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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  March 26, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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this is beyond 100 days, with me, this is bbc news. jane 0'brien in washington. i'm rebecca jones. christian fraser is in westminster. the headlines at eight. our top stories — the house of commons takes control of parliamentary mps prepare to take part in a series business and sets out two days of votes tomorrow to try to choose its preferred brexit options — but the prime minister and find an alternative says still believes her deal to theresa may's brexit you're watching beyond 100 days. deal that the house is the best way forward. the house of commons takes control a stunning turnaround for actor of commons can support. of parliamentary business and sets jussie smollett — uefa opens disciplinary proceedings out two days to choose its preferred all 16 charges brexit options. against him are dropped. against montenegro after some fans he'd been accused of staging a hate made racist chants towards england the prime minister says she is not attack against himself. players during their euro 2020 qualifier victory last night. bound by the commons‘ decision i would not be my mother's son and still believes her deal if i was capable of one drop is the best way forward. of what i was accused of. theresa may still hopes to bring her brexit deal back coming up in the next half hour — for a third meaningful jack shepherd, convicted of killing vote this week. purdue pharma — the drug—maker a woman in a speedboat accident the former brexit secretary, behind 0xycontin — david davis, believes she has now settles a lawsuit which claimed on the thames in london, a fair chance of getting it through. its opioids contributed to is to be extradited back the deaths of thousands of people. to the uk from georgia. well, it's not a good deal, six teenagers have been arrested but the alternative on suspicion of ransacking is a complete cascade of chaos. a mosque in newcastle, and one size fits all? where copies of the koran were ripped up and windows smashed. also on the programme: why nasa's first all—female space walk had to be called off a stunning turnaround because of a wardrobe malfunction. for actorjussie smollett — all 16 charges against him are dropped. he'd been accused of staging a hate attack against himself. chicago's mayor calls this a whitewash. i would not be my mother's son if i was capable of one drop
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of what i have been accused of. and the queens who ruled egypt — it's now been almost three years since the uk voted a new exhibition tries to seperate the myths from the women. in favour of leaving the eu, and yet the original departure date — which was supposed to be the end of this week — has been delayed, and it's not clear until when. new research now shows just how disillusioned the uk is with the entire process. 6% of people think hello, i am christian fraser the country will end up in london, jane o'brien is in washington. with a good brexit deal, it has been a quite extraoardinary and leave supporters are more day in westminster. pessimistic about that than remain supporters. parliament is in control — the government is our home editor mark easton has been powerless to stop it. and tonight, mps were setting out looking at the details. how things will unfold tomorrow worcester has won a reputation as a bellwether for when they put aside the ordinary what the public thinks. business of the house to hold this true to form, at the referendum, series of indicative votes. its vote for leave almost exactly mirrored the result across england. there will likely be six or seven options presented to mps. later in the evening, i think we are definitely better... they will be given half an hour to indicate on paper voting slips during the campaign, i came to worcester‘s cap'n'gown pub, which options they can live with. where a brexit hustings drew local activists from both meanwhile, the prime minister sides of the argument. is working hard to bring back her deal, hoping the unprecedented events of the past almost three years on, few days will focus minds among i've invited the participants the eurosceptics whose of that brexit debate back support she needs. to the pub to see
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what they think now. she has some cause for optimism. leading brexiteers jacob rees—mogg and former brexit secretary david davis said, arguing for leave at the 2016 hustings was former amid the chaos, mrs may's deal ukip stalwart peter. could be the least worst option. i think for the first 12 months it will be chaotic... it's not a good deal, no, perhaps that's an exaggeration. but the alternative it will be difficult. is a complete cascade of chaos. thereafter, this it's what i said a week ago, country will flourish. and now you are seeing it. local businessman richard you're seeing people bend amendments was a passionate remainer. to try and wrench control i would like to stay because it's better for my of the negotiation away business in my opinion. from the government, but just tell me what that would be a disaster, we're going to do. and you're seeing proposals you sound absolutely being put up which are all at the end of your tether! lam! worse than her proposal. i lose sleep over it. a norway plus or common market 2.0 actually is more like eu minus. william, who campaigned for brexit, says his business has suffered you've got the second referendum, since the referendum. designed only to stop i think what's been the result of the referendum, happening is terrible. it's causing indecision for investments, the people i supply so they are all worse. in the construction industry, it wasn't just opposition because of the uncertainty, mps who voted against decisions are being put back. the government last night — 30 conservatives rebelled against their leadership as well. the disillusionment of activists three ministers quit on both sides of the brexit debate their administration jobs to make is reflected in the latest research sure parliament has a chance to take from the british social
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control of the process. attitudes survey. according to the poll, let's hear why they did it, 81% of people think the government starting with the now has handled brexit badly. ex—foreign 0ffice minister, alistair burt. just 6% of voters, leave and remain, we have to do something, and we shouldn't be this close think the uk will get a good brexit deal. to the edge, and we shouldn't be so what should happen now? in a position where we could risk no there were strong opposing deal by any accident. views in the cap'n'gown. that's why i think we need to make a decision. what worcester woman says is all of the ministers indicative of how the country goes. who resigned supported the prime minister in her deals, well, i, worcester woman would say including myself, but we all felt to the westminster bubble that that we were going nowhere with this you are there to implement endless alternative of her deal the decision of the british people. or no deal. these are extraordinary times, and the country is stuck i wanted to leave, but now, in its biggest constitutional i do not want that again. political crisis, i want to remain. i think, since suez. you've changed your mind? and we are stuck in a never—ending i've changed my mind completely. merry—go—round of doing the same it's been very, very disappointing. thing and expecting different the amount of people answers, so something's got who are now having regrets, to change, and we've got to break the amount of people who have through this logjam. changed their mind, so we've heard a little bit that matters a lot. about the plan for tomorrow, because if you're still going to but let's just take a moment to look talk about the will of the people, in more detail at what the so—called you need to measure it against the current information indicative votes are. and what's going on now. the mps will be able to vote 0ne national pollster has calculated that worcester on a series of options — would now support remain. maybe six or seven of them — and that, according to today's british social attitudes survey, to see if any of them commands a majority. reflects the view nationally. so here are the likely options —
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but the researchers also warned that a no—deal brexit, a standard perhaps the key message is for everyone to show a degree free trade agreement, of humility when claiming to know a canada—style agreement, the will of the people. the pm's deal, the pm's deal plus customs union, that's the view from the uk, the pm's deal plus customs union and single market, but how is the ongoing brexit saga perceived in europe? otherwise known as common market a short while ago, i spoke to my colleague adam fleming, 2.0, a second referendum from the european parliament in strasbourg. adam, do you get the sense and revoke article 50. that the eu is really trying to ramp they'll vote on all options up the pressure on the uk parliament? at once — a straight yes/no i don't think it's so much vote on each preference. that they're trying they will count them up and the speaker will decide later to ramp up the pressure. they just want some resolution in the week which options go from the uk about what kind of brexit can unite through to the run—off. the house of commons. that's certainly the view i'm joined by conservative mp andrew mitchell, who rebelled of guy verhofstadt, last night and voted who is the senior member of the european parliament who oversees this institution's approach to brexit. for the letwin amendment. he thinks this is a positive step, what's happening in the uk, are you not at all worried that because it is a step towards a cross—party consensus collectively you have opened up about something that parliament could unite around, pandora's box? the house of commons has got to move the thing on a bit something that he personally has been calling for for several weeks and that is why i supported all of and several months now. the's amendment. but i should make though then you get other members
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it clear that one of the principal of the european parliament reasons i did so is because, if the who are not quite so positive. house of commons is to move on, then the vice president of i think the prime way to do so as to the centre—right grouping here, the european people's party, accept the prime minister's deal. i said, "parliament just needs to choose. voted against it injanuary but are stay in or get out and live now support it because i think it is with the consequences." the least worst option on the table. and one mep, a green mep from belgium who is the leader soi of one of the green groups here, the least worst option on the table. so i want my friends in the er g to was absolutely scathing about the british prime look at the instruments of torture which lie before them, all the minister theresa may, saying that she lacked even the basic human skills required options you have just set out for of a political leader. and he said, look at last week's summit of eu leaders viewers, and realise that actually their best interests are in where theresa may even managed supporting mrs may's deal. we have to annoy the prime minister heard from jacob meet rees mogg of luxembourg, who is renowned as the nicest man in europe. today. —— jacob rees—mogg. pretty scathing. yeah, not very polite at all. heard from jacob meet rees mogg today. ——jacob rees—mogg. if you do not have faith in the direction the how much optimism is there, though, that the uk parliament can get anything done within this new timeframe? it really depends who you speak to. government is going, why not hold a some people think all of this is a recipe for the uk leaving the eu without any deal at all because itjust general election? you all voted to have confidence in the government, can't agree on one. she has vote of confidence in the
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party, therefore should you not let other people think this her lead? what on earth would the is a recipe for the uk staying ma nifesto her lead? what on earth would the manifesto say? night that the main in the eu for much longer, political parties have any coherence potentially causing lots of problems at all on what they want to happen. for the eu as brexitjust drags out and consumes evermore political maybe tomorrow parliament will say oxygen when there's other stuff that we are up to something because that the eu wants to be grappling with. the problem at the moment is then you get other people parliament has said no to everything who are optimistic that this but have not embraced any of these could lead either to a much closer options, so maybe tomorrow we will future relationship between the uk and the eu than the one move forward but the idea that an election would solve this is for the the british government has been birds. we have set out six or seven pursuing up till now, options there, which of those could or perhaps even a reversal you live with? her deal is the best of the entire brexit process, a revocation of article 50, option. i was a remain photo or another referendum in the uk where the deal is put originally but i am now convinced we have to leave. —— photo. i think the to the british people. so there is a whole spectrum of opinion. canada plus plus option is quite all we really have to get our teeth good. i do not actually think that into on the eu side, though, is what eu leaders signed up to last we would leave with no deal, i do week, that two—tiered approach not think there is such a thing as not think there is such a thing as no deal because they would have to to extending the brexit process. bea no deal because they would have to be a lot of deal is done were we to does theresa may's deal get through this week before the 29th of march, advance down that option. i don't in which case brexit would be extended to the 22nd of may, to give
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think it's desirable or in the the uk time to put its domestic interests of my constituents, but i do not think it is a disaster. you legislation in place? seem hesitant to put your name to 0r, failing that, the uk then has any of these plans. it is an until the 12th of april to come up instrument of torture for you, you with a way forward that can satisfy see it as a means to the end to get the eu and then we go from there. the deal across the line. see it as a means to the end to get the deal across the linelj see it as a means to the end to get the deal across the line. i do. that if no way forward is found is the point. but we all have a that pleases both sides, pleases the british parliament and the british government merit order, no two members of and the eu side, by the 12th parliament think precisely the same of april, then that is the new date way. we are all trying to reach the by which the uk would leave right conclusion for our without a deal at all. adam, thank you very much constituents, we all have a merit order, so common market 2.0 is below indeed forjoining us. what would be called the max factor some rather stinging comments from the europe side today. canadian option. i know you have i'm joined now byjack blanchard, editor of politico's london voted and i rushed over here, so playbook. you should read jack's and column thank you very much. every morning, he keeps me up with we can speak now to catherine barnard, constitutional law professor at cambridge university. what is going on in this place. fill mein... this is rather odd. parliament is what is going on in this place. fill me in... you did not go to bed last night! he was up all night. what is putting the cart before the horse, this was supposed to be a sequential process whereby the two sides agreed going on within cabinet? parliament
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the divorce and then down the line and over the course of the next two yea rs and over the course of the next two years we look to the future. that is is now holding its own vote on what absolutely right. what is so odd the next brexit move should be, and about this process, let's say that the next brexit move should be, and the big argument within the cabinet and within the conservative party addicted folks find that the common is, should theresa may tell her mps market 2.0 is the preferred option. that you can vote for these options but not these ones, or should you the only thing that can be done at stand back and say, i can control the moment is to put in the this anymore, for what you believe in. the worry for the prime minister political declaration, and that is is if she doesn't allow that free vote, she will see another big series of resignations from her government tomorrow. the main supporting ministers who just really not legally binding. the only way to make it legally binding would be to feel they now have to start put in the withdrawal agreement, yet the eu says that is in a box and we asserting their own view on a softer brexit deal because they do not cannot touch it. the withdrawal believe hers will get through. so a agreement is about the past, not about the future. so the political declaration is about the future, not big decision for her and for the legally binding, which means if there is a change of government they whips office to make tonight and tomorrow morning as to how they can change their minds about what manage this process forced upon them the future might look like. so you by mps. how would you whip that? a start to think, what is the point about indicative votes? gives you an load of options on a piece of paper, other names go on it was met will idea about the direction of travel you be able to see? you cannot see but it is not legally got binding. who is voting for that. we are used
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so what you are ultimately saying is to this very public voting system, this will be done behind closed u nless so what you are ultimately saying is unless they can i ministered to take doors, on spike —— almost like the deal to the european union, get embraced in an international treaty, voting in an election. but it will but the political declaration is not binding, so that would be somewhere become public in the end, later down the line, a future brexiteer tomorrow. to may's position has a lwa ys tomorrow. to may's position has always been, as we have had so many prime minister might say, i don't times, my deal that's it. there aren't supposed to be any other options. suddenly mps are being like that and we will legislate to presented with them, so her position remove it. absolutely, and indicative votes are just ought to be, you pick my deal and indicative, not legally binding, they will not be in the form of an nothing else. but if that is what act of parliament, and even if they she says, we will see a lot more were, the whole point about people walking about the government. andrew mitchell, at the top of the parliamentary sovereignty is an act programme, said he does not like any of the options he has been asked to of parliament passed a day can be vote on tomorrow. he sees it as reversed by the government of leverage to get the deal across the tomorrow. so the indicative votes are essentially a way of saying, what the parliament of today once is line. yes, and privately come inside a customs union all common market downing street, there are people who think this might not be the most 2.0, but that is in no way binding helpful process. as tory rebels in brexiteers voting down a deal again going forward. and as you said, this and again, look at what parliament is now doing, and if there is a big is partly an issue, the way the eu support tomorrow night for a much has set up the structure of all of softer sort of brexit, a norway
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option where we stay very closely these negotiations. we have got to aligned with the eu, they mightjust do the divorce first, that is start to realise that that is the theresa may's deal, and only once we way this is now headed, parliament will try to force that upon the have agreed to that deal can we move country, and it might convince them to back a deal may be later this week. if it is brought back, split thinking within the cabinet. michael gove singh let abbott on friday, the onto the next stage of looking at day we were supposed to be living, what the future relationship might andrea leadsom singh, no, we are be. and that will take a number of focusing people's mines in the fact yea rs be. and that will take a number of years to decide. so of course in we are not actually leaving. —— that time there may be a change of political attitude towards the relationship we want from the eu. so andrea leadsom saying. yes, and that the indicative votes do not give you a final destination which we will not know until that future deal has is still possible, or it could be been signed, sealed and delivered. left until next week or even the as parliament continues to take week after, although that is getting pretty close to our new brexit control of the whole process itself today. they will not hold that vote until they think they can win it. and theresa may by definition loses they are not in that position yet, control, at what point will they and they are worried that if they have to call a general election? lose it for a third time, they will not have a fourth opportunity to get it through. so the position now is, this is very unclear, and it is all let's get people on site, to be as very well saying that parliament has sure as we can that we can win the sport before we hold it. so that will be the determining factor when
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taken back control of the process, that vote goes ahead. the size of data model? we have never seen in but the fact is, we cannot negotiate with ourselves but with the eu, and the eu has been very clear that they will not be talking to parliament but only to the prime minister. this country parliament taking control to that extent. this is because traditionally, under our unprecedented. get some sleep tonight! a big day tomorrow, we need constitution, it is the executive, you on site. thanks, jack. it's the prime minister, that does international negotiations. so if the prime minister refuses to listen and does her own thing, then what really odd, we don't really know the can parliament do about it? the parliament may be not a lot because process because this is so unprecedented. it is good to be like at the moment unless there is a vote of no confidence in the government, a brexit beauty pageant, where these less attractive options get knocked there's not much that parliament can do to tie the hands of the prime out one by one, then you get to monday, and the best go through to minister, and indeed even in the the final vote. and of course, the conservative party they cannot have speaker plays such a significant a leadership contest unless you role in this, jane. and the other voluntarily steps down. until december, there was that failed thing that interests me, listen to leadership contest before christmas you and jack talk, as it sounds like and she won. thank you very much a strategy that the government actually has to get theresa may's indeed. there is some thought as to deal through. is it a strategy? that whether they will want to put a isa deal through. is it a strategy? that is a word we do not hear much at the second referendum on this ballot paper tomorrow because it would not moment. i could not hear you there, be the first casualty of a rush to say that again. is there a strategy
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the soft brexit so all ports of here? i think there definitely is. thoughts about what will be put talking to andrea mitchell, you get the sense that a lot of them within forward. it gets quite complicated. the sense that a lot of them within the conservative party see this as one way to leveraging the ergs the issue today though, it was across the land. but they need the extraordinary, there was a period in the afternoon where the government dup, and you have got this, as the we re the afternoon where the government were waiting to see what the sun newspaper described it, a business of the day would look like mexican stand—off. some are saying tomorrow, everybody was in the dark, we will vote from that of the prime then you have 0liver let win, minister goes, the dup saying we effectively doing the job of the will vote erg do, and the erg are chief whip, setting down what might happen in the course of the day, and saying the opposite. but what the government sitting on its hands, normally happens in a mexican waiting to see what they would do, stand—off as they all shoot each other. yes, right, too many moving quite an extraordinary set of events. anyway, let's turn to parts. you might remember that yesterday we reported that the sackler trust had stopped matters in america. making charitable donations in the uk amid claims the family president trump travelled fortune is linked to the opioid to capitol hill today to meet with republican senators crisis in the us. for the first time since well, today, purdue pharma, the delivery of the mueller report. the drug—maker owned by the sackler family, of course, the finding of no collusion has them in a jubilant has reached a $270 million mood, but the white house has promised retribution against some of those settlement in a lawsuit which claimed its opioids who pushed the case so hard. contributed to the deaths here was the president a short time ago. of thousands of people. the mueller report was great. it could not have been better. let's cross to new york
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it said no obstruction, and speak to our business no collusion, it could correspondent, samira hussain. not have been better. now, both parties are already rolling up their sleeves for the next big fight a number of cases against purdue over health care. the trump administration has asked the courts to strike down, notjust part of the affordable care act or 0bamacare, but the whole thing. pharmacy, how significant is the settle m e nt pharmacy, how significant is the settlement and oklahoma ? pharmacy, how significant is the settlement and oklahoma? they are joining us now is deputy communications director for still facing around 200 other the republican national committee, lawsuits, but this is significant because it is the first, and one in which they settled for a pretty big cassie smedile. amount, $275 million. this could be health care has been a huge issue of amount, $275 million. this could be a sign that there are more settle m e nts a sign that there are more settlements to come in some of these the midterm elections, democrats campaigned on keeping and so did other lawsuits. now, settling means some republicans. why would the administration decide now to that some potentially damning challenge in the courts? the courts information about how aggressively purdue pharmacy post pushed this have brought it back up again. if we remember hit in the us, when the drug and how addictive it was, does supreme remember hit in the us, when the supreme court said 0bamacare was not come to light because they constitutional, the individual mandate for not having health care settled. now there are rumours that was a tax, and when the individual mandate was repealed and tax was perhaps purdue may file for
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bankruptcy, which would put all these other lawsuits on hold. zeroed out, there came into question, why is this still yesterday, we talked about the constitutional? and we know that damage to the reputation of the sacklerfamily, even this week the court in texas said it damage to the reputation of the sackler family, even members damage to the reputation of the sacklerfamily, even members of the family not even associated with purdue pharmacy. but how damaging is not constitutional. the administration does not have to push it, is now the right time? but has this been financially? we need health care is a priority for virtually every american, regardless to be clear that in this particular lawsuit, they were not named, but they aren't named in other lawsuits, of where you are on the issue, and and as you reported yesterday, we there are still many americans who are receiving quality care. they have an assurance card but nobody to see that the sackler family trust is give them coverage. but what is the no longer putting out any donations. alternative? republicans have had eight years now to come up with an —— they are named in other lawsuits. alternative and they don't have one. if purdue files for bankruptcy, there is no shortage of alternatives because it is a private company, thatis because it is a private company, offered in congress. there was that is a big part of where the debate on which one was the best and sacklerfamily gets that is a big part of where the sackler family gets its that is a big part of where the sacklerfamily gets its money that is a big part of where the sackler family gets its money from. and also, it will really needs to be in that case getting to the majority seen and also, it will really needs to be seen just how connected the sackler on that in both houses and getting that 60 vote threshold in the senate was important as well in terms of family is to 0xycontin and to doing anything wide—ranging in purdue. in fact, family is to 0xycontin and to purdue. infact, in family is to 0xycontin and to purdue. in fact, in one lawsuit in the state of massachusetts, one 0bamacare. it is a difficult debate to have when it needs to take place judge revealed some e—mails that
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and one that we are ready to do. suggest that one of the past president of purdue, richard meanwhile, the pentagon has sackler, part of that family, really announced today it is transferring $1 billion towards the building of downplayed how addictive is 0xycontin is, and in some e—mails, the wall. some republican voters, that we really need to put the blame on the patient to make themselves, that they are criminals, they are will they not think, this is a the people responsible. —— on the republican party that is supposed to back the military, they are supposed patients themselves. fascinating, to be putting more money into the thank you forjoining us. military, and here's the president taking out? that is a misnomer. this european football's governing body, uefa, isa has opened disciplinary proceedings taking out? that is a misnomer. this is a national security crisis so it against montenegro for racist is a national security crisis so it is very much in the purview of the behaviour during last night's euro 2020 qualifier against england. defence department. that's why the president is using his authority to 0ffensive chants were directed at several england players. go in and allocate resources where england won 5—1, but the match was overshadowed by racist chanting they can be best used for the from some home fans directed defence and security of our country. at several players, it is clear that these resources is including raheem sterling. for military construction. that will shares in the plane—maker airbus rose in value after china not do anything to deplete our announced it would buy readiness ability with our military. a word on the mueller report on the 300 of its aircraft.
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tweets we have had from the president who is naturally angry. he the deal, worth $35 billion, seems to be threatening to comes as airbus's chief rival, the us firm boeing, weaponised the report. is that a faces difficulties following two fatal crashes. goodidea? last week, kurdish—led weaponised the report. is that a good idea? do voters really want to forces took the last piece see him go after the fbi, the media, of territory in syria occupied by the islamic state group. it brought to a formal end the democrats? would they not rather the self—proclaimed "caliphate" he just brushed under the carpet announced back in 2014. but amid the celebrations, now? it is really good news that no kurdish authorities say they're struggling to cope with the thousands of captured americans colluded with russia, but is men and women, and are calling for an international what they also found as there is court to be set up to try them. evidence that russia did make attem pts evidence that russia did make our correspondent aleem maqbool atte m pts to evidence that russia did make attempts to meddle in our democracy has been given rare long before president trump was even access to one of the camps, roj in northern syria, a candidate. how did we get to this where many of them are being held. level with the report right now? to what should be done even have russia getting this close with the captured men and women to meddle with our democracy. who of the islamic state group? knew about it, when did they know about it and why did they do nothing it's one of the most urgent issues now the last enclave has been won back from is. hundreds of women who joined to stop it? those are important the group from around a0 countries questions not just to stop it? those are important questions notjust for this situation but to ensure it does not are in this camp in northern syria. happen in the future and we do not they include ilham allow a ny happen in the future and we do not allow any foreign straight to meddle from the netherlands, who admits to having joined is, in our democratic process again. --
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but as yet has has no idea where she might face trial. foreign state. i was watching an we are asking the government to take us back, but i'm still here, waiting. if you did go back to holland, what do you think would happen? american network today, they had a i'd go to prison. pull up american network today, they had a pullup and american network today, they had a pull up and they asked people, what will change your vote in 2020? top my children, i hope, to my family. of the pub was held, then the candidate, then the economy, do you that's what's going to happen. know where russia was? right down at and you can accept that? the bottom, zero people in this yeah. survey we re the bottom, zero people in this survey were interested in the rush because i know i made a mistake. investigation. i think that is an well, you'll understand important point for democrats because even though some of them may there are people around the world who will be watching this because even though some of them may be angry at the lack of conclusive and they will say, "well, leave her there". and over the obstruction ofjustice yeah, but it's never about issue, when it comes to collusion, what people are thinking about me. there was no collusion, and to a with few countries taking back their is group nationals, dealing with them has been left certain extent that takes the to the ill—equipped pressure of democrats because they do not have to talk about that now. kurdish administration. this isn't a prison. it is, as you can see, a camp in a war zone. and a lot of their voters do not wa nt and a lot of their voters do not the longer it goes on, want them to talk about it, they wa nt to want them to talk about it, they want to talk about the economy and the more there is a risk that things that actually affect their lives, so this could well be in something could go wrong, there could be instability in the region again. front for democrats, particularly in unless a plan is put in place soon, those very tightly formed states.
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who knew people were interested in this really is a ticking time bomb. own affairs? it is extraordinary, isn't it? people here have already suffered living under is then losing now to an amazing turn of events in chicago today. so many lives fighting is. all charges have been dropped against actorjussie smollett. here, countries like britain the case drew international revoking the nationality of citizens headlines when the empire star who join the group has was accused of faking a racist and homophobic attack gone down badly. against himself. the kurdish head of foreign he had originally been relations, abdulkarim 0mar, charged with 16 counts, but today he walked free says it's created a huge problem. with his record wiped clean. he spoke out right after the decision. i want you to know that, not for a moment, was it in vain. "unfortu nately, the i have been truthful and consistent international community has on every single level since day one. "disappointed us," he says. i would not be my mother's son "we can't hold and try if i was capable of one drop these people alone. "if the world doesn't help us, of what i have been accused of. there will be a problem again, but in a press conference, chicago's "and the islamic state group will once again be mayor condemned today's decision, "a danger for all of us." calling it a whitewash ofjustice after the final offensive that shows there is no to wipe the so—called accountability in the system. islamic state from the map, the city's police chief we saw trucks that carted away, we were told, hundreds echoed that sentiment. do i thinkjustice was served? of is families, an ignominious end no. myjob, as a police officer, for the militants, but a reminder is to investigate an incident, that children had been gather evidence, gather the facts and present them caught up in it all too.
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to state's attorney. that's what we did. i stand behind the the administration here is urging detective's investigation. countries to at least do something to help rehabilitate these young and with us now from new york foreign victims to try is criminal defence attorney caroline polisi. to stop the ideology into which they were born re—emerging through them in the future. this was the most extraordinary aleem maqbool, bbc news spectacle. have you seen anything in north—eastern syria. like this before? never. this is this is beyond 100 days. still to come — giving unprecedented, to say the least, and the queens their due. a new exhibit highlights the women quite frankly it is at debacle for who left their mark on egypt. the chicago prosecutors and police a man convicted of manslaughter following a speedboat crash is to be extradited back to the uk. system at large. the lack of jack shepherd fled to georgia before communication between the systems is quite extraordinary and i think a the end of his trial last year. after months in hiding, lot of people are left asking a lot of questions. 0ne he handed himself in to police. lot of people are left asking a lot of questions. one of the main thing steve rosenberg sent this report. to remember is this case file is sealed so we do not know how this decision was made. jussie smollett maintains his innocence but as you for ten months, he had been on the
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run. 2500 miles away in georgia. heard right there it seems like the hailing from british justice. prosecutors and police department still think he is guilty, it is very confusing. how will it be resolved if the records remain sealed? run. 2500 miles away in georgia. hailing from britishjustice. —— presumably we will never see the hiding. today, jack shepherd was evidence. it is resolved. the charges have been dismissed. 0f ordered back to britain. last year course he left his bond on the table at the old bailey, jack shepherd had been convicted in his absence of the there and is going to the city of manslaughter of charlotte brown. chicago. if you were actually they had been out on a date on his exonerated and the police department speedboat, when it had crashed on and prosecutors actually thought he the river thames. charlotte was was completely innocent of this crime, why on earth would they take killed, and jack shepherd charged $10,000 from him? it sounds like a with manslaughter by gross plea bargain but they are not negligence. but ahead of his trial, he had fled to georgia, where he was couching as a plea bargain. a lot of u na nswered couching as a plea bargain. a lot of eventually tracked down injanuary, unanswered questions. there is still and handed himself in to georgian a federal criminal investigation under way regarding that letter that police. shepherd told the court he was sent. remember there was a suspicious letter sent in the had already decided to return home beginning of this whole thing and foran had already decided to return home for an appeal hearing in the manslaughter case. i wish to chicago prosecutors indicated that that may have been sent byjussie participate in the appeal process. smollett himself. who knows what is what? it was racially charged this
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but also politically charged because through his defence team today, jack he said when he was attacked in shepherd made an unusual request, january they had shouted at him, claiming to fearfor his this is make america great again shepherd made an unusual request, claiming to fear for his safety in a britishjail, he country, so when he was arrested, claiming to fear for his safety in a british jail, he wants a cell all to himself. he wants 24—hour video surveillance, and he wants the media the president piled in. i would to be allowed into his cell to see presume given his disagreement over him. the georgian judge clearing his name, it will also be to be allowed into his cell to see him. the georgianjudge said that is political now. absolutely. just not a decision he can take. with jack shepherd set to return to the played a snippet of his speech where uk, tonight, charlotte brown's the police chief said it was a family urged him to drop the appeal whitewash of justice. he against his conviction. to accept the police chief said it was a whitewash ofjustice. he went into detail about what a miscarriage of responsibility, and to atone for his justice this was. he is alleging actions. steve rosenberg, bbc news, thatjussie smollett men the tblisi. manipulated those laws. he said the famous pharaohs of egypt something to the effect of, how have long captivated scholars and schoolchildren alike. depraved can you get? so, yes, i after all, the pyramids of giza remember back when it first broke, are one of the world s great everybody was so up in arms about archaeological sites, the fact that a hate crime had been and who hasn t cringed at the thought of being mummified?
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perpetuated in such a way, and then now, a new exhibit at the media swung the other way to the national geographic museum here in washington shines really attackjussie smollett‘s a spotlight on the queens of egypt character, now we're back to square ? the way these women attained the throne, and how they ruled. one. it very political. and very i went to have a look. puzzling. thank you very much indeed for joining puzzling. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. more than 1.8 million people one of the most lavish tombs ever in mozambique have now been discovered in ancient egypt. affected by cyclone idai, this 3d recreation shows and some of them are in critical just how beloved queen life—threatening situations — nefertari must have been. that's according to the latest figures from the united nations. more than 3,000 years and many looters later, it's probably as good as we'll get aid agencies say that thousands to seeing what it was like. of survivors have yet to receive any help 12 days after the storm hit. this sarcophagus is so important the bbc‘s nomsa maseko has visited because it's the only thing that remains of the funerary set of queen an internally displaced person camp just outside beira nefertari. and sends this report. made from pink granite, nefertari's sarcophagus beyond the airport in beira, was discovered in 190a along where international aid organisations have set up base, are tented communities with what may be the queen's knees. such as this one. these knees are a kind of mystery hundreds were brought here. we are still trying to solve. this is now nearly two weeks first of all, we can say since cyclone idai struck. the hundreds of people here have they belonged to a woman told me some harrowing stories. an elderly woman told me how who died around age 40, she saw water sweeping who lived in the new kingdom,
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away her son, her only son. so this seems to fit perfectly with nefertari. but we can't actually say it's her. people are desperate here. tracing the story of egypt's queens can be tough. people want help. although many ruled but most of the things in their own right, they still lived in a man's world, that they have told me, and their history was often in terms of the type of help manipulated or even erased. they want, are resources to rebuild their homes. the tales told in stunning it could be much worse for these hieroglyphics can't be trusted people because there because they are also symbols are still thousands more of authoritarian rule. who are still desperate for help, and aid organisations it is a very strange thing, in a patriarchal society, to allow women to step are yet to reach them. to the highest rung of the ladder and to lead her people. the authorities in iran say so we know very, very little. that the number of dead as a result we know the perfected image. of a week of flash floods has risen to 21. there were many queens of egypt. most were killed in the southern city of shiraz. this exhibition looks at six, at least 100 others have been injured. spanning more than 1,400 much of iran has been years of ancient history. hit by extreme weather, it's hard to know exactly how including torrential rains, snow and blizzards. they lived, but there is plenty the disaster hit in the middle here to show how they died, of the iranian new year and how their memories celebrations, with many emergency were perfected. perhaps nobody personifies this more services staff on holiday. a second major power cut in just than the fabled beauty nefertiti. a few hours has plunged do we know if she actually the venezuelan capital, looked like that? caracas, into darkness again, we have no idea what she actually
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with other regions also affected. looked like, and her mummy hasn't been definitively identified. it came after a four—hour blackout and even if it had been, on monday which the government how are you going to go from one sought to blame on opposition sabotage. to the other and say, 0k, here's the skeletal face a nationwide power cut earlier this and then line it up with this, month prompted looting and desperation in many parts is this actual reality? this is what she wanted to present to her people, it's what her husband wanted of the country. to present her as. this exhibition also includes the last queen of egypt, cleopatra. her life, too, has been rewritten christian, you're looking a bit cold standing out there, and manipulated over the centuries but it could be worse. but thanks to this exhibition, she and the other queens emerge from their tombs as real women imagine taking an icy bath! and notjust the stuff of legend. that's what fireman william mott did on friday when he plunged into a freezing river in wisconsin to rescue a dog. wow, amazing. i have a real interest 0k, he tried to do it without getting wet, but the ice broke and he didn't in egyptology as a former cairo correspondent, because i used to have much choice. hang out with old mummies, the the poor puppy meanwhile had been archaeological kind. this is me struggling for 10—15 minutes before mr mott arrived, but everybody got to shore safely, coming out of a tomb that had just proving you can't beat been opened, a 2500 year tomb in a a good doggy paddle. basket, which used to make me laugh.
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and i love the way everybody rushes the chief archaeologist in egypt to comfort the dog and keep the dog fancied himself as a modern—day warm, but what about the fireman? indiana jones, and he always wanted not even a cup of cocoa! good lord! ours, the bbc, there for the big reveal of a new tomb that had been opened because he thought he would this is beyond 100 find one of these queens. and on this particular day, we dropped in days from the bbc. and it was 20 dusty old monies, which i thought was extraordinary! coming up: new research now but he thought, you know, he wanted shows just 6% of people think the country will end the tutankhamun and all the jewels. up with a good brexit deal. but of course, the tomb raiders had we'll look at the details. been there before us. i had never really thought of you as the indiana jones of the newsroom before, but and purdue pharma, i'm starting to see you in a whole the drug—maker behind 0xycontin, settles a lawsuit which claimed its new light. that shot of you going up opioids contributed to the deaths the rock, that was amazing. can you of thousands of people. that's coming up. crack a whip? i was worried i would get one of these tutankhamun diseases. i was glad to be taken out in the basket. see you tomorrow for the big one. hello. the weather patterns across the uk fairly static at the moment,
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and so very little in the way of weather change over the next few days. maybe a little bit more sunshine breaking through for some compared to today, and overall it will start to feel a little milder as well. hello. what we've seen through today the weather patterns across the uk is high pressure anchored towards the south—west, fairly static at the moment, so here's the satellite imagery, and so very little in the way clearest of the skies of weather change over revolving around that, bringing in a little bit more the next few days. moisture off the atlantic, maybe a little bit more sunshine hence we saw more cloud today breaking through for some compared to today, and overall it will start in northern ireland, scotland, northern england, to feel a little milder as well. down through some eastern parts of england and north wales, too. what we've seen through today here, still a fair bit of cloud is high pressure anchored towards the south—west, as we go through to right, as well. so here's the satellite imagery, clearest of the skies a few showers across northern scotland, too. but the clearest of the skies revolving around that, towards the south—west remaining bringing in a little bit more in place through the night, moisture off the atlantic, there could be the odd mist orfog patch, but it's hence we saw more cloud today in northern ireland, here we'll see the coldest scotland, northern england, of the night—time temperatures. down through some eastern parts down close to freezing in city of england and north wales, too. centres but certainly in rural here, still a fair bit of cloud areas, —1, —2 not out of the question. as we go through to right, as well. compare that to 7—9 degrees in the far north a few showers across northern scotland, too. but the clearest of the skies of scotland, where tomorrow, it stays fairly cloudy. further showers at times towards the south—west remaining in place through the night, and a bit of a breeze. there could be the odd mist winds lighter further orfog patch, but it's south you are, again, cloud amounts will vary throughout here we'll see the coldest the day, fairly similar to today of the night—time temperatures. but if anything a bit more sunshine down close to freezing in city breaking through for england centres but certainly in rural areas, —1, —2 not out and wales in particular as you go of the question. through into tomorrow afternoon. compare that to 7—9 temperatures for your wednesday degrees in the far north
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afternoon still at levels a little of scotland, where tomorrow, bit above where they should be it stays fairly cloudy. further showers at times for the time of year, 14 or 15 and a bit of a breeze. celsius in one or two spots. winds lighter further south you are, again, and here is that static weather pattern i mentioned. cloud amounts will vary throughout high pressure firmly in charge, the day, fairly similar to today southern half of the uk. but if anything a bit more sunshine it's expanding a little bit into thursday, so light breaking through for england winds across the south, and wales in particular as you go through into tomorrow afternoon. a greater chance of some mist and fog patches to start the day, temperatures for your wednesday still the chance of a bit afternoon still at levels a little bit above where they should be of patchy frost, too. but more sunshine developing for the time of year, 1a or 15 through thursday across the country. celsius in one or two spots. bright day in the north, as well, and here is that static weather only one or two showers pattern i mentioned. for the hebrides and the highlands. high pressure firmly in charge, and on thursday, temperatures southern half of the uk. could peak around 16—17 it's expanding a little bit around aberdeenshire, moray firth and quite easily 17, into thursday, so light maybe 18 celsius across some parts winds across the south, a greater chance of some mist of central and eastern england and fog patches to start the day, as well as north—east wales. still the chance of a bit of patchy frost, too. as for friday, well, but more sunshine developing we almost do it all again. through thursday across the country. a bit more cloud, though, bright day in the north, as well, towards the west this time. best of the sunshine only one or two showers central and eastern parts, for the hebrides and the highlands. 16—17 in the high. and on thursday, temperatures but turning colder across scotland, could peak around 16—17 outbreaks of rain in northern around aberdeenshire, moray firth and quite easily 17, scotland pushing southwards maybe 18 celsius across some parts and showers for saturday for england and wales. of central and eastern england and then for sunday, high pressure builds back in its wake. as well as north—east wales. skies will be clear as for friday, well, for a good part of the time, we almost do it all again. a lot more sunshine, but it will feel a bit more cloud, though, colder this weekend. towards the west this time. temperatures at very best of the sunshine best only around 10—11.
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central and eastern parts, and then next a quick heads—up, 16—17 in the high. notice how the north—westerly winds but turning colder across scotland, develop, it is going to feel outbreaks of rain in northern scotland pushing southwards substantially cooler into the middle and showers for saturday part of next week with a cold wind, for england and wales. and then for sunday, high pressure some showers and they could even builds back in its wake. turn a little bit wintry. skies will be clear goodbye for now. for a good part of the time, a lot more sunshine, but it will feel colder this weekend. temperatures at very best only around 10—11. and then next a quick heads—up, notice how the north—westerly winds develop, it is going to feel substantially cooler into the middle part of next week with a cold wind, some showers and they could even turn a little bit wintry. goodbye for now.
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