risk when it referendum on leaving at all. comes to brexit as the uk is only but it's far from clear whether mps one half of the equation here can agree on anything. and the votes could lead it's possible nothing to an outcome which is at all will get a majority unnegotiable with the eu. labour said the pm had and even if it does, the prime minister says to respect the process. she might not implement it. mr speaker, the government must take when we've tried this kind this process seriously. of thing in the past, we do not know what the house
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it's produced contradictory outcomes will decide on wednesday. or no outcome at all. commotion. this house must also consider whether any deal should order! there is a further risk when it be put to the people for a confirmatory vote. comes to brexit as the uk is only there isn't much time if mps one half of the equation and the votes could lead are to agree a new plan. eu wants some clarity to an outcome which is unnegotiable with the eu. in a fortnight. the government will still try to win labour said the pm had to respect the process. more support for its own deal and maybe bring it back for another mr speaker, the government must take vote, but ministers now this process seriously. fear parliament will try we do not know what the house and force something else. will decide on wednesday. nick eardley, bbc news. this house must also consider let's speak to our assistant whether any deal should be put to the people political editor norman smith. for a confirmatory vote. there isn't much time if mps are to agree a new plan. there has meanwhile been some speculation around what the prime eu wants some clarity in a fortnight. minister's next step will be. in the the government will still try to win more support for its own deal middle of what is already going to and maybe bring it back for another be an epic day tomorrow, slap bang vote, but ministers now as the debate on indicative votes fear parliament will try and force something else. and folds, theresa may is going to nick eardley, bbc news. address the 1922 committee of tory let's speak to our assistant backbenchers and you sense that political editor norman smith. could be a pivotal moment. whether
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she will face demands from some is this a game changer? it has the brexiteers to say quite clearly she is going to go if she gets a deal potential to be because parliament through, in other words, to set out have now pretty much put themselves a departure date for her and how she in the driving seat but if they have the faintest idea how to drive the responds to that, whether she feels she has got to give a clear signal car is another matter altogether. but they are now at the wheel. to get her deal through, or whether she hunkers down and scolds the mps albeit, it is an incredibly for trying to seize control from the difficult process they are now going to pursue. they have got to find government, echoing some of the some sort of agreement amongst language from matt hancock this themselves, when we know there are morning, mps coming up with profoundly differing views amongst mps about what to do with brexit. unworkable, contradictory unicorns. but there will be a series of votes whether she tries to enforce or whip tomorrow night which will provide on the votes, or whether she allows some sort of clarity, then there mpsa on the votes, or whether she allows mps a free vote, and if she doesn't might be more votes on monday, which allow them a free vote, do we see might be more votes on monday, which might provide more clarity, and more ministers walking, it promises eventually they might get to a to be an absolutely pivotal moment consensus. if they do, they have in the whole brexit saga. at the then got to get the government to same time, we have parliament act on it, with theresa may saying, desperately trying to get a grip on forget it. so then they have got to the process by trying to, with some coherent alternative. they probably get theresa may's arm behind her
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won't get it tomorrow, it may take back and force her to do it by two or three days of votes to come up two or three days of votes to come up with a plan. then they have got legislation. that is untested, you somehow strong—arm the government would do it. if the problematic, but not impossible. and when they have done all that, they government would do it. if the government says, no, we are not have got you turn around to the eu interested , government says, no, we are not interested, they have got to find a and say, here is a solution, will way to legislate to make them do it. you go with it? and by the way, we it's never been done before. no one are going to need more time. so knows how practical it is. and after there are a whole lot of hurdles that, you have got to say to the eu, they have got to get over, but we we have got a new plan, what do you are in such a deep, dark hole, think? do you like it? so there are something has got to be tried, and a whole lot of hurdles they have got that was certainly the view of steve to get over and i think the view of many mps is that something frankly brine, who resigned last night. has to give and in the absence of i know she has concerns about the game changing moment, this is indicative votes process and i perhaps the only option left. steve understand those constitutional concerns but these are extraordinary brian resigned last night.” times and the country is stuck in perhaps the only option left. steve brian resigned last night. i had a long conversation with the prime its constitutional crisis since suez minster last night and she has and we are stuck in a never—ending concerns about the indicative votes merry—go—round of doing the same process, constitutional concerns, but these are not usual times, these thing and expecting different answers so thing and expecting different answers so something has got to change, we have got to break through are extraordinary times and the country is stuck in its biggest
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this logjam. if the house of commons constitutional crisis since suez, can coalesce around something, maybe and we are stuck in a never ending that will come up with an answer or merry—go—round, doing the same maybe focus the mind of those who thing, expecting different answers, say they don't want the deal despite so something has got to change. we saying they want to deliver on have got you break through this brexit. i think the prime minister's logjam. if the house of commons can deal is a good one and i will be coalesce around something, maybe that will come up with an answer or supporting it again but let's see if it may focus the mind of some of there is another one as a back—up. those on my side who say they don't wa nt those on my side who say they don't is there any way theresa may can want the deal, despite the fact they ta ke is there any way theresa may can take back control? the first thing wa nt want the deal, despite the fact they want to deliver on brexit. i think she has to do is work out what she the prime minister's deal is a good one andl is going to tell her mps to do it the prime minister's deal is a good one and i will be supporting it again, but let's see if there is tomorrow night because if she tries another one out there. tomorrow night because if she tries to force them to vote in various where are we? it is bad for the ways, the chances are she will government but it is not the end of trigger yet more ministerial the road because the great hope is resignations. that is the first that once the brexiteers cmp is thing she has got to get hammered beginning to fashion a softer, out in cabinet this morning. then slower brexit, a lot of them may get she has got to work out, and i think spooked and think, we are going to this is the only card they have left lose brexit unless we backed mrs a play, when they are going to bring may's deal. interestingly, j back a meaningful vote for a third separate —— jacob may's deal. interestingly, j separate ——jacob rees moore, who i time and get her deal through. there think has been toning down his is an argument that says, mps rhetoric in the last few days, did a
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seizing control could yet play to podcast which was recorded yesterday in which his language is a lot more her advantage. if it so spooked the brexiteers that they think parliament is moving towards a emollient, saying if it comes down slower, softer brexit, we have got to theresa may's deal or something to do something, could it panic them on board? and some of them are sounding distinctly wobbly. jacob else, he may realise that they may rees mogg did a podcast yesterday. if you listen to him, he is half a risk losing brexit, and the step away only from backing mrs government are indicating that they are going to play hardball because may's deal. that has got to be the they are notjust going to do what parliament comes up with. hope of theresa may, although many we will be having votes on wednesday seem utterly opposed. the other on oliver letwin's amendment. and option, the final nightmare scenario, is the governmentjust we'll cabinet listen to the will of decides to press the button marked parliament? the prime minister has general election, but what is clear, set out the facts, which is that ministers are saying at the moment they will not necessarily do what parliament comes up with. parliament will have, will set out its views, but as government we it is government going to support can't necessarily deliver on it, as parliament? we will be having votes the prime minister has always been clear. it is a negotiation between oi'i parliament? we will be having votes on wednesday on oliver letwin's ourselves and the european union and amendment. and we'll cabinet listen
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if parliament expresses a view, it to the will of parliament? the prime may be entirely undeliverable. minister has set out the facts, which is that parliament will have, it is becoming a bit tedious me talking about epic days but tomorrow will set out its views, but as is another huge, titanic day, because we even get to the —— before government we can't necessarily deliver on it. the prime minister has always been clear, it is a we even get to the indicative votes, they will be a debate about negotiation between ourselves and extending brexit, signing up to this the european union, and if parliament expresses a view, it may delayed timetable. a lot of tory mps be entirely undeliverable. on the warpath over that. and then what is the mood in downing street? we get to the indicative votes. does that end in a parliamentary car it can only be frazzled, crash? it really is another huge, shell—shocked, stand, because mrs huge brexit day. thank you. may does not seem to have a get out ofjail card. she doesn't have an let's look in some more detail about what these so called alternative strategy beyond ploughing on with plan a. there were indicative votes are. they allow mps to vote on a series of options designed to test the will of parliament various things she could have done but she seems to close down every to see what, if anything, commands a majority. single option, which means she is let's speak now to two mps — conservative andrew mitchell lashed to the mast of her deal. and and owen smith for labour. if this goes down, it is very hard for her to continue.
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we are going to get reaction in a moment from the labour mp stephen he wants to see a second referendum. kinnock. what happened last night had been a long time in coming because they andrew smith,, andrew mitchell, we re long time in coming because they were various amendments that were going to be put forward but they sorry, why did you vote against the we re going to be put forward but they government? i think we have to move were pulled because theresa may effectively offered to do what mps this on and it was a good wa nted effectively offered to do what mps wanted her to do by force through an opportunity for parliament to assert itself. it was a number of us have amendment. that changed yesterday said for quite a long time now, if when mps decided no longer did they trust theresa may to do what she the government can't get a deal would have done in terms of whether through, parliament will have to ta ke through, parliament will have to take this over, and that is it would be what they wanted so in that event the mps took control of effectively what the 0liver letwin amendment does. this has the the parliamentary agenda and we are beneficial effect that sensible where we are now, which is tomorrow brexiteers who thought this all there will be those votes on trying through, like jacob rees moore, they to work out exactly where they may can see the instruments of torture bea to work out exactly where they may that parliament is now displaying be a majority for the next step in the brexit process. before them and i think it makes it more likely that mrs may will get let's speak now to labour mp stephen kinnock her deal through the house of who is supporting the so—called common market 2.0 plan — commons. she may be preparing to a norway—style soft brexit. welcome. mps are in control then?|j announce a timetable for her departure tomorrow to further try to facilitate that. she is appearing think welcome. mps are in control then?” think we have certainly got one hand before the 1922 committee. would you on the steering wheel now and not before time because the prime
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like to see her announce a minister's plan a has failed and in timetable? no, i think like to see her announce a timetable? no, ithink the like to see her announce a timetable? no, i think the last thing we need is a leadership life, in politics, when your plan election or further uncertainty fails, you have got to come up with about the prime minister at this a plan b. she seems to be incapable point in our national peril. we need of thinking in those terms so we a prime minister who remains at the have to take control of the process crease. if you change to the prime and tomorrow, we as parliamentarians minister, you are not going to should step up to the plate and change the numbers in the house of develop a plan b that respects and commons. i rather admire the way the prime minister has stuck doggedly at honours the respect —— a result of it, to try and deliver brexit as the referendum without destroying instructed to do so by the british the referendum without destroying the british economy. how well is a people. i don't think it would help plan b? theresa may says there is no to undermine her tomorrow. so you guarantee she will do what mps want see everything that has happened as her to do and as things stand, there a way of putting a squeeze on those is no way mps can force theresa may who are still voting against the to ta ke is no way mps can force theresa may to take action. what theresa may deal? no, i don't see it like that. needs to understand is that she has what i see is that parliament, rewritten the british constitution by bringing her deal back twice. the rightly, if the executive cannot get way our politics works is that the their deal, then parliament rightly government makes proposals and has to assert itself. in britain, parliament votes. if parliament the executive are accountable to reject the proposals, the government has to go away and think again. she parliament, not the other way around. i voted against mrs may's has to go away and think again. she has changed the rules of the game.
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deal back in january, she must now accept that the ball is around. i voted against mrs may's deal back injanuary, i voted for in ourcourtand a10 days ago. why? because it is the she must now accept that the ball is in our court and she has to become a least bad option on the block. owen servant of parliament. she has to deliver what parliament comes up smith, you would like a second with. if she is not capable of referendum but you don't think it is delivering what we come up with, she right to table it tomorrow, is that has to step aside and make way for right? i agree with andrew that we somebody who can. those who want to needed to do something because mrs see a second referendum say it is not the time right now. some say it may's intransigence was clear for is not the time right now for mps to the entire country to see and even yesterday she showed no sign of even even vote on that. how does that fit with the process we are in?” being paid to countenance any sort of compromise, so i think it was even vote on that. how does that fit with the process we are in? i think we should tomorrow develop the plan. right for parliament to try, on behalf of the country, to move this i hope it will be common market 2.0. process forward. the danger that i it is the option that really does see is that there is a risk we not the result of the referendum confuse content with process. without wrecking the british content being a source or possible economy. whatever option is chosen, future relationships that we might those campaigning for a second have with the eu, because we are not referendum should then table a really talking about indicative motion saying, that is the leave option that parliament has agreed votes in respect of the withdrawal on, let's have a vote on whether agreement, it is about the prospect that leave option... so you are of future relationship between our country and the european union, and talking about staggering the vote? the process of confirming whether
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thatis the process of confirming whether that is what the country wants. i am if those campaigning for a second very concerned that those people who referendum have to accept that you wa nt very concerned that those people who want to try and guarantee that they can't have a ballot paper which is can't be a confirmatory referendum remain versus remain. you have to on the deal, try and put that have a viable leave option on the ballot paper. given that the prime alongside a smorgasbord of other minister's deal is dead in the options in order to vote it down and water, we have to come up with vote it out. what i think we need to another leave option. if those be very careful is, we see these two wanting a referendum want to test things as quite distinct. whatever the will of parliament that, they the deal agreed in parliament, the are very welcome to do so. and on right democratic thing to do is to put that back to the people to check thatis put that back to the people to check that is what they wanted when they what you want, common market 2.0, voted for brexit back in 2016. stay effectively close regular tree alignment, it keeps being said that with us. we need to say goodbye to for anybody who wants that to viewers on bbc two. happen, there is no reason to vote against the prime minister's deal. more on today's main stories the problem with the prime coming up on newsroom live minister's deal is the political here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. declaration on the future relationship, which is full or meaningless platitudes. a spectrum of outcomes. we can't expect taxpayers money to be spent on a lea p taxpayers money to be spent on a leap of faith. but the point is, the divorce deal has to be agreed and
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then you get into a negotiation ship just to pick up then on exactly on the future relationship. it is at where you were, what do you want to see happen tomorrow?” where you were, what do you want to see happen tomorrow? i think we are odds, isn't it, with saying we need going to see a series of votes on to tie up the past before we look to different options, whether it is no the future. i have no problem with way pless, canada, or no deal. that is what we anticipate happening. —— the future. i have no problem with the withdrawal agreement. i think the withdrawal agreement. i think the backstop is fine. anything that norway plus. whether these are going protects the good friday agreement. but the political declaration is an integral part of the package. now, to be either or, yes, no, or ranked preferential votes, the danger has the political declaration is not really worth the paper it is written always been in my view that you end up always been in my view that you end up with what economists call a on and if and when theresa may has regression with a mean, the lowest gone and somebody like, goodness common denominator, the compromise knows, jacob rees marco boris that everyone thinks he's kind of johnson were to take over, they a cce pta ble could turn that political that everyone thinks he's kind of acceptable being the thing that goes forward , declaration into anything. what they acceptable being the thing that goes forward, and if that is true, if wa nt declaration into anything. what they want is a bonfire of regulations, parliament agrees on a second rate they want to turn our country into a brexit by anybody's measure, even those like me who are pretty much european version of the cayman islands. i could never vote for implacably opposed to brexit, that that. what common market 2.0 does is definitely needs to be put back to the people, because it isn't what give real teeth and meaning to the they voted for, it is what we have
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arrived at in a muddle and a rush political declaration, it binds to right at the end of a very badly the government into negotiating a deal, which means we leave the eu organised two and a half year but without destroying the british process. owen smith, andrew economy. thank you very much. mitchell, thank you very much. much that is one of the options mps will more reaction from westminster throughout the day. potentially get to vote on. it has been said that the mps has got the power over the legislative programme now back to annita. at 3:30pm this afternoon, for tomorrow but once they have got simon mccoy will be joined that day in play they can by maddy thimont jack, from the institute for government potentially vote for other days to come into play and there is talk and bbc senior political analyst peter barnes for bbc ask this. they will be answering your around potentially more votes again questions on the current brexit next week, potentially on monday. situation and how things will work procedurally over the coming days. you can send in your questions let's analyse a little using the hashtag bbc more about what ask this on twitter, emailing askthis@bbc.co.uk these so called and by texting in to 61124. indicative votes are. they allow mps to vote on a series of options designed to test the will of parliament to see what, if anything, commands a majority. the headlines on bbc news: mps back an unprecedented move to take greater control with me now isjoe owen, of the brexit process the associate director working on the brexit programme as they prepare to vote tomorrow on possible alternatives
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to theresa may's plan. at the institute for government. a man convicted of manslaughter for killing his mps effectively have control for one girlfriend in a speedboat crash on the river thames has agreed to be sent back to the uk following his day at the moment but is thatjust extradition from georgia. the start of it? exactly, we still finding answers don't know how this process will for bereaved parents. play out. what they will want to do coroners in england and wales may be given new powers to with that one day and whether one investigate stillbirths. day will be enough. some of the ideas we started to hear floated last night during the debate was that tomorrow could be used as a sort of qualifying round for mps to lay out all of the different options it is time for sport now. and understand where support lies. before whittling that down and montenegro will face punishment potentially having a more formalised after racist chanting from france run off early next week. who really last night during the euro 2020 qualifier against england. uefa have holds the power at the moment? the mps can do that at the moment, they opened disciplinary proceedings and at the very least we understand that can have their vote, the prime montenegro will have part of their minister doesn't have to see it stadium closed for their next through. could the mps go for other qualifier against kosovo. racist abuse marred the 5—1win mechanisms? after monday, or even qualifier against kosovo. racist abuse marred the 5—1 win for
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tomorrow if a clear consensus arrives, they could start to force england. raheem sterling said that the government's hand with legislation. in some respects, it is quite right that theresa may is finding countries for racist behaviour of their fans isn't reserving her right to implement the will of parliament because we don't working. the bbc‘s chief football writer was at the match last night know, mps could vote on something that they know is not negotiable and he heard that chanting first hand. with the eu, sojust the first thing to say is that that they know is not negotiable gareth southgate has added that with the eu, so just because mps say they are happy with, for example, a customs union where we get sa in sanctions has effectively worthless unless they are accompanied by some european trade deals, the government sort of education in the subject of will know that is not going to be negotiable with the eu so you cannot racist abuse. in the past, fines then ask the government to go and have never been very heavy. if you implement that when it is possible. wa nt have never been very heavy. if you want to move this on, you are in some respects it is right that talking about ground closures and somebody even suggested last night the government is standing because we can't blindly accept what comes in extreme cases expulsion from out of parliament, but if there is qualifying competitions, but that is one of these off—the—shelf models that we know the eu has looked at, yet to be decided. certainly, england reported the matter very if there is that famous michel quickly and they will expect montenegro to be punished for it. barnier steps chart, and eight features on there, it might be much and we have heard that chelsea have harderfor features on there, it might be much harder for the government to resist complained to uefa about alleged the will of parliament. we are in racist abuse during their europa
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uncharted territory. how much does league tie against dynamo kiev in this change the way our democracy ukraine last week. operates and the understanding of the way our democracy operates? so chelsea defender bright is back in this is about minority government the england squad for the games next and it is not uncommon for backbenchers to decide business. there are certain days allotted through the timetable that allows backbenchers to do that but what is month. england have fourfriendlies different is that they are taking before their first world cup match control of a day where it is up to against scotland on the 9th ofjune. the government to schedule business. what that means, if we are in a situation where there are future england's women have beaten sri la nka minority governments, and if this england's women have beaten sri lanka by eight wickets in colombo to ta ke lanka by eight wickets in colombo to take an unbeatable 2—0 lead. two bursts the dam, basically, and becomes a more common occurrence, we don't know. it will depend on wickets for katherine brunt and one parliamentary arithmetic. eu citizens in britain could be for heather knight. england chase denied access to benefits down that total pretty quickly. such as council housing and social security payments after brexit, a report has warned. victory in the final match would give them a record tenth win in a mps are debating ending eu nationals‘ right to live and work in the uk. row, which is something england but parliament's human rights haven't managed since 2012. committee says new laws could leave eu nationals, including those who have and the mixed martial arts star paid uk taxes for years, conor mcgregor has announced his in a "precarious" situation.
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the home office says the government retirement from the sport. he posted the news on social media this has already committed to protecting the rights of eu citizens in the uk. morning. he is 30 years old and had established himself as one of the that's all from westminster for now. world's leading fighters, but his career was marred by controversy with an arrest and plans to get now back to annita. anger management help. it is not the first time he has announced he will coroners in england and wales be retiring. could be given new powers that is all the sport for now. more to investigate the deaths of stillborn babies. from me at around 1:30pm. currently inquests are only held let's get more now on that news for infants who have shown signs of life after being born. that uefa is to launch an investigation after montenegrin under the government's proposal fans racially abused england's players during their european all full—term stillbirths, championship qualifying which happen after 37 weeks, match last night. would be looked into, giving bereaved parents some answers the racist chanting was directed at several players, during england's 5—1victory. as to what happened. manager gareth southgate said he was disgusted. the justice minister thejustice minister said investigations into steel base can go further. —— stillbirth. it is unacceptable. i have spoken to our players individually. we have got to support them. we will report any stillbirth is a tragedy and, although we have robust processes it but i think that reporting is
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in place at the moment to investigate them, already in place because so many we think we can go further and we should go further. people in other areas of the ground the use of coroners to investigate have heard it. i believe the uefa them in an open and transparent way would not help not only help bring delegate also heard it. so our part closure to families who have suffered this tragedy, but will help us to learn the lessons for the future, will be to make sure that process is to help further reduce the numbers of stillbirths in our country. well, let's now speak followed. to jane brewin, we can speak now to 0sei sankofa, who is the chief executive education officer of tommy's — an organisation which at the kick it out charity, which campaigns for equality funds research into stillborns. and inclusion in football. what do you think the pros and cons of this proposal are. the government good to have you with us today. raheem sterling is calling on uefa has launched a consultation today andi has launched a consultation today to hand out some real punishment and i think it is really important over this. what would that real for pa rents and i think it is really important for parents to have their say. i punishment be in your estimation?” think some parents will welcome it think there has been quite a bit of and some parents really won't debate about what the punishments welcome it. so it is important for have been in the past and whether or not they are working. they don't people to have their say but also to seem to be working so i think there think about what they would prefer isa seem to be working so i think there is a call from many people in the industry that we need to start in these sorts of circumstances. i seriously looking at stadium closures, about docking points, think for some parents, they will about maybe even banning teams from feel that having an independent coroner's investigation will help participating in tournaments because them get to the answers about why the current procedure isn't seeming
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to be having any impact at all. so their baby died and i think for other parents, they will feel that we are hearing at the very least the process will add an unacceptable montenegro might have part of a stadium closed but what have the level of distress in an already punishment beans in the past? punishments have been written difficult situation. so in those circumstances, how would you balance a situation where the coroner thinks warnings, very paltry fines, but whatever has been in place at the they might be something to learn moment isn't working so i think what from an inquest into a stillborn we are waiting to see, we obviously ba by‘s from an inquest into a stillborn baby's birth, from an inquest into a stillborn ba by‘s birth, but from an inquest into a stillborn baby's birth, but the parents don't welcome the investigation, but we wa nt baby's birth, but the parents don't want that to happen. they don't want are waiting to see if uefa are going to show some real leadership and a the inquest to happen, i should say. real stamp down. what we should be it is very important to take into talking about is a great day for account parents views and some england but instead we are talking pa rents account parents views and some about another incident where we are pa re nts wa nt account parents views and some parents want this and i think that isa waiting for uefa to make a stand on parents want this and i think that is a good move, but if parents don't this. and in many ways that was the wa nt is a good move, but if parents don't want it, i really don't think they best response england could give, should be forced into having a coroner's inquest. but do you think scoring goals and winning so emphatically. but in terms of actual having inquest into stillbirths sanctions from uefa, you are talking might actually make pregnancy safer about some hefty sanctions. more than they have done in the past. and give us more information both as clearly there is a big role here for pa rents and give us more information both as parents and the medical profession
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education as well. that is what you into how to prevent stillbirth?” do. yes, and i have been involved in think that is the most important educating at various levels, whether point in all of this, that where thatis there is a stillbirth, a thorough educating at various levels, whether that is schools, colleges, universities, working at football close, and that is a starting point. investigation takes place, and i think, for me, the issue is to somebody's behaviour, once they work through that gates, that is down to ensure that all investigations of stillbirth that are undertaken by them, but if you look at the work we hospitals take place with the have done in this country and we involvement of parents and our still have problems in this country, you can only imagine there is a lack thorough and independent, and that of work being done in other countries so it is no surprise we any thorough and independent, and that a ny lessons thorough and independent, and that any lessons that need to be learnt are learned. that already happens see these incidents taking place across european grounds towards across many hospitals but i think england's players, who just across european grounds towards england's players, whojust want across european grounds towards england's players, who just want to represent their countries but the point is that it is not always instead have to deal with things they shouldn't have to deal with.” consistently good and that parents are not always fully involved. i know you have not had to deal with think that is the issue that i would racism when you have been on the page and you count yourself lucky, like to see addressed more than anything on behalf of parents. so in but tell me what your thoughts work when you saw the game last night.” terms of tommy's contribution, you will be saying yes, but with the actually miss the game. i was following the game on twitter and i caveat to make sure that parents are watch the highlights, but i have been involved in football for a long involved in the decision—making
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time asa been involved in football for a long process ? involved in the decision—making process? absolutely. our view is time as a young player, as a young that it professional, a player in the process? absolutely. our view is thatitis process? absolutely. our view is that it is really up to parents to decide what they want under these premier league, someone who has gone into coaching, and it saddens me to incredibly difficult situations and say that i wasn't even surprised. i that parents shouldn't be forced read later that the players were briefed that something like this into having something done to them and their babies that they really, could happen and what they should really don't want. thank you very do, how they should respond. raheem sterling spoke to the younger much for your time today. players and said, this is how you should approach it. we should be talking about how good england were and again we are talking about this, a manjailed in his absence but i wasn't surprised, and i think for killing a woman in a speedboat thatis but i wasn't surprised, and i think that is even more damning. clearly accident in london on their first date, has agreed to be players like raheem sterling and extradited back to the uk. jack shepherd went on the run others speaking out is having a big impact as well. players like him before his trial where he was found being really vocal about this.” guilty of manslaughter. he handed himself into the authorities in georgia injanuary think the stand he has taken, you and was jailed for three months. shepherd has been granted the right have to take your hat off to him, to to appeal against his conviction. i am joined in the studio put up with all the scrutiny he has been under for several different by our correspondent, helena lee. reasons over the last few years. at obviously, there has been a lot of the moment he is arguably england's publicity around this case but perhaps remind our audience of some most important player, one of of the details. the accident england's most high—profile players, but he is not afraid to speak out. i happened on the river thames in
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thought his reaction after the goal 2015. jack shepherd had taken was appropriate, given what had charlotte brown out on a date. it was the first time they had met each happened, and his interview afterwards where he consistently other. they went for a meal, they spoke about the fact it is 2019 and then went on his speedboat on the this should not be happening. and thames and they crashed. he handed then he went on to twitter to make further comment. he is showing great her the wheel of that vote. she had leadership on this topic and he is not standing for any more nonsense. no boating experience at all. she crashed and they were flung into the he has put himself out there as a cold waters of the thames and she voice for other people to follow and i think it is great to see. thank died. jack shepherd's trial took you for talking to us today. place last year at the old bailey. he wasn't there. charlotte brown's a manjailed in his absence for killing a woman in a speedboat family had to sit through that trial every day not seeing the man who accident in london on their first date, has agreed to be then was convicted of charlotte extradited back to the uk. brown's manslaughter. given that his lawyer is now saying he has agreed to be extradited back to the uk and jack shepherd went on the run that he obviously fled the uk in the before his trial where he was found first place, what more do we know guilty of manslaughter. he handed himself into the authorities in georgia injanuary — about the decision—making process leading up to this? a court hearing and was jailed for three months. shepherd has been granted the right to appeal against his conviction. i am joined in the studio in georgia happened in the last by our correspondent, helena lee.
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given that jack couple of hours. it was an given thatjack shepherd had given that jack shepherd had fled extradition hearing. what the court the uk in the first instance, why is heard was that the extradition order his lawyer saying that he is now is based on both that manslaughter willing to be extradited back to the conviction but also jack shepherd is uk? because he has got an appeal. he facing an assault charge which is in has been granted leave to appeal relation to an incident in the uk against that manslaughter last year. what the prosecutor told conviction. that accident which happened in 2015. he had taken the court this morning, he said, we charlotte brown, they were on their are sure that if he is extradited, first date, he took her out on a they will be no threat to his life. speedboat. the trial heard he had been drinking, he handed the wheel you may remember that jack over to charlotte. she then hit a shepherd's defence team and he himself had said that if he returns submerged log, the boat capsized, they both fell into the water and to the uk, he was worried about his she died. he fled the country and life. he felt threatened if he came handed himself in to authorities in back. but that was discounted in court today by the prosecution. his georgia. he had been on the run for defence lawyer then said even though months. he didn't attend that trial. they don't agree with the case made by the prosecutor, nonetheless their today we have had that extradition hearing at the city court and what client consents to extradition and we heard during that hearing is that they say, as you mention, jack the prosecutor first of all outline shepherd is appealing against his conviction in the uk. what happens the prosecutor first of all outline the extradition order, which is not
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next, he could be back as early as only to do with that manslaughter conviction but also to do with an the end of this week. typically assault charge which jack shepherd within a couple of weeks. a judge is facing in the uk. the prosecutor still has to sign that extradition off. a couple of met police officers also said that they are sure that if will probably agree a date and a jack shepherd is extradited, they will be no threat to his life. just time, go over to georgia, take custody of jack shepherd, bring time, go over to georgia, take custody ofjack shepherd, bring him to point out a couple of other back on a bain under escort, they things that his defence lawyer said will probably sit either side of during this court hearing, they had him, he will probably go into police custody, and he will probably be requested, orjack shepherd requested, orjack shepherd requested, once he is back in the dealt with very quickly at the old uk, he wants for one year to be in a bailey for skipping bail and then cell by himself and the after that, at some stage, that around—the—clock video surveillance and he also requested for the media appeal against his conviction will ta ke appeal against his conviction will to be given access to his cell. the take place, and that is the reason we heard in court today as to why he judge today replied to that and said does want to return. thank you very thatis judge today replied to that and said that is not something for him to decide, but he has consented to that much. extradition. so how quickly could he some breaking news to bring you with be back in the uk? potentially by european football's governing body, the end of the week. the judge uefa are confirming that they have be back in the uk? potentially by the end of the week. thejudge has agreed that this will happen. at least a couple of met police opened disciplinary proceedings against montenegro for racist
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behaviour. this follows the european detectives will go over to georgia, they will take custody of jack qualifying group a match between shepherd, they will bring him back montenegro and england, played last ona plane, night. and you may well have seen shepherd, they will bring him back on a plane, probably both sitting either side of him as they come raheem sterling talking about this, back. he will then come to a police about the racist abuse that he said station in the uk and he could possibly appear at the old bailey he personally did not hear but was heard by other players on the team. very quickly, perhaps the next day, and will be dealt with for skipping uefa is saying that it is looking at bail. but he has got that appeal against his conviction. we haven't got a date for that yet. thank you five charges against montenegro, very much. now it is time for the including racist behaviour. they also include the setting off of weather forecast with simon king. fireworks, the throwing of objects, crowd disturbances and they are investigating, and safety and security regulations, that stairways we re security regulations, that stairways were blocked at the stadium. but in terms of the story we have been more in the way of blue skies and following since last night's game, sunshine developing as the morning goes on. probably more cloud than which england won 5—1, the racist sunshine across northern england. some outbreaks of rain affecting the behaviour, the racist chanting that some of the england team were
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far north of scotland. maximum temperature is getting up to 11 to subjected to. you will know that the england manager gareth southgate, in the aftermath of that match, was 14 degrees. they will be at varying calling for uefa to investigate this amounts of cloud through the night and this morning we are hearing that so in lengthy clear spells, they will be taking disciplinary temperatures could get close to freezing again, particularly across southern areas. elsewhere, we keep proceedings, or opening disciplinary proceedings, or opening disciplinary proceedings against montenegro, and we understand the case will be dealt that cloud. between four and six with by the uefa control ethics and disciplinary committee on the 16th celsius. 0n of may. that cloud. between four and six celsius. on wednesday, another largely dry day. temperatures coming that news just coming in. up largely dry day. temperatures coming up by largely dry day. temperatures coming up bya largely dry day. temperatures coming up by a degree or so. perhaps even israel has carried out more air 16 celsius. goodbye. strikes in the gaza strip as palestinian militants continue to fire rockets into israel. the israeli army said it had struck dozens of hamas targets, deploying tanks on the border. in return, palestinian groups say they have also fired into israel. the conflict quickly escalated following a rocket attack yesterday the headlines. mps have backed which injured seven people deep inside israeli territory. hamas officials say a ceasefire taking greater control of the brexit had been reached, process as they prepare to vote but israel has not yet commented. tomorrow on alternatives to theresa may's plan. 0ur correspondent yolande knell we are stuck in a never ending
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merry—go—round of, you know, doing the same thing and expecting different answers, is on the israeli—gaza border. so something has got to change. we've got to break what is the situation they now?” through this logjam. the through this logjam. prime minister says there are guarantees the prime minister says there are no guarantees she will abide by their what is the situation they now? i am ina what is the situation they now? i am in a townjust what is the situation they now? i am in a town just a couple of miles decisions. the prime minister has away from the very north of the gaza always been clear. it is a negotiation between strip, so it has been a very noisy ourselves and the european union and and nervous night for people. a lot if parliament expresses a view, it may be entirely undeliverable. of people spending the night with jack shepherd who was convicted of theirfamilies in air raid shelters, the manslaughter and a speedboat in safe rooms in their houses as sirens rang out. according to the crash on the thames will be extradited back to the uk. he went israeli military, some 60 rockets and mortars were fired towards on run to georgia but was sentenced to six years in his absence. finding southern israel over the course of several hours and, at the same time, a nswe rs to six years in his absence. finding a nswers for the israeli air force was striking to six years in his absence. finding answers for bereaved parents. coroners and england and wales may what it said were militant sites be given new powers to investigate inside gaza. dozens of them, still births. uefa has announced it including military compounds, also has opened disciplinary procedures. the office of the hamas leader. that sent upa the office of the hamas leader. that sent up a big fire ball into the sky. all of that came in response to
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that earlier, more unusual, longer range rocket attack. a rocket fired from gaza towards the centre of we are live at westminster where mps israel yesterday. it covered a have effectively taken control of distance of some 75 miles and it was the next steps in brexit, defeating that attack, after a home was the next steps in brexit, defeating the government last night, voting foran destroyed and seven people were the government last night, voting for an amendment put forward by all the first lap when, the tory mp, injured, that prompted the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to that means mps will now get to have cut short quite dramatically his their say on a range of brexit visit to washington. he had a quick meeting with president trump. he was options. the agreement has been trying to show himself as an picked twice to mps now and theresa important statesman on the world may has faced a heavy defeat. there stagejust important statesman on the world stage just before the israeli elections. now the focus is all back was speculation she may put it back today but that is not happening. the on security and mr netanyahu, who arrived back a short time ago in focus on tomorrow and what might happen with that, might lead to mps israel, he has gone straight to israeli military headquarters in tel getting behind a softer brexit? aviv, and although they have been whatever the outcome of those votes, those reports of ceasefires, certainly there is a little in the the government is saying they are violence at the moment. what we not guaranteeing with what mps want heard from a senior diplomatic tomorrow. let's speak to the
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source on the bain with mr netanyahu is that a ceasefire has not been conservative mp for monmouth. reached in israel's viewer. another welcome. a leave means leaf mp, but side said a ceasefire was reached one who has been supporting theresa but that is not true. we are waiting to see what happens next. thank you. may withdrawal agreement. you voted against that process last night. why did you vote against that? let's ta ke against that process last night. why did you vote against that7m against that process last night. why did you vote against that? it is mps let's take a look at the weather who want to stop brexit. this is what it is all about. it is not forecast now. hello. for northern parts of the uk, quite cloudy. in about having a second referendum, there are a majority of mps who do southern areas, lots of sunshine. a not accept the public have their right to say. and we'll try to stop touch of frost. we now have a reward of the blue skies. that is east brexit. i do not buy rubbish about sussex at the moment. further north, not quite as cold. the cloud thickest across the north of wanting second referendum is, what they want to do is stop brexit from scotland. outbreaks of rain this afternoon and a breeze. decent sunny happening. you want to get out and spells across southern areas. maximum temperatures up to 13 the e are g says there is no way celsius. overnight tonight, that they will support the brexit deal. cloud will continue across scotland.
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outbreaks of rain. elsewhere, varying amounts of cloud. some clear "erg spells. a touch of frost in the it will keep us in a customs union countryside but for many of us in for two years and maintain a close the towns and cities, temperatures above freezing. up to seven celsius. relationship afterwards, it is a compromise but it is one that could just about have a majority in the wednesday, sunny spells. most likely houses of parliament if they are willing to support it. i am quite in england and wales. more cloud for happy with a world trade organisation brexit but the numbers scotla nd in england and wales. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland. maximum temperatures of 15 celsius. are not there for it. we have to goodbye for now. ta ke are not there for it. we have to take the compromise that is on offer are we will lose everything. some are we will lose everything. some are saying if they do not get behind this agreement, they are effectively throwing away brexit. they want to hello, this is bbc newsroom live. see a timetable for it may the headlines... mps back an unprecedented move departure. would you like to see that? i would not departure. would you like to see that? iwould not like to take greater control departure. would you like to see that? i would not like to get into of the brexit process speculation. —— theresa may as they prepare to vote tomorrow on possible alternatives departure. certainly leave the to theresa may's plan. we are stuck in a never ending merry—go—round of, you know, doing the same thing and expecting european union within the next different answers, couple of weeks. all mps made this
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so something has got to change. we've got to break commitment. what disappoints me that through this logjam. so many mps on both sides, including but the prime minister says there are no guarantees she ll abide by their decisions. the prime minister has some of the cabinet, i willing to always been clear. undermine the deal in order... they it is a negotiation between ourselves and the european union and if parliament expresses a view, do not like it. they think they know it may be entirely undeliverable. better than 17.4 million people. there is a real arrogance and i have jack shepherd — who was convicted to say it includes some cabinet of the manslaughter of charlotte brown in a speedboat ministers, as well as many labour crash on the thames in 2015 — mps. there is an arrogance they are has agreed to be extradited back to the uk. where they buy into this idea that he went on the run to georgia during his trial but was sentenced people who voted to leave our to six years in his absence. finding answers elderly are, you know, not educated for bereaved parents. coroners in england and wales and generally should be ignored. i may be given new powers to investigate stillbirths. think it is outrageous. i voted to leave. i have been campaigning for yea rs. leave. i have been campaigning for years. i have not changed my mind andi years. i have not changed my mind and i know no one else who has uefa has announced its opened disciplinary proceedings change their minds. i am sick of following allegations of racist chanting directed towards england's footballers in their being told i was tricked into doing euro 2020 qualifier victory in montenegro last night. it, i'm a bigot and have changed my mind. lots of people i know have not
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changed their mind. we were due to sport now. leave the eu this friday but that date is now delayed and it is not iam sure clear what is happening next. how i am sure you are starting with that news from the governing body. they are you feeling about it? are we nearer or further away from the brexit you want. have opened proceedings after the qualifier last night. they will be so how are you feeling about it? looking into racist behaviour as are we nearer or further away well as the throwing of objects from the brexit you want? watford was one of the most marginal during the match. england players areas when it came to the vote, with 50.3% voting leave where the target of racist chanting. and 49.7% voting to remain. 0ur reporter ashleyjohn—baptiste 0ur sports correspondent was there. is in watford for us. hello. i am currently in the town centre in the hustle and bustle of people shopping and having their a night which should have been lunch. an extremely marginal seat. all about another emphatic win it is an area that voted leave with but which ended on the very sourest of notes. in the closing minutes, a very it is an area that voted leave with as he received a yellow card, a very narrow it is an area that voted leave with a very narrow majority ofjust 252 danny rose was subject to racist chanting, which england say must votes. i have some voters, locals, now be investigated. earlier raheem sterling had celebrated england's fifth goal who voted in the referendum and we by cupping his ear to the crowd, after also hearing abuse. wa nt to who voted in the referendum and we want to get their views of how they he was keen to make his point. think the government have been it was shame, really, because it was handling the brexit negotiations. we
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a massive team performance have harriet who voted remain, and on a difficult ground, a difficult place to come. we knew how difficult it would be. keith who voted remain. how do you think the government has handled the we knew it would be hard at times. brexit negotiations? very pearly. as we stuck together as a team and there were some great performances in there today we know with theresa may she was a but then, you know, just a couple of idiots — mind my language — but a couple of idiots remain. —— very pearly. she does not ruined a great night. have the heart and what she was earlier england had battled doing andi have the heart and what she was back from conceding doing and i think we have ended up a shock early montenegro goal, with a situation where nothing has in impressive style. been done, a mixed bag of a plan. michael keane had led the way, before two goals from ross barkley with a situation where nothing has been done, a mixed bag of a planm helped send them clear. has not gone very well at all. i captain harry kane also chipped agree it has been handled pearly. in with a typically composed having said that, it was a difficult finished but sadly the goals were only part of the story. ididn't hearduring thing for any government to carry through when you have such a split the early part of the game, feeling across the country and but i am told there was things in parliament as a whole where the the early part of the game as well. majority are remain is. i think she but i certainly heard has been too dogmatic and going for when danny rose was booked and it is unacceptable, her deal. going back with the we will report it. so—called meaningful voted three times meaning the first two were not for england, an evening of mixed meaningful. i also feel that it is time now for her to put the whole emotions. an impressive win but matter back to the country because
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the electorate has changed from when overshadowed by the behaviour in the the electorate has changed from when the last vote was taken. furthermore, a lot of people voted stands. for something we did not understand. they had no clear view of whether raheem sterling said fining they wanted a hard or soft brexit.” countries whose fans are singing racist chants is not working and all should say that theresa may players can do is draw attention to withdrawal deal has been rejected the problem. he tweeted get some twice in the comments. almost three yea rs twice in the comments. almost three years since the referendum. we have education. away from that seen the twists and turns of the negotiations, how has it changed your view of politics and the democratic process?” story... your view of politics and the democratic process? i think it has shown a lot of self interest by a lot of politicians, they are doing what they think is best for them her replacement left out. goalkeeper rather than the country. even has been included as well. england putting the vote to the public in the first place was a pier decision have four friendlies before their because people did not have the world cup match against scotland on fa cts because people did not have the facts to make informed decision. —— the 9th ofjune. england's women have clinched the t20 a bad decision. thank you. series against sri lanka — winning by 8 wickets to take an unassailable 2 nil lead in the three match series. i'm alsojoined by sri lanka could only make 108 46. joanna cherry, the snp mp for edinburgh south west.
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welcome. good afternoon. david davis and england are chase down their mp said mps have voted for what is target injust14 overs. going to be unfolding now i and england are chase down their target in just 1a overs. victory in basically doing it because they want the final match would give them a to thwart brexit, that is what it is record tenth win in a row, something about. no, we are doing it because england have not managed since 2012. the tory government... a different we have worked very hard this tour. it has been a big shift for us. we david davis. the point stands we are doing it because of the conservative are looking for ten in the next game government have failed to deliver a we have got. it is not easy to win satisfactory outcome during the any game in international cricket, how are you making it look so brexit process. parliament has been straightforward? we are trying to be ina brexit process. parliament has been in a state of paralysis. all the ruthless and had our plans in place. prime minister seems capable of doing is bringing back a deal that we are trying to get the job done. has been defeated. it is vital that and conor mcgregor, the former two—weight ufc champion, parliament took control of the has announced his retirement from fighting. process. we live in a parliamentary he posted the news on social media this morning. the irish man is 30. democracy, this is a minority government who are only there on he has established himself as one of sufferance of parliament and last night it did not have the support of the leading fighters. although his the majority, is parliament has career has been marred with taken over. the majority, is parliament has ta ken over. it the majority, is parliament has taken over. it is called democracy. controversy and an order to have if david davis does not like it,
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anger management help. it is not the tough. it seems to be focusing some first time he has announced he is of the minds of mps. jacob rhys mogg retiring. we will see if he sticks to his word at this time around. has been saying it is a choice that is all the sport. between theresa may's deal and brexit, he would go for the deal. can you see the deal getting through because mps are staring down the face of the barrel. some brexiteers let's go to our political editor like michael gove have taken the norman smith. i think we should be view that they will take theresa may deal, take brexit and get a more wa ry norman smith. i think we should be wary of taking that leap. what we do know is that theresa may is going to right wing deal in and rip up that deal, as these people have been address conservative backbenchers shown to do in the past. that would slap bang in the middle of that not be in the interest of our crucial parliamentary debate on indicative votes on a brexit plan b reputation to make deals and break them. i think what mps have to make at five o'clock. that is going to be a focus on now is find out what at five o'clock. that is going to be a high drama pressure point moment, there is a consensus around and putting any deal that is reached back to the people of the united very obviously, because she may well kingdom for their approval. nearly face calls from brexiteers and
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three years ago during the others to set out a timetable for referendum campaign, promises were her departure if she wants to secure made about what brexit would look their backing. more than that, her like. those promises have proved tone will be crucial towards undeliverable. circumstances have changed. the brexit that theresa may backbenchers. does she adopt the same approach as yesterday in the has negotiated, and any other commons where she suggested these brexit, would look very, very indicative votes was unworkable, different from what was promised to would not result in anything, that people who voted leave. it would, as matthew hancock was circumstances have changed and the snp believe the vote should go back repeating this morning, just result to the people. thank you very much. in them voting for unicorns. 0n repeating this morning, just result we have yet to see what, if in them voting for unicorns. on top of that, is she going to insist that they stick to some sort of party anything, mps get behind tomorrow in whip or will she allow a free vote? terms of a majority. at 3:30pm this afternoon if she does not allow a free vote, simon mccoy will be joined by maddy thimont jack does that trigger more resignations? from the institute for government and bbc senior political analyst write in the middle of an already peter barnes for bbc ask this. they will be answering your incendiary debate that could change questions on the current brexit situation and how things will work procedurally over the coming days. the course of brexit, theresa may is you can send in your questions using the hashtag bbc ask this going to have a pivotal face—to—face on twitter, emailing askthis@bbc.co.uk meeting with her backbenchers, and by texting in to 61124. which, who knows what that will result in and help fire that will
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shape the course of events tomorrow andindeed i will say goodbye and hand you back shape the course of events tomorrow and indeed theresa may's one position. they have been lots of to the studio. thank you very much. questions around how long she can remain in power and how powerful it let's ta ke to the studio. thank you very much. let's take a look now at some of the would be in delivering support for her agreement were she to set out a day's other stories. coroners in england and wales could be given new powers timetable for departure, with the to investigate the deaths eog indicating it is the price of of stillborn babies. currently, inquests are only held their support and so if she did it for infants who have shown signs of life after being born. come may fall into line. how much of an impact do you think it would have under the government's proposal all full—term stillbirths, which happen after 37 weeks, where she to go with that? is it would be looked into, giving bereaved parents some answers effectively one of the only things as to what happened. up effectively one of the only things up to her that she can offer up to try and win support for that deal?” let's now speak with trish and mike white, who set up the teddyrose foundation think it might win some brexiteers. following the still births of their children teddy and rose. i doubt she would win anywhere near enough. i think the view in number tell us first of all about your two ten is the more effective implement to get brexiteers on board is, blu ntly, to get brexiteers on board is, bluntly, fear. the fear that brexit bbs. could slip through their fingers if they continue to vote against the ——babies.
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deal and theresa may will point to the indicative votes debate and say, still borrowed back in september. in effect, look, if you do not back was there any investigation into any my deal, parliament is going to of their deaths? there was pursue a much, much softer brexit development issues with teddy, that that could involve staying in the customs union, could involve the was the reason why he was born at 21 single market, freedom of movement, weeks. with rose, the pregnancy was continuation of the european court ofjustice, and by the way, this healthy and everything was fine. we will be a long, protracted slow did not realise until a postmortem we found out the reasons why she was process. the hook will be that that fear will finally force the brexiteers on board. —— we hope. that is the main strategy that stillborn. mike, from your perspective was it useful to find number ten may think that will out what had gone wrong? yes, at the deliver them victory if she puts her time when we last rose, it was an meaningful vote to a third vote this week. thank you, norman. unexpected loss, we could not get our heads around it. by the morning we had lost her. it was a difficult decision to go for a postmortem. we
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new research from the disagreed whether we should do it british social attitudes survey has been analysing how public attitudes might be because we did not want anyone messing with her after we had lost natcen social research polled more her. we are glad we went for the than two and a half thousand adults last month about their views postmortem because it gave us the on brexit — and compared this with data from february 2017. answers we needed and she got an when asked, just 7% thought the uk government had done a good job in the talks, infection and that was ultimately while 81% said the reason. you do not normally they were handling them badly. the data suggested that public faith in the negotiations has contract that until you pass through dramatically fallen — as when questioned in 2017 — the birth canal and your waters go 29% thought the government was handling brexit well and a1% said negotiations were but she caught pneumonia from inside and that is what killed her. the being handled badly. fa ct we and that is what killed her. the fact we did the postmortem gave us and in another startling revelation, those answers and we are grateful we only 6% expect britain did that. i wonder what your to get a good deal now, thoughts are on this consultation down from 33% in 2017. process and the idea that there and 63% now expect britain to get a bad deal — could be inquests into all up from 37% two years ago. the poll also indicates that 55% would now vote to remain in the eu. here s professor sirjohn curtice, stillbirths from a 37 weeks onwards. whose team conducted the research, on the poll findings. i think it is a good thing. i do. i think it is a family decision and it
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the truth is, the public eye now should come down to the family deeply critical of how the uk whether they want their baby to have a postmortem. that was our personal government has handled the brexit choice for us. i think the other negotiations. around four in five of us think they have been handled thing to consider is you have to badly. believe voters are also as bearin thing to consider is you have to bear in mind, unless you do the are likely of remain voters to hold postmortem, you cannot help yourself, even in the future, that view. it is not surprising we because all of the babies that are have now become deeply pessimistic about the kind of deal we are dying, we cannot find preventions getting out of the brexit process, with around two thirds of people and cures for the future. it has thinking it is going to be a bad helped us and we are talking to consultants, they can tailor your deal and leave voters, the people future plans because they know what theresa may is trying to satisfy, just as critical as those who voted has happened, rather than speculating we think this has remain. believe voters have become happened. they know what has less certain about the economic happened. they know what has happened. it is a difficult decision consequences of brexit. —— leave. but i would encourage families to think longer term, even though it is a hard thing to do at the time. your they are still committed to the thoughts on that as well, tricia, if cause. at the end of the day, the you wait because there is the truth is most voters would vote thought that by carrying out a exactly the same way and a second
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referendum as they did in 2016. the postmortem it would help future polls do now show a narrow remain deaths, should it override the leave, not least because those who family's wishes if they feel they did not vote too and a half years cannot go through the process with ago are more pro—remain. their stillborn baby? it is a the uk was due to leave the eu this difficult question and i think it is friday but that date is now delayed, a personal choice for the family. and its not entirely clear friday but that date is now delayed, difficult question and i think it is a personal choice for the familym so how are you feeling about it? was a difficult choice for us to are we nearer or further away make and we made that. i think the from the brexit you want? watford was one of the most marginal pa rents make and we made that. i think the parents should get the final say. areas when it came to the vote, with 50.3% voting leave thank you both very much for talking to us. they have set up the and 49.7% voting to remain. 0ur reporter ashleyjohn—baptiste foundation in memory of their is in watford for us. children. thousands of people who invested hello. i am in watford. in a high—risk bond scheme hello. iam in watford. i hello. i am in watford. i am hello. iam in watford. iam in hello. i am in watford. i am in the marketed as a "fixed rate hustle and bustle of the town isa" might now face a two year wait centre. you can see some people in before getting just a small the area, many are shopping now. percentage of their money back. london capital finance when it comes to brexit, watford is collapsed in january and the serious fraud office now says it's arrested four people quite an interesting area. on the in connection with the case.
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my colleague victoria derbyshire spoke to people coming to terms with losing their life savings, 2016 referendum, we know that including julianna lancaster who lost more than £100,000. watford voted to leave but only by a narrow majority ofjust watford voted to leave but only by a narrow majority of just 252 votes. watford voted to leave but only by a narrow majority ofjust 252 votes. i should say that 50,000 votes were it was a shock. i went into shock cast, around 70% of the electorate mode. i tried to ignore it. i did here in watford. you can appreciate just how narrow that majority is. i not do anything. then i waited for a should also say that the bit and not do anything. then i waited for a bitandi not do anything. then i waited for a bit and i wrote to my mp, nicky conservative mp for watford quit morgan. i started at the top. and last night as business minister in support of that amendment giving mps now, two months later, i am in control over the brexit process by a bereavement. that is the only way i series of votes. really to get a can describe the feeling. i am sense of how brexit and the trying not to think about it. i have negotiations may be impacting local written it off, find, get on with economies i can speak to andrew carter, the chief executive of a life. in the month in between, i'm think tank focusing on the economic hoping to start a new business so it performances of uk cities and is will take off to provide for my politically independent. andrew, you have done research into brexit. how future. when someone mentions it,
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like today you are asking me how i is it all affecting local feel about it and the sum and amount authorities like watford? even though we have not left the european of money, ifeel sick feel about it and the sum and amount of money, i feel sick in feel about it and the sum and amount of money, ifeel sick in my feel about it and the sum and amount of money, i feel sick in my stomach. radio 4's money box reporter union yet, we have had nearly three dan whitworth is with us now. years of negotiations and we have just take us through the headlines seen particularly businesses reviewing their plans. we go to from this report. this is it here, a swindon and the cat honda i look at fat or nissan in sunderland, they 50 page document that was released this morning. for someone like me are taking a second glance. also we who has been following this story, every page is fascinating. two main ta keaways for every page is fascinating. two main see that workers are both leaving takeaways for the audience and investors, people like we heard they the uk and are not coming to the uk are, it is going to take at least two years to get any of that money from the european union, which makes recruitment of talent much more back. crucially, the administrators difficult. when it comes to local in the best case scenario i hopeful areas like watford, what are the only to recover around 20% of all of signs that people can support on the potential impact of local economies? their money. we are talking about an brexit makes it more uncertain and experienced first—time investors, businesses do not invest in people who were putting in their uncertain environments and jobs to pensions and savings into the scheme, that is a long wait, two
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yea rs, scheme, that is a long wait, two years, and only 20% of their money. not get created. wages are not growing as much as we would like. some of the stories are also, because there is less money in heartbreaking. 0ne some of the stories are heartbreaking. one other thing i wa nt to heartbreaking. one other thing i want to pull out of this report for the country, public services suffer you, andi and local authorities do not get the want to pull out of this report for you, and i think is important, the funding they need. it? you have been wording from the administrators looking into, do you think local here. they are saying, our economies are prepared for brexit?” investigations indicate some of the think brexit makes the challenges bondholders, some of their money that many people face all the more flowed through a variety of difficult. that means we have to transactions which resulted in a more mindful about preparing our multi—million pound of those money is going into the personal places and providing people with the possession or control of four skills to take advantages of what comes next, helping firms find other people. just briefly, it continues, opportunities to trade and export internationally. the european union the administrators have approached isa internationally. the european union all of those four people and are is a significant place. lots of other goods go to the european asking them to pay those monies to a holding account so that if the union. finding alternative sources is going to be a challenge. to see bondholders do not get all of their how brexit will impact local money back, there was a multi—million pound worth of monies economies like watford, i guess we will go to the bondholders. just to just have to wait and see. thank you. we will have lots more coverage finish, to have agreed to this. they
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have said the well. the live from westminster. now i will administrators are still waiting to hand you back to the studio. hear from the other two in this thank you. in a moment we'll have all the business news, regard. also quite crucial. as well but first the headlines on bbc news... as the administrators, other mps back an unprecedented move agencies are looking into this. to take greater control where does this leave the investors? of the brexit process as they prepare to vote tomorrow you mentioned the might only get 20% on possible alternatives to theresa may's plan. a man convicted of of what the invested. yes, and some manslaughter for killing his girlfriend in a speedboat crash of what the invested. yes, and some on the river thames has agreed to be of the other organisations, the other agencies, the financial sent back to the uk following his extradition from georgia. conduct authority for example, they finding answers for bereaved parents — got into the finance in december and coroners in england and wales may we re got into the finance in december and were concerned about misleading be given new powers to marketing. if these are first—time investigate stillbirths. and experienced investors, a lot we re and experienced investors, a lot were taken in by this advertising. a lot of it happened online and a lot through social media. the financial conduct authority were not happy now the business news... it could be one with that. it went in and of the bigges reforms of the internet in a generation. investigated the company and it froze the finances. it collapsed at the end of january. froze the finances. it collapsed at the eu is voting on plans to protect the end ofjanuary. as froze the finances. it collapsed at the end of january. as well as the copyright of movie and music financial conduct authority, the
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producers as well as photographers and news providers. serious fraud office are arresting. it wants internet firms to police they have made four arrests, they content more closely and remove links that infringe copyright. have not named the people. they made it could mean the end of gifs the arrests in conjunction with the and memes as well as online news national crime agency, the city of aggregators such as google news. london police, the serious fraud office took the lead on it. a lot of soaring executive pay has become a symbol of "corporate greed" people are looking into this. thank and is undermining the reputation of uk business according you for explaining all of that to to a group of british mps. us. the business select committee said a detective in the netherlands said that over the last decade, who is nicknamed the indiana jones the pay of ftse 100 bosses has grown of the art world has tracked down a painting by pablo picasso that four times as much as national average earnings. disappeared 20 years ago. buste de femme was stolen shares in mens clothing retailer on the french riviera from a yacht owned by a saudi sheikh in 1999. moss bros are down 10% after the firm fell to a full—year the painting is thought to be worth loss for the first time since 2011. the firm has reported $28 million dollars. a 9.3% fall sales. store sales fell sharply, but online sales performed well, anna holliganjoins echoing the fortunes of other us from the hague. this extraordinary tale, something high street firms. ofa this extraordinary tale, something of a thriller. indeed. some would say rather careless to leave a good morning. it could be the biggest picasso masterpiece on your luxury change to the internet in over a generation. yacht in the french riviera where it the european parliament was undergoing a refurbishment. it
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is debating this morning and will vote on whether to modernise the laws that govern how we use the web. had baffled detectives in france for what does the bill do? two decades. the suspicion was it it would make online platforms had been destroyed because it is and aggregator sites, like google, facebook and twitter, responsible for copyright virtually impossible to sell such a infringements, and supposedly funnel more revenue from tech giants back distinctive item on the open market. to artists and journalists. those backing the new rules include industry bodies that look but then this dutch detective, a after content producers — super sleuth as he is known in the the likes of universal music netherlands called arthur, got wind group and waner music. it might be circulating on the dutch but people are worried underworld so being used in illicit about something called article 13 — dubbed the meme ban. deals with drugs and arms and that no—one is sure whether memes will fall foul of the kind of thing. keep it wired out to proposed rules. his con tasks asking if anybody had they are discussing that today. inadvertently bought it picasso. —— pitt words out to ask. a dutch another controversial businessman turned up at his section is article 11, known as the "link tax", department in amsterdam with this would mean publishers and aggregate sites — such as google — have to pay a tax to 1938 masterpiece wrapped in a sheet sites to whom they link. and a couple of black bin bags. he hung it on his wall overnight and he let's speak to robert ashcroft. what
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said that he thought picasso would do you make of these plans? they could change how we all use the appreciate this because it made the internet. i do not think it is how detective one of the most expensive we are going to use the internet that changes, people will still be able to upload the content, they in amsterdam. —— it would make the will not be liable for any copyright infringement, that passes onto the apartment one of the most expensive in amsterdam. thank you for telling platforms. parody is accepted from us that extraordinary story there. this. this is good news for consumers and creators. it balances the economy to create a fair market. experts have told the bbc that authorities are in denial about the practice of ‘breast you suggest it will not change how ironing' and that pe teachers we use it, but if you look at some need to be trained to spot it in young girls. of the things that will fall foul of breast ironing is when hot objects are used to press and destroy this, tweets, status updates, links the breasts of girls as young as nine. it originates in west africa, we will. 0n but is happening here in the uk. this, tweets, status updates, links we will. on line, all will be 0ur reporter amber haque has been to meet women in middlesbrough, birmingham and london, checked by google. no, i think you all speaking for the first time, about their experience of being breast ironed by members of their own family. might be mistaken there. the whole point is if they have copyright breast ironing is a hidden form of material that is uploaded, they are
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obliged to use, the large ones have cultural abuse. it originates in the technology to do so, identify it countries in west africa. the bbc and remove it on request. the point has heard stories of it happening is to take out a licence for the content. that is what we do, it is across the uk. it involves flattening a girl's chest with hot what the record labels do and the publishers do. what we are objects to do lately breast from encouraging us to have a fair market growing so she does not attract male in the pricing of that content. what attention. it is often done out of are you going to define as a fair love and protection. your mum was use policy? someone who is posting a video or music track which is subject to copyright or someone who is using it in a fun way, in a fun saying, you are growing up, there will be a shame if i do not iron them. they will be coming to you to way? they are allowed. if they want have sex with you. she was breast i to upload that, that is fine, that is the whole point, to take the owned by her mother at ten years burden off of the consumers and the users and place it on the platforms, old. it is a practice carried out by the people who currently are women on women, and pressure on some mothers to carry out the tradition licensed in many places. youtube has can be immense in the uk.” a licence and facebook has recently taken one out, twitter has not yet. mothers to carry out the tradition can be immense in the uk. i remember when my daughter turned ten years what we are trying to do is to move old, i remember my late mum towards a level playing field where
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proposing to me, she is growing and there is a fair market for content on the market. while we are talking, she is beginning to have breasts. we have heard from brussels telling she said it is time. i said no, no. us that the eu has backed that proposal. they are getting the in the house we locked the door.“ backing of the lawmakers. that is they would have been able to get something he would welcome? that is them, what would they have done to right. we kicked off this debate in them? they would have hired her 2014. it has been a long rational discussion and this creates an breast. safe experts say opportunity for us now to have a business partnership with the internet giants. i am very pleased professionals a re breast. safe experts say professionals are in denial about about it. it is good to talk to you. breast ironing. it is a community robert ashcroft there. just sensitive hidden crime. the numbers are far greater sensitive hidden crime. the numbers are fargreaterthan we sensitive hidden crime. the numbers are far greater than we anticipate. confirmation there as we were comfort was breast i owned at eight talking, the european union has yea rs comfort was breast i owned at eight backed preliminary proposals to years old. it was in a pe class that tighten and clamp down on some of those rules regarding what we can she realised she looked different share and where the revenue can come from the other girls. i must have from. more money funnelled into the been 14 or 15. i always hit myself people who create the content, but he could not hide yourself. that rather than the tech firms who distribute it. it could be good news is when i noticed their breasts were
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for things like journalism as well. different to mine. if my pe teacher had known back then, they would have in other business news... noticed something. if i had had to the chips are down at samsung. help then, i would have been able to deal with it. but now that i am a the south korean electronics giant has warned that profit for the first three months of the financial year full grown adult and i am finding will likely miss expectations. out this is the reason i am going an unprecedented statement by the company blamed a decline in chip prices. through this, because someone 0nline supermarket service 0cado has signed a partnership agreement decided to mutilate my body. now with australia s coles group — campaigners tell the bbc that breast marking its fifth major overseas ironing should be made a mandatory deal in less than 18 months. the deal will see 0cado s technology pa rt ironing should be made a mandatory part of sex education in schools and and software develop coles online s pe teachers should be trained to grocery business in australia as supermarkets try to compete spot the signs in young girls.“ with the demands of online shopping. has to be about education of teachers and people working with young women to make sure they uber is to buy its middle eastern realise this is a thing and it is happening here in the uk and that rival careem for $3.1bn. they should be talking about it and prepared to listen to understand what is going on. a lot of money. the america—based ride—hailing app is looking to expand globally and wants to increase its value ahead of its stock market listing later this year. the tie—up is expected to be in a moment, it's time
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completed by the start of next year. for the one o'clock news a quick look at what the numbers are with reeta chakrabarti, but first it's time for a look at the weather doing at this point. 0ver with tomasz schafernaker. quiet out there on the right now. a quick look at what the numbers are doing at this point. over the departure from the eu will take. the for many of us, fair and hazy skies. ftse100 some are lucky enough have blue departure from the eu will take. the ftse 100 up departure from the eu will take. the ftse100 up a little this morning. expect the volatility, not on the equity markets, but the customer skies. over the next few days, not a lot will change. the temperatures markets as they are trying to work could get up to the mid teens across out what that meant. mike ashley the owner has put in a renewed bid for the uk. this high pressure has anchored it across the uk. to the debenhams. the debenhams boat are north, that is where the cloud is having none of it but they are streaming in. the high pressure is willing to offer an all—cash purchase to buy the shares. here and stops the cloud. they are clipping parts of scotland. northern currently has about 30%. its major areas of the uk will remain on the cloudy site. even some spots of rain deal in australia has been welcomed for our friends cloudy site. even some spots of rain by investors, online supermarket for ourfriends in the cloudy site. even some spots of rain for our friends in the western isles. 10 celsius in stornoway. in deliveries. it is doing pretty well for the firm. its shares up 4%. you the south, 13 celsius. quite fresh out there today. tonight, very little change. you can see the
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are up—to—date. thank you very much. pattern with the arrows blowing around like a clock. as long as the cafe's welcoming cats and rabbits high pressure is here, the weather have been opening up will not change a lot. it has to across the uk and here's one the queen could put on the itinerary frost in central and southern areas. for her next royal visit. this is the corgi cafe in bangkok. visitor's are able to spend an hour with the dogs, this is where it is going to be where they feed them and watch them perform little tricks, milder. the air out there is but it's not all work, the owners are keen to stress the dogs are given plenty of rest relatively mild. spots of drizzle in the hebrides as we go through after all the excitement. tomorrow. the tendency will be for a dull cafe. that is my kind of the temperatures to rise as we go through the course of the week. thing. it is time for the weather wednesday into the mid teens. mild forecast. —— dog cafe. we have a bit ear stuck in this area of high pressure. “— of difference north to south in the ear stuck in this area of high pressure. —— mild ear. up to 18 uk. sunshine. 0ver celsius. this mild air is riding of difference north to south in the uk. sunshine. over the of difference north to south in the uk. sunshine. 0verthe next few around the high pressure. the cold days, high pressure in charge. it does not move very far over the next air is to the north of that. there few days but gradually this weather are hence the colder air is heading front will encroach into the far our way next week but not for the north—west of scotland later in the time being. a decent day. cloud
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week. for the meantime, north—west of scotland later in the week. forthe meantime, quite again in the north—west. more of a cloudy. we have got clear skies and breeze here. those temperatures on sunshine further south in kent. that thursday hitting 17 celsius. with difference in the north to south light winds and sunshine, it is will continue this afternoon. going to feel very pleasant indeed across the south of the uk. at the sunshine in southern areas this morning. the cloud will build up a weekend, things could be cooling off and that will take us into next little bit. sunny spells across southern england. northern england, week. colder weather on the way. not more cloud. bright spells. more cloud across scotland and northern ireland. outbreaks of rain affecting yet. the fire north of scotland. maximum temperatures is 10 celsius. elsewhere, 11 to 13 celsius. through tonight, varying amount of clouds. some lengthy clear spells. that will allow temperatures to drop too close to freezing in the countryside. for most of us, temperatures above freezing. three to seven celsius. cloudy across scotland and outbreaks
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of rain. elsewhere, sunny spells again. like today, chasing the cloud around a bit. more in the way of sunshine for the northern areas compared to today. maximum temperatures, higher than today. 12 to 15 celsius. high pressure is still there. clear spells into thursday morning. a bit of mist and fog developing. an area of high pressure. the wind is going in a clockwise direction. drawing in the warmerair clockwise direction. drawing in the warmer air from clockwise direction. drawing in the warmer airfrom the clockwise direction. drawing in the warmer air from the south—west. warmer during thursday. mist or fog we re warmer during thursday. mist or fog were clear away quite swiftly. a brighter and sunnier day for many of us, especially for northern ireland and eastern and southern areas of scotland. maximum temperatures up to 17 celsius. 0ne scotland. maximum temperatures up to 17 celsius. one or two spots hitting 18 celsius. by friday, similar
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conditions. north—western area is becoming cloudy again. temperatures will drop down to 11 to 15 celsius. plenty of dry and fine weather to come for most of the week. goodbye.
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