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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  March 27, 2019 9:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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bbc news channel and on bbc world news, let's continue our coverage stuff byjoining news, let's continue our coverage stuff by joining christian news, let's continue our coverage stuff byjoining christian is down in westminster as ever. this is a bbc news special from westminster where we are about to discover whether mps have been able to find a way out of the brexit deadlock this is the scene live in the commons where mps are voting on legislation needed to delay brexit day in uk law — shortly we are expecting to hear the speaker tell us the outcome of the so called indicative vote mps have been chosing from 8 different brexit options — they include plans for a customs union, another referendum and a no—deal brexit. earlier theresa may told her mps she won't stay on as prime minsiter — if her brexit deal is passed by parliament. a number of senior conservative brexiteers — including the leadership hopeful, borisjohnson — now say
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they will now back mrs may's deal. including the breaking news indicating that they would not be backing theresa may ‘s deal. updating you on all of those options facing mps and taking any questions you may have on the process. the good evening, welcome to westminster, i'm christian fraser. in the next half hour or so we're expecting the results of the house of common‘s indicative votes on brexit. the idea is to try and plot a way through the current impasse in parliament. so far theresa may's withdrawal deal has been rejected twice in parliament. and we've just heard that the dup — the small northern irish party whose
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support theresa may's government depends upon for its survival — has confirmed tonight that they still won't back the deal. let me see the pictures in the house of commons. with a through a division of the notion to move the brexit day. domestic law here in the uk, set up 29th of march, friday. that is soon we were supposed to be leaving, instead is the 12th of april or the 22nd of may, which is reserved in case theresa may is to go through, the extra time would be for the house together legislation through the house of commons. the other big news of the day is that theresa may has told her mps — apparently with tears in her eyes — according to at least one of them — that she intends to step down before the next phase of the brexit negotiations — that's
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if they agree to back her deal. she said she intended to do what she promised, and what she believes is right. the prime minister was addressing the 1922 committee this evening. just to clarify — that's mrs may saying she will go we have heard those against the deal, theirjudgement we have heard those against the deal, their judgement tonight we have heard those against the deal, theirjudgement tonight and also we have heard from jacob who seems to be indicating that he would
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back the prime minister's deal, so long as the dep came across. i think there is serious problems with the deal, but we must leave, thatis with the deal, but we must leave, that is what voters demanded in 2016 andi that is what voters demanded in 2016 and i preferred leaving without a deal, but once that had gone, i was willing to back theresa may's deal and she has now set that once the deal has gone through, then she will stand down, which i think shows and her nobility. getting some reaction from vicki young, tagged on the idea that he would switch as long as the dep came across because they are the custodians of the house. they will
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not be supporting the government and they are not going to abstain on this, they will not be voted, they'll be voting against it, and without them, we do not have the numbers, so it feels as if theresa may saying earlier that she was willing to resign after goes through, but that will not happen because of the dep it is incredibly difficult, but there is been a significant switch but, with a large number of labourmps, switch but, with a large number of labour mps, there is no no way this can go through the house of commons. it was a conditional resignation speech really and it was made very clear in downing street that it was only if the first phase, the withdrawal agreement was to get through parliament. what we do not know is if the government will still have a go at their deal, try to get through on friday, because what they are concerned about is what the eu has said about the automatic delay
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to brexit, which takes us to the 22nd of may and that only happens if the withdrawal agreement goes through, there another massive dilemma. for the moment, we will leave it there. again, the pictures of the house, going through the lobbies of the moment. the instrument in which they are voting on at the moment, designed to shift the day of brexit to the 12th of april because there is no prospect of theresa may's deal going through and resignation is the last chance she had to deal. so we will see. the reaction we get this evening, what they do next, while we are looking at these pictures, it is important that we take you through these various options that the mps have voted on. maybe we can put on screen. option b —john baron: leaving the eu without a deal on april 12.
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option d nick boles: common market 2.0 or norway—plus. that's the uk remaining in the single market and a customs partnership option h george eustice. the norway option without a customs union. in other words the eea + efta. optionj ken clarke: leaving the eu with a uk wide customs union. option k jeremy corbyn: labour s brexit plan — a permanent customs union plus alignment with single market on future eu rights and regs. option ljoanna cherry: the revoking article 50 option, if a no—deal brexit is not explicitly approved by mp s a day before we leave. option m margaret beckett. is the second referendum option, a demand for public approval of any
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withdrawal agreement. option 0 marcus fysh: is the malthouse plan b option. favoured by the eurosceptic erg. if the withdrawal agreement is not approved then the government must seeka standstill agreement with the eu, while negotiating a future trade deal. ijust i just wanted to say that we are going to get the result of these votes probably all at once from the speaker and i have to say, i do not know how he is going to announce it because it has never been done again, soi because it has never been done again, so i will try to guide you through it because of the announcers, you won't know what it is without them. as i will try to guide you through it and tell you what the results are as we go, we will just have what the results are as we go, we willjust have to see how the speaker delivers it. let's go back
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to the reaction of the statement in house. we had the announcement from theresa may saying that if the deal goes through she would stand down probably before the summer, we heard that the democratic unionist party saying that they will be voting against the government deal if they are trying to bring that back, switching to the defence minister who was with me now, just react to that first of all, you just seem to not have good numbers if they're going to come over and support you, it isa going to come over and support you, it is a pretty big blow to the government. no doubt about it, but we are seeing numbers changing, we wa nt we are seeing numbers changing, we want to cd you pee on board it isn't just dup, but -- dup. —— dup. does everyone have to compromise? i voted —— dup. does everyone have to compromise? ivoted remain, i have to recognise the democratic outcomes, what will actually allow the country to come together after
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this and that is all we need to look at, we all need to compromise. that is what it's been about in the house of commons, they'll be voting against the deal and it is less likely that he gets through and they would have been stare, it's going to be much more important. mps taking over the process, what did you vote for today on that long list that you had to take the boxes for? the long list of eight different options reflected many different options that i'm getting in my inbox that many are getting bombarded by across the country, that's the problem with this whole referendum, what does it mean to leave the eu? we all have our different views on this, none of us are our different views on this, none of us are going to give her we want out a our brexit, sol us are going to give her we want out a our brexit, so i asked the dup and other colleagues to think about what actually happens, the nation is watching us, they want us to get on with other things and they also want us with other things and they also want us to have a partnership with europe. and interestingly, the
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actual emotions that are on the paper today, all require the written agreement, they all required the divorce settlement, if you like. it is the political declaration of what happens next. just to get the withdrawal agreement across the line and then we can look at the detail across that relationship, so let us support the prime minister get this across the line tomorrow. i think there are heated negotiations taking place, but what i would say is that this is parliament actually working ina this is parliament actually working in a frenzied activity but it is working. this is what this democracy does, the wheels are spinning fast, but the changes taking place. i hope minds are focused because the exercise of looking at the options and people realising that they are not going to get their preferred answer, so not going to get their preferred answer, so let's compromise. not going to get their preferred answer, so let's compromisem not going to get their preferred answer, so let's compromise. it can be very important happens, notjust today but next week as well because
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we know mps have also voted to be in control on monday as well, we'll have to see if they come up with a compromise. an important point, whatever they come up with, they are still going to have to pass this withdrawal agreement. the backstop will be in it or not regardless of whether they like it. but it will still be there. here is the dep leader. we were looking to deal with the backstop, we wanted it to be dealt with, then there was the conversation about trying to deal with the issues as well. but we think very fundamentally, the backstop and that withdrawal agreement is not possible for us to sign up to and i regret that. because he wanted to get a deal that work for the whole of the united kingdom, a deal that work for
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northern ireland, but now we are in a situation where we cannot sign—up free withdrawal agreement because the prime minister decided to go for that backstop way back in the december 2017. by mcnamee shea the pictures, we life, paying for the financial times and good to see you. that is a real blow for theresa may. any hope of getting this deal through on winning over the unionist party is they are ten mps, and only for the arithmetic, they hold a lot of sceptic opinions, i have spoken to this evening, i will come aboard when the dep come off board, it is been chicken and the egg and they have now come up with, if you look
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at arlene foster's statement, number one, they are not going to abstain and some had hoped that they would actively vote against, and sit on their hands. there's still waiting for while we will probably not have that meaningful vote until friday, 24 hours left for theresa may to open up her wallet put more cash in and they're not there now, but they could be there just by the time that next meaningful vote comes. i make the democratic unionist party, does not come down to the party by mackie comes down to the union. the backstop, they are not going to support any deal that still has that in place, there's not really any way that the eu and theresa may and parliament have found so far to square that circle,. the point i'm
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making is they are opposed to the backstop, they may be as soft or brexit, maybe they have one of these options to the political declaration the next few months, the backstop will still be there in the withdrawal agreement. absolutely and which you could see what the dup, is a softer brexit and if we have the norway style, where we stay in the single market, that we keep northern ireland in the uk aligned to the whole eu and it would be unique to their party, if they want to hold their party, if they want to hold their seats at the next general election, they have to be unionists first in this relationship between the dup and the brexit supporting conservatives would serve both sides and that is really finished and the dup went back to protecting the union. back to protecting the house, evenif union. back to protecting the house, even if you had the dup, you'd start 15 to 20 from that euro sceptic group that are not coming across but
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the remainders would rebel as well, they're not a lot that are going to come across to support the prime minister, are they. i've seen a few coming across, but those numbers have not really shifted throughout the course of this brexit vote and yes, there's a lot of talk about the mps, but it is important to remember that the majority of them, it's a lot of pro remain, so even if they voted to leave, still, what they would tell you is that those in those seats are not supporting brexit and they say my footed base, they wanted to remain. they are a party, this was a softer brexit that labour helped deliver, they would've said yes, you would follow through on the referendum. the party, as long as they are bit more remaining than the conservatives, but less
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than the conservatives, but less than the conservatives, but less than the independence, that's the place where they want to be in you'll see all sorts of changes of positions, oh, webb backing a softer brexit or a second referendum because they have to keep their voting coalition which goes from hampstead to the liberal seats and the more conservative, they have to keep those things in play here but if they going to vote for the deal, they are not there. the key deal is they are not there. the key deal is the prime minister's speech on wednesday that any hope that had been done to win over the mp5 was destroyed in ten minutes because they saw that speech in the attack on parliament and an attack on them. the call politics did not work. nodded all. —— not at all. theresa may is going to be there and this promises to try to be followed through, and another thing is that labour have been so adamant in the fa ct labour have been so adamant in the fact that they are not going to back
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the steel under any circumstances that they have built themselves too big a ladder to climb down. the prime minister says she will go if they back the deal, if they don't back the deal, and given that the dep aren't coming across these votes, much more important, she will have to cross red lines, she'll have to do that can she do that politically? all the pressure has made clear to her for weeks and that she is going to have to step down. made clear to her for weeks and that she is going to have to step downlj have to interrupt you because i think we're about to get the results. the tellers are standing in front of the box. we are about to get the second one? i think, that the result. let's listen and to the comments. order! order! the the ayes have it
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to the right. the ayes to the right 441 the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock. order. iwill the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock. order. i will now suspend the house until the outcome of votes. let me! let me advise the house, let me advise the house that it was very much the hope of our extremely dedicated professional staff that they would be able to provide the results of the indicative votes to be announced immediately after the result of this division, but that is not proved possible i do not expected to be
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very long suspension, but i will suspend the house until the house relating to the withdrawal from the future relationship of the european union are available. there will be around ten minutes before the house, resume. order. order. the speaker has suspended the sitting for the moment while they carry out the voting count on the indicative votes, let me just give you the result of that vote we just had on the instrument, this is the vote on moving brexit day in domestic law from the 29th of march to the 12 of april, 441 supported moving in, 105 conservative rebels probably have voted against it, causing great anger on the euro sceptic benches that the prime minister had moved it and asking plenty on what authority she had done that in time again, she
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said on the authority of the house. 441 versus 105. just to put you in the picture, is a binary choice on each of these options for the mps, so eight options, a lot of accounting for the clocks, all in one piece of paper, they all have to check it, double check it and then each of the names, it will be a public record and on each of the records, what they have voted. 11 professional staff, working feverishly on getting their results, and we will bring you the results. let bring back in, i know you have to go and file, but you're still here and we are grateful your company. what do you make of that? that practically tells you that there is a hard—core hundred conservative mps that are disappointed that the prime minister wa nted disappointed that the prime minister wanted to move the brexit date. yes,
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it was always going to be the most militant hard brexiteers i would try to stop it at any cost, but all that would have done if that had been voted down would've just made it quite confusing legal situation because that has already been agreed, it is already international law that the brexit they be moved, said he would've just ended up with a tricky situation and cost a lot of problems, and of course that damages the we just wejust do not we just do not know what is going to come out of this, the possibility that several contradictory things, there is a possibility that nothing will be achieved from the majority, they will not indicate necessarily what will happen from now on, but it will indicate that this is something that parliament will take forward if
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there is majority to get it through tonight, and perhaps in the later stop by we had one conservative mps saying he took note of the two options and he abstained on everything else and his colleagues abstained as well as opposed will only know when we get the preferential votes on monday when we get note of what they can live with. there might be a majority, which is unlikely, but we will have a better idea, but yes, even if these come if they were able to see who had the majority, that actually will not mean anything in reality until that is voted on separately. what will be standing come the end of next week, we shall see, thank you very much indeed. we are in a bit of a recess in the house at the moment, they're going to a suspension at the moment, let's go to vicki young, what did
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they make of it all down there? this is an unusual system, mps usually walk one way or the other, people standing there for 15 minutes, this is far more complicated, eight different options on the sheet of paper and we have no idea how many people voted, we know the cabinet was up standing on all of this but this could be 550 or so different sheets of paper that whether they voted yes or no on the options, there's been a delay in what the speaker said as they will be a short delay they will ring the division bell that summons mps to go and vote, they will ring that two minutes before they're going to get the results and those people will get up and read out how many votes each option has managed to get, and the important thing is whether they've got any kind of majority or if they've got more than theresa may's last night, i think those are
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the kind of numbers that people are looking at. does looking towards the indicative vote in the results that we get what do you think the speaker will choose? could get two different favoured choices, there may be some that do not get as much support but we didn't do a preferential system, it's the four? that is a more complicated scenario, and i'm not sure they decided quite yet how to break it down to, but the fact that there are eight, will be hoping that there are eight, will be hoping that there is some clear losers that they have not got the supported all in the matter can imagine that the no deal scenario, given how the comments is voted in the past, that will not gain much support, i think there will be more options with the customs union and the one which is
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about referendum a, referendum two being held after any deal is gone off to the house of commons that summer most people think that there could be a majority that may be the house of commons could coalesce around, and it's become more important with what is going on in there and the support would go against and vote against prime minister's deal if she put it back again, making it incredibly hard for the government to get it through this week, so they may be looking at the process going on here and whether there is any way of getting any kind fora whether there is any way of getting any kind for a different option. for the moment, thank you and the conservative mp, a part of the group, a brexit supporter, but you would never vote for the prime minister deal you told me last night. you are one of the hard—core 15 that
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was standing firm. does that mean these indicative votes become more important? i do not think they become more important, ithink the reality is that they are not legally binding, ivery reality is that they are not legally binding, i very much doubt you could find one which would have been the first choice. so to be honest, neither had the opportunity to have a say, but do i think it will develop? no, idon't. a say, but do i think it will develop? no, i don't. just because we are in the position wherever you are with the dup. this is heading in one direction, a much softer brexit. that is where she and i sit tight —— that is where he and i disagree. ido not, —— that is where he and i disagree. i do not, i think, for her, it will bea i do not, i think, for her, it will be a chance where she feels she must ta ke be a chance where she feels she must take to see whether or not she can get it through. clearly there's
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going to be some last—minute, she is not quite like that, but she is running out of road trip and if she does not bring it this week, she can bring it next week, but is much going to change? i believe even she can see the writings on the wall. so she will lose a lot more mobility if she will lose a lot more mobility if she does not get on with it. people we re she does not get on with it. people were stopping and just getting in! she says that if the deal goes through, so if it is not going through, so if it is not going through, she staying. absolutely, but which is more important? brexit are the prime minister? you only get one opportunity to make a decision about brexit. prime ministers, they come and they go. it brought very confidence in the prime minister. would you say that power is starting to run away? yes. i do think she
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needs to go, come what may. the credibility is gone, she has no authority. she's got to go. realistically, whether this because he doesn't go, her deal is going to go. we all know and she knows. we can be dealing with the second part ofa and can be dealing with the second part of a and unfortunately, it can be quite ruthless. this brexit moment, at the same time,. it's been done before, yes it can, clearly it is not idea and then the party, it matches as and they've will try to separate the two. in terms of the replacement, i think the old guard, they are all tainted with history and fallout the last time we had a
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lead ship election, has to be someone new and dominic is the right person, i think he can run the party. thank you very much. so let's just recap what we are waiting for, mps displaced a series of indicative votes on eight different ideas for brexit, let's get ross and will tell you more about it. while we're waiting for the outcome in the commons, this is the ballot paper that all the mps and markdown, all of these different options they supported and the idea that he can break the current and past that we have an apartment with theresa may still being rejected with no clear message coming from mps as to what should go in its place. we should emphasise the outcome of these votes is not legally binding, the prime minister is not obliged to act on it, in fact, theresa may made it quite clear that she is opposed to these votes even taking place. that's if in a cabinet minister.
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are you confident that the votes are the way to go today? it's an important opportunity for the house to show its place and say what it well accepted rather than what it won't, i think it's an important moment. the government always listens to the house but we will see when she comes outwith, thank you. plenty of listening going on but to reiterate no obligation on the government to act out what happens this evening, the reason it's all happening is because a conservative backbencher on monday, proposed this happen, and peas at the idea and that included 30 to mps who voted against the government and that meant three of them who are master is hard to resign, while sir oliver has been essential to the whole day and spoke earlier and comments. this process came about as a result of the increasing concern that many advise have had across the comments that we are not heading towards an
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approval of the prime minister deal, but to a note deal exit which i pitted myself against it for many months. mps offered 16 options, but they were whittled down to eight as they were whittled down to eight as the votes come through, we will look at them in more detail, but they included a nokia brexit, common market with the eu, customs union and another referendum on the matter or simply cancelling brexit altogether, and whatever you think about what was happening, it's definitely a different way of doing things and we saw a different debate this afternoon, some welcomed the change including the tory and can't collect who supported the whole process happening. the mac at last i think we are seeing is a dialogue, the house is moving into a mood where it's possible to end at the catastrophic samples of the last six months, we are beginning to talk about actually being able to take
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decisions founded on some side across party consensus and search for a majority that can be sustained. as he had been hearing all week, not everyone supports indicated votes, the prime minister didn'tand indicated votes, the prime minister didn't and this is the tory mp saying the whole thing will not present a coherent prior to brexit and he says it's an exercise and parliamentary navel—gazing and he will abstain and he's a tory mp who chose to do that now all of them could do it they will, this was a free vote, meaning party leadership did not tell them where to go and to be honest if they had tried, it may well have been ignored by quite a number of mps and we may have seen resignations as well. on top of that, the cabinet decided to abstain throughout, sell all of the most senior people in government simply opted out of the process, but again was a manoeuvre to avoid a further division, both within conservative party and specifically within the cabinet, the opposition labour party took a different tack, telling its
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mps to support some of the options, around another referendum are common market option or customs union membership, here is jeremy market option or customs union membership, here isjeremy corbyn. this chaotic and incompetent government has driven our country into chaos. you know the scale of the crisis, mr speaker, when the tuc and cb! are united in writing to the prime minister is saying that a plan b must be founded to protect workers, economy and the irish border. my question on monday went unanswered. so, iwill border. my question on monday went unanswered. so, i will be border. my question on monday went unanswered. so, iwill be prime minister now say what is her plan b? cani minister now say what is her plan b? can i say, as he knows that we are continuing to work with the insured a delivered brexit and guaranteed that we do for the british people that we do for the british people that we do for the british people that we had a deal that cancels that
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you membership fee makes them to stop making our laws our own immigration policy, and the common fishery policies. other options don't do that theyjust need to delay and uncertainty and risk never delivering brexit. it was after five o'clock this afternoon, that teresa may spoke to the tory mps and tell them, i will stand down it my deal gets to parliament, seeming like a big moment there was fresh momentum behind it and a possibility of getting through, big guns within the tory party indicated they would go from being critical of the deal to supporting it. but at the heart of this, the dup, a party from northern ireland, and without them, it is incredibly difficult to win evermore brexiteers with antares but also just to get the right number lined up, so there's lots of speculation about what would the dup say, when you start to move and then boom,
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about an average go, arlene foster, the leader of the dup told the bbc this. of course we want to try and get a deal, when this all began, but the and that meant we were looking to deal with the backstop i want to be with child agreement reopened without backstop today, then there was conversation around treaty level changes to try and delegations as well. but we feel very fundamentally, that the backstop within that withdrawal agreement makes it impossible for us to sign up makes it impossible for us to sign up to the agreement and i regret that because we wanted to get a deal, one that worked for the whole uk, one that works for northern ireland and now we are in a situation where he cannot sign up for it because the prime minister decided to go for that backstop way backin decided to go for that backstop way back in december of 2017. cell, the clearest message from the dup that it's not in the mood to change on
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the dl. interestingly some brexiteers and suggested if abstain back to be enough to come behind the deal, clear message on that. they did notabstain deal, clear message on that. they did not abstain on the union on the uk, said that ibs fact, and if there is no support from the dup some brexiteers say there when i come across let the scheier reaction, here is paul with a post saying... he does not think it's going very well. dan on sunday saying... best quite a few it's there, but
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let's bring and kristin again, who is down in westminster, christian, let's not get ahead of ourselves, but if she wasn't able to get the deal through, what are different routes that lay ahead of us?|j deal through, what are different routes that lay ahead of us? i think the most obvious when she set out is slow brexit, and that's the term she was using the other day. certainly there is appetite for that, donald triska told us today, and urged the european parliament to think about a longer extension, the guardian said they would want an extension to the 1st of april yes, april one, 2020, april fools' day, that's a long time, battle upset lots of brexiteers who wanted to be leaving on friday. so, i think realistically that thing is that obviously they'll have to do back to the eu, may be at the house can coalesce around one option and we are about to hear what they prefer, maybe they can change
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they prefer, maybe they can change the political liberation, the best feature one, having it back, that's a lot of it's, that depends on whether there is support on these benches for one particular plan. looking at the house here, looks like they are starting to gather i think we had that two—minute bail, so we are going to see speakers take the seat, connect to say, i don't know how he will announce it and what detail he's going to get as he announced that, we have eight options, there is the members name along each one and will he spell out what each means i don't know, if he doesn't i will try and have been before he gets a result to spell it out to you what each of them means, andi out to you what each of them means, and i will hopefully give you some detail as we go through it all otherwise he won't know what she's —— what he's talking about. let me bring in vicki young, who is watching in the lobby, your
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thoughts, what are you looking for as these results come in? - incredibly unusual situation we've never had this before, so in some ways is quite tricky to know what to look for, everyone looks for obviously the biggest amount of support, and whether that's some kind of customs union arrangement, that's what most mps think and possibly of christ... a motions relating to the withdrawal from and future relationship with the european union. in respect of the motion be, brackets no deal. the eyes we re motion be, brackets no deal. the eyes were 160, so noes have it. in respective motion be. common market to.0. respective motion be. common market to .0. ayes, 188, knows too hundred
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83 noes have it. motion h, the ayes 65. the no, there hundred 77. noes have it. motionjay, customs union. the ayes to hundred 64. the no, to hundred 70 to. noes have it. in respect of the motion k. labour is alternative plan, the ayes, to 37, no, it 37. noes have it. motion avenue, revocation to avoid no deal.
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noes have it. in respect of beckett motion and, the public vote, noes have it. in respect of fitchett —— noes have it. order! order! i'm finishing. order! i'm finishing my statement. i don't require help from
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the government chief whip. the list showing how honourable, you learn if he listens. showing how honourable and right honourable voted will be published, on the website, and in the inside. plaintiff order. thank you, mr speaker. it's very disappointing... it's of course a very great disappointment at the house has not chosen to find a majority for any proposition. however, those of us up at the proposalfor it as however, those of us up at the proposal for it as a way of proceeding predicted we would not reach one, and indeed for that very reason we put forward a business house motion designed to allow the house motion designed to allow the house to reconsider the matter is on monday.
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perhaps colleagues will do the right honourable gentleman and a courtesy, yes i say to the right honourable member, i'm now —— i'm not asking i'm telling him that the right honourable gentleman will be done the courtesy of being hurried, and thatis the courtesy of being hurried, and that is at the beginning and the end of the matter. thank you, mr speaker, & monday the house is able to reach a majority view, i think it'll be in the interest of our constituents. but i... but i personally continue to harbour the hub that my honourable and right honourable colleagues will see fit to vote in favour of the government motion between now and friday. which
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would obviate the necessity for further assessment both on monday. thank you, secretary of state for exiting the european union, point ordera. exiting the european union, point order a. the house has considered a white variety — — order a. the house has considered a white variety —— wide variety of options as a way forward. it demonstrates that there were no easy options here, there is no simple way for it. they deal the government has negotiated is a compromise. both with the eu, and with the members —— across the house. that is at the nature of complex negotiations. there is also the processes houses through today, strengthens our review at they deal the government has negotiated is the best option.
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furthermore, mr speaker,. secretary of state. furthermore this is not a significant of state. furthermore this is not a significa nt feature of of state. furthermore this is not a significant feature of today's debate, and ebl must include a withdrawal agreement. it's the government firm wish to get that which i'll agreement approved by this house and i encourage all members, no matter the view on what the future relationship should be, if you believe in delivering on the referendum result by leaving the eu with adl, that it's necessary to back up the withdrawal agreement. if we do not do that, then there are no guarantees about where this process will and. it is for that reason, that i call on all members from across this house in the national interest to back the prime minister
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deal. point of order, mr ian blackford. thank you very much, mr speaker, this is a very serious moment for all of us. we have to reflect that the house of commons has tried to find a way through the brexit crisis over the last few months. and we have failed. we need to reflect on the fact that when the government talks about bringing the deal back, that they are to occasions they got to hundred and too had to hundred 40 to votes. that dealer should be dead and indeed the people's vote got to 60 votes. i know we did not win, but we got more votes for the peoples votes than the government did for its opposition. mr speaker, i think it's becoming increasingly clear, that this house cannot find a way forward, this government and prime minister has
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failed to provide a leadership. the only thing we should now be doing is going back to the people of the united kingdom and had a general election to end this. i'm grateful to the right honourable gentleman, plaintiff order, sir patrick. thank you, barry mitch, mr speaker. can you, barry mitch, mr speaker. can you confirm that if we follow from your railing earlier on today, none of these questions can be put again? the particular process that's been set and trained as a consequence of the business house motion is a discrete process, it's the first time it's been contacted, it was approved by the house and therefore, my understanding, no, not debating theissue my understanding, no, not debating the issue with the right honourable gentleman, he has more or less could easily raise the point of order with
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me and! easily raise the point of order with me and i am responding to it, i'm not going to conduct a debate with him. my understanding of the situation does not entirely coast here with his. and i had explained that i think at the motion passed by the house, expresses support for a 2—stage process, and i will for the time being mean it there and i had no, i'm not debating, point of order. point of order, and debris. point of order. mr speaker... mr speaker. as somebody, as somebody... as somebody who's been called by the
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speaker... order, let mejust explain, order, let mejust speaker... order, let mejust explain, order, let me just explain one thing in this place. the right honourable gentleman is a very senior member of this house. and he isa senior member of this house. and he is a former chief whip. he is not the speaker of this house. he is not, and it's not for the right honourable gentleman to process him the order in which matters are considered and i trust he won't suppose that it's for him to do so, let me say very gently to the right honourable and that i treat them with the respect i'm not intimidated by him and i'm sure, i'm sure i'm absolutely sure he would not seek to intimidate me, i'm taking a point of order from the right honourable lady. and frankly, that's the situation, plaintiff the ordinary.
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sit down. mr speaker, the country is watching. and i gently say to the honourable gentleman, i can shout as loudly as anybody, but let's try, let's try to remind ourselves what we've decided to do. nothing! and some of us have been involved in the debate and the discussion about the procedure from the outset, very well people coming in the end of my love this, let us remind ourselves, this was a, oh i can patronize as well, this is a 2—stage process, so today, was our attempt is that there was anything we could settle on but to
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look where the biggest votes may be. that prime minister's deal, secured to hundred 43 votes. the amendment motionj, supporting a customs union got about to hundred 64, beating all of them was the people's vote. may i suggest, mr speaker, may i... no need to shout it out. may i suggest. like any other honourable member to be heard at, and she will be heard, and i. thank you, can i suggest we proceed... and i. thank you, can i suggest we proceed. . . a and i. thank you, can i suggest we proceed... a fairly rambunctious evening and the comments, disappointments and can't be heard, not everyone agrees with what she
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has to say but with the public watching, you would at least expect her to be allowed to say what she has to say, let's have a look at all of those eight options, because as she was setting out, it was in fact the referendum vote, motion that was put forward that finished at the top, but none of these eight options we re top, but none of these eight options were able to get a majority in and when you look at the list, was quite surprising is that many people would've considered the favourite item of these eight options, the common market to point out, which had been talking up in recent days, it only got 188 votes. the customs union put forward by kenneth clark, so leaving that european union with a customs union went to hundred 64. the referent of the put forward by margaret beckett, if you compare it, the bar is the prime minister is
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gales, which have been put forward a second time, and it got more votes, you can see why she's raising a point of order there and pointing to the support to pass. let's go to vicki now, iwas the support to pass. let's go to vicki now, i was in the lobby, i suppose that's a reflection, the one at the top i'll be it no majority for any of them, it's a reflection that this is a remain leaning house of parliament. yeah i think the point about comparing it to the dl, i think government says is a different system to forget and pcr, where taking and saying yes to everything they could live with, so it's a slightly different issue but i think interesting you talk about the customs union, the proposal that got partly because labour were whipping in favour of it, telling aim piece to back that one. i think that'll explain why that one was slightly higher than the others, and then the idea of a confirmatory
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public vote of quest, margaret beckett another one that was pretty popular, i will wait to see how people voted and cabinet of course, idid abstain people voted and cabinet of course, i did abstain on all of this much to the fury of some tory mp saying there was no leadership in government effectively in place, let's speak now to the shadow transport minister. he's with now. what you make of the numbers i know it's difficult to work your way through them but do you think now if he goes to my damn things i whittled down a mark, would you be willing to back the idea of a customs union put forward ? back the idea of a customs union put forward? we wanted to, but who knows how it all worked out. we are fresh out of the chamber and it's difficult to really comprehend how this could go for it on monday, but there will be have to be a different way of approaching it, but a mind of the whole discussion today said a private discussion amongst tory mp is about who the next lead is going to be. that's been the focus, and we simply cannot go on like this, we
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now need a general election to resolve this issue, we cannot go on with this tory government stumbling from crisis to disaster, we are now the international laughing stock of the international laughing stock of the world, and we need to bring it to an end. you have to have a ma nifesto to an end. you have to have a manifesto with your policy and brexit, and if you know, you're a party is not as one on all of this, you whipped in favour of that idea a banana, another referendum, have you had resignations from your front bench? i understand there has been wine but i'm not totally on top of the full picture. i will leave that entirely to the chief whip. that there is discussions amongst your shadow ministers and cabinet lots of them don't want and are not in favour of the referendum. this is difficult for everyone, trying to find out what people were compromising on, that's the attempt to get some consensus, that's not secure the consensus tonight but we still got to keep trying for that in
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my view. how would it be different under labour? it'll be a fresh mandate and if they can return with a better deal and deal with the rest of the issues impacting the communities, that'll be a clear instruction, we have to dispense with this administration it's run it's course and ran the country into the ground and we did change it to quickly. if you believe in brexit and you said you want to honour that referendum result, whatever happens in the future relationship which is really what was discussed today, you needed a withdrawal agreement to sort out the citizens' rights and set up the money to uk others, you would still have to back some kind of withdrawal agreement so why not this one? you would need one, but i don't want to stand up to a withdrawal agreement that ties this country and set up the money to uk others, you would still have to back some kind of withdrawal agreement so why not this one? you would need
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one, but i don't want to stand up to a withdrawal agreement that ties this country into control from the eu, forfouryears this country into control from the eu, for four years beyond the extension —— transition period over issues such as state aid, and that's hard—wired into the northern ireland protocol as well, so that the competition and make it —— markets authority infringe upon the freedom of the uk government to deal with public services and the way that that we would wish, and i would bring about more control and privatisation more outsourcing, the very thing that's bedeviled the country for 70 years, it would prevent us from making important changes, but the critical issue is the future different —— relationship going forward. what this tells us todayis going forward. what this tells us today is the tory party, trying to stitch it up, to give us a hard right prime minister, who is going to because even more problems that we never anticipated under this one. jelena dup say they are not backing the deal so i think without the and it'll be hard for the government to get through. it could be what ozan and the house of commons and tonight and the house of commons and tonight and monday could be significant if that you are willing to get around
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an option. that's right, if there is an option. that's right, if there is a concentration of the minds, to try and ranking on monday. would labour go with that? that seems to be away for it i confess it's brand—new, just walked out, i think it's a possibility to change the way in which the votes are preferred, and i think i may bring a clear picture, is something that needs to be considered —— contended in the next half hour. thank you very much indeed, so you can say nothing has changed because we are in a situation where a is struggling to struggling to get to the comments, and yet again, house of commons voted against all option. vicki in the lobby, thank you very much. that evening and welcome to westminster, i'm christian fraser, tonight and peace have failed to reach an agreement on any of the eight options they were considering and the hope of breaking the deadlock over brexit. the idea was to plot a
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way through the current impasse in parliament after teresa made his deal list twice rejected, and peace cannot agree on a way for it, it comes as a deal also ran into yet more trouble, she offered to resign today if she can get tory backbenchers to support her, but up a squeezing number numbers to pass we re a squeezing number numbers to pass were dashed when the bp made it clear it wasn't going to back it. before we go further let me take you through the options that the mps have voted on this evening. leaving the eu without a deal on april the 12th 160 votes in favour, 400 against. option d, 2.0, under way, known as the uk remaining in the single market and customs partnership, surprisingly only 188 votes for that. 283 against. option
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h, the former minister, this is the norway option, without a customs union. that is 65 votes, 377 against. optionj, father of the house, leaving the eu with a customs union. that came out second this evening, not a majority but 264 votes for, 272, remember in the second meaningful vote, theresa may only got 242 votes. option k, jeremy corbyn's plan, plus an alignment with the single market on future eu regulations, 237, so notjust as many for what tvs and they got for her deal —— theresa may got for her deal. a revoking of article 50, if a node deal brexit is not approved the
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day before. 184 in favour of that, 293 against. and this is the headline news tonight, margaret beckett, the second referendum option, which ran for public approval, 268 against 295. talking about that for a second, much more than the 242 theresa may got for her deal, i count 563 vote cast in that altogether, there are quite a lot of mps abstaining, if you went through to the preferential voting system on monday night, that is the big question. and just to finish, option, the plan b option, favoured by euro sceptics, if the withdrawal agreement is not approved then the government must have disagreement with the featured trade deal, if
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they do not approve the withdrawal agreement, only 139 votes for that four to 22. three options that have over 200 votes, the customs unions, labourers plan and that second referendum on a brexit deal. let's go to vicki young. there is a lot of disagreement on the benches tonight when the speaker said they will have another go at this on monday and you said to me before, the important issueis said to me before, the important issue is that if you want to control the business of the house, you have to keep winning the vote. it is going to be a big question now going forward whether they can keep this going through into next week. they will try again and they will come up with a former system for trying to whittle down, may be the top three orfour trying to whittle down, may be the top three or four and get it down to
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one, but the problem with this is, thatis one, but the problem with this is, that is a different kind of voting system, if in the end you are genuinely talking about introducing a law that is not done under that system, you have to get the right number of people through it in the majority of people through it to give one of these options, it is all about compromise and there has not been much sign of that by the westminster leader who is with me now, i'm tempted to say what this mean, what do these numbers mean, the vote on any deal that goes through looked popular, they had 295 against it. i'm going to have to say it did get more votes than the prime ministerdid it did get more votes than the prime minister did for it did get more votes than the prime ministerdid for her it did get more votes than the prime minister did for her deal when she brought it forward, but that is not good, i think the public looking at this, and knowing what's going on it's a parliament that is not delivering for the people of the united kingdom, we can't find a resolution to the brexit chaos and i think it's at the corner of this, the conservative and labour parties are very fragmented, there is no
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unity in these two parties, the democracy is breaking down. we are in shambles, we will try again on monday, i appeal to people, in shambles, we will try again on monday, iappeal to people, peel the parliamentarians, it given where we are, we have not been able to resolve this and i think the right thing to do is that we need to come together and recognise that we can put this back to the people. if that does not happen, then the only other option we've got is a general election. we have shown a lack of ability to resolve this and in the end, parliament has to collapse. we have to put this back to the people andl have to put this back to the people and i am not in the interest of blaming people, but it is the prime minister who failed to work across parliament throughout the last three years, she is the one who's been responsible for bringing her deal forward , responsible for bringing her deal forward, no one else had the ability to influence that situation and i think the prime minister really has to take a lot of the blame for the shambles and the chaos which is now here, you think this week where we are supposed to be leaving the european union, thank goodness that
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we got some rest bite, got up to the 12th of april, but we have not got long to resolve this. but i'm confident of is that if it does come down to the choice between no deal and relocation, we will run that fight because he must stop the dislocation that is happen to the economy if we have no deal. no deal is absolutely resignedly been beaten tonight. for another referendum, this was brought down by margaret, ifa this was brought down by margaret, if a deal where to go through, a withdrawal deal, they would then have to have a referendum on it. and you are backing that, and we should back it if there is theresa may's deal? but i said in the chambers that we all have to make compromises, we want a people's vote against the straight remain option, but all of us are prepared to make sacrifices, we have set all along that we would do that. we've had two one half years of our compromise position in the single market in the
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customs union, it isjust a pity that the government has not engaged positively in that process, i have worked very closely with other parties in the past year and a half, democrats, independent group, we really need mps to work together in a progressive spirit so we can find our way out of this, but we have great conflict in scotland with the remain vote in scotland, you have a government in edinburgh that is getting on with his dayjob and ultimately we have to reflect what is happening here and getting closer to the point, i think the people of scotland need to take that decision by one final point is well is that the prime minister will go if her deal gets through. we know that the conservative party has become increasingly brexiteer driven, i don't think there is any question that those from theresa may are going to be a brexiteer, and if she gets her deal through and gets in position, a brexiteer prime minister
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will be discussing the long—term relationship we will have for the european union. you need a withdrawal agreement, don't you. european union. you need a withdrawalagreement, don't you. so you're talking about the future relationship, but in the end, if you wa nt to relationship, but in the end, if you want to leave with a deal, and accept that you do not want to leave the eu, we talked to the prime minister, have you talked to her about the idea of having a referendum on her deal?|j about the idea of having a referendum on her deal? i met with the prime minister last wednesday with other opposition leaders and i said to her that we need to compromise, we needed to work together. we really does have a blank slate that came back with the prime minister that has not really had any desire to work with us, to work with the government in edinburgh, or cardiff, and this is beena edinburgh, or cardiff, and this is been a huge part of the problem. i am really concerned if we have a conservative party imposing on the prime minister of the united kingdom, without an election, it is anti—democratic and i say, we really need to go to the people of the united kingdom, we really need to have a general election to try and
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break this jam. and have a general election to try and breakthisjam. and i have a general election to try and break thisjam. and i appeal to the people of scotland to get behind s&p, who strongly voted for remain, but we need to have this discussion for the constitutional future. we need to make sure we can protect their economic interests, it is becoming clear that we are becoming independence. thank you very much indeed. though they did come out as one of the better losers, does remain the case that they have voted against every single option one more time, there will be an attempt to try to narrow that down on monday. couple of things, they finished, one is about in terms of what the future relationship will look like in the customs union, one is my process which is margaret beckett's idea of the referendum. if the, they will be the referendum. if the, they will be the obvious two to go through to the second stage, when they? i do not see how they could put forward
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labour‘s party plan again, when they wa nt to labour‘s party plan again, when they want to kick the tory deal out. the conservative deal could be argued that it has been voted on separately a couple of times and who knows, it may come back one more time. we just do not know the answer to that because it is a completely new process whether they will pick three orfourand process whether they will pick three orfour and try process whether they will pick three or four and try to whittle those down, or look at the bottom does next, i do not really know yet how they plan to do it. but about the customs union plan is that labour, they told their mps to vote for that one and that is why that hon has a slightly higher number of people —— one. but the people watching from outside, the parliament has voted against every single option there is, they voted against all of these options, they voted against and no—deal brexit, they voted against theresa may's brexit a despair that parliament is stuck i think that is why people are increasingly talking about a general election, because it
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is about the numbers, the numbers in the house of commons and that is what is causing the problem here. i can see him looking beside me, so i'm going to bring in and speak them rather than let them there, hello. people watching this, it is bewildering that parliament has voted against everything. bewildering that parliament has voted against everythingm bewildering that parliament has voted against everything. it is true that no proposition in relation to brexit has the majority, but i think the striking thing about the results we have just seen is two of the propositions, the customs union and the referendum received more votes in the house of commons than the prime minister's deal god when it was prime minister's deal god when it was defeated for the second time. so the brexit secretary said to vote for the prime ministers deal on a third occasion, well if you can argue that, there are two proposals more votes, so it is not entirely surprising that none of them got in majority, this has always been a two
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state process and i would have to reflect on those results. there are clearly some runners that have more support than others. so are you going to abandon the bottom two? what process are you going to use? it isa what process are you going to use? it is a matter for discussion, we have yet to make a decision on how things might work on monday, but there are some things that, he only got 65 votes, no deal was heavily defeated. that is the third time that no deal, i don't think it is going anywhere. so you begin to see the possibility of some movement. will any colleagues be prepared to bring proposals together? and then i think you will need a different process on monday night to deal with this, but what it demonstrates is, the house of commons is still deadlocked and the reason why, and i am pleased that the referendum got a lot of support this evening is if we
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continue to remain deadlocked, this cannot go on forever, where is the one place we could go to get a decision that would draw a line under this one way or another, and the answer is back to the british people. the problem is, explain this to me, if you have to force the government to accept one of these options on monday, how do you force them to do that? if they say they're not going to, the system is not the same is getting through a law, for example, because you still have to have a majority. one hopes to persuade the government, because after the defeat of their deal the second time, they came and said we will run a process, we want to listen and talk to people, but the problem as you know has been, the government and the prime ministers unwillingness to move an inch on the deal. that is the first option, the second is that parliament could seek to legislate and we got close to that when it came to getting the
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government to give us a vote on no deal in voting to apply for more time, it was a prospect of that legislation, possibly being introduced, plus the rebellion of conservative ministers that force the prime minister to change her mind. because of the two ways, i would hope that the government would listen to what the house of commons is saying, none of the proposals have got a majority, and that includes the prime minister's deal. do you think were headed towards the general election? the possibility of where progress might come from. i have no idea, that is a matter for the government to decide, we have a vote of no—confidence after the first defeat of the prime minister 's first defeat of the prime minister '5 deal. i would be surprised, because i'm not sure that resolves the problem. iwould because i'm not sure that resolves the problem. i would love to see a labour government, but i don't think the prime minister, havingjust announced that she was willing to step down, but just
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announced that she was willing to step down, butjust be, please reelect me again and be here for a couple of months. thank you very much, we are still in deadlock i think is the headline news. thank you very much, very interesting, let's get some more reaction to it. chris from the independent group. let me start with you, chris. what do you make of this? this the first stage of a process and the people expressing their preference today, this will be an interesting day, how will all of these options whittle down and go together, possibly combined to something that can actually get us to move through. the consensus, the referendum coming performing the best, not the majority but it had the highest recorded vote, then you're possibly looking at combining that with the customs union so that you would end up customs union so that you would end up at the ballot paper that says do you want brexit with the customs
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union or do you want to stay in the eu? possibly the prime minister will come back with her deal on friday, she combined with the peoples vote, you might be a neck kind of space. so this is a useful process, think guinness backbencher mps are taking control and at least stepping —— goodness. labour's plan was defeated tonight, around three orfour goodness. labour's plan was defeated tonight, around three or four votes, there is an important clarification that you should make, i was saying that you should make, i was saying that it was the speaker's decision to bring it back, it is not the speakers decision, is it? it is the first step tonight, i am really pleased that the idea of putting whatever agreement is made back to the public in confirmation, i am pleased that that got the most votes of any option and it is very interesting that clearly the support
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for a very different plan from theresa may, she has said it's my plan and no plan, but actually there isa plan and no plan, but actually there is a big support for softer brexit with the customs union or somewhere protecting the economy more. we never that we'll get to one thing today, that was all is going to be a process, and it will be for mp5 to decide what goes forward to the next stage and how we vote on it. maybe next time it won't be yes or no, maybe we'll have to rank our preferences in order, but i think it is remarkable how far we've come in today, i feel like is remarkable how far we've come in today, ifeel like if is remarkable how far we've come in today, i feel like if only we had been having this debate, a real debate right from the start, we could have avoided this mess. we will put up all the results and coming back to that point, not the speaker that's going to choose what goes through, i guess he'll be a vote, so you will rank them. so who does the site that? the house. it
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will be proposals put forward,- set the rules for the day, set the rules for today, we'll have another business motion that will determine what the will be. we could come together and say the highest performing four orfive, together and say the highest performing four or five, go forward, so we whittle it down, it might‘ve been that over the weekend that those with the customs union will meet with those of us who have been saying confirmatory vote and kind of combine these and get this over to a full majority, so it is an iterative process with back benches taking control with two dysfunctional party front benches who have completely dropped the ball for the past two yea rs. dropped the ball for the past two years. polemic in order to agreement instead ofjust, agreement instead of just,|j agreement instead ofjust, i don't think it will be simple, but i think that my one message to theresa may would be, still, if you want to get
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your deal through, i would let that happen if you put it to the public and it will be a quick way of solving that right now. is there an urgency now because theresa may has said that, i presume, that means she is going and let people.|j said that, i presume, that means she is going and let people. i think, theresa may saying that it's not just a surprise that she think she's going to go before the next step of our future relationship with the eu, the tory is going to have a hard line brexiteer in there. so does not matter what her withdrawal agreement says, the n process is that a hard line brexiteer will be a hard line brexiteer. and be damaging. and there is a sense of urgency among mps that we have to agree an alternative way forward to stop that from happening stop byjust one very quick question, if we are from happening stop byjust one very quick question, if we could have something that could go with a withdrawal agreement, but you can therefore push that through
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the next two months, we are talking aboutjoining the the next two months, we are talking about joining the european the next two months, we are talking aboutjoining the european election. you cannot give away our current voice, our role of decision—making that we have within the european union and the expected to be given back again. i think we have to do this now, properly, if it means that it takes another three or six or nine months, let's get this right, there is no point rushing and crashing out, hurting livelihoods and jobs, now, we crashing out, hurting livelihoods andjobs, now, we can crashing out, hurting livelihoods and jobs, now, we can see the pathway forward. the reason there is so much turbulence from all of these ha rd so much turbulence from all of these hard brexiteers is that their fantasies are evaporating and we now have a sensible path forward. thank you very much. and that is a thought isn't it that will be taking part in european elections if this is the way forward. everyone here is saying that, there is a way forward, but i think the people watching outside will say, parliament has voted against everything again and they have voted against no deal and
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theresa may's deal, what is the next step? and even the idea of referendum, it still did not get a majority. not yet, but what is clear is that he got the highest number of votes, that is really good. —— it can't. all of those people will now be feeling like, oh, there is hope for this again and i think what we've always known, and that's the thing, i was not expecting anything to happen tonight. but i was always looking for what was the gross number, was the highest number of mps, what do they want and what we saw tonight was it followed by a customs union. i just saw tonight was it followed by a customs union. ijust stepped out of the chamberand it customs union. ijust stepped out of the chamber and it was clear that we will keep going with this, it is a process we are not there yet. but is not just a straight process we are not there yet. but is notjust a straight referendum, one that you are voting on tonight was
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to say that any deal that pass will have to go through a referendum, we prepared for example, to put theresa may's deal through? yes, prepared for example, to put theresa may's dealthrough? yes, we have said that very clearly and we were back at the carl wilson amendment, and it has been our policy since that referendum. whatever deal comes back, we want to make sure that the people get a say in it, and the option to remain and we will go back and to remain if that happens. jan xmp would say that in no deal would be an some of this, it depends on what the government decides to do now. if they cannot get that third meaningful vote, if they do not want to back it, it be foolish to bring it back now, they need to work out what they do next. and it may well be that that is what they go for, something like that, but critically we have put it to the people with the option to remain and the liberal
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democrats to be campaigning to stay within the european union. you know what critics say about that is that it will be going back on the will of the people when we had that referendum. and it could cause all sorts of problems because for people that voted to leave, they will look at what's going on apartment and say you blocked it, you blocked it happening. there is nothing that is better i think and asking them, what they think now. it has been three years, 1000 days and a lot happens in that time. and the idea that people can't have another say, can't have changed their minds and what we see now is for the last year, remain and leave clearly in a way that it didn't before, we can't have, you can say it's just didn't before, we can't have, you can say it'sjust more democracy, let's put it back to the people and see if people think. if they like brexit, then let them vote for it, they can do it again. but i will be campaigning from the to remain. do
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you think it is possible that that idea of a referendum can happen under a conservative government? under this conservative government with theresa may at the head of it or other conservatives? do you think it could happen? i hope the message that theresa may takes home with her tonight is that there's actually a way for us to keep the deal alive, if she put and put her bench, the payroll boat abstaining, if you add that to the positive vote of the people slowed, we are there. we've got the numbers, we know we have the numbers not for the peoples vote, she just needs to accept that as a reality and put it to the people and then she can fight for her deal, if she thinks it is worth fighting for, put it to the people and let her fight for it. i would not vote for it, i will not vote for in a referendum, i will be voting for remain. could that be the one way through all of this? will have to see what happens for the next of this week if there is another attempt to get the government's deal
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through and what happens here on monday. i have served built with me from the erg group was not a very happy man, you just heard the scandal, chris leslie saying that they're going to go onto my day and ta ke they're going to go onto my day and take over the parliamentary business again and what do you make of it? they first, the reality is that this is the most ridiculous idea, it's like it being run by, it is com pletely like it being run by, it is completely absurd. this indicative voting is nothing to do with parliamentary procedure. and actually what it's really all about is about giving presidents to the house of commons as a whole, rather than the government which is prescribed by the standing order 14, which says, government business take precedence. unfortunately, to reverse this nonsense. the bottom line is the real reason why they
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have that presidents is not because you like the government, it's because if you have a parliamentary democracy, but you have then is a majority of those constituencies which have enough mps to create a majority in the house of commons which is the basis of which our entire system functions. but they have not found a way, and i respect the deal you put forward, but it is likely to be voted against because of the business of the houses to get something through. i don't want to. actually the last time this happened, it was in the 16 50s, and what happened was oliver cromwell let palma get on and there was so many different factions that became the completely, he went down to two parliaments and said, you have been here too long for anything useful you have done in the name of god, 90, you have done in the name of god, go, depart and the reason for that
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was because you do have to have a policy based on the manifesto in our modern democracy as a result of which people vote in a democratic system, consequently, you end up with the government and a prime minister who is the prime minister of this country. that is the basis of this country. that is the basis of what they're doing which ingots com pletely of what they're doing which ingots completely undermining all of that, and —— which is completely undermining all of that. and the reason that we are voting, the way i am, against this withdrawal agreement and for that matter in favour of a referendum result, in favour of a referendum result, in favour of a referendum result, in favour of the notification of withdrawal, in favour of the withdrawal, in favour of the withdrawal act is because the very people who i am voting for, the democratic principles and sovereignties of this country. in the bottom line is, the people who are now behind us, all voted for the sex of parliament and are now reversing them by what and creating chaos. so it is chaos of historical
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proportion. we have been brought to this point by the erg who would not vote for theresa may's deal. can i just. the point is this, for the conservatives, in collaboration with labour have brought this about. it wasn't the erg at all, we are standing upfor wasn't the erg at all, we are standing up for the vote of the british people, standing up for the sovereignty of parliament which is expressed by the referendum which was passed by 6—1 to the house of commons, giving back to the people the right to be able to make this decision. by the notification and by the way, he actually voted for the third withdrawal act in every single conservative. give me a quick answer, because i'm out of time. his theresa may still ever going to get through,? we theresa may still ever going to get through, ? we have theresa may still ever going to get
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through,? we have until the 12th theresa may still ever going to get through, ? we have until the 12th of april, what is going to happen? the bottom line is that those voting against the withdrawal agreement, and by the way, there is some suggestion that that withdrawal agreement may not come back to the house of commons this week, we are not quite sure about that. it translated into a bill and then we are asked to vote on that, i shall vote against the second reading and you may ask why. the answer is simple. because it is not representative of brexit, it is giving control of our laws and the prime minister said we will not truly leave the european union u nless we truly leave the european union unless we regain control of our laws and for the best part of four years, what is going to happen under this withdrawal agreement is that the laws are going to be made by 27 member states, over our heads, putting aside the mercy of our competitors and our system will ensure that the 27 other states are not our own, that is not, it will
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castrate this parliament and that is why i am so much against it and the british people absolutely voted by 17.4 million people to vote for the idea of our leaving the european union. the shenanigans that we witnessed tonight is a demonstration of the anarchy of those who actually created an abominable situation that is undemocratic, chaotic. thank you very much. if you are justjoining us, it is important that i take you through what is happening this evening. we have had votes on eight options, a variety of options, a full gambit of options, but i suppose the headline news is that none of them have got a majority and we look at the vote. let me take you through them one by one. that's an ideal option at the top, the next one was the common market,
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