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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  March 27, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy at westminster. today at three. mp5 prepare to vote for the kind of brexit they would like to see — hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy at westminster. but will there be any agreement? today at two. i profoundly hope that if we reached mps prepare to vote for the kind of brexit monday and we get to a majority view they would like to see — but the prime minister insists her in favour of a particular proposition that the government plan is still the best way forward. would say, as i think it ought to say, that it would then carry that forward. other options would lead to in the house of commons the speaker uncertainty, delay and risk. the john burqa has called for a vote on prime minister is failing to deliver brexit because she cannot build whether the oliver letwin plan consensus, cannot con'ipi’on‘iise brexit because she cannot build consensus, cannot compromise and cannot reunite the country. should go ahead. —— john the prime minister is failing to deliver brexit because she can't build a consensus, is unable to compromise and unable to re—unite the country theresa may meets her mps later — whether the oliver letwin plan after hinting she'll try should go ahead. ——john bercow has called for a vote. john bercow for a third time to get deal through parliament this week. putting the brakes on speeding 7 plans are revealed to fit all new cars with a device to keep them within the limit. having the power to decide which out
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officials in an area of new york state have declared of more than a dozen motions on the a state of emergency following a severe outbreak of measles. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. table should go ahead. this is a bit ofa table should go ahead. this is a bit gordon taylor, chief executive of of a formality that they are going the professional footballers‘ into the lobbies and we will get a association will stand down after 38 yea rs association will stand down after 38 years in that role. result in the next ten or 15 minutes. we will be back in the house of commons when that is under and we will have the weather. rather cloudy. staying mild for the next couple of days. it will cool way. down at the weekend. the conservative backbencher sir oliver letwin, whose cross—party proposal ushered in today‘s debate, said the government should pursue any alternative brexit path that gains a majority in parliament and if it does not, parliament also coming up — tributes to a two—tone will seek to force it to do so. legend — roger charlery, the beat‘s ranking roger — the former chancellor ken clarke asked him if he could name who‘s died at the age of 56. an example where the government had not done this. can he think of any example in his experience, i cannot in mine, of the government pursuing a policy on such a vital national matter, knowing it
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good afternoon — did not have the support of the house of commons in the way it was this is afternoon live, going about it, and simply defying a majority that had voted for another i‘m simon mccoy live at westminster on another extraordinary day where mps are seizing control approach? of the commons as they try to break as my right honourable friend is not the deadlock over brexit. tonight they will vote on a series of proposals — just a former chancellor and lord chancellor and almost everything alternatives to the prime minister‘s deal — with a second else, but also the father of the referendum, a no deal brexit — even no brexit at all house, he will have more experience than the rest of us put together, among the possible options. and if you cannot think of such a conservative mps will be able to case i am certainly not going to be vote how they choose with her able to. i do not know of such a cabinet abstaining from voting. case. simply because of the theresa may insists her deal is the only one possibility that people would raise which guarantees brexit — and she may still bring it back this issue i have done some research to try to find out whether there is to the commons for a third time — amid signs more mps may any such case recorded by historians now support it. who have a longer virtual memories here‘s what we‘re expecting in the commons over the next few hours. than we have actual memories, and i mps are currently debating have to say i cannot find one. i the indicative vote motion itself — once that is finished, the speaker will select which votes think that suggests there is a make it onto the ballot paper. pretty strong president that if the there will then be a debate on each of those votes — house of commons passes in a matter which should start at around 3pm of extreme significance to the and will run until about 7pm. then mps will be given nation a resolution in favour of a their ballot papers
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and will vote between 7 and 7.30pm. clear view of how to proceed, it we expect the results to be announced later — would be not unlawful, so far as i between 9.30 and 10pm. our political correspondent jonathan know, although that is a matter for blake has our first report. the attorney general to rule on and downing street, where the big not me, not unlawful, but decisions are made. nevertheless very constitutionally unusualfor nevertheless very constitutionally today, though, theresa may left unusual for the government is not to accede to that resolution and number 10, heading for parliament, proceed in the way the house of commons had requested it to do so where mps have forced her and her under those circumstances, and i government to take a back—seat. profoundly hope that if we reached questions to the prime minister. but before the house of commons monday and we get to a majority view tries to take control, another pitch from the prime minister in favour of a particular for her plan. proposition, that the government we are continuing to work to ensure would say, as i think it ought to that we can deliver brexit say, that we would then carry that for the british people and guarantee that we deliver brexit for the british people. forward. the leader of the house, andrea leadsom, said the government is concerned that they‘re other options would lead to delay, having control of business uncertainty and risk taken away from them. never delivering brexit. but he was clear that theresa may hasn‘t delivered. that government is disappointed that the amendment in the name of my the prime minister is failing to deliver brexit because she cannot right honourable friend was agreed build a consensus, is unable by the house on monday. a clear to compromise and unable commitment had been made by the to reunite the country. government to provide time for the house to find a majority for a way instead, she is stoking further division, she is unable to resolve forward. i take my role as leader of
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the central issues facing britain today. and she is frankly unable to govern. the house very seriously. i have a lwa ys the house very seriously. i have always been very clear that the this evening mps will vote government will listen carefully to on various options. the speaker will decide exactly parliament. but today‘s motion is an which they have to choose from, extremely concerning precedents for but the list could include a closer oui’ extremely concerning precedents for our democracy. for many years the relationship to a customs union convention has been that it is for the government, as elected by the or single market, a cleaner break people, and with the confidence of and a free trade agreement. living without a deal, another referendum or if no deal this house, to set out their is agreed, cancelling brexit. business. it is for parliament to are you confident that indicative votes are the way to go today? scrutinise, amend, reject, and to approve it. what is today does is well, it‘s an important opportunity for the house to show its voice effectively turn that precedent on and to say what it will accept, rather than constantly saying its head. those who are not in what it won‘t accept. so it will be an important moment. government are deciding that other senior ministers are more worried, and say this process sets business. our chief political a dangerous precedent. it is for the government to put correspondent, vicki young. forward business and today‘s indicative votes throw that convention in the air. iam seeing i am seeing it is almost a foregone so i am very concerned about the far—reaching conclusion but it is not because implications of this happening. with the government saying they will not back it? you are getting a collection of
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backbench mp5 together, they managed so far, people‘s vote has not found to win the vote earlier this week, enough support in parliament, it is not an easy thing to keep but those who want another referendum say it could help doing because, as you say, the mps get a deal through. i am prepared to vote for some sort government are not backing this. of brexit deal to avoid there will be dozens, hundreds of a no deal departure, mp5 who will not be voting for it. but only, only if mps let you have to keep together that the people vote on it too. coalition of the willing from all the different parties, make sure they are here, make sure they are voting in the right way. it is not before tonight‘s votes, theresa may will meet conservative an easy thing to do when you are not mps to try to convince them the government and you do not have a to back her deal in a third and final vote. whips office and an operation telling people what to do. yes, they had a comfortable majority in terms of parliaments when they won the vote earlier this week, but they some are ready to, if she‘ll promise to stand aside will not be completely convinced and allow a new prime minister until it goes through. this is just to lead the brexit negotiations from here on. and even without that, to explain the so—called business some who have blocked her deal so far are ready to back it now. motion. this has to go through to are you finally going to be backing allow those votes on various options the prime minister‘s deal? reluctantly, he and others say to happen. this is the bits where they will, fearing if they don‘t, brexit may not happen all. mp5 are taking control but if it living without a deal does not go through, then that would be my top choice now. then you come to mrs may's deal and then you come business does not happen. then we will have a much earlier nights than to not leaving at all. and mrs may's deal is better we we re will have a much earlier nights than than not leaving at all. we were expecting.
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will you support the deal iamjust we were expecting. i am just wondering, activities it regardless, or is it may well be watching what is going still contingent on the dup deciding that they will as well? on. it remains contingent may well be watching what is going on. she will be addressing members on the dup because i view them of the 1922 backbench committee as the protectors of the union later on and then the focus once that is the united kingdom, which is more important more will be on her deal. than our relationships with the european union. that is right. we do not know what parliament is poised to assert itself. she is going to say to her mp5 later the government still grinding on. on she is going to say to her mp5 later on at 5pm. we do know from big decisions will be taken tonight, but there is no guarantee of breaking the brexit deadlock. jonathan blake, bbc conservative mp5, there has been discussions with theresa may about news, westminster. all of this and about her future and let‘s get the thoughts of our chief political correspondent, whether, if she were to say vicki young, who is here. specifically that she was standing down at a certain time that that would bring enough people behind her deal. she would want to be sure that we keep seeing another extraordinary was the case before she said day. if you are outside the anything publicly. they, the other side, would want to be sure she westminster bubble, you may see, how would stick to her word. at the does this affect me? what is going on? the government, at moment there is no sign she will set an exact date for her departure. least for today, has lost complete they are still working on mp5 changing their minds and backing her control of the brexit process, because theresa may has not been deal, when a death that comes back able to get her deal through. and to the house of commons. because there is this deadlock in chris morris is wanting to get back
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parliament some mps have decided to ta ke parliament some mps have decided to take it into their own hands to see on chris morris is wanting to get back on air. if mps can get round at beat one have i got time? yes, quarter past three is the time. option + at least one option for our reality check correspondent brexit. chris morrisjoins me now. oliver letwin has got up to tell mps if this goes through, what then are what he thinks they should be doing. it is incredible stuff. also seeing, we if this goes through, what then are we going to be looking at. he will do it next week and the week a lot of the options are nothing to after. that is the thing for the do with the divorce deal, they are to do with what the future government, even though it is only advisory, saying this is what the relationship looks like. house of commons might want to get behind, there is that threat from backbench mps that if they have the we have a graphic that looks at some of numbers they can keep that mps those that might be picked together voting the same way they could even change the law. by the speaker this afternoon. do not go away. let us listen to andrea leadsom. one of the options is what a lot of it has been clear in all conservative brexiteers fever, a circumstances that‘s changing the free trade agreement, like that with withdrawal agreement is not an canada. they think they can get option. this government wants to there by having a standby deliver on the referendum of 2016 in arrangement with the eu to have no a way that maintains a deep and trade tariffs. the problem with the
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special partnership with the issue of a free trade agreement is european union. urgent action is that it does not solve the issue, say its critics, of keeping the needed. businesses and people cannot northern ireland border as open as be left in limbo any longer. there it is now. there we go, northern are two sides to this negotiation. i ireland, it does not solve that repeat, what that house decides issue. the other problem, whatever needs to be deliverable, it needs to agreements we issue. the other problem, whatever agreements we come up issue. the other problem, whatever agreements we come up with, it still has to be negotiated with the be negotiable, and it also needs to deliver on the referendum. the european union. this one, the european union. this one, the european union. this one, the european union says it will not fly. a customs union, that would go some council conclusions agreed last week way to solving the backstop issue. set out that their withdrawal yes, a permanent customs union, that agreement in all circumstances must is official labour party policy. it be adopted by the united kingdom. i would stop the uk signing new trade would urge colleagues to accept that deals around the world with other countries, that is what the approving that withdrawal government says, that is why it does agreements, which is complex, and not want to be in a customs union. which covers wide ranging areas, but it would allow trade with the eu from citizens‘ rights to farming, with no customs formalities. that is from citizens‘ rights to farming, from overseas territories to what labour says is the way forward. security and financial services, has other mp5 say there needs to be more to be the first step. the eu has emphasis on being in the single market and having the same rules and said that there withdrawal agreement will not be changed and parliament regulations and allow everything to
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needs to accept that before we can move freely, including free movement of people. then there is the option look to the future partnership, which is what much of today‘s debate known as comet markets 2.0, stay in will focus on. notwithstanding that the single market, have a customs arrangement, similar to the customs had no amendments have been union, from theresa may‘s selected, in particular i do hope that should the debate today proceed perspective possibly the worst in accordance with the business of option because it crosses red lines, their house motion, it will allow that it would solve the northern for all motions to be fully ireland issue. considered, rather thanjust for all motions to be fully and another option? considered, rather than just a select few. this would enable parliament to establish what it does one of the things that will be on wa nt parliament to establish what it does want rather than what the selection the table is no deal still. no deal would permit. mr speaker, that would mean that we would leave government has consistently said without any kind of agreement. the that we do not support the approach problem with that from the the house is taking to remove perspective of government and many government control of the order businesses as it would have a paper, no matter the circumstances. disastrous economic impact. brexiteers see that is not the case, for that reason we will oppose we brexiteers see that is not the case, we must have the courage of our today‘s business of the house convictions, move forward, it is a motion. while it is now up to clea n convictions, move forward, it is a clean break. but we have already parliament to set out next steps in seen the house of commons reject respect of today‘s business, the that as an option. that is why a
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government will continue to call for couple of the options, once these 16 are whittled down, there are two realism in the debate ahead. any that pretty much say the same thing, options considered must be in the event of no deal been the deliverable in negotiations with only other option, then we should that european union. thank you. the shadow leader of the revoke article 50, take it off the table and stop brexit altogether. this is all, and a big if, if they house. decide to go ahead with this. cani house. can i thank the honourable member most of today‘s broadcasting could for west dorset for that business of be in vain if they decide not to. the house motion... let us see what those numbers say. iam the house motion... another thing worth emphasising, i am still joined the house motion... i am stilljoined by vicki young. other people have said it to you, what do you make of that? that is not a huge surprise. they do evenif other people have said it to you, even if one of these future economic not want to have backbench mps in policies kind of wins the support of control of what goes on in the house of commons, it still needs parliament. not surprisingly the a withdrawal agreement to be in government will not back it. but place to deal with financial with the numbers earlier in the arrangements, citizens‘ rights, and the irish border. if you knew where week, you would expect the numbers are still there in order to make this happen today. the interesting thing that is being pointed out as you had to end up and did not have too had the debate there is the chance of doing this in a shorter it is important to remember that the time period so we do not get to the options mps are to be voting on is place for the irish backstop would be needed. all about the future relationship with the eu there. talk to you later. thank you.
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iam going with the eu there. i am going to stop you there. a lot of people are confused. they think this is instead of. we need to clarify what we are let us go back to vicki young. the talking about. this is why downing chamber is filling up. we are not street is so frustrated by all of far away from the first vote. this because the point they keep making, and they are right, you this is about whether that series of still need a withdrawal agreement. votes later does go ahead or not. there withdrawal agreement talks none of these will be one with any about that money that the uk is kind of big majority, we are in a going to pay to the eu, it talks hung parliament, and this is very about rights of eu citizens, all of unusual. the government telling its that needs to be sorted out. mp5 to vote against the entire frustration is that mps are not process because obviously it wants to stay in charge of what is on. focusing on that bit, they are going straight to the future. the other i want to speak to a brexit mp who point that andrea leadsom is making, whatever you decide, if the is on the —— to a conservative mp government is going to take it seriously maybe even adopt it, it who is on the brexit site of the has to be realistic. there is no debate. you have changed your mind. what has point parliament getting behind changed are at their circumstances. something which is not negotiable what we see going on now, the with the european union. and andrea constitutional wreckage of this new leadsom has strikingly said that process , constitutional wreckage of this new process, the backbenchers is there withdrawal agreement will not attempting to take control of the be reopened. she has said that is process , attempting to take control of the process, that has changed. when the not going to change. votes asking before the house we all would have expected standing orders for people sitting down, because
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they want to watch this throughout and the constitution to remain the they want to watch this throughout the afternoon, give as a rough same. that is nowt wrong. in timetable. there will be a vote is probably on this business motion at 3pm. then we addition the prime minister has made clear she will not proceed no deal will know the different motions that the speaker will accept. that will be between three o‘clock and half without consent of the house. the past three. then they will start negotiating position has changed talking about it, then the results without no deal being an option. i will be much later tonight, because do not like the deal for the reasons i have said. but we do have to have thatis will be much later tonight, because that is the other small matter of changing uk law to make sure that an eye to the fact that 85% of the date the uk leaves the eu is no people who voted in the 2017 general longer friday. there is a lot going election did so for parties that on longer friday. there is a lot going we re election did so for parties that were committed to respecting the on today. the final votes will not be until referendum result. given that is the ten or half—past ten tonight. case, we have to take a pragmatic approach, leaving the european union ina approach, leaving the european union in a compromised fashion. what about your colleagues? it will ta ke what about your colleagues? it will take a lot of them for her to get a chance of getting this through. it will be close. no matter what, when and if the third meaningful vote co m es, when and if the third meaningful vote comes, but i would say, i think you are seeing a vote comes, but i would say, i think you are seeing a movement vote comes, but i would say, i think you are seeing a movement of a number of people taking the same
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approach that i have. there are a number of concerns we have got. this withdrawal deal if passed will at the european parliament this present significant challenges for morning, there was a sense us asa of confusion and exasperation present significant challenges for us as a country but now it is the at the events here best way to move forward and get to in westminster today. the president of the european the next stage. commission, jean—claude juncker, said he was finding it almost what about the future for theresa impossible to read what is going on. may? there is talk of trees that may while donald tusk, the head of the european council urged meps to keep an open mind about giving naming a date for her departure so the uk a long brexit extension she is not in charge of the second and told them not to ignore stage of negotiations should that what he claimed was an increasing majority of british people who want to remain in the european union. adam fleming reports from strasbourg. happens —— should that happen? what would you like there is a lot of chatter about that british mps to do today? we‘ll see. in this parliament, they‘d like the other parliament to make a decision... one way 01’ there is a lot of chatter about that one way or another. i am not in the president juncker, what should british mps do today? business of looking at leadership hi! ..to end the guessing game about speculation because everybody out which direction they‘re going in. there is one thing is to get on with translation: if you compared great britain to a sphinx, this process, make a decision, move the sphinx would be an open things forward. i am not spectating book by comparison. let's see how that book speaks over about the future of the prime the next week or so. minister. we have got to come the man who chairs the summits of eu leaders pushed the idea together as the conservative party, of the uk staying in. as parliament, and ultimately as a he was speaking directly to meps, but indirectly to mp5. country, and get what we want from you cannot betray the 6 million people who signed the brexit process, not go around the petition to revoke article 50... and around the issues and attacking applause. each other.
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..the1 million people who marched for a people‘s vote, or the increasing majority of people the important question for the who want to remain government is how many people feel in the european union. applause. the same way about now changing their minds. it does seem as if a they may feel that they are not lot of significant players are sufficiently represented by their uk parliament, moving over, if it comes to a vote but they must feel that they are on moving over, if it comes to a vote on to these it may‘s deal a lot of represented by you in this chamber — people think it would be close. because they are europeans. thank you. donald tusk‘s comments iam people think it would be close. i am keeping one eye on the screen have gone down well here at the european parliament, here. we are not far from the vote. but they will be very controversial in the uk because there are questions about how many people went on that we were not expecting this to be as march for another referendum, tight. the amendment on monday had a the opinion polls aren‘t decisive, and the government has rejected the petition calling majority of 29 mp5, a lot of us for brexit to be cancelled. thought that majority would hold. it is interesting that it does seem to for the few supporters be as tight as it is. of brexit here, they fear let as assume that they vote for it, their dream of leaving the eu is withering, not blooming. i would say to you, to all of you and national leaders, and the indicative of voting goes ahead. talk us through, none of us reject the british extension has been through this before, what beyond 12th april. do we expect?
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get britain out and then we can alljust get john bercow will be crucial. yes, on with the rest of our lives. applause. john bercow will be crucial. yes, john bercow will select as many of the eu thinks today‘s votes the 16 motions as he chooses. then should have happened at the start of this process, mp5 will delete those motions and at 7pm they will go into the voting not at the point where the british try to grab one last lobbies to vote on the option is selected but not in the usual way. selfie before they go. instead, they will say yes or no on our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas a piece of paper listing out those joins us from brussels. options. to try and get around the issue of ordering a motion, to leave john jothuncker seeing the last one standing, which might john juncker seeing he finds jothuncker seeing he finds it almost impossible to read what is get more votes. a lot of people going on here. he is not alone in watching this will be confused, that, is he? because many of us here are, about he is not. i think the entire eu is exactly what we are looking at. we thinking that. jean—claude juncker are not looking at an alternative to is saying that the sphinx is easier to read than what is going on in london. the eu is looking at this, they are not looking at a process theresa may‘s plan, hair plan is the whereby they see parliament taking control, they are looking at a divorce. this is about a future pi’ocess control, they are looking at a process where they see a lack of arrangement. yes. control all around. parliament
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let as go into the house. perhaps indicating today what it might favour but not able to compel there are two tellers there. back to you. i am keeping an eye on that to happen. government is opposing it. governments perhaps not able to get its own version through it. just talk as through the but it‘s might be bringing that back. what the eu really wants process. the process now? at that something to emerge from this that moment mp5 have voted or are in the shows a path forward. whether this process of finishing voting on that is theresa may‘s deal going through, business motion. they have walked which would be the easiest option through one of two lobbies. all around, whether that is that we are heading towards a no deal, or whether that is parliament is able to coalesce around something and then press that forwards, and then that‘s my chart a path for the future, but all of those are still ayes and noes. john bercow will uncertain. interesting, healing donald tusk this morning. is that view, that there is a glimmer as far as announce the result to the house. europeans are concei’neu , there is a glimmer as far as europeans are concerned, of the uk staying in the eu after all this, is i would imagine he would like to that a glimmer that is growing whittle down the emotions because voting is at seven. a couple of brighter? motions are similar on stopping
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well, i think certainly for donald task it is something that he has held on to. very early on in the article 50. but it is really up to him. he has quite a lot of power at pi’ocess , held on to. very early on in the process, at the beginning of the this moment in this process. quite brexit process, he put his cards on the table. he is a committed nervous for many mp5 at this stage, european, way back in his own ata time nervous for many mp5 at this stage, at a time when they were not political history, he was sort of a expecting to be nervous. can somebody investigate the delay in street fighting politician fighting for democratic rights in poland, and the no lobby? i want to go back to he sort of instinctively believes in europe and the uk‘s place in the eu vicki young. the longer this goes so europe and the uk‘s place in the eu so he has never let go of that, even on, the tighter it is? though a few weeks ago he really thought that brexit was going to there have been some delays recently happen, now he says he has seen that in the lobbies for whatever reason. march in london, that petition it does not necessarily mean that. online, he is holding out that there have been some whispers that prospect that perhaps a long its might be closer but the point extension might still be possible. here is it is not going to be a huge but i would caution, actually. i majority either way because as you think there are many here, and know it is highly controversial. i think the majority earlier in the amongst the eu capitals, who are taking a different view. they are week was about 28, so it is not looking at what is going on and they going to be a huge majority either are increasingly moving in an way. the government would be
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opposite direction and thinking that absolutely delighted if it wins actually, their patience is wearing this. that would mean that the out, there are concerns about the voting tonight, this indicative vote, it would not go ahead. it possible impact of continued would mean mp5 would not have seized uncertainty for the future of brexit control of the agenda. it would be dragging on, dragging the eu quite extraordinary given that decision making process down with ministers resigned to get this, if it was now not to get through. but it. here there are quite a few who are starting to think that no deal it was now not to get through. but it isa it was now not to get through. but it is a matter of getting all of the might be the cleanest outcome of right people in the right places at all. we certainly saw the eu leaders the right time and that is not that at theirsummit easy to do when you are effectively all. we certainly saw the eu leaders at their summit last week and quite at their summit last week and quite a tough line with that, granting the an unofficial operation. you are talking about backbench conservative extension, but only until april 12, oi’ extension, but only until april 12, or perhaps a little longer, while mp5 teaming up with labour mp5 and they look for clarity. other opposition mp5, trying to keep those numbers together. it is a thank you. difficult thing to do. it is worth i‘m joined by paul scully, the conservative party vice chairfor london. seeing, if oliver letwin gets his way and goes ahead with this process we keep hearing words like historic on monday or wednesday next week or and unprecedented for what is going even eventually tries to bring in a on and unprecedented for what is going on in the building behind us now, new law, that is why it is so how important is it? it is important. it is the first difficult. because you have to make time parliament has enacted such a sure that people keep going and keep procedure. the fact that the voting in the same way, often against their own size, and that is government, who has got a fully against their own size, and that is a difficult thing to do because you
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formed agreement ready to go, to do not have the power that normal whips have of telling people what to allow us to leave, and yet it has allow us to leave, and yet it has all been taken over by a handful of do. parliamentarians, is a very odd order, order. structure. a handful and the states a little? there are a lot of people who are leading the charge. yvette cooper, nick knowles, these type of people. i am ayes 331, noes 227 ayes, 331, noes, cooper, nick knowles, these type of people. iam not cooper, nick knowles, these type of people. i am not sure that after the vote today we will be much further forward , vote today we will be much further forward, it is extending uncertainty. you have backed trees that may‘s deal. you still do. you wa nt to that may‘s deal. you still do. you want to bring it back here as soon 287. ayes have it. as possible? yes, for sure. all of there we have it. we are going these options that we have in front through this process but it is tight. of us, well, likely options, we do yes, that is a bigger majority than not know what the speaker will it was earlier in the week. we seem select, but there is one that is fully formed that the eu can agree to have more numbers now. to. bear in mind, anything we talk another thing that is interesting about all of this. about, it still goes back to the eu, they must sign it off, the eu i have selected the following parliament must ratify, then we are
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ready to go, and respect the referendum. but a lot of what is motions for decision by recorded being discussed is not about the vote. motion be. motion d. motion h. divorce settlements, it is about the future relationship. there is a lot of confusion about what is now being talked about and what is not. of confusion about what is now being talked about and what is notm of confusion about what is now being talked about and what is not. it is confusion that has been deliberately set as well. there are three amendments that are all to do with the customs union, which is all motionj. motion k. motion l. motion about the future relationship. that is in the political declaration, the possibilities of a customs union. the future trade deal. that is in the air. the canada style deal. all of that is for the next stage of the negotiation. all we are trying to do now negotiation. all we are trying to do now is the withdrawal, the divorce if you like. you have got a free vote, what are you going to do? we emma —— motioned m. motion 0. i will see what the selections are. any option that respects the referendum, there are options within it, in terms of rejig the backstop, which is unlikely, but i know that isa which is unlikely, but i know that is a big sticking point. i am still shall therefore calljohn barron to
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prepared to keep no deal on the open the debate. he does not need to table but it is something i do not wa nt to table but it is something i do not want to be tested because there is a fully formed deal ready to go. you will be meeting with the prime be unduly concerned. he shall do so by moving his motion, motion b. minister, and the 1922 committee. what will you be hoping the prime minister will say to you. speculation. what will the reaction john barron‘s motion is to agree to be? that is the sort of thing i hope leave the eu on 12th of april we be? that is the sort of thing i hope we do not get into. i hope it is not without a deal. yes, we can see the eight motions son‘ie we do not get into. i hope it is not some sort of transactional thing. this is a prime minister who has so selected. when mp5 vote at seven many moving parts working around, an o‘clock on a bit of paper, that bit of paper will have eight options for impossible task. i want to be able them to vote on and they can say yes to get this through and then when oi’ she wants to go, she can go with her them to vote on and they can say yes 01’ no them to vote on and they can say yes or no to as many them to vote on and they can say yes 01’ no to as many as them to vote on and they can say yes or no to as many as they like. that is the format that is going to take dignity. people said i could get this through, here i am, here it is, place. very unusual. i am not sure we can it has been done before but that is this through, here i am, here it is, we can get through to the next stage. what i would be most what is going to happen later on. interested in is the reaction from not the normal vote that we would my colleagues, who fought that leave have. just to go through the motions site, as i was, it will start to that have been selected. what the understand it is this or the speaker has done, he has selected a likelihood is that we are moving wide range, because the entire point towards no brexit at all, which is to find out where the house of would be a travesty.
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commons might be able to agree on a way forward. going from john barron, so we are awaiting the end of that discussion to see how this will work a conservative brexiteer, his option is to leave the eu without a deal, and things get under way from three including the motion from joanna o‘clock, and crucially, john burkle, the speaker will decide how this entire process goes forward for an cherry, revoked article 50, stop eventual vote this evening. brexit if there is no deal, then let‘s look in a bit more detail there is the labour party motion about what some of those indicative votes might look like. from margaret beckett, any our reality check correspondent withdrawal agreement passed by the chris morrisjoins me now. house of commons would have to be we have 16 options ranging from no put to another referendum. various deal to know brexit. a lot are other options, leaving with a customs union or without a customs focused on the potential economic relationship in the future. we have union. several options. let us listen to more detail that the a graphic that looks at some of speaker is giving mp5. those that might be picked by the speaker this afternoon. many of them look at where we might end up in this process. let us look at one in listen to more detail that the speaker is giving mps. during that timel speaker is giving mps. during that time i will suspend the house, the particular. it is one that a lot of annunciator will display the end
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time of the voting period. members conservative brexiteers favour, ending up with a free trade agreement. the idea behind that, one with surnames from a to k should hand their forms in in the aye of the options on the table, they wa nt of the options on the table, they want some sort of standstill arrangement with the eu which would get rid of trade tariffs while the lobby, members with surnames from l future trade agreements was being negotiated. critics say it does not toz solve that northern ireland border lobby, members with surnames from l to 2 should hand their forms in at issue because you would not have the no lobby at the relevant desk. frictionless trade across that border. it has already also been members may not vote to add no to dismissed as unworkable by that european union. you have got to the same motion. remember, whatever gets decided here, has to eventually be negotiated with brussels as well. that is one of the options from the brexiteers side of the argument. what do we need to be looking out —— may not vote aye add no to the for? this process looks like univision. there seems to be same motion. multiple—choice. when will we get a clear idea of what is actually i shall not respond to that heckle. happening? this evening, possibly not until however, if that were to happen, the about ten o‘clock, we will know how many people voted for which option. vote would not be counted. as with we will get an idea later about what will happen. it‘s might be that next deferred divisions members may not
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hand in forms on behalf of other monday we have another series of votes, perhaps the top three members. each member must hand in options. you mentioned the northern ireland his or her own form. members with border issue. the option of the customs union, pi’oxy his or her own form. members with proxy votes in operation will need where is that? to get their nominated proxy to hand this is official labour party in theirform. a policy, to negotiate a customs to get their nominated proxy to hand in their form. a short note to the policy, to negotiate a customs policy with that european union. office confirming these arrangements. i will result —— i there are two or three options on the table which are similar one but will announce the results to the the table which are similar one but the labour party ban means no chamberas will announce the results to the chamber as soon as they are ready. ta riffs the labour party ban means no tariffs or trade with the european union. the disadvantage from the the results of the votes will be government‘s perspective means it would stop the uk signing new trade published in the same way as deferred divisions on the commons deals around the world for goods from other countries because you votes website, and in hansard, have two follow the eu‘s own tariff policy. there are various versions showing how each honourable member of this. let us not focus so much on voted in each motion. the customs union. let us focus on last monday, 18th of march, i made a staying in the eu single market. statement to the house explaining rules and regulations at the scene. the standard that would have to be then there is this idea called reached to allow another meaningful comment market 2.0, try to combine vote provided in the eu withdrawal both, stay in the single market, also stay in a customs arrangement, act, i cited erskine may, i they are not calling it a customs concluded, that a proposition which
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union, but it would have a similar is the same or substantially the effect. that, from the government‘s same may not be brought again during perspective, you have to allow for the same parliamentary session. this free movement of people to continue. these are the kind of issues that monday, 25th of march, in the course will have two be debated in a fairly of answering questions following a short period of time, given that we statement, the prime minister are looking at the potential future accepted this constraint, saying, i direction of the country, today is the first day that you could say am clear about that stricture is that after months and months and months of the house of commons that mr speaker made when he made telling us what they do not want, his statement last week and where todayis are we his statement last week and where are we to bring forward a further telling us what they do not want, today is the first indication that mps are going to have to see what motion to this house we would of they do want to happen, what they coui’se ensui'e motion to this house we would of course ensure that it's met the think is a way out of the problem. requirements he made i understand that the government may theresa may, her withdrawal agreement has failed to get through be thinking of bringing meaningful vote three before the house either twice, people are talking about that she might bring it back. tomorrow or vote three before the house either tomorrow oi' even on vote three before the house either tomorrow or even on friday, if the it isa she might bring it back. it is a possibility if she has that house opts to sit that day. number is there. another option on therefore, in order that they should the table, default position if there be no misunderstanding, i wish to make clear, i would expect the is no deal, the option to go for no deal. that means the uk leaves the government to meet the test of cage, eu without any deal whatsoever. the problem with that, a lot of people they should not seek to circumvent
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my ruling, the table office has been will say the economic impact. government studies, independent instructed no such motion would be economic studies, say it would be accepted. i look forward to today's potentially catastrophic for the econon‘iy. potentially catastrophic for the economy. brexiteers say, no, have the courage of your convictions, go debate and votes which gives their for it and turn the page. most house to start the process of economic opinion says it would not positively indicating what it wants. bea economic opinion says it would not be a good idea. we also know that to move the first motion i call the the house of commons has rejected fairly firmly the idea of leaving honourable gentleman, the member for with no deal. but again, it is not basildon and billy ricky, john just as. if we do not want to leave with no deal and want a longer barron. extension, we are going to have to persuade the european union there is cani a plan in place for that to happen. barron. can i thank you for choosing this particular motion? i refer when you go to dinner parties does everybody ask you the same thing? honourable and right honourable it is all i talk about. thank you members... while that gets under way very much. i want to bring in vicki young. plenty more obviously on what is listening tojohn coming up. other news now. i want to bring in vicki young. listening to john bercow they i want to bring in vicki young. listening tojohn bercow they are, a clear warning to therese at may that all new cars sold in europe there needs to be a clear test of from 2022 will have speed limiters fitted to them, under new rules provisionally change, and at the face of it it agreed by the eu. does not seem to be there at the
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the technology uses cameras to automatically slow down a car if it exceeds the speed limit. moment. the uk is expected to adopt the measures, regardless if he is going to stick to that that of the outcome of brexit, will be a problem for the as sarah walton reports. it looks set to be the biggest government. he is saying you cannot keep change to driving since bringing back the same vote. there the introduction of seat belts. from 2022, cars, vans, has to be a change. as you say, it trucks and buses sold in europe could be fitted with technology that stops people breaking the speed limit. safety charities say it does not feel as if the change to would save thousands of lives. these new measures offer a huge leap the deal itself is there. there forward for road safety. notjust in the uk, might be additional papers, there but in europe as well. could be something about the they could save 25,000 lives and 140,000 serious injuries so—called stormont block giving more over the next 15 years, powers to northern ireland, but as that really is staggering. for the deal itself, that has not the speed limiters would use gps really change. the government could information and digital maps to tell argue that circumstances have cars what the local speed limit is. changed. for example, today mp5 as well as that, the european deciding to take control of the commission has approved plans to fit agenda makes a difference. but the technology that detects when drivers idea that was being floated around are distracted or falling asleep, from ministers here was that you could put down, bear with me, a a system that keeps vehicles in the centre of lanes, and accident paving motion, the government could black boxes that record vehicle movements. bring forward a paving motion, mp5
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but some motoring organisations like the aa say taking control away could vote for that, which could from drivers may make supersede what the speaker was them more complacent. seeing, so that if they do want to what we must ensure have a vote on meaningful vote is that the technology doesn't three. but the speaker is saying he become so overpowering or get drivers in a position would not allow that and that the where they can switch off. table office has been told that yes, there is a whole world of talk cannot happen. this could be yet around moving to fully another problem for the government, autonomous vehicles, and this technology will put us just as theresa may looks like she in the right direction towards that. but ultimately, the best might be persuading a lot more mp5 speed limiter in the car is the driver's right foot. to get behind her deal. thank you. and there are differing views from drivers and pedestrians. he has done it again. we got a sense i think it's a ridiculous idea, because sometimes you have to go of deja vu. there isjohn bercow faster and overtake, somebody may be dawdling. saying it will not happen if there it will save people, is no material change. prevent people from accidents, on the face of it there is no so i think it‘s a good idea. material change. exactly. on the i think it's a bad idea, face of it it sounds like he is for the same reason that i don't use hoping that some change, potentially cruise control in the car, even if a car has got it. to the political declaration, given i feel that if i'm in the car, that that is what the eu is most i need to be in control. willing to negotiate, and some of the department for transport has welcomed the idea, the motions up today would change but it could still be several months before the european parliament the motions up today would change the political declaration, and it sounds that is what he is looking formally approves the plans.
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for, given that he has said that the erin baker is the editorial director government cannot this paving motion. can the government, can't at auto trader uk and joins us theresa may, go over his head and from the goodwood motor circuit. say, tough, we are going to do it?|j thought the most obvious way for her to do that is to table a paving everyone will agree that something that makes things safer is good motion and he has said that the tabling office will not accept that so tabling office will not accept that so it does make it harder, but the but...? saving lives, role of the speaker is to facilitate that makes things safer is good but. . . ? saving lives, anything that makes things safer is good but...? saving lives, anything that makes that more realistic is a good what mp5 want, not to obstruct the thing. but the question is what will will of the house, if a significant number of mp5 do want to vote on the help prevent collisions with pedestrians and prevent fatalities? deal again i believe he will still listen to that but it is up tojohn bercow, and today he has said that iam not pedestrians and prevent fatalities? i am not sure that simply making ca i’s is not happening. i am not sure that simply making cars adhere to the speed limit of the road is that right option. it is ever—changing story by the moment. the road is that right option. it is the same blanket idea of government let us rejoin the house of commons, 20 mph zones in towns. and it is and john barron, whose first motion is upfora and john barron, whose first motion taking responsibility away from the is up for a date —— up for debate, drivers. and it is taking into that we leave the eu on 12th of account is not at all the conditions april without a deal. on account is not at all the conditions on the road. you might be on a a0
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cani april without a deal. can i remind members also, that mph road where a0 mph is not remotely the correct speed for that whilst most of as in this place road. it might be a lower speed prefer a good deal to know deal, no limit, a greater speed limit, depending on the conditions. any deal is still preferable to a bad sort of automating of the speeds at deal. we are left in this position which the vehicle is travelling at now, given that it looks as though gets rid of those variables and that is not a good proposition. will this the prime minister‘s deal, unless there is a major shift in this apply to bikes? two motor bikes or place, is not going to pass, i do not think it will come back and if pedal bikes? two motorbikes. yes, it does i do not think it will pass, the default position is we are the idea is you have got to put that leaving on wto terms. camera the idea is you have got to put that ca mera software the idea is you have got to put that camera software on the idea is you have got to put that camera software on the front to recognise what is going past on the road. i ride motorbikes as well. we trade profitably on wto terms with the majority of the world‘s gdp coming offa road. i ride motorbikes as well. coming off a motorbike at 20 mph can outside the eu. and we have been bea coming off a motorbike at 20 mph can be a serious accident, a fatality for the rider. if the software says assured on several occasions, i will it is a0 mph, you are ok up to a0 ina assured on several occasions, i will in a second, by ministers and indeed mph. there is also the case that by the prime minister that we are many of these vehicles use prepared for a no deal exit. i will give way to the honourable lady. let
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recognition data to determine what the speed is on the road. mejust take give way to the honourable lady. let me just take a moment to remind the house and particularly the honourable member that northern ireland has not had an executive, a manufacturers say that cars are capable of mis—reading speed limits government, since january 2017. we on capable of mis—reading speed limits on the back of lorries. occasionally have no ministers in northern ireland. the head of the northern ca i’s on the back of lorries. occasionally cars will pick up on those signs and ireland. the head of the northern ireland civil service has warned as think, 60 mph on that road, and recently as the beginning of this limit the drivers speed entirely month, in his words, of the grave inappropriately. there was a time in consequences for northern ireland if people with get behind the wheel we we re consequences for northern ireland if we were to leave without a deal. just to have some fun, are those does the honourable gentleman have any respect for the head of northern days gone? i think they are certainly in danger of going. this ireland or the people of northern motor circuit is the spiritual ireland? when the gentleman responds circuit of the petrol head, which i it might be helpful to the house to was part of myself. petrol heads, explain that no fewer than a7 car love rs was part of myself. petrol heads, members are seeking to contribute to car lovers in the uk, we are worried the event from the backbenches, a about how far automation goes, how very constrained timetable, plus quickly automated cars arrive on the three frontbenchers, so speeches of scene. quickly automated cars arrive on the scene. we are a long way off from more than about five minutes are going to render it impossible for the fully automated car but this is a step in that direction. what it
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does not take into account is the everybody else. the honourable gentleman didn't know that when i need to update driver skills called it though he could have alongside that. the most important reckon with the likelihood of substantial demand, so economy is of pa rt alongside that. the most important part of this legislation by a long the evidence —— essence. way is not the speed limiter, it is the emergency braking that is also substantial demand, so economy is of the evidence —— essencelj substantial demand, so economy is of the evidence -- essence. i will take this one intervention. i have a great respect for the people of going to be mandatory on cars, automated emergency braking. northern ireland, having served there in the 19805 and got the medals to prove it, i do take into it is all very well having new cars account what the people of northern ireland as part of our union have to that don‘t go over the speed limit, but there will still be many, many say. but at the same time we are more cars that can. how do those two pa rt say. but at the same time we are part of the united kingdom, and i would suggest to the honourable lady married together? yeah, you have to that there are predictions on both ask yourself, i can hear outside the sides of this discussion as to circuit, outside my office, the possible outcomes. we just saw the scream of the mighty ferrari v8, taoiseach now suggest that you did capable of 200 miles an hour. you not need a hard border to solve what will have the german restricted auto has become known as the northern —— unrestricted auto barn but i ireland backstop problem. so i would suggest there are differences of don‘t think they would welcome opinion and we should need to eve i’yo ne don‘t think they would welcome everyone flying over there to put recognise that in this debate. mr their skills to the test. some cars speaker, i will take note of your are restricted to 150 mph, we know stricture and just make very quick that volvo is perfectly capable but haste in my remaining comments. we
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will restrict all of its cars to 112 have been assured by ministers time mph. what you might look for some and time and time again, both in committee and in this place, that we sort of ability to turn off that are indeed prepared for no deal. we limiter, which we understand will have spent billions on no deal, £a.2 billion is the figure that seems to initially drivers will be able to override that facility simply by be current currency. and i would pressing firmly on the throttle, so suggest that when the prime minister bring your car to pressing firmly on the throttle, so bring yourcartoa pressing firmly on the throttle, so bring your car to a circuit and give a nswer suggest that when the prime minister it the full beam. thank you very answer is very directly a question much for that. now the weather with that i posed to the prime minister staff. at the dispatch box on 12 the fabric and it was a very simple question, a bit cloudy out there across are we and it was a very simple question, are we going to be prepared, she a nswered are we going to be prepared, she answered in three words, indeed we northern and eastern areas, the are. now i have to take at face sunshine increasing especially across the south—west and wales and value, i won‘t thank you very much, the midlands. the next week, high p i’essu i’e the midlands. the next week, high pressure with us, looking at dry i have to take at face value those weather and with sunshine it should reassu ra nces by i have to take at face value those reassurances by ministers that we feel even milder. high pressure with are indeed prepared for no deal, but cani are indeed prepared for no deal, but can i also mr speaker come onto what us, feel even milder. high pressure with us, across feel even milder. high pressure with us, across its north—eastern flank, this weather front is bringing seems to be a prevalent argument in thicker cloud, after a lovely end to this place that no deal would lead to disaster? not just
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the day, temperatures will fall this place that no deal would lead to disaster? notjust in this place but outside this place as well, and under clear skies overnight but what i would respectfully point out generally quite a chilly night in to these people is that these are often the very same people who these seven parts. tomorrow we will predicted doom and gloom in 2016, hold onto the cloud, the breeze across the far north—west of the country but elsewhere, after a should we vote to leave. in fact, chilly start, more sunshine around, some of the predictions were so dire those temperatures will respond and it will feel milderfor those temperatures will respond and it will feel milder for many into the afternoon, 15 or 16 degrees. a that they were beyond credibility. we had predictions we would have similar picture on friday, with highs of 17 or 18 perhaps across the 500,000 people extra and employed by south—east but then conditions turn december 2016 if we voted to leave. much cooler. a weather front will move south. this weekend it will some estimates put it up to 700,000 turn much cooler with the risk of people extra unemployed. we had frosty cold nights. predictions of self—made recessions, we even this is bbc news — predictions of self—made recessions, we even had predictions in some cases of conflict on the continent our latest headlines. of europe. they were all proved mp‘s prepare to vote wrong, so for the kind of brexit of europe. they were all proved wrong, so much so that the bank of england, for the first time in its they would like to see — but the prime minister insists her history to my knowledge, had to plan is still the best way forward. theresa may meets her mps later — publicly apologise for getting it so after hinting she‘ll try badly wrong, and what has happened again this week to get her deal since then? we‘ve had record low through parliament for a third time.
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putting the brakes on speeding, ? plans are revealed to fit all new cars with a device to keep them within the limit. unemployment, record high manufacturing output, record investment. and those decisions officials in an area of new york state have declared a state of emergency during the course of the last two or following a severe outbreak of measles. three years have been in the full knowledge, the full knowledge, that we knowledge, the full knowledge, that we could be leaving the eu on no sport now with katherine downes and deal forward slashed wto terms. and news sport now with katherine downes and news about the head of the pfa, gordon taylor. what i would gently remind members he is set to announce, we have is that investment is about discovered he is set to announce, he is standing down as chief executive comparative advantage. it‘s about such factors as what is your level of the professional footballers of corporation tax rates compared to association after nearly a0 years in other countries, how flexible are charge. your labour markets, what about your top universities? what about your it follows a controversial couple of years for taylor — financial expertise? in aggregate, with questions over his salary and whether player welfare has been a priority during his tenure. our sports correspondent in total, they actually are of david ornstein has more: greater influence when it comes to gordon taylor became chief executive investment than three to five to 7% in1981. he gordon taylor became chief executive wto ta riffs. in 1981. he 74 gordon taylor became chief executive in 1981. he 7a years old. certainly a controversial figure in more investment than three to five to 7% wto tariffs. and i would ask the re ce nt a controversial figure in more recent years. a lot of scrutiny, house just to reflect on that because there are too many wild especially in the last year, when
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people started to take note, and you predictions flying around this can see place, when really the argument or people started to take note, and you can see gordon taylor in the middle there, people started to date note the discussion should be based on of his salary, {2.2 million, far economic reality. and i would go one stage further. by introducing a fair higher than many of the sums that and controlled immigration policy, the pfa donates to retirement funds and things like that. there was wages will rise faster in this reportedly a petition signed by 300 former and current footballers country than if that immigration saying he must resign. it seems they policy was not in place, and that is will get their wish because at the agm today in manchester, it seems he something that lord rose, as the will tell members he will leave. but house will remember was leader of he wants to oversee the process of the remain campaign leading up to the remain campaign leading up to the referendum, actually said in appointing a replacement. some people might not be happy with that. front of the treasury committee. so with the first golf major of the year, i would suggest to the house that the masters, a fortnight away, the world‘s best have assembled scare stories, that somehow we are in texas, hoping to fine tune their games at the wgc match all heading for doom and gloom, that play. goods will no longer transverse dustinjohnson is the defending customs unions, trading blocs around champion, but the galleries will be packed for this man. the world, they already do that, is very wide of the mark. let‘s base it‘s been six years since tiger woods took part. this discussion, they spoke tonight the format‘s changed since then, on economic reality, and as a few on
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it‘s a round robin format to start with to make sure that everyone get‘s at least 3 matches. if all goes to plan for the oraganizers there could be the opposite benches, particularly a mouth watering woods v the opposite benches, particularly the snp, don‘t like to admit it, rory mcilroy knockout match actually we are doing rather well in the last 16 ...but woods isn‘t going to look that far ahead. economically, and those decisions have been based on the possibility i haven‘t really played a whole lot of us very much leaving on no deal of matchplay since 2013, and i‘m looking forward to it. i‘m looking terms. so i would appeal, mr forward to the fact that i just get to focus on one guy. each and every speaker, given your guidance as to shofs to focus on one guy. each and every shot‘s different, and you don‘t timings, iwill really care what the rest of the speaker, given your guidance as to timings, i will bring my comments to field is doing. ijust have to beat a close but what i would suggest is the guy standing in front of me. i appeal to the house for rational consideration with regards to no caster semenya says lord coe has "opened old wounds" deal. i know there are a lot of with his claim that "gender classification" is needed in women‘s sport. scare stories out there but this is the olympic 800m champion is challenging the iaaf over its bid a repeat of 2016. there is scare to restrict levels of testosterone in female runners. the united nations human rights council have called the plans "unnecessary, stories were wrong then, they are wrong now, let‘s have a note of humiliating and harmful". optimism about the future of this country, a note of optimism about does snooker have a problem with sexism? rebecca kenna is ranked third in women‘s world snooker, the capability of this country, but she‘s had to give up let‘s back this country, and if we on her local league because some clubs have a men—only policy. can‘t get a good deal, then let‘s the governing body says it‘s ‘disappointing and unacceptable‘. actually get back to economic
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reality and realise that we already i was told i will not be able trade profitably with the majority to play in that fixture, of the world‘s gdp outside the eu on wto terms, there is no reason we i will have to stay home. can‘t trade with the eu on such what reasons did they give you? terms and i urge all recommend the house to support motion b. the we don't let our wives in, so we won't let you in, we don't have facilities for a lady. how did that make you feel? outraged, really. question is as on the order paper, to be told you can't play the sport you love because of your in respect of the honourable gender is ridiculous. gentleman's motion. we now proceed, it's quite upsetting remembering, but... humiliating? yes. finally — rough, bunkers, trees — because the honourable gentleman has ina timely because the honourable gentleman has in a timely way completed his some of the hazards you‘d expect to encounter on the golf course. unless you‘re playing operation to the next contributed to in savannah harbour in georgia... when this is another the debate, and i am proposing what of the challenges you could face — an enormous alligator marching across the green. might be called an indicative time—limit might be called an indicative time-limit laughter of five minutes, mr stephen kane. it‘s not unusual to see them on the course in that part of the us — but this one stood out thank you, mr speaker and thank you because of its size. too for the work of the great work of the right honourable memberfor look at that, absolutely enormous, a west dorset who is making today‘s legitimate excuse i‘d say for slow proceedings possible. i rise today
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to speak in support of amendment d, play. that‘s all the sport for now. in my name and the name of the honourable member for grantham and snappy as ever, thank you, catherine. i‘m here all week! let‘s other honourable members. mr ta ke catherine. i‘m here all week! let‘s take you to the commons because speaker, this really is five minutes jacob rees—mogg is addressing that to midnight for this parliament, for this government and for our country. mission, let‘s hearfrom him. we desperately need to find a way out of this mess. our country has spent two years tied up in knots by jacob rees—mogg is addressing that mission, let's hear from him. go back to the electorate and the reason my honourable and right honourable friends are not willing the prime minister‘s incompatible to ta ke red lines which offered such a honourable friends are not willing to take that conclusion is that they narrow interpretation of the referendum result. a50 2—a8 result are going against the electorate‘s was not certainly an attraction for will as expressed in our greatest a disastrous no deal or a hard evei’ will as expressed in our greatest ever referendum. i will give way.|j canada a disastrous no deal or a hard ca na da style a disastrous no deal or a hard canada style job destroying brexit, thank my honourable friend and will a lwa ys thank my honourable friend and will always learn from him but i think on it was an instruction to move house this i must disagree. i am quite but to stay in the same neighbourhood. the efta ea model offers that possibility, it respects capable of distinguishing between my general competence in the government the result without wrecking the and its measures and its prime british economy. not convinced? it is worth remembering what nigel minister, and they specific conduct farage told a question time audience in 2016. i hear people say, he said, on minister, and they specific conduct on this particular issue, and wouldn‘t it be terrible if we were
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furthermore i would point out to him like norway or switzerland. really? that in that great referendum, which he refers to, which voted to leave they are rich, they are happy and the european union, i have been they are self—governing countries. consistently voting with the government in which i have all the memberfor they are self—governing countries. all the member for north confidence, with the prime minister, they are self—governing countries. all the memberfor north shropshire, a passionate brexiteer, in 2015 told in which i have confidence, to give effect to that decision, and he has us a passionate brexiteer, in 2015 told us only a madman would leave the market. or the member for been voting against. jeering. my us only a madman would leave the market. or the memberfor uxbridge and south islip who has also been supportive of the single market in the past. the point i am making here is in 2016 euro scepticism meant something that it apparently no longer means today. today, honourable friend. let's hear from mrmogg. euroscepticism means, i‘m sorry, the honourable friend. let's hear from speaker has said we have very little mr mogg. my honourable friend makes time so i‘m afraid i won‘t be able a highly intelligent but fundamentally wrong point. and i to ta ke time so i‘m afraid i won‘t be able to take any... today, euroscepticism must seems to mean setting off into the fundamentally wrong point. and i m ust co nfess fundamentally wrong point. and i must confess i have sometimes thought my right honourable friend brexit fantasy forest of unicorns for west dorset was more of a wick and rainbows. yet in 2016, and most van of my own school, but nevei’ and most van of my own school, but never mind, we will leave that to euroscepticism meant simply being opposed to political integration one never mind, we will leave that to one side. the expression of whilst cheerleading for the single confidence through the government is market. and that, in a nutshell, is through its control of business not on through its control of business not on any individual item of business, what common market 2.0 is all about.
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and that is why confidence and what does it require? first, it only control of business comes together. requires a renegotiation of the and this has been taken away in the short political declaration on the past, and my right honourable friend future relationship, which the eu for west dorset referred to the has consistently told us it is open to amending. the reason labour assertion of parliamentary authority in the civil war. well, we know how that ended, that ended with pride is politicians such as myself have rejected the prime minister‘s deal purged, it ended with people being is because that political prevented from voting. the declaration, because of that political declaration, not because of the withdrawal agreement. that is government, the executive and the legislature are clean different things. that separation of powers is because the political declaration offers no long—term guarantee on workers‘ rights, and does nothing for the services sector, which is essential. the conventions of our constitution are essential and it is 80% of our economy. it is membership important we observe them properly of the single market that delivers because the sovereignty of parliament at the end is not the 70 of us, however brilliant we may be, for workers‘ rights and for the it is not the sovereignty of the services sector. that point was made mace, it is the sovereignty of the british people. they have told us explicitly by frances o‘grady of the what to do. we must do it. jacob trade rainy in congress just this morning and by the society of motor manufacturers and traders this morning also who were absolutely clear, they did not mince their rees—mogg. let‘s talk to lara spirit words, the customs union alone will
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from the our future our choice not deliver on workers‘ rights or on campaign, calling for another brexit frictionless trade at our borders. referendum. do you welcome what is trade unions and business voices going on, which is as it is came together. studio: that is described, parliament ta ken going on, which is as it is described, parliament taken control? ido stephen kinnock, putting forward the described, parliament taken control? i do think it is very important parliament has the chance to look at common market 2.0 motion in his name all the various different brexit options and to discuss what the and nick boles‘s name. let‘s pick up implications, trade—offs and costs with maddy team and jack on this. could be. in my opinion, when you just explain, common market 2.0, you ta ke could be. in my opinion, when you take a brexit option and put it into reality and look at the have already lost half the audience when you say that, so just explain consequences, reality and look at the what that is about. consequences, it becomes far less appealing. so i think you are looking at a hard and painful brexit that would be if the eft a pillar, oi’ looking at a hard and painful brexit ora looking at a hard and painful brexit or a soft and pointless one, and in the backdrop to that, still looking at theresa may‘s deal which has been the group of countries part of the rejected twice by historic margins andi rejected twice by historic margins and i hope continues to be rejected. single market but not part of the it leaves my generation with few opportunities and lower living eu, norway, iceland, lichtenstein, standards, young people being forced they are part of this group of to make sense of something which we states called efta. the uk would nevei’ to make sense of something which we never have thought make sense for britain so i welcome mps to do this. join in those but also negotiate but reading between the lines of what you are saying, those who voted access to a customs union with the eu, and the reason you would do that brexit have had a couple of years to is really to try to avoid the border see brexit have had a couple of years to see the light, to see the truth, on the island of ireland. it has that it see the light, to see the truth, thatitis see the light, to see the truth, that it is not technically possible,
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and yet the facts are, certainly been termed a norway plus in a suggested, that most people have not changed their mind. there is some former incarnation foster how is it evidence and people are changing their mind and there was a social different from george eustice‘s efta attitude survey out yesterday that showed a more nuanced picture, but n‘diaye? different from george eustice‘s efta n'diaye? george eustice has not tacked on the customs union, it is a moving towards remain. younger slightly different arrangement, instead he is trying to find an people favour remained by eight in ten and for very good reasons for alternative arrangement. the stop they know brexit will harm their futures, they don‘t like the fa ct whipping arrangements for this are their futures, they don‘t like the fact it is being decided by a few quite interesting because on this mps such as jacob rees—mogg and particular motion, stephen kinnock on his feet now, labour haven‘t come borisjohnson behind mps such as jacob rees—mogg and boris johnson behind me mps such as jacob rees—mogg and borisjohnson behind me who they don‘t think at their best interest out and said we want you to at heart. so what would you like to happen in the next few weeks? i have practice, have they? they haven't, it is not on their official list of heard it before, i know what you motions they are supporting, but don‘t want what do you want? they are encouraging their mp5 to heard it before, i know what you don't want what do you want? more and more mps to realise that the only credible and sane option out of support this option, that they want this mess for my generation and the to have enough support, because that whole country is whatever they decide through this process, be at clearly seems to be their second—best option, given that they theresa may‘s deal or any other form have their own motion has been of brexit, make sure that has the selected, which sets out their own consent of the public, on such a vision of a future relationship with fundamental question is this, it is the eu, so probably at this stage right we get the public consent. and they don‘t feel like they can whip ignore the result of the last in favour of they don‘t feel like they can whip infavourofan they don‘t feel like they can whip in favour of an alternative to labour‘s brexit, that clearly it
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referendum? it is not ignoring it. seems to be they are indicating it is their second—best option. we have given our politicians nearly three years to make sense of seems to be they are indicating it is their second-best option. behind something, it is not my fault they the scenes in downing street, one have proven completely and grossly suspects having registered whatjohn bercow has just said, there is a lot incompetent to deliver on the result of the referendum. ultimately the of work furiously going on right now promises we as to how they can get theresa may‘s of the referendum. ultimately the promises we were of the referendum. ultimately the promises we were made were not delivered, this deal is 1 promises we were made were not delivered, this deal is1 million miles away from what we thought it deal back in front of the house would look like and we don‘t have to withoutjohn bercow saying no.|j go through with this. it is not think withoutjohn bercow saying no.” think that‘s exactly the case. we democratic to force ourselves as an have speculated about whether we act of humiliation and self—harm, i just don‘t think it is. have speculated about whether we have requested an extension of act of humiliation and self—harm, i just don't think it is. thank you article 50 so we have a longer very much. you are watching period of time before we leave with afternoon live from bbc news. two oi’ period of time before we leave with or without a deal, and whether that other news now. will be enough to change the circumstances, but today barco hasn‘t really been very clear on that. he didn‘t say it would be enough, i suspect downing street will be trying to figure out what might be. john bercow is on his feet, let‘s join the might be. john bercow is on his feet, let‘sjoin the proceedings once more. i am just feet, let‘sjoin the proceedings once more. i amjust reminding the house of the time constraints under which we operate. these safeguards would give the uk a qualified but victim shows in her 60s pushed from unilateral basic right to suspend freedom of movement if that country
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behind. the incident happened after believes it is suffering serious an alleged altercation of another societal or economic difficulties. woman ina an alleged altercation of another woman in a tesco store in pimlico. police have appealed for help locating the suspected attacker. these musicians have paid tribute to the it would end the seemingly limitless singer known as ranking roger who has died at the age of 56. the nature of the eu regression that birmingham born star had a string of top ten hits in the 19805 as birmingham born 5tar had a string of top ten hits in the 19805 as part of the beat. david sillito look5 top ten hits in the 19805 as part of the beat. david sillito looks back at his life. does concern many voters. it is often said the uk would become a rule taker, but that is a # mirror in the bathroom... ludicrously simplistic view. under the terms of common market 2.0, the 1980, and roger charlery, uk would leave the jurisdiction of known as ranking roger, the ecj and therefore end the principle of direct effect. this is had just turned 17 and suddenly found himself on top of the pops. because the efta court the uk would the beat were, like the specials join respects national sovereignty ina way and ubao, part of the ska revival, join respects national sovereignty in a way the ecj doesn‘t, and new and ranking roger brought a touch laws have to be approved by each of jamaica to their chart—friendly 5ound. nation and their national parliament. it is also worth noting # mirror in the bathroom... that we have one in four efta court judges rather than the one in 28 eu 30 years later, he was judges rather than the one in 28 eu judges and that only one third of eu 5till performing songs from that string of hits. law applies to the eea anyway. we would restore policy—making power in born in birmingham, his family were from st lucia and his first
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vast areas, including agriculture, foray into music was a punk band. fisheries, foreign and justice, security affairs, justice and home when the beat split in 1983, affairs and taxation. while it is he and dave wakeling true that the efta states to take on formed general public. most single market rules, it is # seems like without tenderness, worth remembering that they enjoy there‘s something missing... the option to delay, adapt or derogate from any single market law over the years, he performed with big audio dynamite oi’ derogate from any single market law or directive. any decision to and the specials and amongst today‘5 incorporate law must be unanimous, tribute5, there were many so incorporate law must be unanimous, so in effect this gives not a vote names from that era. # tears of a clown... in the eu process because of course we are in the eu process because of course we are leaving the institutions, but it does give a veto at the national level. norway and iceland have # mirror in the bathroom... derogate from eu law on more than a00 occasions. the norwegian prime minister has also made clear that and then in 2005, ranking roger her country is ready to facilitate reformed the beat, a testament to just how well the sound as joining her country is ready to facilitate asjoining the eea her country is ready to facilitate as joining the eea via the efta pillar. michel barnier has always of his teenage years had lasted. music. said that a so—called norway plus deal would work and that the only reasons it hadn‘t been considered was due to the prime minister‘s red lines. mr speaker, our common market 2.0 motion brings together levers
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in a moment, maryam will be telling and remainers, and three different us the latest business news. parties, in terms of those who have first a look at the headlines signed in support of our amendment. on afternoon live. this breadth of support i believe is mp‘s prepare to vote extraordinary and unique. i‘m not for the kind of brexit sure that any other option has that, they would like to see — but the prime minister in5i5t5 her plan is still the best way forward. and certainly not revoking, nor a no—deal brexit, norfor a confirmatory vote in terms of that spread of remain— leave opinion. we do need to find a way notjust of officials in an area of new york state have declared a state uniting this house, in a solution of emergency following a severe that will get us out of this outbreak of measles. constitution and political crisis in which we find ourselves, but which can also begin to reunite our deeply divided country. it is time for british politics to rediscover the lost art of compromise. it is time for the house to support the motion that we are putting forward today, andi that we are putting forward today, and i genuinely hope that members the pressure is on aviation giant from all sides willjoin me in the boeing today. company bo55e5 boeing today. company bosses and division lobbies to do so. mr officials company bosses and officials from america 5 aviation regulator nicholas boles. thank you, mr
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are due to testify before the us senate in washington. they‘ll discuss how the federal aviation administration speaker. studio: i just certified the boeing 737 max. nicholas boles. thank you, mr speaker. studio: ijust want to pick there have been two up speaker. studio: ijust want to pick up on what we just heard with maddie fatal crashes involving the aircraft since october. once again. the criticism of what we the british museum has lost its crown as the uk‘s most just heard from stephen kinnock is popular visitor attraction for the first time in a decade, the common market 2.0 deal would overtaken by tate modern. almost 5.9 million people visited the tate modern make us a law taker with no art gallery last year, new figures show — influence. i think that is the issue just above the 5.8 million who went and why a lot of mp5 don‘t like it. to the british museum. it is as close to eu membership as possible but without being represented in the institutions. so it is harder to have your say and try to influence the rules the eu would be making and we would probably have to make most of them. the most popular attraction is couege the most popular attraction is college green. knew nearly said the it would allow us to put the mo5t college green. knew nearly said the most popular dinosaur, i know! the interminable brexit row behind us. changing face of retail? the great strength of the common last year was a turbulent year market 2.0 proposal, relative to all for retailers, with rent5, rates and falling shopping numbers all taking their toll on established other brexit compromises is that it names of the high street. offers something important and according to british retail consortium, december 2018 was the worst december 5ales valuable to everyone and every party performance in ten years. in this house. four members of the retail week is holding one of the biggest gatherings labour party it offers that strong of the industry today,
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to discuss ways to fight back. position in the single market which kim winser, founder of winser london is france‘s grading has confirmed it and and a former director at mark5 is france‘s grading has confirmed it is vital for workers‘ rights. and spencer explains how and why the high street is france‘s grading has confirmed it is vitalfor workers‘ rights. for is so different. honourable and right honourable members in the snp, common market 2.0 preserves the principle of free movement of labour, which they tell without question, one of the most me is essential to scotland‘s future economic prosperity and social challenging times for retail. a lot cohesion. but for those in other has happened. i mean, if you think natalie mass and a set up net a parts of the uk worried about the porter nearly 20 years ago, and what possibility of another massive influx of european migrants, like has happened with the internet, i am the one we experienced after poland still surprised that some of the and hungary joined the week businesses still haven't the one we experienced after poland and hungaryjoined the eu in 200a, recognised that and moved very quickly over the last couple of it offers an emergency brake, which could be deployed as a temporary decades. you have also had from 2008 when we had the crash, a lot of safeguard in the regions affected. for my honourable and right companies were looking at ways to honourable friend on these benches, save money, and in many instances, common market 2.0 offers the prospect of being able to benefit they were looking at pushing up from the free trade agreements margins on the product to try to struck by the european free trade covei’ margins on the product to try to cover the costs of the company association, or to do our own trade during weaker revenue times. that deals once alternative arrangements
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to maintain no hard border on the did push down the quality of the island of ireland have been agreed with the eu. and i am happy to give product, so you have ended up with quite a mass of businesses with a way. i thank my honourable friend very similar offer that are really not keeping up with live tile for allowing me. my rule today is to changes. so in a strong market, the only support things that are realistic and deliverable, and i think what he is presenting and what i have read he is presenting ticks weaker players can survive and in a both those boxes. but can he confirm weaker players can survive and in a weaker market they will definitely that common market 2.0 would not require northern ireland to accept fall. different rules than the rest of the uk, which has been the stumbling block that has just held us in this british companies have scaled back purgatory for so long?” 5harply their hiring and investment plans amid the growing turmoil around britain 5 exit block that has just held us in this purgatory for so long? i am very from the european union — grateful to my honourable friend, that‘5 according to the recruitment who did a heroic thing earlier this & employment confederation. more firms were downbeat week and i salute him for that, and about the outlook for jobs and investment than were optimi5tic iam week and i salute him for that, and i am grateful to him because he literally leads me to my next point. for the first time since the rec began its surveys injune 2016, for our allies in the dup, common the month of the brexit referendum. kate 5hoesmith explained why firm5 market 2.0 removes any threat to the feel more down feet. for obvious reasons, the economy is uncertain right now, we don't know what is happening in parliament with the brexit deal, union, because it keeps every part there is still potential there is no of the united kingdom inside the deal on the table which is causing employers to pause. they don't know single market and a com pensive whether they should be investing in customs arrangement that delivers
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businesses right now, they don't know whether they should be hiring frictionless trade. —— people. the good news is we still have more people, more employers comprehensive. for honourable and looking to take on permanent staff, right honourable friend is but there is a real concern about representing scottish constituencies what will happen in the future. and coastal communities around the uk, common market to guarantees our quick look at the markets, the british pound ro5e back to love exit from the eu‘s common fisheries $1.32 as policy and our rebirth as an british pound ro5e back to love $1 . 32 as investors british pound ro5e back to love independent coastal state.” $1.32 as investors eyed tho5e receding ri5ks $1.32 as investors eyed tho5e receding risks of a no—deal brexit. policy and our rebirth as an independent coastal state. i thank my right honourable friend for it will be another day of high drama giving way. would he confirm that the common market 2.0 proposals in parliament. european 5tock markets have managed to get back would entail continuing to follow single market rules with no say? the into positive territory after lo55e5 earlier on tracking asia and bank ofand overnight on wall street. single market rules with no say? the bank of and have advised against that. unlimited free movement would continue with only a limited and temporary possibility of restricting thank you very much. see you later that, and according to the house of on. thank you very much. see you later on. you are watching afternoon live. commons library, financial contributions would continue at around about half the current level? in october, a small group of koala5 was brought from australia to the uk, mr speaker, i in an effort to protect the species. around about half the current level? mrspeaker, iam around about half the current level? mr speaker, iam happy around about half the current level? mr speaker, i am happy to confirm some of what my honourable friend but after one of them died, said but not the first point about the project came under criticism not having a say over the rules. from animal welfare groups. laura fo5ter reports, there is an absolutely crucial process for eea member is called the
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they spend up to 22 hours a day joint committee, all new rules sleeping and the rest of the time, they‘re eating. passed under single market but if you thought the southern legislation are referred to that koala was a chilled out animal, committee, and members of the eea you would be wrong. they‘re very delicate and can have a right of reservation, which get stressed easily. it‘s why longleat safari park has means that the postal directive for hidden them from the public for the last six months, giving them time to adjust insta nce means that the postal directive for instance has still never been to their new home. implemented by norway, because they don‘t like it and ijust implemented by norway, because they don‘t like it and i just say implemented by norway, because they don‘t like it and ijust say no. we monitor their diets really that right would extend to us if we closely and make sure everything work tojoin. is working well for them. i think it‘s around 18 that right would extend to us if we work to join. does he agree with me, different species now, rotating them around, not keeping them on one thing at one time. even under wto rules, every single fourfemale5 and one male arrived back in the autumn uk export into the eu will still after being packed into crate5 have to comply with all eu rules and surrounded by their favourite food. they are considered to be regulations? there is no way that once you vulnerable, found in just regulations? there is no way that once you leave the eu you can one area of australia. somehow remain a rule maker within there are concerns that one bad case of disease could wipe the population out. the eu? it is absolutely correct, and every single producer in this country is hardly going to have one dennis is the only male koala here at the park, set of rules for their uk sales and and at the moment he is kept separately from the females their european sales, they will have because he isjust a baby. one standard set of rules and they but it‘s thought that in a few will probably be following the weeks, he might be ready to mate, european ones. my honourable friend
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and that‘s good news because the females are already is making a very good case to add to starting to call for his attention. that of the honourable gentleman who open. will he emphasise also that back in january, though, one of the females became sick from a disease she‘d been flown actually more than two thirds of the thousands of miles to get away from. entire directives that currently apply... studio: as sir oliver the park said it had letwi n apply... studio: as sir oliver letwin replies to that, let‘s pick to put her down. up letwin replies to that, let‘s pick up with maddie where we are. common campaigners question the scheme, arguing that the animals are being exploited. market 2.0, a soft brexit in effect, keeping the country in a single market and involving a new customs it‘s early days for their project, and, sadly, they‘ve already seen arrangement. yep. so what does that the death of one individual animal. mean for the border in northern i fail to see how this tiny number of animals is going to help develop ireland? so what they are trying to the conservation of the species. we need to look at this do, the border in northern ireland, for what it is, a commercial there are two different issues, one facility bringing animals to exhibit about regulatory alignment, and to paying visitors. the park says its koalas are incredibly strong. actually having checks at the border they study them daily, to ensure that goods crossing the and the research is already helping border at the same sort of standard koalas in the world. from the republic of ireland and northern ireland, so that is the single market aspect of it, the the money that we make from this goes directly into conservation membership of the eea, that is what and research for koalas. thatis membership of the eea, that is what that is trying to address, and then the customs arrangement is about
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conservation is a term trying to sort of ensure that there that is thrown all around the place, but research is the key isa thing behind it. trying to sort of ensure that there is a common external tariff, which without the knowledge, means there is not a change in we don‘t know enough about them and without the information, tariffs, so you don‘t have to have we can‘t save them in the world. checks at the border as goods cross, these koalas are the only ones tax them as they crossed the border. of their kind in the whole of europe, and expected to be a big these are theresa may‘s red lines, draw when this enclosure and theresa may right now is going opens on friday. hopefully, there will be even more to be trying to work out how on of them in a few months‘ time. earth she brings her deal back into laura foster, bbc news, longleat. parliament, having just had that warning from john bercow, frankly, that unless something has changed, and he clearly doesn‘t believe it prince charles and the duchess of cornwall have has, she can‘t. taken part in a classic car rally, and he clearly doesn‘t believe it has, she can't. yes, and what was as they continue the first quite interesting about common official visit by the royals market 2.0 is that really what that to communist—run cuba. it was part of a tour of the island‘s so—called ‘british corner‘. is addressing is changes in the the couple later went political declaration. there are two on to visit an organic farm. documents as part of her deal, the our royal correspondent, withdrawal agreement, the legal nicholas witchell, reports. treaty, and then there is 25 page high—level declaration about what we wa nt high—level declaration about what we want from the future relationship, no, it‘s not the latest in luxury royal limousines. it‘s charles and camilla, and the eu has said it is open for arriving at a classic car rally in havana in a 1953 mg td. renegotiation, and we know that the sort of changes the commons are suggesting would be able to be cuba is home to thousands of classic cars. incorporated into the change of the vast majority are american, but some are british, political declaration, so actually
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models from the 19505 or earlier, it isa political declaration, so actually it is a world in which those sort of kept on the road because the american trade embargo changes could be made if theresa may has made the import was willing to accept that, and if of new cars very difficult. charles and camilla met the crowds, the commons agree this is what they want, which of course we don‘t know curious at the sight of members yet. on the moment, at the face of of a royal family. it, john bercow has laid it fairly and from one spectator, clearly down the line, what was his another of cuba‘s specialities — a cigar, handled rather gingerly phrase, it must meet the test of by charles, who is strongly anti—smoking, change, and as far as any of us are but accepted nonetheless. then to a recording studio, aware at the moment, that will not be met. not at the moment. again, and something that always takes camilla‘s fancy — the question about whether a change in when we are leaving the eu might a bit of skilful footwork. be enough to say something, but it doesn‘t seem that likely. be enough to say something, but it doesn't seem that likely. didn't look like it, for what he was all very cuban, but could the couple at the corner table be saying. might be a change in the tempted to have a twirl? not on this occasion. political declaration is needed. we know that the eu is not ready to renegotiate the withdrawal and finally, a destination agreement, some of the motions that that is more up charles‘s street, an organic farm, and a discussion did go down that weren‘t selected we re did go down that weren‘t selected were trying to make changes to the about livestock husbandry, in this case, cows. withdrawal agreement. thank you very alongside all of that, of course, there is the question much, maddy, don‘t go away. whilst of whether this first royal visit to cuba has achieved anything tangible. we much, maddy, don‘t go away. whilst we look at this indicative voting it has been more symbolic than substantive, but that‘s going on, there is talk, and there the way royal visits are.
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is the tweet from laura kuenssberg, britain, though, will be hoping that that there is a possible statement a more constructive relationship between london and havana from the dup coming soon. rising will now emerge. the foundations have been laid. growth in the relationship is expected. chat, she says, about that nicholas witchell, bbc news, havana. statement, believe it when you see it, she says. senior ministers is more likely than not they will be another go at the vote tomorrow or friday. i don‘t know if that was let‘s just take you into the house of commons. still a debate, this is written before john friday. i don‘t know if that was written beforejohn bercow had to say what he had to say but he has at vicky ford, just looking at the the moment throwing a bit of a pi’ocess vicky ford, just looking at the process that has been put forward spanner the moment throwing a bit of a spanner into those works once again, and the business of the motion, but the dup crucial because many which we are expecting to go over to conservatives have said they will vote with the prime minister on her later on. john bercow will call in a deal if the dup decide to change its moment for a vote on whether the pi’ocess goes moment for a vote on whether the process goes ahead. that‘s unlikely to fail, but things warm up from about 3:15pm, and the debate will mind and back hair. now the weather with staff. get under way. the vote is not scheduled until later tonight, but those indicative votes in the we have had quite a lot of cloud in business of how that all works is the sty today, a disappointing grey being voted on shortly. we will take day for many with the best of the you into the house of commons for sunshine across the south—west of that, wes streeting on his feet at england. the next few days, high the moment. now the weather with pressure still with us, it will be stabbed rennais asked. largely dry and we should see a bit
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quite a lot of clout in the sky more sunshine around through thursday and friday, so as a result it will feel milder. high pressure today, a bit of a disappointing grey day for many with best of the has been with us, which is why it is sunshine across the south—west of england. the next few days, we have dry with high winds, and for cloud high pressure with us so it will be to the north of scotland thanks to largely dry. a bit more sunshine the weather front which brings outbreaks of light patchy rain to the north and west of the highlands around for thursday and friday, so asa around for thursday and friday, so as a result it will feel milder. mainly. we in the day of fairly high pressure has been with us which is why it is dry and settled with mildly with temperatures in the low light winds, thicker cloud across teens celsius for many. another the north of scotland. patchy rain chilly night on the cards, particularly across the south—west, where skies will be clearest to the north and west highlands. we longest. elsewhere, variable cloud, end the day on a fairly mild note. a little bit of mist and fog, some low cloud, temperatures, a touch of then overnight those temperature is frost across the south—west. elsewhere particularly where you well fall away. another chilly one have cloud, no lower than three or 6 on well fall away. another chilly one on the cards particularly across the south—west where skies will be degrees. thursday, thickest cloud clearest longest. some low cloud, across parts of scotland, close to these weather fronts, and across parts of scotland, close to these weatherfronts, and notice across parts of scotland, close to these weather fronts, and notice the isobars a bit later together, so temperatures, touch of frost across the south—west, elsewhere more of a south—westerly breeze to particularly when you have cloud, no the north, northern ireland, to the lower than three to 6 degrees. high p i’essu i’e lower than three to 6 degrees. high northern half of scotland. further pressure still with us into south, closer to the high pressure,
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lighter winds and hopefully we thursday, the thickest cloud across should see more sunshine on parts of scotland, close to these weather fronts. a bit thursday. as a result it will feel a parts of scotland, close to these weatherfronts. a bit of bit milder, temperatures reaching parts of scotland, close to these weather fronts. a bit of a highs of 15 or 16 degrees across south—westerly breeze to the southern and eastern england, closer northern half of scotland but to 11 where we have the rain in the further south, lighter winds, and hopefully more sunshine on thursday, north—west of scotland. for friday, a similar story, but a weather front so asa hopefully more sunshine on thursday, so as a result it will feel a bit encroaching from the north—west, more persistent, heavy rain to the milder, 15 to 16 degrees in southern north—west of scotland, a bit of and eastern england, perhaps the cloud, for scotland and northern north—east of england, but closer to 11 where we have the rain in the ireland generally, but england and wales, another good—looking day for north—east of scotland. friday, a you. with more sunshine around, it similar story, a weather front could be even warmer, temperatures encroaching from the north—west, 17 or 18 more persistent heavy rain to the could be even warmer, temperatures 17 or18 in could be even warmer, temperatures 17 or 18 in one or two spots, but north—west of scotland. a bit of single figure values for stornoway, cloud, scotland and northern ireland because we start to see a change as generally, but england and wales, we because we start to see a change as we enter friday and into the another good—looking day for you weekend, with this cold front with more sunshine around, it could sinking southwards, a band of cloud be even warmer, temperatures with a bit of rain, behind it much cooler air flows down from the reaching 17 or 18 degrees in one or north—west right across the country. two spots but single figure values it will be noticeable through the weekend. going through the south of for stornoway, because we start to see a for stornoway, because we start to england, we should see milder air see a change as for stornoway, because we start to see a change as we for stornoway, because we start to see a change as we enter friday into the weekend with this cold front before the cooler shower a condition sinking southwards, event of cloud spread down from the north. 15
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cover behind it much cooler air degrees in london, cooler as we head flows down from the north—west right across the country. it will be through the week across all areas. across the country. it will be across the country. it will be across the south of england, milder air before the cooler showery conditions by down from the north. 15 degrees in london lately, cooler i , you are watching afternoon live, i as we 15 degrees in london lately, cooler as we head through the week across all areas. am simon mccoy. today at apm. mp5 have taken control of parliamentary business from the government and began to debate their preferred options for brexit. theresa may meets her mp5 in the next hour — but the speaker warns she might not be able to bring her withdrawal deal back to the commons this week as she hopes. ido i do expect the government to meet the test of change. putting the brakes on speeding ? plans are revealed to fit all new cars with a device to keep them within the limit. officials in an area of new york state have declared a state of emergency following a severe outbreak of measles.
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coming up on afternoon live all the sport. it has been confirmed, gordon taylor says he will step down as chief executive of the professional footballers‘ association, but only after the next agm. all the details later. and we will have the weather. it has been an improving picture across england and wales. things are set to turn cold as we head into the weekend after if few fine sunny days. turning much cooler by the end of the week. also coming up — tributes to a two—tone legend — roger charlery, the beat‘s ranking roger — who‘s died at the age of 56.
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good afternoon — this is afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy live at westminster where mp5 have seized control of the brexit process and are now considering eight possible alternative courses of action for leaving the european union. among the options are a second referendum, a no deal brexit and even no brexit at all. we expect the results between 9.30pm and 10pm this evening. theresa may meanwhile will meet her mp5 in an hour‘s time — she hinted this afternoon she wanted to bring her deal — which has been defeated twice already — back to the commons this week — but in the last half hour, the speakerjohn bercow has warned her she can‘t do that unless she makes some changes to it. last monday, the 18th of march, i made a statement to the house explaining the standards that would have to be allowed for that
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meaningful vote, i cited page 397 of erskine may, a proposition which is the same or substantially the same may not be brought forward again during the same parliamentary session. this monday, 25th of march, in the course of answering questions following her statement, the prime minister accepted this constraint saying, i minister accepted this constraint saying, lam minister accepted this constraint saying, i am very clear about the stricture is that mr speaker gave when he made his statement last week, and where we to bring forward a further motion to this house, we would of course ensure that it's met the requirements he made i understand that the government may be thinking of bringing meaningful vote three before the house either tomorrow or on friday, if the house opts to sit that day. therefore, in order that there should be no misunderstanding, i wish to make clear, that i do expect the government to meet the test of change. they should not seek to
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circumvent my ruling by means of a paving motion or a standing motion, the table office has been instructed that no such motions will be accepted. i look forward to today's debate and votes, which give the house the chance to start the process of positively indicating what it wants. leader of the house kenneth clarke is on his feet in the house of commons. long negotiations that were required, and it is up to this house it seems to me to respond to that properly and deal with this procedure with a willingness to compromise with each other and move towards some eventual binding, i think, recommendation to the government, about the way in which
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things should be conducted in future. i shall certainly approach it in that way myself. my right honourable friends also helped the government, although raising absurd constitutional arguments, which they could have remedied easily had they put down their own proposals for having indicative votes which they said they were going to, two days ago. a hair splitting thing about the government should table business motions and not backbenchers is an irrelevance. my right honourable friend from dorset west has a problem, because i have never seen the right—wing members of the european research group panicked by the way in which the house as a whole is moving. their dreams of a note deal departure are feeding despite the frequent leanings of the
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prime minister, they are beginning to peel off now, one by one, having first of all rebuffed it. i congratulate those ministers who resigned in order to get this pressure going, and those who put this process together. turning briefly to the substance of how i am going to vote. i will vote not for my first preference, i will when it occurs, but for that which i can live with. i think, unfortunately, we are live with. i think, unfortunately, we are doomed, in my opinion, to leave the european union within the next two or three years. i exercise my ownjudgment next two or three years. i exercise my own judgment now on what is the national interest that will minimise the damaging consequences and perhaps save some of the better features for future generations. i have said before, and i think the obvious compromise, it seems to me,
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is to unfortunately give up the european political union, leave the institutions, remain in the common market, the customs union and the single market, thereby ensuring no problems at borders, no problems with business, smooth running of trade and so on. i think it is that particular compromise... i cannot give way. i would like to collaborate but i must take notice of time. it is important not only because at least it would actually economically continue to give the advantages of being in the biggest and most prosperous international free trade area in the world, but also it would begin to reconcile the 5296 also it would begin to reconcile the 52% with the a8%. it is a compromise that i think most sensible members of the public, however passionate their views, remain or leave, of the public, however passionate theirviews, remain or leave, could see the sense of moving together. it
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used to be the main eurosceptic demand, 20 years ago, leave the european union but do not leave the common market. i think if we solve that we begin to repair the dreadful political mood of the country. i will vote for revoke when ever it appears in the amendment because thatis appears in the amendment because that is my personal preference, that is self indulgence. if we get a majority i would be delighted. i will support common market 2.0, anything that resembles it. i will not dwell on that further. amendment g. not dwell on that further. amendment g, it is not my first preference. that is father of the house kenneth clarke, let us speak to a think tank who has been monitoring what has
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been going on. we are going through the various options. ken clarke wa nts a the various options. ken clarke wants a customs union. that is what he is in favour of and he has tabled. he is also seeing he is willing to vote, not necessarily his first choice. this is where we are at in this process, trying to get to at in this process, trying to get to a position where mp5 are willing to compromise and not necessarily vote for their first preference, for what they want with the uk‘s relationship with the eu, but to potentially vote for something, it is not what they really wa nts for something, it is not what they really wants but they are ok with. they are hoping more mp5 will be willing to do that to get closer to knowing where a majority may lie. bit like voting for switzerland in eurovision, you do not want them to win but you are happy to give them a chance. it is sort of saying, it is
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not something we really wants but we are willing to live with it because this is the best chance we have got at the stage in the process. spice girls in there as well. what we really, really want. i am sorry. we cannot quite understand... i know someone who can get us out of this, our chief correspondent, vicki young. it is whatjohn bercow has said that is probably resonating in downing street because he has said he will not have mp5 having the third attempt to get her deal through on what he has said at the moment. he said previously it cannot keep on being brought back. he said things have to change. either the deal itself has to change. or when he first gave his ruling a couple of weeks ago he talked about the circumstances changing. i felt then that was giving him enough wriggle room that if things change then he would allow it. but from what he has said in the last hour, there are
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conservatives, and bizarrely conservative brexiteers, who absolutely hate the deal, but they are absolutely hate the deal, but they a re really absolutely hate the deal, but they are really furious with the speaker, they think he has overstepped the mark. they cannot understand how he is allowing backbenchers to basically change the rules of the house and have their debate and votes but will not allow the government to change the rules to have their votes. we are in a very, very bizarre situation here, where it looks like it is possible that enough people are starting to move in the direction of theresa may, yet she may not be able to hold the vote. let us discuss this with lisa andy. that point from the speaker, it seems odd that they will not allow a bill, is he in the right here? it is problematic. i see this as somebody who is normally supportive of the speaker. i am not an expert on erskine may but it is problematic because something has changed. what has changed as we are staring potentially down the barrel
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of no deal which would be catastrophic for the country and so there are mp5 who are looking at theresa may‘s deal and would be minded to vote for it. there is not an opportunity to test a bill of the house. that is a problem. lots of rumours. there are conservative mp5 changing their mind about backing her deal, rumours about the dup but nothing confirmed at present. you are saying, staring down the barrel ofa no are saying, staring down the barrel of a no deal scenario. if it gets within 20 votes? the problem is, the issue i have is not with their withdrawal agreement, it is what happens next. we have not started negotiating our future trading relationship with the eu and it is that which will determine whether there arejobs in that which will determine whether there are jobs in wigan, the sorts ofjobs, how much people are paid, environmental standards, and
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parliament has no role in that process. we have no right to do anything except question the government on that. we have no vote at the end of that process. i have been asking her all the way through will she commit to giving parliament a vote on that future trading relationship and she has resisted. frankly i do not trust the conservative prime minister to go and negotiate a trade deal that protects those jobs, protect those rights. as it stands i am still unable to vote this thing through. what about tonight, the so—called indicative votes on various options. that labour party is getting behind this idea of a referendum if a deal we re this idea of a referendum if a deal were to go through, how do you feel about that? i will not be voting for it tonight. i am still not clear at all from the proposers of that amendment what it is that they are seeking to put to the people. we have not started negotiating our future trading relationship. all we haveis future trading relationship. all we have is a 585 page legal text, which i think they are proposing to put to the people at the same time as running elections to the european
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parliament. there is no consensus about what should be on that balance but there is a proposal to have remain under withdrawal agreement on it. i have to say, large sections of the country, including many in my constituency who wants no deal, that isa constituency who wants no deal, that is a choice between two versions of remain. that would not settle it. but i will not be opposing that amendment tonight because as we are going through and trying to sort the different options it is essential that we allow as many of those options to make it through this ballot as possible. if not we are going to be left with the potential of no deal, that is that legal reality now that we have triggered article 50. the default option is no deal, and that would be a disaster. rather than mp5 voting down the things they do not like, which is what we have been doing for three yea rs, what we have been doing for three yea rs , we what we have been doing for three yea rs, we have what we have been doing for three years, we have got to allow some of these major options to be debated and heard and sorted through next week so that we can find the common ground and come to a common view on
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where this country is going next. are there any options you would actively vote for tonight? yes there is an amendment in the name of the labour of the labour party which seeks a close economic leadership with the eu after we leave, and a proposal from with the eu after we leave, and a proposalfrom stephen kinnock and others, about a nami style model, not my preferred option, but i think it would be far preferable to leaving without —— leaving with no deal. and the option put forward by the snp, to revoke article 50. it is important that as many of us as possible start to move because if we do not start to move and compromise then we will not see any movement in then we will not see any movement in the country and we will remain as divided as we are and this just simply can‘t go on. divided as we are and this just simply can't go on. what do you make of this entire process? some people are saying it is controversial and in the end is its meaningless? the prime minister saying she will not ta ke
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prime minister saying she will not take it it is something that has to be negotiated, she cannot see she will get behind it. in truth this is something that should have happened two and a half years ago. we should have been allowed to work together and to beat the various options, rather than just a few days ago. the prime minister says it is just my way or the highway. but it is important we do this now. it is not perfect. i would important we do this now. it is not perfect. iwould much important we do this now. it is not perfect. i would much rather have had a balloting process on which we we re had a balloting process on which we were asked to state positive options rather than allow us to block options, which we have been doing for three years. and it is important that the house comes to a common view, that would make it far more difficult for the prime minister to ignore. she does not seem to be listening. she has not been listening. she has not been listening for a long time. but if the house can reach a common view about an alternative proposal it is important we are given the chance to do it. other people are saying this is defecting from the real point because their withdrawal agreement needs to go through anyway. you‘d
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needs to go through anyway. you‘d need a withdrawal agreement anyway. the political declaration is not binding, not legally binding. what is it that mp5 are discussing? binding, not legally binding. what is it that mps are discussing? the problem, as you rightly say, is not with the withdrawal agreement itself, people on the labour side are supportive of that withdrawal agreement, the problem is what next, and the prime minister‘s refusal to give us a roll or vote in that process about what comes next is disappointing because it means it is too big a gamble to vote this through and allow whoever is prime minister, a tory prime minister to go and trade away those rights, jobs, protections, of100 years. i thought she might move. it is not a huge ask to have parliament with a role in this process. that is one reason why if this meaningful vote comes back i will be seeking to amend it and reset this process in
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the next stage to force whoever is prime minister to have a genuine dialogue with every party and most important every part of this country about what comes next. thank you. that debate will go on until seven o‘clock this evening and this unusual process then when mp5 will be handed a slip of paper and told to write down what it is that they can live with. let‘s look in a bit more detail about what some of those indicative votes selected are. our reality check correspondent chris morrisjoins me now. the first option selected was put forward by conservative mpjohn baron... it‘s on a no deal brexit... that means no deal but the big fear expressed by government and many businesses as the economic impact of no deal, they say it could be
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catastrophic for the economy, john barron and other brexiteers say, it represents a clean break and he must have the courage of our convictions. to leave, not quite on schedule, but on april 12. i do not think that will get through the house, we have seen will get through the house, we have seen already that no deal has been rejected by a majority in the house of commons. common market 2.0, put forward by conservative nick boles. and it is a cross—party alliance of mp5 in the centre ground. it keeps the uk in the eu single market and sets out a new customs arrangement. one of the things it does, it means the uk would have to allow the free movement of people, which obviously isa movement of people, which obviously is a red line for theresa may and the governments, that‘s part of being in the single market means that free movement of people is
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allowed. proponents of it, stephen kinnock, nick boles, say there are circumstances where you can have an emergency break, they are talking about you can use european economic area legislation properly, someone can come here and look for work, they are not allowed to do that and break the rules. it is close to free movement, not quite as absolute as eu membership but close enough. when rules are made in the european union, new rules or regulations, every member of the eu has a vote on it, but countries like iceland who are part of the european economic area but not part of the eu do not have a vote on it at that stage although nick boles says there is something called the eea committee where you can raise objections. again, there is a process that you can be involved in. the bottom line is when big decisions come at eu level that could affect you, you
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have no vote. and the option that means we remain in the customs union. a customs union, not the eu customs union, terminology is important. there would be no tariffs or other customs formalities on trade with the eu that it stops the eu —— stops the eu that it stops the eu —— stops the uk signing new trade deals with other countries around the world because you have to accept the eu‘s external tariff, the eu negotiates on your behalf on goods. again, that isa on your behalf on goods. again, that is a red line for theresa may. one that has the support of 5 million people who signed that petition, to revoke article 50 altogether, tabled by snp‘sjoanna cherry. revo ke cherry. revoke article 50 f no deal is the only alternative. revoke an article 50, what that does, you unilaterally
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decide to stay in the european union. the controversy is that it goes against the referendum result. you mentioned 5 million people signed the petition, 17.a million people voted to leave in the referendum three years ago. the option of another referendum. yes. there is growing support for this i think in the house of commons but it is something in the house of commons, there would be a vote on eu membership. it is not clear entirely what question would be asked. would it be remain in the eu or approve the prime minister‘s deal? or possibly another deal from the set of options being debated today? one way to get a withdrawal agreement through the house of commons would be to say to people, if you vote for it we will put it back to the people for a final say. thank you. confused ? for a final say. thank you. confused? not at all.
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our chief political correspondent, vicki young is just over the road in the houses of parliament. there is a lot of talk aboutjohn bercow seeing potentially not allowing the government to bring forward a third vote on the withdrawal agreement. he says it has to have changed. he will not even allow the house of commons to change the rules so that will happen and thatis the rules so that will happen and that is causing absolute fury, even amongst those who ate theresa may‘s deal. former brexit minister. you do not like this deal and yet you are angry that the speaker will not allow a vote on it. he is quite right that you should not have repeated motions of the same substance as what has been debated, that is clear, that is the president. but frankly what we are seeing this afternoon breaks every precedent you could imagine. what we have got today is
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unprecedented. that speaker is entirely happy to have this series of indicative votes but he is not prepared for the government on the other had to have its own vote back. iam quite other had to have its own vote back. i am quite happy that this meaningful vote is not coming back but i am not happy that the speaker appears to be operating without any consistency at all. when it comes to that vote, if it we re when it comes to that vote, if it were to happen, there are signs that a number of your colleagues are changing their minds. jacob rees—mogg, borisjohnson, changing their minds. jacob rees—mogg, boris johnson, several others are saying now because of what is happening here today it shows there are numbers to potentially take over the brexit process so potentially take over the brexit process so you potentially take over the brexit process so you are potentially take over the brexit process so you are risking brexit not happening at all. we ought to see what happens today. i think today will also prove inconclusive. in 2003 jack straw had a series of indicative votes on the future of the house of lords and house of lords reform. that proved inconclusive also. when you have got so inconclusive also. when you have got so many options it is hard to see
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how a majority of the house can get behind any of them. the fact is that this is really a job for the government. the government should be taken control of this process. i am personally extremely upset also that the government is allowing a free vote for conservative members of parliament, and is ordering the cabinets to abstain. it does not seem cabinets to abstain. it does not seem to me that that is showing great leadership. tell me about that. that is unusual. the cabinet are being told to abstain, the rest of you have three votes. what is that telling you? the cabinet cannot agree? i think there is concern that there might be such a split within the cabinets that they would be another tranche of ministerial resignations but frankly this is what leadership is about. if the prime minister is concerned about which particular minister can be trusted to vote in accordance, she should tackle that minister, and if the minister will not vote with the whip, the minister knows what he or she should do,
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which is to resign. the prime minister will address the group of backbench conservative mp5 at five o‘clock. what do you think she needs to say? if she was to give a date when she would stand down would that persuade you to vote for the deal?” think the deal is a thoroughly bad one and it will not be made any better by the resignation of the prime minister. what the prime minister needs to do is to recognise that the only thing certain in this process is that parliament has voted to leave that european union, it was set to leave on friday of this week, that date has now been changed, and are rather dubious circumstances, to the 12th of april, but that is the date that we should go. that is what people voted for, that is what parliament voted for, that is what should happen. but it is unlikely because it would set parliament has a numberto because it would set parliament has a number to stop that happening.” am not sure that is the case. at the moment we have a series of motions before the house of commons. there is an awful long way to go in
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a short time if they want to secure that. what the prime ministers should do now is simply keep faith with the electorate, give as brexit, that can be done on a world trade organisation basis on 12th of april. thank you. that is very clear. and many of his colleagues feel the same. but there are clear signs that significant some conservative figures are now changing their mind, and if we ever get to the point where there is another vote on the deal. our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas joins us from brussels. it is that question, if there is a chance for theresa may to come back and give it a third goal because john bercow has been specific. yes, absolutely. watching from here, there will be even more uncertainty now about the way forward. the eu‘s
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preferred option is still to see their withdrawal agreement go through because that is the path forward for the eu side. anything else offers deep uncertainty. no deal clearly offers uncertainties but also the process that parliament is about to go through, to go through these votes and try to indicate what it might refer, it is very unclear what will emerge from that, if anything. very unclear what will emerge from that, ifanything. if very unclear what will emerge from that, if anything. if those things that, if anything. if those things that emerge will be acceptable to the eu is not entirely clear. several will involve potentially quite serious negotiation with the eu, and whether the government will accept any of that? more confusion. we heard john —— we heard an eu figure today seeing reading that uk's figure today seeing reading that uk‘s intentions is more difficult than reading the sphinx.
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we are in the position now the eu felt it would never be in at this point, still unclear what is going to happen. we heard from donald tusk this morning, characteristically blunt, expressing the view that the uk might stay in the european union after all. yes, he did. he was addressing the european parliament. i think, yes, he did. he was addressing the european parliament. ithink, having seen european parliament. ithink, having seen the march in london the other day, the online petition that has garnered five plus million signatures, he has always held out this kind of idea that it would be much betterfor this kind of idea that it would be much better for the uk this kind of idea that it would be much betterfor the uk to remain in the eu. he has always been for that. in recent months he said hope dies at last. he was pretty much out of hope. now having seen those things he seems to be more hopeful. he was talking to the parliament saying they should not betray those people
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who wanted to remain in the eu, they should well come a long extension if the uk wanted that, and the potential of keeping uk meps in the european parliament to represent pro—europeans in the uk, fanning the flames, if you like, of that idea. stephen barclay, the brexit secretary, has addressed the commons and confirmed the government will table a motion to sit on friday, the day after tomorrow, he said, it is better to have it and not need it that you need it and not have it. this is about the proposal for theresa may‘s brexit deal to come before the house for the third time. all of that is now up in the air. here is the weather. it was a great start for much of the country but we see the sunshine
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turning more widespread. still cloudy across the far north of scotland. next few days, high pressure. largely dry. it should be milder. outbreaks of rain to the north and west of scotland. under clear skies temperatures will start to fall away. mist and fog developing here. temperatures close to freezing in one or two spots, particularly in the south—west. tomorrow morning, a chilly start, but dry and bright. more sunshine across the board, away from the far north—west of scotland. to end the week, friday is going to be mild as well. into the weekend, colder air moving across the board. it will turn chilly with cooler nights.
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wintry over high ground next week. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. no deal, a customs union and revoking article 50 are being debated in the commons, as the speaker warns the pm over bringing back her deal unchanged. therefore, in order that there should be no misunderstanding, i wish to make clear that i do expect the government to meet the test of change. putting the brakes on speeding ? plans are revealed to fit all new cars with a device to keep them within the limit officials in an area of new york state have declared a state of emergency following a severe outbreak of measles. we‘re in westminster on another big day — as mp5 prepare to vote on their preferred brexit options this evening — in an attempt to resolve the impasse. the prime minister, meanwhile, is continuing to canvass support
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for her withdrawal deal, which could be put before mp5 for a third time later this week. that of course is all dependent on whatjohn bercow that of course is all dependent on what john bercow has that of course is all dependent on whatjohn bercow has had to say in the last hour, and no doubt in downing street they are assessing how they will go forward. steve barclay the brexit secretary saying in the last few minutes they intend to sit here in the commons on friday. back to the commons, where mp5 are debating this evening‘s votes. da m e mp5 are debating this evening‘s votes. dame margaret beckett is on her feet. they do make us rule takers without being, as we have been, influential rule makers. it is clear that many who voted leave have accepted the possible economic damage of which they‘ve been ward 11 as a price they are willing to pay for a return to sovereignty, and i are honoured for that stance, but sovereignty is not
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returning. in fact, we are sacrificing sovereignty for the sake of saying that we are no longer members of the eu. i recognise that such a deal may be all that‘s on offer, but to me it is inconceivable that its acceptance should be solely a matter for members of this house. i genuinely have no idea what view the british people might take of these various compromises, and certainly many, including in this house, vehemently oppose that they are even being asked. ever since the day of the second referendum result in 2016, a deluge notjust of warnings but of threats has come from those who take this view. forecasting unrest, civil disorder, greater division, and a dramatic further reduction in the public‘s trust in politics. but i invite
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collea g u es trust in politics. but i invite colleagues who determinedly resist a confirmatory vote to look starkly at the full implications of what they‘re saying. they are willing, some are determined, to vote to terminate our membership of the european union, even if this may now be against the wishes of the majority of the british people. consider the possible consequences for trusting politics or social peace, if this house forces and outcome of the people of this country that they no longer desire. that really would be the undemocratic establishment stitch up of all time. we have all heard people say that the deals now available are worse than the one that we now have as eu members, and
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some still say, nevertheless, that they still wish to leave. my mother would have called that cutting off your nose to spite your face, but if thatis your nose to spite your face, but if that is still the view of the majority, then so be it. so be it. but how, in all conscience, can we alone in this house force through such a decision on their behalf, without allowing them any say as to whether that is still there view? i‘m sorry, i don‘t have time to give way. as with the good friday agreement, whatever emerges from these complex negotiations, the outcome should go back to the people for confirmation. the people started this process. they set a desired goal. it has proved far more difficult and tortuous than predicted, but we will now have, soon, a potential outcome. it‘s the
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people who should choose if, on the terms now on offer, they still wish to proceed. there is should be the final decision on the list, which is the first stage only of our withdrawal from the eu. the first stage only of our withdrawalfrom the eu. with the first stage only of our withdrawal from the eu. with a the first stage only of our withdrawalfrom the eu. with a clear conscience, i can look my constituents in the eye and tell them that that is the outcome that this house has secured. the european union needs reform. britain could play a key role in shaping them, or we can play a key role in shaping them, or we canjust play a key role in shaping them, or we can just walk away and live with the consequences. but it is the british people who should now decide what comes next. thank you, mr speaker, and i rise in support... studio: that was dame margaret beckett talking about her motion, calling for a confirmatory public vote. let‘s pick up with maddy here
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from the institute for government. we are getting a clear idea of the options and a wide—ranging view, that wasjohn options and a wide—ranging view, that was john bercow‘s options and a wide—ranging view, that wasjohn bercow‘s intent. options and a wide—ranging view, that was john bercow's intent. yes, he has gone for a no option, he has gone for the norway plus, the customs market 2.0 option, and he has also gone for a second referendum. what is quite interesting on the sort of referendum point is that two weeks ago we had a vote in the house on whether to have another referendum, which labour chose to abstain on, so it was defeated quite roundly. this one is a slightly different wording, this time it is saying we are not going to approve a deal unless the public have also approved it, but this time labour are whipping in favour, so we can imagine it will be a much closer vote, so it be quite interesting to see how that one plays out. that is obviously going on and there will be the vote tonight, but the real change in the last hour has been what we have heard from john bercow. he has once again said that unless there is a
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real change to theresa may‘s deal, then he is not going to let it come back to the house. he has done exactly what he did last time and we all remember what happened then, everything broke out here, and you get a sense that people are now scrabbling around now to try and work out what happens next. we‘ve had stephen barclay saying the house will sit on friday. the government clearly hoping that by friday something will have changed to make it bring back abel, which is not a word, but it is now! and the most important part of what bercow said was he ruled out the idea of using a paving motion, which would set aside the parliamentary convention that you don‘t vote on the same thing twice, and he says actually the table office will not accept that kind of motion to allow the prime minister to bring back a deal, and it is what a lot of us thought might be the way she could do it. so i think they will have to be a bit more creative to bring it back. last time we discussed this, there was
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talk of provoking parliament, you end this setting and then technically not bringing anything back, she is starting again —— prorogue parliament. the problem with that is it does not really resolve your problem, you can dissolve that session and start a new session but if mp5 don‘t support your deal then you still don‘t have a majority for what you want. the only way you would really get to that stage where you think that is your option is if you know you have a majority that will vote through your deal. my own view is that i don‘t think bercow would get in the way if mp5 want to vote through the deal. there was a view that the fact there had been an extension to the date might be enough of a change, and that was the gamble theresa may was taking, well, it hasn‘t paid off. bercow did not necessarily rule it out but yes, it doesn‘t seem that is not enough, otherwise you feel he would not necessarily feel the need to mention this convention again and say i am still looking for more
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changes. that is a challenge and maybe this is his way of trying to encourage the government to more seriously consider what mp5 are voting on here tonight. the feedback i get on twitter and elsewhere, people switch on the television in the afternoon and all they wanted some sort of clarity, some sort of sense that we are moving forward. we have just taken sense that we are moving forward. we have just ta ken another sense that we are moving forward. we have just taken another huge step back today, haven‘t we? have just taken another huge step back today, haven't we?” have just taken another huge step back today, haven't we? i don't think it is a huge step back but i don‘t think we have more clarity, maybe we are still in the position. we are still not sure when there will be aim meaningful vote, there was speculation it might be later this week, now it seems bercow might not allow that, but from what stephen barclay has said, they will still try. can they railroad this true? can they say mr speaker, we hear what you are saying, but we are putting parliamentary business first. the trouble is you need support of the house to do that. they could produce a business motion that sets aside that the government does not vote on the same thing twice, but you need a majority in the house of commons to get that through, and it is very challenging
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that parliament is not willing to consider the prime minister‘s deal at this stage then it is much harder for the government to get around that. talk us through, we are halfway through the list of indicative motion now. then there is a vote tonight. but talk that this goes on into next week? yes, one of the things mp5 voted in favour of earlier today was to set aside or ta ke earlier today was to set aside or take control of more parliamentary time on monday. during the debate, oliver letwin, who is sort of the architect of all of this, he said they haven‘t agreed what they are going to be doing with the time on monday and that they will put forward a new business motion to sort of set out what is going to ta ke sort of set out what is going to take place on monday then. i expect what they will do is wait and see what they will do is wait and see what they will do is wait and see what the outcome is tonight and see whether there are some options that we re whether there are some options that were voted on that would have a much bigger group, much more support than others, and it might be they start rolling out some of the options tonight. we‘re not sure. they haven‘t said this is how much support they have to get to be taken
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through, so i guess we have to wait and see. listening to dame margaret beckett, when john and see. listening to dame margaret beckett, whenjohn bercow went through, it was her he got the chair, that is for another referendum. there is support in the house in favour of that. we know there are some conservative mp5 who do support another referendum, and now labour is actually backing that motion. again, that will be quite interesting to see quite how those numbers play out. i think probably none of these motions will necessarily get a majority tonight but we might get a sense of what could get a majority in the future. maddy, always good to see you. let‘s ta ke maddy, always good to see you. let‘s take you into the house again because george eustice is in the house. he‘s got a motion before the house as well. that is about efta, and the whole process of the continuing relationship, in terms of free trade with the european union.
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let‘s hear from him free trade with the european union. let‘s hearfrom him now. free trade with the european union. let's hear from him now. would it really be such a bad thing to return to that model, given we were the godfathers of the european free trade association? mr speaker, in conclusion, the benefits of this approach is that we can get things done quickly, we canjoin the efta surveillance system within three months, and full efta membership within six months. we would have a ready—made free trade agreement, we would be outside the customs union and have an independent trade policy, we would have control of our fishing grounds again. we would have an independent agriculture policy. we would become an independent country again. thank you very much indeed, mr speaker. isn‘t there something really quite liberating about the debate that we are having here this afternoon? because the normal atmosphere, the normal structure, one side and the other
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propositions has all disappeared, as the house of commons has taken control of this really important discussion about how we‘re going to ta ke discussion about how we‘re going to take our country forward. the other thing that is striking is that every single member has spoken in support ofa single member has spoken in support of a proposition has not sought to rubbish the other proposition. they have put their case in an effort to win support from across the house and if that is not confirmation of the wisdom of the house i don‘t like the wisdom of the house i don‘t like the phrase having taken control because i think it is ourjob to allow us to do that, then i don‘t know what is. everyone in this chamber knows it is an essential building block of making any progress to achieve actually the two objectives the prime minister herself set, keeping an open border and at the same time keeping
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friction free trade moving to oil the wheels of our industry. i will also vote for the common market 2.0 proposal, although, like many others, i note on the one hand, on the other, when it comes to a customs union, a customs arrangement, and it is a compromise proposal, but i will support it. i will also vote for the confirmatory referendum. ijust will also vote for the confirmatory referendum. i just simply want to say i thought we heard an absolutely outstanding speech from my right honourable friend, the memberfor derby south. and i will be voting for it as someone who for a long time has not argued for a people‘s vote. but i want to just explain why i have come to the conclusion that a confirmatory referendum is the only way forward. it is, in essence, because things have changed. and the
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proposition that was put before the british people in the form of the prime minister‘s deal, the proposition that was made by the leave campaign during the referendum, that one did not have to choose in some way between our sovereignty on the one hand and the economic health of the country on the other has been proved to be false. it has proved to be false, and i‘m not going to give way, and i hope the honourable member will forgive me, because there are so many people who want to speak. but i think the anger that we have seen expressed by some members towards the prime minister‘s deal is in part revealing of the fact that the truth is there is a choice to be made, and the suggestion that somehow we could have all of the things we wanted without any of the things that we
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did not has proved not to be the case. and, therefore, if things have changed, should we not ask the people? the second and final point i wa nt to people? the second and final point i want to make is this. the government changed its mind originally on whether the house would have a meaningful vote. the government did at one point say they would be an enormous row about the structure of the negotiations and then changed its mind and accepted the way in which the european union wanted to conduct them. the government has come back once already and may well come back once already and may well come back once already and may well come back again in an attempt to persuade us to change our mind about the withdrawal agreement, the political declaration. the first holder of the post of secretary of state for exiting the european union has changed his mind about supporting the deal. there are
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reports that the honourable member for north—east somerset may be in the process of changing his mind. the prime minister changed her mind about the fact that we were definitely, 108 time she said it, we re definitely, 108 time she said it, were going to leave on 29th of march 2019, and we are not. why is it, mr speaker, that the only people in this debate who apparently are not allowed to be asked whether they have or have not changed their mind is the british people? how can that be democratic? and if members agree with that argument, that it isn‘t democratic, then i hope very much that they will vote for amendment m tonight. thank you mr speaker. it is a pleasure to follow my honourable friend, but let‘s actually remember the people in all of this. they voted two years ago to leave the
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european union, and then they voted in an election on where we stood in the manifesto saying we would leave the manifesto saying we would leave the european union, and its two main pillars, the single market and the customs union. those are integral to what the european union is. and they wa nt to what the european union is. and they want to see their instruction carried out now, so i come to be honest, think it is quite chamber to be calling for a second referendum before the first one has —— quite shameful before the first one has even been implemented. the reality is the single market and customs union, if we went down that road, and most of the motions that are there today... not at this point... are to do with trying to implement those anyway, even as we leave, in contravention of that manifesto and the referendum result, but they effectively give away our trade policy and they effectively give
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away our control of our regulation in ourown away our control of our regulation in our own country, and both of those things are very, very valuable to our economy, and to our future as a nation and to our children. it is worth just pointing out, a nation and to our children. it is worthjust pointing out, because i don‘t think many people quite understand, with respect, what a customs union, rather than being in the customs union of the european union actually entails. many people think this allows frictionless trade but that isn‘t correct. what it does mean is that we would have to implement a system of movement certificates. there would be export declarations associated with those full stop and it doesn‘t take away the need for border formalities and for recording of goods moving across borders... are not going to give way because i know a lot of people want to get in, the other point is we
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would not be in control of various aspects of it, so we wouldn‘t be in control of the conditions, those conditions of the formalities at the border, we wouldn‘t be in control of the money collected by tariffs, for example, if goods were coming to our market but via rotterdam, the ta riffs market but via rotterdam, the tariffs on those imports, effectively to us, would be collected and kept in the european union. so it doesn‘t control our money, and it doesn‘t give us control of the access to our trading partners to our market, and it doesn‘t also give us control of our traders access to our trading partners markets. so it really is inconceivable to me that we should even be considering a permanent customs union as a feature of leaving the eu in any recognisable description, and so that i think is one reason why people outside of
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this place are quite confused by some of the suggestions that the house has been coming up with. the other thing to understand is that many of the single market proposals and the customs union proposals that are on the table tonight, they don‘t obviate the need for a backstop in the withdrawal agreement. and so the problems of the withdrawal agreement, which some on my side have been highlighting, and others, those problems would remain anyway, so those problems would remain anyway, so the problems of being hostage to fortune within the further negotiation of how those customs union arrangements might work or how the single market arrangements might work to for example give exemptions on fishing, as we heard earlier, and other matters, those would still be up other matters, those would still be upfor other matters, those would still be up for negotiation, where we were in a relatively weak position in those negotiations, so the hostages for example of defence manufacturing,
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which would be prejudiced by the backstop, should we end up having to go into it, the same for agriculture, the restrictions on state aid for our agriculture, while the eu is allowed to subsidise its agriculture, those still remain. the issue of northern ireland, what happens to northern ireland? should we happens to northern ireland? should we not be able to agree, still remains. so i don‘t really see these things as particular solutions. and it is also possible, to come to the circumstances of my motion... point of order? the honourable gentleman has been on his feet for five minutes and has not yet had an opportunity to tell us why we should be voting for his motion, can we encourage him to tell us about amendment over rather than what is wrong with the others? yes, it would be best to expedite the process. that is exactly what i was getting onto. this motion oh and i move it,
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it‘s about what happens in the circumstances we it‘s about what happens in the circumstances we can‘t agree a withdrawal agreement for one reason or another, there is a host of reasons where that might happen, the european union might not want to do it, they might not want to extend, there are all sorts of permutations that could have an impact. i don‘t think we are as a house going to revoke article 50, because that really would be a finger in the eye to the public. so we have to have a plan b, and this sends out the plan b arrangements, a contingency arrangement, which is in essence a two—year stopgap arrangement to facilitate trade and allow space for our longer term negotiation to take place. it consists of effectively having a trade preference, with no tariffs, no quantitative restrictions. it involves having
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mutual recognition of standards and conformity assessment, and it involves having a customs arrangement but which consists of advanced trade facilitation measures. and we advanced trade facilitation measures. and we are advanced trade facilitation measures. and we are prepared to pay money for that, and indeed to agree potentially other measures that are within the withdrawal agreement, given that the eu will no doubt want to try to agree some of those things, like on gis, that we have agreed. this is a practical approach, and it is a compromise which was discussed in the malthouse process , which was discussed in the malthouse process, of what we do as a back—up if we can‘t get anything else done. so it is in fact a very fair settlement. it does involve money, contrary to what the secretary of state said. we know that eu business wa nts to state said. we know that eu business wants to trade with us, we know now that the eu and ireland have no intention of putting up a hard border, and i have no doubt that they have our alternative arrangements that we proposed, and that that is how they would want to
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implement it, so that‘s how we‘re going to do this. this is simple to ee, going to do this. this is simple to agree, it doesn‘t prejudice what the future relationship is with the eu, so we can future relationship is with the eu, so we can keep talking about that, and it is pro—trade and pro—business with the eu and the rest of the world, it honours the referendum and our manifesto and i commend it to the house. can i apologise to honourable and right honourable members, given the time constraints i will not extend the usual courtesy of taking interventions. i am particularly pleased to be participating in this debate because today we can start to bring an end today we can start to bring an end to the chaos. parliament has taken back control, because this tory government, this prime minister is out of control. mr speaker, scotland did not ask for this crisis, nobody asked for this chaos, and of course scotla nd asked for this chaos, and of course scotland voted to remain in the
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european union, and we voted overwhelmingly to protect our economy and the freedoms and the values that the european union give to the people of scotland. scotland isa to the people of scotland. scotland is a european country. historically, we is a european country. historically, we have been a european country. economically, socially, culturally, we economically, socially, culturally, we have benefited from our membership. today, the snp laid a motion to ensure scotland‘s voice is heard, because scotland‘s wishes have been completely ignored during the brexit process. this is in stark contrast to the european union that seeks consensus and fosters collaborations through its institutions and throughout the community, a partnership of equals, in stark contrast to this place, where there is no equality of respect for the devolved institutions. the lack of appreciation as to how the uk should work a post—revolution world, mr speaker, haunt this place. increasingly, those living in scotland, will they reflect on the
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way we scotland, will they reflect on the way we are scotland, will they reflect on the way we are treated in this union, the united kingdom, it is most certainly not the partnership of equals that the prime minister had missed us. it is, we are told, quite simply, that our votes don‘t count, where we can be stripped of our european citizenship, and for what? where we will pay a price economically, socially and culturally. the facts are clear. brexit will rob scotland ofjobs. it will rob our economy of talented workers, our public sector‘s needs, it will steal opportunities to travel and learn from our eu partners and for future generations, it will divide relationships, families and friendships. mr speaker, there is no such thing as a good brexit. and it must be stopped. we must act to protect the interests of our citizens, of our communities and of our nations. today it is the
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opportunity, perhaps the only opportunity, perhaps the only opportunity, mr speaker, today in the european parliament my friend and colleague alan smith mep asked europe to keep a light on for scotland, to show us the way home. i wa nt scotland, to show us the way home. i want the eu to keep a light on for scotland. four members of parliament, we must decide, can we follow that light, or is the united kingdom heading into the darkness? scotla nd kingdom heading into the darkness? scotland will not follow the uk into that darkness if the uk fails to change course. we can and we will follow the light to allow scotland to become an independent country in the european union. mr speaker, i wa nt to the european union. mr speaker, i want to make it clear that tonight the scottish national party...
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today at five, we‘re live at westminster where mp5 are preparing to vote for their preferred brexit option. this is the scene in the house of commons where eight different options for brexit are being debated, including plans for a plans for a customs union, another referendum, and a no—deal brexit. at the same time, the prime minister is meeting conservative mp5 to try once again to win them over to her deal. mrs may will address members of the backbench commitee in the next few minutes, but the speaker has again warned there must be changes to her deal if it‘s to be put to another vote. i wish to make clear that i expect the government to meet the test of change. they should not seek, they should not seek to circumvent my ruling by means of tabling either a notwithstanding motion or a
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